Department of
COMPUTER-SCIENCE






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Computer Applications
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BCA112 OFFICE AUTOMATION TOOLS LAB 2 1 50
BCA121 PROFESSIONAL ENGLISH 3 2 100
BCA131 FOUNDATIONAL MATHEMATICS 3 3 100
BCA132 STATISTICS I FOR BCA 3 3 100
BCA133 DIGITAL COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS 4 4 100
BCA134 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING USING C 4 4 100
BCA151 DIGITAL COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS LAB 4 2 100
BCA152 C PROGRAMMING LAB 4 2 100
2 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BCA212 STATISTICS TOOLS LAB 2 1 50
BCA221 COMMUNICATIVE ENGLISH 3 2 100
BCA231 BASIC DISCRETE MATHEMATICS 3 3 100
BCA232 STATISTICS II FOR BCA 3 3 100
BCA233 OPERATING SYSTEMS 4 4 100
BCA234 DATA STRUCTURES 4 04 100
BCA251 OPERATING SYSTEM LAB 4 2 100
BCA252 DATA STRUCTURES LAB 4 02 100
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BCA312 ACCOUNTING TOOLS LAB 2 1 50
BCA331 INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 3 3 100
BCA332 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING 3 3 100
BCA333 OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING JAVA 4 4 100
BCA334 DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 4 4 100
BCA351 JAVA PROGRAMMING LAB 4 2 100
BCA352 DBMS LAB 4 2 100
BCA361A GERMAN 4 4 100
BCA361B FRENCH 4 4 100
4 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BCA431 GRAPH THEORY 3 3 100
BCA432 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 3 3 100
BCA433 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS 4 4 100
BCA434 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 4 4 100
BCA435 WEB TECHNOLOGY 4 4 100
BCA451 .NET LAB 4 2 100
BCA481 DBMS PROJECT 6 3 150
5 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BCA531 UNIX PROGRAMMING 4 4 100
BCA541A OOAD USING UML 4 4 100
BCA541B TCP/IP 4 4 100
BCA541C SYSTEM SOFTWARE 4 4 100
BCA541D USER INTERFACE DESIGN 4 4 100
BCA541E E-COMMERCE 4 4 100
BCA542A MOBILE APPLICATION 4 4 100
BCA542B GRAPHICS AND ANIMATION 4 04 100
BCA542C MICROPROCESSOR AND ALP 4 4 100
BCA542D PYTHON PROGRAMMING 4 4 100
BCA542E BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE 4 4 100
BCA551 UNIX LAB 4 2 100
BCA552 WEB DESIGNING PROJECT 4 2 100
BCA553A MOBILE APPLICATION LAB 4 2 100
BCA553B GRAPHICS AND ANIMATION LAB 4 02 100
BCA553C MICROPROCESSOR AND ALP LAB 4 2 100
BCA553D PYTHON PROGRAMMING LAB 4 2 100
BCA553E BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE LAB 4 2 100
BCA561A GERMAN LANGUAGE - I 3 3 100
BCA561B FRENCH LANGUAGE - I 3 3 50
BCA562 PSYCHOLOGY FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
6 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BCA631 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS 4 4 100
BCA641A CLIENT-SERVER COMPUTING 4 4 100
BCA641B DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS 4 4 100
BCA641C COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE 4 4 100
BCA641D COMPILER DESIGN 4 4 100
BCA641E CLOUD COMPUTING 4 4 100
BCA642A SOFTWARE TESTING 4 4 100
BCA642B MULTIMEDIA APPLICATIONS 4 4 100
BCA642C EMBEDDED SYSTEMS 4 4 100
BCA642D INTRODUCTION TO SOFT COMPUTING 4 4 100
BCA642E ADVANCED DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 4 4 100
BCA661A GERMAN LANGUAGE -II 3 3 100
BCA661B FRENCH LANGUAGE - II 3 3 50
BCA662 CYBER LAW 3 03 100
BCA681 MAJOR PROJECT 12 6 300
        

  

Assesment Pattern

Theory Assessment

Component

Mode of Assessment

Parameters

Points

CIA I

Written Assignment/

Class test/

Problem based assignment

Basic and conceptual

10

CIA II

Mid-semester Examination

Conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

25

CIA III

Quiz/ Seminar/ Group Presentation/ Test

Mastery of the core concepts

10

Attendance

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

05

ESE

 

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject with core concepts

50

 

Total

100

         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practical Assessment:

The pattern of assessment depends on the types of courses (programming/minor applications/major projects/etc.) and the details will be provided in the course plan of the respective courses.

Examination And Assesments

  • Continuous Internal assessment (CIA) forms 50% and the end semester examination forms the other 50% of the marks in both theory and practical.
  • The MSE & ESE for each theory paper is of two and three hours respectively.
  • The CIA for the practical sessions are done on a day-to-day basis depending upon their performance in the pre-lab, the conduct of the experiment, viva questions etc. Only those who qualify with minimum require attendance and CIA will be allowed to appear for the ESE.
Department Overview:
Department of Computer Science of CHRIST (Deemed to be University) strives to shape outstanding computer professionals with ethical and human values to reshape nation?s destiny. The training imparted aims to prepare young minds for the challenging opportunities in the IT industry with a global awareness rooted in the Indian soil, nourished and supported by experts in the field.
Mission Statement:
Vision The Department of Computer Science endeavors to imbibe the vision of the University ?Excellence and Service?. The department is committed to this philosophy which pervades every aspect and functioning of the department. Mission ?To develop IT professionals with ethical and human values?. To accomplish our mission, the department encourages students to apply their acquired knowledge and skills towards professional achievements in their career. The department also moulds the students t
Introduction to Program:
Bachelor of Computer Applications is a 3-year undergraduate programme spread over six semesters. The course is designed to bridge the gap between IT industries and academic institutes by incorporating the latest developments into the curriculum and to give students a complete understanding within a structured framework. The curriculum supports students to gain adequate programming practices along with theoretical foundation and also includes interdisciplinary courses and electives for widening the domain expertise. State-of-the-art infrastructure provides an excellent learning environment to hone the knowledge of each student.
Program Objective:
Programme Objectives: - Provide strong foundations in fundamentals of computer science and applications for employability and/or further graduation. - Empower students with competencies in creative thinking and problem solving, inter-personal communication and managerial skills. - Facilitate overall understanding of the technological development with legal and ethical issues. - Equip the students in providing professional solutions to real-time problems. Ethics and Human Values: 1. Only proprietary or open source software would be used for academic teaching and learning purposes. 2. Copying of programs from internet, friends or from other sources is strictly discouraged since it impairs development of programming skills. 3. Unique Practical Domain based exercises ensures that the students don?t involve in code plagiarism. 4. Projects undertaken by students during the course are done in teams to improve collaborative work and synergy between team members. 5. Projects involve modularization which initiates students to take individual responsibility for common goals. 6. Passion for excellence is promoted among the students, be it in software development or project documentation. 7. Giving due credit to sources during the Seminar and Research Assignment is promoted among the students 8. The course and its design enforce the practice of good referencing technique to improve the sense of integrity. 9. Courses involving group discussions and debates on ethical pract

BCA112 - OFFICE AUTOMATION TOOLS LAB (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

MS-WORD

The purpose of this course is to teach students to identify word processing terminology and concepts, Create technical documents, Animation and Design document, format and edit documents, use simple tools and utilities, Mail merge concepts and Mathematical expressions.

MS-EXCEL

This course will teach you the skills you'll need to successfully use Excel. This course will start with basic skills, and then move forward to more advanced features and techniques.

Learning Outcome

 

CO1: Design the document and create charts and diagrams for data

CO2: Create macros and use pivot tables and pivot charts

CO3: Design and develop applications using VBA

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
List of Programs
 

MS-WORD

  1. Create and Design Admission/Enquiry Forms in Microsoft Word.
  2. Create a mail to ‘n’ number of contacts from label and send mail to ‘n’ number of contacts selected from label using mail merge.
  3. Prepare a document about any topic in mathematics which uses mathematical symbols.
    At least 5 mathematical symbols should be used.
    Assign a password for the document to protect it from unauthorized access.
    Demonstrate the use of Hyperlink Option.
    Write a macro that sets margins to your document, a font of size and double spaced document.

      4. Create and Design Seminar/Conference/Workshop brochure.

 

MS-EXCEL

1.      Enter the order id, product name, unit price, quantity and discount. Perform      the following operation using MS – Excel.

a. Calculate the revenue and tax on the revenue for each product

b. Calculate the net come of each product

c. Calculate the total revenue of all products

d. Calculate the total net income of all products

e. Count the number of products in the list above

f. Count the number of products of Order ID <<X>>

g. Calculate the total net income of products of Order <<X>>

 

2.      Enter the following details of 20 students data’s in column wise, s.no, roll no, name, test – 1, test –   2 and test – 3 marks, total, mention and grade from

     Cell A to h and do the following operations in excel

a. Calculate the total score of each student

b. Display the word "Fail" if the student failed and "Pass" if the student passed in Mention column.
c. Students are considered failed if their total is less than 30. Otherwise, they pass.

d. Count the number of students who failed in subject wise

e. Count the number of students who passed in a subject in the column "# of passed students.

f. Calculate the percentage of students who failed in all subjects and write "% of failed students"

g. Calculate the percentage of students who passed in all subjects write "% of passed students"
Format the cell in percentage <="80--"> <="75--"> <="70--"> <="65--"> <="55--"> <="50--"> <="45--"> <="40--">

h. Display grade letter of each student in Grade column, based on the following conditions:

75 <total Score <=80   à A

70 <total Score <=85   à B+

65 <total Score <=70   à B

55 <total Score <=65   à C+

50 <total Score <=55   à C

45 <total Score <=50   à D+

40 <total Score <=45   à D

35 <total Score <=40   à E+

30 <total Score <=35   à E

Total Score < 30   à F

 

3.      Create a basic calculator with VBA in Excel.

4.      Write some code in VBA (Visual Basic for Application) to manipulate records in Excel spreadsheet and work with VBA user form to build graphic user interface application.
In case that you have a lot of records in your data sheets, manipulating records--add new, update, save, delete, move, and find record is hard. With VBA, you can solve this problem.

5.      Write some code in VBA (Visual Basic for Application) to manipulate records in Excel spreadsheet and work with VBA user form to build graphic user interface application.
In case that you have a lot of records in your data sheets, manipulating records--add new, update, save, delete, move, and find record is hard. With VBA, you can solve this problem.

6.      Prepare a pay-bill using a worksheet. The work sheet should contain

          Employee Id, Name, Designation, Experience and Basic Salary and Job ID.

          If Job Id is 1 then DA is 45% of the basic salary. HRA is Rs. 5500.
          If Job Id is 2 then DA is 40% of the basic salary. HRA is Rs. 4500. For all

          the other Job ids DA is 35% of the basic salary and HRA is Rs. 3500. For all

          the above Job ids PF to be deducted is 4%. For the job ids 1&2 Rs. 100 to be

          deducted as Professional Tax.

a.       Find the net pay. 
b. Use filter to display the details of employees whose salary is greater than 10,000.
c. Sort the employees on the basis of their net pay. 
Use  advance  filter  to  display  the  details  of  employees  whose  designation  is Programmer and Net Pay is greater than 20,000 with experience greater than 2 yrs.

7. Using Excel project the Product sales for any five products for five years.

 a. Compute the total sales of each product in the five years.
 b. Compute the total sales of all the products in five year.
 c. Compute the total sales of all products for each year.
 d. Represent annual sale of all the products using Pie-Chart
 e. Represent annual sales of all products using Bar Chart.
 f. Represent sale of a product for five years using Pie-Chart.
 g. Label and format the graphs.

Text Books And Reference Books:

*

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

*

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 50%

ESE - 50%

BCA121 - PROFESSIONAL ENGLISH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course focuses on  preparing students to communicate verbally and non-verballyin an effective manner. The aim is to introduce students to communication in a professional environment. It is instrumental in learners comprehending the role of technical english in communication. 

Objectives:

1. Introduce learners to language skills in their area of specialisation.

2. Enavle them to enhance career prospects and employability through English langiage skills

3. Help students gain understanding of language at the workplace

4. To develop verbal and non-verbal skills in English communication

Learning Outcome

§  1. Comprehension and demonstration of language in the field of technology

§  2. Prepare individuals as Independent communicators

§  3. Illustrate professional requirements through language proficiency

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
reviewing grammar
 

This unit undertakes to revise the foundation of language; the grammar section of language learning. Students will be reviewed the grammar aspects mentioned through task based activities

Concept of time in language – reflective learning will be used to help students detect their grammatical errors in tenses and rectify.

§  Degrees of comparison – using technical literature students can be engaged in apprehending degrees of comparison

§  Direct and reported speech – to enable learners carry on a comprehensible conversation either spoken or written, in a business context

 

§  Subject verb agreement – through worksheets and task based learning students will be familiarized to construct error free sentences

 

§  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
technical vocabulary
 

Learners will be acquainted with the basic of English language learning. They will be taught to identifying technical vocabulary from the general. Technical magazines prescribed by the institution that are subject specific can be used as teaching tools.

§  Introduction to technical lexicon – help students identify jargon and technical terminologies. Assist them comprehend the significance of implementation with moderation through their subject literature.

§  Internet lexis and contextualisation – provide meanings accurately to ensure right exercise of terms in a professional scenario through hands-on experience

§  Circumstantial usage of diction – aid the comprehension of word usage as verbs and nouns based on the requirement. Differentiating the meanings of synonyms and their orientation in a text

§  Integrating technical vocabulary in describing process and procedure – through prescribed texts students can be made to enhance their language by right integration of diction.

§  Mind mapping of textual diction and allied words – diagrammatically mapping of words based on their meaning, context and usage will re-emphasise the words in the minds of the learners

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
rereading texts
 

Having gained familiarity with technical and subject specific vocabulary, students will be introduced to the types of reading. The basic receptive skill will help students help students prioritise and eliminate content.

§  Reading strategies – acquaint the learners with the functions and benefits of reading strategy in the academic and professional set-up

§  Reading: skimming, scanning – introduce learners to the types of reading. The integral aspects of each method will be familiarized to the students. They can be given practice sessions through subject material provided

§  Intensive and extensive reading – benefits and features of the two types of reading can be elaborated. To emphasise on the learner the difference, practice sessions with subject material can be carried out

§  Summarising – consolidation of key ideas can be carried out in the spoken and written format. Technical literature can be provided for the purpose

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
non - verbal communication
 

The ancillaries of speaking skill is in focus here. Prior to delving into the productive skill, the nitty gritty that enhance its effectiveness is made familiar to the learner. Classroom activities and vicarious learning through case studies and video clippings can be screened.

§  Competence in non-verbal communication- create an awareness of the role of non-verbal communication in a professional set-up

§  Functions of non-verbal communication – the various utilities of nonverbal communication can be elaborated to students with case studies

§  Benefits of non-verbal communication – elucidate the advantages of non-verbal communication with reference to cultural distinctions

§  Proxemics, Chronemics, Kinesics, Haptics, Gestures, Paralanguage - vicarious learning of these aspects of non-verbal communication can be carried out through video clippings of suitable material and print media

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
communication strategies
 

The productive skills are finessed through identification and refining of the elements mentioned in this unit. They contribute to holistic presentation. Task based activities must be used to practise. Business Communication texts and worksheets will provide ample support.

Nuances of Communication – communication in the work place requires knowing the dos and don’ts of professional communication. An introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing with reference to professional communication can be provided.

§  Opening techniques

§   Speech markers

§   Fillers

§  Turn taking

§  Backchannelling

§  Dealing with interruptions

every element mentioned can be elaborated. Ample examples can be provided through audio visual media, it can be provided to them through demonstrations and verbal reinforcement language checklists can be provided to aid students understand implementation of the elements. A follow up through mock sessions must be carried out in groups

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
writing skill
 

Having dealt with speaking skill in the previous unit, the other productive skill; writing is taken into consideration here. The various forms of sriting in an official context will be taught in form and content.

§  Report writing – a corporate requirement is the ability to report on meetings and conferences. The format and requirements of a report writing can be taught to the students through samples and later they can be made to draft reports of their own and peer evaluated

§  Note taking – corporate atmosphere calls for not taking at every step. Students need to be taught the framework of note taking. They can be given samples as reference. Later they can be made to listen to technical audio clips and provide the note taking carried out at an individual level.

§  Minutes – corporate life calls for being in attendance of numerous meetings. Taking down the minutes is a skill that is assumed to be possessed by one. The essentials of maintaining the minutes must be made conversant through illustrations. This can be emphasised by classroom activities of the same

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
professional communication
 

 Lastly students will be introduced to typical work scenarios through hands-on sessions.

§  Small talk – the purpose and role of small talk must be taught to the students. They can be screened video clippings of the same. Mock sessions can be performed in the class. The key phrases and language used can be imparted through provision of language worksheets and skills checklists

§  Meeting- types of meetings, hierarchy of most often featuring members, etiquette to be held at meeting and the duties to be performed can be taught implicitly. Chairing, setting the agenda, controlling the smooth functioning, participating, deliberating and diplomacy must be made clear. The key phrases and language used can be taught through language worksheets and skills checklists

§  Group discussion – group discussions are carried out at every level. Students must be familiarized with the basics of a group discussions. Agreeing, disagreeing, and being diplomatic are essentials to be imparted. The soft skills and language essentials most commonly noted can be made comprehensible to the students. Vicarious learning and language charts can be used as learning tools.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Driscoll, Liz. Common Mistakes at Intermediate and How to Avoid Them. CUP, 2008.

[2] Carter, Ronald and Michael McCarthy. Cambridge Grammar of English. CUP, 2006.

[3] Leech, Geoffrey, Jan Svartvik. A Communicative Grammar of English. Third Edition. New Delhi: Pearson Education, 2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Booher, Dianna. E- Writing: 21st Century Tools for Effective Communication. Macmillan, 2008.

Knapp .M. Essentials of Non-Verbal Communication Theory Rea. FL: Harcourt, 1995.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 20

MID SEMESTER EXAM - 50

CIA II -20

BCA131 - FOUNDATIONAL MATHEMATICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at introducing the students into the world of Discrete Mathematics. It includes the topic like Mathematical Logic, Method of proofs, Mathematical induction, Permutations and combinations and Binomial coefficients. Also, this course emphasizes general techniques of problem solving and explores the creation of mathematical patterns.

 

Course Objective: This course will help the learner to

COBJ1. understand and use the notions of Mathematical Logic.

COBJ2. give proofs for Mathematical problems by using different methods of proofs

COBJ3. prove the mathematical problems/statements by using Mathematical Induction

COBJ4. use the permutations,combinations,binomial coefficients for solving problems appropriate problems

Learning Outcome

Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, student will be able to

CO1. Formulate and interpret statements presented and determine their validity by applying the rules and methods of propositional logic.

CO2. Reformulate statements from common language to formal logic using the rules of propositional and predicate calculus, and assess the validity of arguments.

CO3. Apply the logical structure of proofs and work symbolically with connectives and quantifiers to produce logically valid, correct and clear arguments

CO4. Construct elementary proofs using ordinary and strong induction in the context of studying the properties of recursion

CO5. Apply basic counting principles including the pigeonhole principle and rules for counting permutations and combinations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Logic
 

Propositional Logic, Applications of Propositional Logic, Propositional Equivalences, Predicates and Quantifiers.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Methods of Proof
 

Nested Quantifiers, Rules of Inference, Introduction to Proofs, Proof Methods and Strategy.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Counting
 

Mathematical Induction (Pg.311-333), The Basics of Counting, The PigeonholePrinciple, Permutations and Combinations, Binomial Coefficients and Identities

Text Books And Reference Books:

K. H. Rosen, Discrete Mathematics and its Applications, 7th ed., McGraw – Hill, 2012.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. R.P. Grimaldi and B.V. Ramana, Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics, An applied introduction, 5th ed., Pearson Education, 2007.
  2. D. S. Chandrasekharaiah, Discrete Mathematical Structures, 4th ed., India: PRISM Book Pvt. Ltd., 2012    
  3. J. P. Tremblay and R. Manohar, Discrete Mathematical Structures with Application to Computer Science, Reprint, India: Tata McGraw Hill Education, 2008.
Evaluation Pattern

ESE - Question Paper Pattern

Part

Unit and No. of subdivisions to be set in the unit

No. of subdivisions to be answered

Marks for each subdivision

Max.  marks for the part

A

UNIT I

4

10

3

30

UNIT II

4

UNIT III

4

B

UNIT II

4

3

7

21

C

UNIT I

5

4

7

28

D

UNIT III

4

3

7

21

Total

100

 

 

BCA132 - STATISTICS I FOR BCA (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To acquaint students with various statistical methods.
To cultivate statistical thinking among students.
To prepare students for future courses having quantitative components. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand and appreciate descriptive statistics.

CO2: Understand the concepts of probability and random variables.

CO3: Understand the different index numbers.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction
 

Importance of Statistics, Primary and secondary data, data collection methods. Presentation of numerical and categorical data. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Concepts of central tendency and dispersion
 

Mean, median, mode and partition values-quartiles for grouped and ungrouped data. Range, quartile deviation, standard deviation and coefficient of variation for grouped data 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Probability
 

Random Experiment- Sample space and events. Probability. rules. Conditional probability and Bayes theorm.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Random variable
 

Definition, types of random variables, probability functions, expectations and variance. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Index Number
 

Laspeyres’, Paasches’, Fishers price and quantity index numbers. Time reversal and factor reversal tests. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Berenson and Levine, Basic Business Statistics, New Jersey, 6th edition, Prentice- Hall India, 1996.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. D.C. Montogomery and G.C.Runger, Applied Statistics and Probability for engineers, New Jersey, John Wiley and Sons, 3rd edition, 2003. 
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

 

Component

Marks

Continuous Internal Assessment-I

10

Continuous Internal Assessment-II

25

Continuous Internal Assessment-III

10

Attendance

5

End Semester Exam(Written Test)

50

Total

100

 

End Semester Exam Pattern:

Section

Total number of questions

No. of questions to be answered

Max. Marks for each question

Total Marks

A

12

10

2

20

B

6

5

6

30

C

6

5

10

50

Total

24

19

 

100

BCA133 - DIGITAL COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of this course is to provide knowledge in concepts associated with digital logic and circuit design. The course starts with an introduction to number systems and its applications in computers. The course familiarizes with the Boolean algebra, logic gates, and combinational and sequential circuits concepts and its real world implementation. It provides fundamental idea in design and analysis of the digital circuit and system.

Learning Outcome

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

 ·      Understand fundamental concepts and techniques of number system and digital circuits

·         Design and implement digital circuit using  Karnaugh mapping techniques.

·        Analyze and design combinational and sequential circuits

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Number System and Codes
 

Number systems: Decimal numbers , Binary numbers : Counting in binary, The weighted structure of binary numbers, Octal numbers, hexadecimal numbers and their mutual conversions ,Binary arithmetic : Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of binary numbers, 1‘s and 2‘s complement, signed numbers, arithmetic operations: addition, subtraction with signed numbers, 9‘s and 10‘s complement, BCD numbers, BCD addition, BCD subtraction,Gray code: Binary to Gray code conversion, Gray to Binary conversion, Weighted code : 8421 code and Non weighted codes : ASCII and EBCDIC.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Boolean Algebra
 

Boolean operations and expressions, Laws and rules of boolean algebra, Demorgan‘s Theorem, Boolean expressions, Simplification of Boolean expression. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Logic Gates
 

AND gate, OR gate, NOT gate , NAND gate , NOR gate , X-OR gate , X-NOR gate, The universal property of NAND gate and NOR gate, Realization of basic gates.Boolean expression for logic circuits, Karnaugh map SOP with examples.

Self-Learning:

Universal property of NOR gate

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Combinational Logic
 

Basic Adders : Half adder, Full adder, 4-bit Parallel adders, Subtractor : Half subtractor, Full subtractor Implementation using logic gates, Decoders: 4 bit decoder, BCD to decimal decoder, Encoder : Decimal to BCD encoder, Multiplexer : 4 to 1 multiplexer, Demultiplexer : 1 to 4 demultiplexer .

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Flip-flops
 

Latches : SR latch, Clocked flip-flops :SR flip-flop, D flip-flop, JK flip-flop, Positive edge triggered flip flops, Timing diagrams , Master slave JK flip-flop.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Registers and Counters
 

Modes of operation of registers: SISO, SIPO, PISO, and PIPO, Asynchronous counters: Four bit ripple counter, Decade counter, Synchronous counters: Four bit synchronous counter, Decade counter.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Floyd, Thomas L: Digital Computer Fundamentals, 11th Edition, Pearson International, 2015.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Malvino, Paul Albert , Leach, Donald P,GautamSaha: Digital Principles And Applications, TMH ,8th Edition, 2015.
  2.  Bartee, Thomas C: Digital Computer Fundamentals, 6Edition,TMH, 2010.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 50 MARKS

ESE - 50 MARKS

BCA134 - INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING USING C (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course provides students with a comprehensive study of C programming language. The course lectures stress the strengths of C, which provides the outcome of writing efficient, maintainable and portable code. Course includes few lab exercises to make sure the student has not only gained the knowledge but can also apply and execute it. Objectives of the course are,

·         To study about algorithms, flowcharts and programs.

·         To solve problems through logical thinking.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to understand the principles of programming and problem solving techniques
CO2: Develop algorithms to solve scientific and mathematical problems
CO3: Design and develop modular programs using  procedural and structural concepts 
CO4: Able to build, test and debug small scale programming applications using C language

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to computers and programming
 

Evolution of Computers, Generation of Computers, Classification of Computers.Characteristics of Computers. Advantages of Computers. Block Diagram of a Digital Computer. Types of Programming Languages.Structured Programming.Algorithms and Flowcharts with Examples.Programming Logic.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to C programming
 

History of C- Character set - Structure of a C program - constants, variables and keywords. Expressions – Statements – Operators – Arithmetic, Unary, Relational and logical, Assignment, Conditional. Library functions. Data Input and output – Single character input, getchar, getch, getc – Single character output putchar, putc, Formatted I/O scanf, printf, gets, puts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:11
Control structures and arrays
 

Branching: condition: if, if..else, switch. Looping: while, do..while, for, nested control structures, break, continue statement, goto statement. Arrays: definition, processing, types - One and Two dimensional arrays. String, string operations, arrays of strings.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Functions and Pointers
 

Functions: Definition, Accessing and prototyping, types of functions, passing arguments to functions, recursion, passing arrays to functions. Pointers: Definition, notation, applications, call by reference.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:11
Structures, Unions and Files
 

Structures: Definition, Processing, user defined data type typedef - Unions – definition, declaration and accessing union elements. Enumerated Data type.Files: File opening in different modes, closing, reading and writing. fopen, fclose, fprintf, fscanf, getw, putw.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:9
Low level programming and C preprocessor
 

Storage Structures: extern, register, static, auto. Bitwise Operations: AND, OR, exclusive OR, complement, right shift and left shift operators. Preprocessor: Types of C preprocessor directives. Macros- comparison with functions. File Inclusion. Command line Arguments.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]   Byron Gottfried, JitenderChhabra ,Programming with C, 3rd Edition. Tata McGraw-Hill, 2010

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]    Balagurusamy E., Programming in ANSI C, 6thEdition,Tata McGraw-Hill, 2012.

[2]    Deitel H M and Deitel P J, C - How to Program, 5thEdition, Prentice-Hall, 2006.

[3]    SmarajitGhosh, All of ‘C’,2ndEdition, 2009.

[4]    M. T. Somashekara, Problem Solving with C, PHI, 2009

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 50%

ESE - 50%

BCA151 - DIGITAL COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS LAB (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course offers an experimental view of hardware components and logic gates of a computer.  The course provides hand-on experience in logic design of digital circuits using   hardware and simulator for a better understanding.

Learning Outcome

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

·        Identify basic components of  digital  circuits

·        Implement efficient circuits using digital components

·        Reinforce the theory concepts through practical implementation in teams

·         Use simulator for the implementation of digital circuits

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
LIST OF PROGRAMS
 

1.  Demonstration of the components of (i) Kindle (ii) iPad (iii) Smart Phone (iv) Laptops

2. Demonstration of the installation and discussion of the features of different Operating Systems. Eg: Mac, Unix, Ubuntu, Windows etc.

3. Verification of the truth tables of AND, OR & NOT gates.

4. Verification of the truth tables of NAND & NOR gates.

5. Verification of the truth table of  XOR using NAND gates.

6. Verification of the truth table of Half Adder circuits using NAND gates.

7. Verification of the truth table of Full Adder circuits using NAND gates.

8. Verification of the truth table of  D flip flop.

9. Verification of the truth table of JK flip flop.

10. Verification of the truth table of  RS   flip flop.

11. Binary To Gray Code and  Gray Code  to Binary Converter

12. Verification of the Function table of Binary Ripple Counter using JK FF.

13. Verification of the Function table of Decade Counter.

14. Verification of the Function table of Serial In Serial Out Shift Register using D FF.

Text Books And Reference Books:

--

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

--

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50%

ESE-50%

BCA152 - C PROGRAMMING LAB (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To learn problem solving through procedural language programming technique and

Understand fundamentals of programming such as variables, conditional and iterative

execution, methods, etc.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to understand the principles of programming and problem solving techniques
CO2: Develop algorithms to solve scientific and mathematical problems
CO3: Design and develop modular programs using  procedural and structural concepts 
CO4: Able to build, test and debug small scale programming applications using C language.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
List of Programs
 

  1. To demonstrate the usage of operators and data types in C

a.       Write a program to print the size of all the data types with its modifiers supported by C and its range.

  1. Write a program to convert Fahrenheit to Celsius.

 

  1. To demonstrate the usage of if, if-else

a. Write a program to check whether the given number is a Prime number or not.

b. Write a program to accept three numbers and find the largest and second largest among them.

 

3. To demonstrate the concept of while, do-while, for loops, break and continue

a. Write a program to print all prime numbers between any 2 given limits.

b. Write a program to print all the Armstrong numbers between any 2 given limits.

 

4. To demonstrate the concept of arrays and strings

a. Write a program to check whether a string is a Palindrome.

b. Write a program to check whether a given matrix is an Identity matrix or not.

c. Write a program to perform matrix multiplication.

 

5. To demonstrate the concept of switch-case

a. Write a program to count the different vowels in a line of text.

b. Write a program to accept two numbers and perform various arithmetic operations (+, -, *, /) based on the symbol entered.

 

6. To demonstrate the usage of functions and recursion

a. Write a program to find the roots of a quadratic equation

b. Write a recursive program to find the factorial of a number.

 

7. To demonstrate the concept of structures and unions

a. Create an employee structure and display the same.

b. Create a student database storing the roll no, name, class etc. Implement modify and search operations.

 

8. To demonstrate the concept of

a. Write a function to swap two numbers using pointers

b. Write a program to access an array of integers using pointers

 

9. To demonstrate the concept of File

a. Create a file and store some records in it. Display the contents of the same. Implement search, modify, and delete operations.

 

10. To demonstrate the concept of Bitwise operators and preprocessors

a. Perform the different bitwise operations (menu driven program) .The i/p and the o/p should be displayed in Binary form.

b. Write a program to include your own header file.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books and Reference Books

[1]   Byron Gottfried, JitenderChhabra ,Programming with C, 3rd Edition. Tata McGraw-Hill, 2010

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]    Balagurusamy E., Programming in ANSI C, 6thEdition,Tata McGraw-Hill,2012.

[2]    Deitel H M and Deitel P J, C - How to Program, 5thEdition, Prentice-Hall, 2006.

[3]    SmarajitGhosh, All of ‘C’,2ndEdition, 2009.

[4]    M. T. Somashekara, Problem Solving with C, PHI, 2009

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA weightage 50%

ESE weightage 50%

BCA212 - STATISTICS TOOLS LAB (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to help the students to explore and provide statistical knowledge with pragmatic tools for statistical analysis. The main objective of the course is to provide Hands-on Experience on any Statistical Tool.

Learning Outcome

 

CO1: Acquire the basics to understand descriptive statistics by practical application.

CO2: Demonstrate their knowledge on the basics of inferential statistics by making valid generalizations from sample data.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
List of programs
 

1.      Calculate mean, median, mode and display results in proper format.

2.      Calculate the product and sum of two vectors.

3.      Calculate Range, quartile deviation, standard deviation and coefficient of variation for grouped data.

4.      Partition values-quartiles for grouped and ungrouped data and display formatted results.

5.      Data Base Creation (including vector, matrix, data frames).

6.      Graphical representation (Bar, Pie, Line, Histogram, Scatter).

7.      Cross tabulation and Descriptive Statistics.

8.      Implement Correlation.

9.      Perform simple Regression and show results in chart.

10.  Testing of hypothesis for single mean.

11.  Testing of hypothesis for comparison of means.

12.  Chi-square test for independence of attributes.

Text Books And Reference Books:

-

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

-

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 50%

ESE - 50%

BCA221 - COMMUNICATIVE ENGLISH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

communicative english BCA 221

Course Description:

This course focuses on making students understand the vitality of English as a tool in implementing and; interpreting technical and professional communication. The course aims at detecting and nurturing research skills through English for professional development. A holistic approach to recognize the fundamental role of language in technical communication is undertaken.

Course Objective:

§  Nurture an enquiring spirit through English language in Technical communication

§  Enhance English implementation in English learning for professional purposes

§  Encourage students towards autonomous learning through enhanced English comprehension that go beyond the classroom

Learning Outcome

Learning Outcome:

§  Students will demonstrate better comprehension and interpretation of technical literature

§  Rudimentary research aptitude through language up-gradation will be initiated

§  Learn the nuances of professional communication through English language

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
PRONUNCIATION
 

The most regularly used words in their field of knowledge, the most often committed mistakes and their right pronunciation will be given to the students. Applications available in this context can be made familiar to learners.

§  Phonetics – students can me taught phonetics through phonetic apps that enable the student to relate the symbol with the sound. They can be taught to read and transcribe words to ensure ample understanding

§  Commonly mispronounced words – technical vocabulary can be focused here. Audio sessions can be implemented to enable auditory retention

§  Common errors in grammar – cooperative language learning will help students familiarize common errors and rectifications

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
TECHNICAL LITERATURE
 

Students need to learn to read and study literature of their subject. Any form of literature in context to the subject can be taken and students can be involved in these chapters mentioned below

§  Comprehensive questioning of procedural writings &  Comprehension answering of procedural queries – through subject based literature students can be taught cognition and responding to the prescribed material through writing and speaking

§  Issuing of instructions – instructions being an integral part of their area of expertise, students need to be made familiar with the sequencing and of ideas and brevity of language. This can be carried out through written and spoken format.

§  Procedural instructions – a set of operating procedures for a piece of technical equipment can be carried out in through first through oral presentations and writing exercises

§  Discussion of processes, errors or glitches – going beyond the usual, students must be acquainted with dealing the nitty-gritty of technical literature. They must be taught to spell out glitches or errors to enable smooth functioning

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
RESEARCH ORIENTATION
 

An integral part of in-depth learning involves research. In this unit research will be introduced to the students. The nuances of  exploratory study and their approaches will be made familiar to the students

§  Structure of the essay – students need to be familiarized on the format and elements that contribute to a holistic essay. Deconstruction of essays can be carried out through cooperative learning and deliberated.

§  Topic sentence recognition – Technical English calls for detection of topic sentence recognition of any technical literature. Students can be taught on detecting keywords and significant concepts that will aid in the process

§  Thesis statement identification – research publications are an integral part of technical writing. Students can be provided research articles and familiarized on the format and texture of a thesis statement

§  Interpretation of data – quantitative study is entirely dependent on data analysis and interpretation. The language to be used in the process can be fine-tuned for the students through case studies of the same

§  Comprehension, organization of ideas and execution of writing project proposal – once learners have been taught the elements of a research paper, they can be encouraged to work in groups and draft their own research paper integrating all the major elements.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
ANALYTICAL STUDY
 

An extension of rudimentary research is present in this chapter. Students will be encouraged to analyse texts, interpret and rewrite them.

§  Rhetoric analysis; a comparative analysis of two texts – in context to the literature prescribed, students must be enabled to make a detailed study of the texts and chart out differences and similarities.

§  Critical analysis – students can be taught to scrutinise the text based on the context and produce a systematic response

§  Paraphrasing – in a professional atmosphere data needs to be interpreted and paraphrased. Tasks with data analysis can be used to help students comprehend the implementation of paraphrasing in the written

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
OFFICIAL CORRESPONDENCE
 

Productive skill; writing is nurtured in this chapter. A few elements of the same was handled in the first semester. Here students will further finesse their writing skills

§  Official letter – the types and format of official letter can be imparted through examples. Students can be then asked to draft letters of their own. Etiquettes of letter writing, register, style and specific language phrases must be taught. H examples can be used to emphasise.

§  Internet correspondence – the soft skills for corresponding through email, carbon copying, blind carbon copying, salutations, register, style, format and diction must be made familiar to the students,

§  Resume writing – the organization of a resume along with the covering letter can be imparted to the learners through providing several samples. They can then be made to draft a resume with covering letter of their own.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
SPEAKING SKILL
 

The previous semester dealt with a few productive oral skills. Furthering their productive expertise, speaking skills are taken into consideration. Students will be encouraged to demonstrate their skills under guidance of the teacher.

Interview – types of interviews can be elaborated to the learners. The essential language and skills required must be emphasised verbally and through case studies. Students can be encouraged to demonstrate the acquired knowledge through simulated sessions

§  Presentations – the critical features and language checklists must be emphasised. Introducing the topic, linking, sequencing and dealing with questions must be mad familiar. The soft skills and paralinguistic aspects can be taught through examples. Group demonstrations must be mandatory

§  Conference – the soft skills and language finesse required must be made clear to the students. Checklists can be provided as learning aids. Chairing sessions, targeting issues, key language, and steering the meeting is required to be acquainted. Audio visual examples can be screened and re-emphasis through practice sessions can be carried out.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Day, R A. Scientific English: A Guide for Scientists and Other Professionals. 2nd ed. Hyderabad: Universities Press, 2000. .

[2] Meenakshi Raman and Sangeetha Sharama . 2009. Technical Communication-Principles and Practice; - Oxford University Press,

[3] Jay. Effective Presentation. New Delhi: Pearson, 2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

English for Effective Communication. Oxford University Press, 2013.

Lynch, Tony. Study Listening. New Delhi. CUP, 2008.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 20

MID SEMESTER EXAMINATION - 50

CIA II - 20

BCA231 - BASIC DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at introducing the students into the world of Discrete Mathematics. It includes the topic like Set Theory, Functions and Relations. They gain a historical perspective of the development of modern discrete mathematics and application of the same in the field of Computer Science.

 

Course Objectives: This course will help the learner to

COBJ1. be proficient in the topics set theory, functions and relations.

COBJ2. enhance the problems solving skills in set theory, functions, relations, sequences, series and matrices

Learning Outcome

On successful completion of this course, students will be able to 

CO1. Demonstrate a working knowledge of set notation and elementary set theory, recognize the connection between set operations and logic
CO2. Prove elementary results involving sets
CO3. Apply the different properties of injections, surjections, bijections, compositions, and inverse functions
CO4. Demonstrate the use of mathematical reasoning by justifying and generalizing patterns and relations
CO5. Determine when a relation is reflexive, symmetric, antisymmetric, or transitive, apply the properties of equivalence relations and partial orderings, and explain the connection between equivalence relations 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Set Theory and Theory of Functions
 

Sets, Set Operations, Functions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Applications of Functions and Theory of Matrices
 

Sequences and Summations, Cardinality of Sets, Matrices

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Relations
 

Relations and Their Properties, Equivalence Relations, Partial Orderings 

Text Books And Reference Books:

K. H. Rosen, Discrete Mathematics and its Applications, 7th ed., McGraw – Hill, 2012. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. R.P. Grimaldi and B.V. Ramana, Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics, An applied introduction, 5th ed., Pearson Education, 2007.
  2. D. S. Chandrasekharaiah, Discrete Mathematical Structures, 4th ed., India: PRISM Book Pvt. Ltd., 2012
  3. J. P. Tremblay and R. Manohar, Discrete Mathematical Structures with Application to Computer Science, Reprint, India: Tata McGraw Hill Education, 2008.
Evaluation Pattern

EXAMINATION AND ASSESSMENTS

 

Component

Mode of Assessment

Parameters

Points

CIA I

Written Assignment

Class test(online)

Problem working

Mastery of the core concepts

10

CIA II

Mid-semester Examination

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

25

CIA III

Written Assignment

Class test, Quiz (Online),

Problem working in class

Mastery of the core concepts

10

Attendance

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

05

ESE

 

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

50

Total

100

 

BCA232 - STATISTICS II FOR BCA (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 The course statistics-II describes the concept of correlation and regression, probability distribution and testing hypothesis.

 Objectives of the course are 

  • To acquaint students with various statistical methods.
  • To cultivate statistical thinking among students.
  • To prepare students for future courses having quantitative components.

 

Learning Outcome

 Upon successful completion of the course one should be able to

CO1:Understand and analyze bivariate data with respect to their association.

CO2:Apply different distributions at the appropriate situations.

CO3:Apply various tests of hypothesis understand their interpretation.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Correlation and Regression
 

Scatter diagram, Karl Pearson’s and Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Regression and properties of regression coefficient.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Probability Distributions
 
 

Discrete and continuous random variables. Probability mass and density functions. Expectation. Binomial, Poisson and normal distribution

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Sampling distribution and confidence interval
 
 

Sampling, distribution and estimation. Parameter and statistic. Chisquare t and F distributions (definitions only) Confidence interval Single mean and difference known and unknown variances. Single proportion and difference of proportions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Testing of Hypothesis
 

 

Types of hypothesis. Level of significance. Types of errors. Test for single mean and difference of means. Paired t test. Tests for proportions. Chi square test for independence of attributes.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Berenson and Levine, Basic Business Statistics, New Jersey, Prentice- Hall India, 6th ed. 1996.
  2. SP Gupta, Statistical Methods, Sultan Chand & Sons, new Delhi, 41st Revised Edition, 2011

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. C.Montogomery and G.C.Runger, Applied Statistics and Probability for engineers, New Jersey, John Wiley and Sons, 3rd ed. 2003.
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

 

Component

Marks

Continuous Internal Assessment-I

10

Continuous Internal Assessment-II

25

Continuous Internal Assessment-III

10

Attendance

5

End Semester Exam(Written Test)

50

Total

100

 

End Semester Exam Pattern:

Section

Total number of questions

No. of questions to be answered

Max. Marks for each question

Total Marks

A

12

10

2

20

B

6

5

6

30

C

6

5

10

50

Total

24

19

 

100

BCA233 - OPERATING SYSTEMS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to the concepts behind modern computer operating systems. Topics will include what an operating system does (and doesn't) do, system calls and interfaces, processes, resource scheduling and management (of the CPU, memory, etc.), virtual memory.

Objectives of the course are

·         To acquire the fundamental knowledge of the operating system architecture and its components

·         To know the various operations performed by the operating system.

Learning Outcome

  • CO: 1 Demonstrate the fundamentals of an operating system.

    CO: 2 Evaluate the importance of process and scheduling. 

    CO: 3 Analyze and Solve the issues in synchronization and memory management. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction and System Structures
 

Operating System  Fundamentals; Computer System organization and architecture; Operating System structure and operations; Basics of process, memory and storage management and protection and security; Operating System services; User interface; System calls; System programs; Operating System structure; System boot.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Process Management
 

Process concept; Process scheduling; Operations on processes; Inter Process Communication; Overview of Threads; Multi-threading models; Threading Issues.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Process Synchronization
 

Need of synchronization; Critical section problems; Peterson‘s solution; Synchronization hardware; Mutex Locks; Semaphores, Classical problems of synchronization, Synchronization examples, Thread synchronization using mutex and semaphore.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
CPU Scheduling
 

CPU Scheduling concepts; Scheduling criteria; Scheduling algorithms; Overview of thread scheduling; Multi-processor scheduling.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Memory Management
 

Overview; Swapping; Memory allocation; Segmentation; Paging, Structure of the page table.


Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Virtual Memory
 

Overview; Demand paging; Copy on Write; Page replacement; Allocation of Frames; Thrashing.

Self Learning

File system structure, Directory structure

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]   A. Silberschatz, P.B. Galvin and G. Gagne, Operating System Concepts.9th Edition, New Delhi: Wiley India, 2011.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]   Stalling William, Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles. 7th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2011.

[2]   Dietel et al, Operating System.3rd Edition. Pearson Education, 2004.

[3]   A.S. Tanenbaum, Modern Operating Systems.3rd Ed, Prentice Hall, 2007.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50%

ESE-50%

BCA234 - DATA STRUCTURES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:04

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Data Structure is considered as one of the fundamental paper towards a more comprehensive understanding of programming and application development. Student is expected to work towards a sound theoretical understanding of Data Structures and also compliment the same with hands on implementing experience. 

Objectives of the course are

• To be able to practically implement the data structures like stack, queue, array etc.

• To understand and implement different searching and sorting techniques.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1:  Demonstrate their ability to understand the need for Data Structures while writing programs.

CO2:  Design and develop modular programs using relevant data structure operations.

CO3:  Evaluate the programs for its efficiency.

CO4:  Build a small scale real-time application using data structures.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Arrays
 

 

Introduction to data structures- Arrays and Structures: Abstract Data Type, Array in C, Dynamically Allocated Arrays, Structures, Unions, Internal Implementation of Structures, Self-Referential Structures, Polynomial Representation, Polynomial Additions.-sparse matrix

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Searching and String
 

Linear Search, Iterative Binary Search, Recursions, Recursive Binary Search, String Abstract Data Type, String in C, Pattern Matching.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Stacks and Queues
 

Stacks- stacks using dynamic arrays- queues – circular queue using dynamic arrays- Evaluation of Expressions, Evaluating Postfix Expressions, Infix to Postfix.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Linked Lists
 

Pointers, Using Dynamically Allocated Storage, Singly Linked Lists, Dynamically Linked Stacks and Queues, Polynomials, Representing Polynomials as Singly Linked Lists, Adding Polynomials, Erasing Polynomials, Polynomials as Circularly Linked Lists, Doubly Linked Lists.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Trees
 

Introduction, Terminology, Representation of Trees, Binary Trees, Abstract Data Type, Properties of Binary Trees, Binary Tree Representations, Binary Tree Traversals Binary Search Trees: Introduction, Searching a Binary Search Tree, Inserting an Element, Deleting an Element, Height of Binary Search Tree.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Sorting Techniques and Graphs
 

Introduction, Bubble Sort, Insertion Sort, Selection Sort, Quick Sort, Merge Sort.  Graphs—Introduction-Definition-representation-Depth first search-Breadth first search.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]   Horowitz Sahni Anderson-Freed, Fundamental of Data Structures in C, Universities Press, Reprint 2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]   Yashwant Kanetkar, Data Structures Through C, 9th Edition, BPB Publication 2010.

[2]   Tremblay J.P and Sorenson P.G: An Introduction to Data Structures with Applications, 2nd Edition, 2002, TMH.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Weightage)

ESE (Weightage)

50%

50%

  

 

BCA251 - OPERATING SYSTEM LAB (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

Operataing System is an introduction to the concepts behind modern computer operating systems. Topics will include what an operating system does (and doesn't) do, system calls and interfaces, processes, resource scheduling, management (of the CPU, Memory, etc.) and Virtual memory.

Course objectives:

This lab introduces basic commands in LINUX and helps students in familiarizing the concepts of operating system through various commands related to operating system activities.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the UNIX commands and system calls  for creating process.

CO2: Apply the Inter process communication and Threads.

CO3: Implement the concepts of the pipes, semaphores, Job Scheduling and Deadlock.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
List of programs
 
  1. To study the execution of various file/directory handling commands.
  2. To study the various commands operated in vi editor in LINUX.
  3. To study the various File Access Permission and different types of users in LINUX
  4. To study about process related commands.
  5. To study about the commands related to memory allocation of variables for a process.
  6. To study about commands for viewing system calls.
  7. To study about commands used for debugging.
  8. Write a program to demonstrate basic operations of a process.
  9. Write a program to create a Zombie process and an orphan.
  10. Write a program to demonstrate a one-way pipe between two processes.
  11. Write a program to illustrate a two way pipe between two processes.
  12. Write a program to demonstrate a one-way communication between two processes using FIFO
  13. Write a program to demonstrate a two-way communication between two processes using FIFO
  14. Demonstrate process synchronization using semaphore.
  15. Demonstrate the basic operations of thread.
  16. Demonstrate thread synchronization using mutex.
  17. Demonstrate thread synchronization using semaphore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books and Reference Books:

[1]   A. Silberschatz, P.B. Galvin and G. Gagne, Operating System Concepts.9th Edition, New Delhi: Wiley India, 2011.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]   Stalling William, Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles. 7th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2011.

[2]   Dietel et al, Operating System.3rd Edition. Pearson Education, 2004.

[3]   A.S. Tanenbaum, Modern Operating Systems.3rd Ed, Prentice Hall, 2007.

Evaluation Pattern

50% CIA 

50% ESE

BCA252 - DATA STRUCTURES LAB (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:02

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is designed to provide a practical exposure on data structure and its applications.

Learning Outcome

CO1:   Understand the semantics of all types of Data Structures and various operations.

CO2:   Design and develop modular programs using relevant data structure for any given problem.

CO3:   Analyze the efficiency of the program.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
List of programs
 

 1. Strings:

a)      Write a menu driven program to compare, concatenate, copy strings and find the length of a string.

b)      Write a menu driven program to find the index of a pattern in a given string and to extract a substring.

 

2. Arrays

a)      Write a program to insert and delete an element(s) in one dimensional array.

b)      Write a program to insert and delete an element(s) in two dimensional arrays.

 

3. Sparse Matrix

a)      Write a menu driven program to read a sparse matrix of integer values and to search the sparse matrix for any element specified by the user.

b)      Write a program to print the appropriately triple < row, column, "value" > that represents the elements in the sparse matrix.

 

4. Searching Techniques:

a)      Write a program to implement Linear Search with sentinels

b)      Write a program to implement Binary Search using recursion

 

5.  Sorting techniques:

a)      Write a menu driven program to implement insertion sort

b)      Write a menu driven program to implement selection sort.

c)      Write a menu driven program to implement quick sort using recursion

d)      Write a menu driven program to implement merge sort using recursion.

 

6. Singly linked list:

a)      Write a menu driven program to implement singly linked lists creation, insertion and deletion

 

7. Stack:

a)      Write a menu driven program to implement different operations on a stack using an array and linked list.

 

8. Queue:

a)      Write a menu driven program to implement different operations on a queue using an array and linked list.

 

9. Binary search trees:

a)      Write a menu driven program to create a binary search tree and to perform Insertion and different types of traversal

 

10. Graphs:

a)      Write a menu driven program to implement breadth first search (bfs)

b)     Write a menu driven program to implement depth first search (dfs) 

Text Books And Reference Books:

-

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

-

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Weightage)

ESE (Weightage)

50%

50%

BCA312 - ACCOUNTING TOOLS LAB (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The main objective of the account tools lab is to develop practical knowledge in students by implementing the accounting concepts using Tally or Excel software.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understanding  the practical concepts of  accounting.

CO2: Analyzing different financial statements and applying suitable solutions to generate a correct balance sheet.

CO3: Design a solution to solve accounts related problems.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
List of Programs
 

1.Show the transactions on accounting equation format 

2.Generating Journal Entries

3.Same entries of journal to be posted in Ledger and Trial balance

4.Creation of subsidiary books

5.Creation of Debit memo and Credit memo

6.Recording transactions in three column cash book

7.Displaying Income statement and balance sheet under different time periods

8.Collect the final accounts of a listed company for 3 consecutive periods analyse the effect of assets and comment whether there is a chances of depreciation or sale or purchase or appreciation in that asset

9.Consider an asset with an initial cost of Rs10000, a salvage value (residual value) of Rs1000 and a useful life of 10 periods (years). Solve the above using Straight Line Depreciation.

10.Collect the final accounts of a listed company for 3 consecutive periods and compare its financial performance

Text Books And Reference Books:

Official guide to financial accounting using tally. BPB publications 2018. ISBN-13;978-9387284036.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

-

Evaluation Pattern
CIA 100%

 

BCA331 - INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course aims at familiarizing the students with the basic concepts, some important results and proofs in Number Theory and includes some fundamental theories required for learning cryptography. It also introduces the students to some of the fundamental concepts of Group Theory.

 

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to

COBJ1: Define and interpret the concepts of divisibility, congruence, greatest common divisor, prime, and prime-factorization.

COBJ2: Solve congruences of various types, and make use of the theory of congruences in perceiving applications in cryptography.

COBJ3: Define and analyze groups, semigroups, subgroups, order of an element, cyclic groups, coset decomposition and prove theorems related to these concepts.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

CO1: Enhance research, inquiry and analytical thinking abilities.

CO2: Apply the basics of Number Theory and Algebra in solving problems

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Number Theory
 

Divisibility and Modular Arithmetic, Integer Representations and Algorithms, Primes and Greatest Common Divisors.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Theory of Congruences and Cryptography
 

Solving, Congruences, Applications of Congruences, Cryptography.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Group Theory
 

Definition of Group, Semigroup, Subgroup, Order of an element, Cyclic Groups and their properties, Coset Decomposition, Lagarange’s Theorem and its consequences

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. K. H. Rosen, Discrete Mathematics and its Applications, 7th ed., McGraw – Hill, 2012.
  2. D. S. Chandrasekharaiah, Discrete Mathematical Structures, 4th ed., India: PRISM Book Pvt. Ltd., 2012.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. R. P. Grimaldi, Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics: An Applied Introduction,5th ed.,  New Delhi: Pearson, 2014.
  2. S. Lipschutz and M. Lipson, Discrete Mathematics, New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill, 2013
  3. N. L. Biggs, Discrete Mathematics, 2nd ed., New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2014
  4. J. P. Tremblay and R. Manohar, Discrete Mathematical Structures with Application to Computer Science, Reprint, India: Tata McGraw Hill Education, 2008.
Evaluation Pattern

EXAMINATION AND ASSESSMENTS

 

Component

Mode of Assessment

Parameters

Points

CIA I

Written Assignment

Class test(online)

Problem working

Mastery of the core concepts

10

CIA II

Mid-semester Examination

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

25

CIA III

Written Assignment

Class test, Quiz (Online),

Problem working in class

Mastery of the core concepts

10

Attendance

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

05

ESE

 

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

50

Total

100

BCA332 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of this paper is to provide some basic knowledge about accounting concepts, conventions, and procedure to record the business transactions. This is also to give them an overall idea about how accounting standards are followed in recording and maintaining books of accounts. It helps them in reading and analysing the financial position of the company. 

Learning Outcome

Upon successful completion of the course student will be familiarized with the concept of accounting. Student will get an idea about how the final accounts helps to analyze about a company‘s financial strength and viability. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Subsidiary Books
 

Meaning, Classification and Advantages. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Double Entry
 

Meaning, Nature and Principles of Double Entry. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Journal
 

Meaning and Need, Steps in Journalizing, Problems on Journal Entry.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction
 

Accounting Meaning, Need for accounting, Users of Accounting Information, Meaning of Bookkeeping, Accounting principles, Accounting cycle, Phases of Accounting, Accounting Equation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Trial Balance
 

Meaning and objectives of preparing Trial Balance.Comprehensive problems on Journal, Ledger and Trial Balance. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Ledger
 

Meaning, Difference between Journal and Ledger, Steps in posting. Problems on Ledger

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Cash Book
 

Meaning, objectives and classifications of cash book. Difference between cash dicount and trade discount. Problems on Three column cash book

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Final Accounts
 

Meaning, Need for preparation of Final Account, Components of Final accounts. Problems with adjustments

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Depreciation
 

Meaning, Need for providing Depreciation. Problems on different methods of Depreciation (Straight Line Method and Written Down Value Method)

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  • 1. Fundamentals of Accounting, Kalyani Publishers, S P Jain and K L Narang 2017

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Fundamentals of Accounting, Universal Publications, B S Raman, 2017

2.  Accounting for Managers, Himalaya Publishing House, R Venkata Raman and Srinivas, 2017 

3. S.N. Maheshwari  & S.K. Gupta “Introduction to Accounting” 2016

Evaluation Pattern

50% CIA + 50% ESE

BCA333 - OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING JAVA (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

     This course teaches students how to develop java applications. Course gives an overview of difference between C++ and Java. Students will be developing and testing java application as a practical course work.  The course introduces the concept of UI design in java using SWING and JAVAFX.

Learning Outcome

CO1:Understanding the basic concepts  of object oriented programming.

CO2:Apply the Object Oriented Programming concepts in solving real world applications.

CO3: Build  Client/Server GUI applications using SWING and JAVAFX.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
JAVA BASICS
 
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
ARRAYS AND CLASSES
 
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:11
INHERITANCE,STRINGS AND EXCEPTION HANDLING
 

Inheritance

Inheritance basic - member access and inheritance - constructors and inheritance - using super to call superclass constructors - using super to access superclass members - creating a multilevel hierarchy - superclass references and subclass objects - method overriding - using abstract classes -using final - the object class.

Strings

Constructing strings - operating on strings - arrays of strings - strings are immutable - using a string to control a switch statement - different string handling functions.

The exception hierarchy - exception handling fundamentals - the consequences of an uncaught exception - using multiple catch statements - catching subclass exceptions - try blocks can be nested - throwing an exception - using finally -using throws - java’s built in exceptions - creating exception subclasses.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
INTERFACES, USING I/O AND MULTI THREADING
 

Packages and Interfaces

Packages - packages and member access - understanding protected members -importing packages - Interfaces - implementing interfaces - using interface references - variables in interfaces - interfaces can be extended - default interface methods - use static methods in an interface.

Java’s I/O is built upon streams -  byte streams and character streams - the byte stream classes - the character stream classes - the predefined streams-using the byte streams - reading and writing files using byte streams - reading and writing binary data, using java’s character based streams - file I/O using character streams.

Multithreading fundamentals - the thread class and runnable interface - creating a thread - creating multiple threads - determining when a thread ends -thread priorities - synchronization - suspending, resuming, and stopping threads.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
SWING
 
Unit-6
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCING JAVAFX
 
Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]   Schildt Herbert, Java :The Complete Reference, Tata McGraw- Hill, 10th Edition,2017

[2]   Dr.Rao,Nageswara ,Core Java,An Integrated Approach ,New Edition Kongent Solutions Inc, 2009. 2005.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]   Java ™ A Beginner’s Guide, Herbert Schildt, McGraw-Hill Education, 7th Edition, 2017

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 50%

ESE - 50%

BCA334 - DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course concentrates on the  principles, design and implementation of DBMS.It provides strong foundation of database concepts that helps in developing skills for the design and implementation of a database applications with focus on the concepts of distributed system,transaction processing ,concurency control and Database recovery. 

 

Learning Outcome

Upon completion of the course ,the students will be able to

CO1: Demonstrate the concepts of Relational database model , ER model and Distributed databases.  

CO2: Implement database operations and transactions using SQL.

CO3: Apply the concepts of Transaction processing, Concurrency control, Database Recovery and Back-up in applications.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
DBMS Architecture
 

Data Models – Categories of data models, Schemas, Instances, and Database states. DBMS Architecture and Data Independence – The Three schema architecture, Data independence .DBMS Languages and Interfaces.Classifications of Database Management Systems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction
 

Data, Database, Database management system, Characteristics of the database approach, Role of Database administrators, Role of Database Designers, End Users, Advantages of Using a DBMS and When not to use a DBMS.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Index Structures for Files
 

Single Level Ordered Indexes – Primary indexes, Clustering indexes and Secondary indexes. Multi-level indexes, Hashing concepts.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Data Modeling Using Entity-Relationship Model
 

Using High Level Conceptual Data Models for Database Design, Example Database applications. Entity types, Entity Sets, Attributes and Keys. Relationships, Relationship types, Roles and Structural constraints. Weak Entity Types and Drawing E- R Diagrams.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Relational Data Model
 

Relation, Integrity constraints - domain, entity and Referential integrity constraints, Basic Relational Algebra operations, select, project and join operations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Database Design
 

Functional dependencies and Normalization for Relational Databases - Normalization concepts, first,second, third normal forms, Boyce-Codd normal form.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Transaction Processing Concepts and Concurrency Control Techniques
 

Transaction and System concepts – Desirable properties of Transactions – Schedules and Recoverability. Lock-Based Protocols – Locks, Granting of Locks, and Two phase locking protocol and implementation of locking.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
SQL
 

SQL data definition and data types, specifying constraints in SQL, schema change statements, Basic queries, More Complex SQL queries, INSERT, DELETE and UPDATE statements in SQL, Views – Concept of a view in SQL.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Database Recovery
 

Recovery Concepts: Recovery Outline and Categorization of Recovery Algorithms, Caching Buffering of Disk Blocks, Write-Ahead Logging, Steal/No-Steal, and Force/No-Force, Checkpoints in the System log and Fuzzy Check pointing, Transaction Rollback.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Data Base Administration
 

Introduction to Database security issues, Discretionary Access Control Based on Granting/Revoking of Privileges and Multi-level security.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Advanced Database concepts
 

Brief introduction to Data warehousing and Data mining.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Distributed Databases
 

Distributed database concepts, Data fragmentation, Replication, and Allocation Techniques for Distributed database design, Types of Distributed database systems.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • ElmasriRamez and NavatheShamkant B, Fundamentals of Database Systems, Addison-Wesley, 6th Edition, 2010.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Silberschatz, Korth, Sudarshan, Database System Concepts, 5 Edition, McGraw Hill, 2006.
  • O`neil Patricand, O`neil Elizabeth, Database Principles, Programming and Performance, 2nd Edition, Margon Kaufmann Publishers Inc, 2008.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50%

ESE-50%

BCA351 - JAVA PROGRAMMING LAB (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course teaches students how to develop java applications. Course gives an overview of difference between C++ and Java. Students will be developing and testing java application as a practical course work.  The course introduces the concept of UI design in java using SWING and JAVAFX

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate their ability to understand the concepts of Object oriented programming and will model the real world applications using Object Oriented Programming concepts

CO2: Apply the concept of Multithreading in concurrent programming.

      CO3: Develop Client/Server GUI based applications using Swing & JAVAFX

 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
List of Programs
 

1.      To implement different entry controlled and exit controlled looping statements
2.      To Implement nesting of switch statement
3.      To Implement single and multi-dimensional arrays
4.      To implement constructor overloading and method overloading
5.      To implement static keyword
6.      To Implement multilevel inheritance
7.      To implement super and this keyword
8.      To implement abstract and final keyword
9.      To implement methods of String class
10.  To Implement exception handling and custom exceptions
11.  To implement package and interface
12.  To implement File Stream classes
13.  To Implement multithreading
14.  To implement mouse and keyboard events
15.  To implement different layout managers
16.  To design a customer registration form using advanced swing components
17.  To implement 2D Shapes using JavaFX
18.  To implement CheckBox and ListView events using JavaFX

19.  To implement JavaFx Effects and Transformation

Text Books And Reference Books:

-

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

-

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50%

ESE-50%

BCA352 - DBMS LAB (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The main objective of this lab course is to provide a strong foundation in database concepts, understand and implement the use of Structured Query Language (SQL) and Procedural Structured Query Language (PL/SQL) to create and query databases

Learning Outcome

Upon completion of the course,the student will be able to

CO1: Design and implement a database schema for a given problem-domain using SQL-DDL commands.

CO2: Implement operations in a database using SQL (DML/DCL) commands.

CO3: Create stored procedures, stored functions, cursors, packages using PL/SQL. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
Topics
 

 

1. Introduction TO SQL                                                                                            

a. Introduction

b. Logging on to SQL interface

c. Choosing and Describing Tables

d. Elements of the SQL Query

e. The System Dummy Table

g. Selecting Tables and Columns

h. Duplicate Information DISTINCT

i. Sorting Information

 

2.      Data Definition Language (DDL)                                                                   

   a.Create

   b.Drop

   c.Alter

   d.Rename

3. Integrity Constraints                                                                                

a. Types of Constraint

b. Referential Integrity

c. Defining Constraints

 

4. Data Manipulation Language DML                                                                  

a. Select

b. Insert

c. Update

d. Delete

 

5.      Filtering Data Using Where                                                                  

a. Where Operators

b. Where with Keywords

c. Where and Logical Operators

 

6. SQL Functions and Data types                                                                           

a. Date and Time Functions

b. Numeric Functions

c. String Functions

d. Conversion Functions

 

7. Group By                                                                                                              

a. Group Function Examples

b. Group Function with Having

 

8. Retrieving Data from Multiple Tables using Joins                                           

a. Natural Join

b. Inner Join

c. Outer Join

 

9. Sub-Queries                                                                                                          

a. Basic Subqueries

b. Multiple Column Subqueries

c. Subqueries with Having

d. Correlated Subqueries

 

10. Views                                                                                                                   

a. CREATE VIEW

b. WITH CHECK OPTION

 

11. Indexes                                                                                                                  

a. Create Index 

b. Unique Option 

c. When and What to Index 

d. Drop Index

 

 

 

12. Data Control Language (DCL)                                                                       

a. Grant

b. Revoke

 

13. Transaction Control Language                                                                        

a. Commit

b. Rollback

c. Savepoint

d. Set Transaction

 

14. PL/SQL                                                                                                               

a. Variables and type declarations

b. Loop structure

c. Procedures and Functions

d. PL/SQL Blocks

e. Cursor/ Cursor loops

f. Exceptions

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

-

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  [1] Vikram Vaswani, MySQL(TM): The Complete Reference, McGraw Hill, The Paperback edition, 2017.

[2] James R Groff Paul N. Weinberg and Andy Oppel, SQL The Complete Reference, 3rd Edition, McGraw Hill, 2011.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50%,ESE-50%

BCA361A - GERMAN (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Basic Course in German aims to provide students a good knowledge of the language, enabling them to read, write and speak German, whereby the

emphasis is laid on speech

Learning Outcome

CO1:  Able to listen, read and write in the language

CO2:  The students are in the position to communicate in a basic manner

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Greetings
 

Greetings, ordering, requesting, saying thank you

Grammar – the article the, conjugation of verbs

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Shopping
 

Grammar – adjectives, endings before nouns

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Addresses, Occupations, Studies
 

Grammar – verb to be, the definite/indefinite articles

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Leisure Time, Sport, Hobbies
 

Grammar  – position of a verb in a main clause

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
At a Restaurant, Food and Drink
 

Grammar – the personal pronoun in the Nominative, Accusative

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
The Technical World,Ownership
 

 Grammar – the verb to haven, Nominative and Accusative

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
Staying in a hotel
 

Grammar – Modalverbs,Past tense of to have and to be

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:9
Travel