Department of
CHEMISTRY






Syllabus for
Master of Science (Chemistry)
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MCH111 MATHEMATICS FOR CHEMISTS 2 2 50
MCH112 GENERAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 2 2 50
MCH131 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY - I 4 4 100
MCH132 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY - I 4 4 100
MCH133 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY - I 4 4 100
MCH134 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 4 4 100
MCH151 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I 6 3 100
MCH152 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I 6 3 100
2 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAC211 COMPUTERS FOR CHEMISTS 2 2 50
MAC212 SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATION: WRITING AND PRESENTATIONS 1 1 25
MAC231 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY - II 4 4 100
MAC232 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY - II 4 4 100
MAC233 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY - II 4 4 100
MAC234 SPECTROSCOPY - I 4 4 100
MAC251 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICAL - II 6 3 100
MAC252 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS 6 3 100
MCH211 COMPUTERS FOR CHEMISTS 2 2 50
MCH212 SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATION: WRITING AND PRESENTATIONS 1 1 25
MCH231 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY - II 4 4 100
MCH232 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY - II 4 4 100
MCH233 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY - II 4 4 100
MCH234 SPECTROSCOPY - I 4 4 100
MCH251 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II 6 3 100
MCH252 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II 6 3 100
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAC331 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS 4 4 100
MAC332 ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS 4 4 100
MAC333 ADVANCED ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES 4 4 100
MAC334 SPECTROSCOPY - II 4 4 100
MAC351 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICAL - I 6 4 100
MAC381 PROJECT 6 4 100
MCH331 ORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS 4 4 100
MCH332 ORGANIC SYNTHESIS - I 4 4 100
MCH333 CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS AND HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS 4 4 100
MCH334 SPECTROSCOPY - II 4 4 60
MCH351 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICAL - I 6 3 100
MCH381 PROJECT 6 4 100
4 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAC411 CHALLENGES IN INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH 2 2 50
MAC431 INORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS AND ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMISTRY 4 4 100
MAC432 INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS 4 4 100
MAC433 CHEMISTRY OF MATERIALS 4 4 100
MAC434 SPECTROSCOPY - III 4 4 100
MAC451 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II 6 3 100
MAC452 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - III 6 3 100
MCH411 CHALLENGES IN INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH 2 2 50
MCH431 INORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS AND ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMISTRY 4 4 100
MCH432 STEREOCHEMISTRY AND RETROSYNTHETIC ANALYSIS 4 4 100
MCH433 ORGANIC SYNTHESIS - II 4 4 100
MCH434 MEDICINAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 4 4 100
MCH451 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II 6 3 100
MCH452 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - III 6 3 100
MCH481 COMPREHENSIVE VIVA VOCE 0 4 100
        

  

Assesment Pattern

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

 

Examination And Assesments

Assessment Pattern for Theory

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

Department Overview:
The Department of Chemistry of CHRIST (Deemed to be University) aims at developing young talent for the chemical industry and academia. The curriculum is developed in such a way that the students are able to venture into allied fields too. The aim of the department through the programmes it offers is to provide ?a cut above the rest? man-power to the ever growing demands of the industry and to prepare students for higher studies and research. The interactive method of teaching at CHRIST (Deemed to be University) is to bring about attitudinal changes to future professionals of the industry. Equal importance is given to practical and theoretical aspects apart from experiential and digital modes of learning. Industrial projects form an integral part of the curriculum. Along with the syllabus, the University emphasizes on Value Addition Programs like Current Affairs, Holistic Education, Certificate programmes and Placement Training Programs, which include training students in group discussions, facing interviews and so on.
Mission Statement:
Vision To ensure that department of Chemistry at CHRIST (Deemed to be University) is the world leader in pioneering research, to inspire and educate students, today and for the future, in the concepts and skills of chemistry. Mission To develop proficient leaders with ethical values to contribute effectively to the nation?s growth.
Introduction to Program:
The two-year (four semesters) Masters Programme in Chemistry (specialization in Organic Chemistry) aims at providing a comprehensive study of various branches of chemistry to develop a critical and analytical approach to all major areas of the subject. The various courses in the first two semesters are presented in such a way as to give the students a harmonious view of the subject followed by the specialization courses of organic chemistry along with an industrial/institutional project in the third semester. Equal importance is given to both theory and practicals. The teaching methodology includes lecture, demonstration, seminars, projects and presentations.
Program Objective:
Students opting for post graduate studies in chemistry will acquire academic excellence in chemistry. This brings about a transformation in their thinking and instills confidence in facing the challenges of the modern times, scientifically.

MCH111 - MATHEMATICS FOR CHEMISTS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This introductory course on mathematics intends to provide the students the required mathematical support to understand the various topics in chemistry.

Learning Outcome

In this introductory course the students will acquire the required knowledge of mathematics required for studying chemistry.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Vectors and Matrix Algebra
 

Vectors : Vectors, dot, cross and triple products etc. The gradient, divergence and curl. Vector calculus, gauss theorem, divergence theorem etc.

Matrix Algebra: Addition and multiplication: inverse, adjoint and transpose of matrices, special matrices (symmetric, skew symmetric, hermitian, skew hermitian, unit, diagonal, unitary etc) and their properties. Matrix equations: Homogenous, non homogenous*, linear equations and conditions for the solution, linear dependence and independence.

Introduction to vector spaces, matrix eigen values and eigen vectoes, diagonalization, determinants (examples from Huckel theory)

Introduction to tensors: polarizability and magnetic susceptibility as examples.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Differential Calculus
 

Functions, continuity and differentiability, rules for differentiation, applications of differential calculus including maxima and minima ( examples related to maximally populated rotational energy levels, Bohr’s radius and most probable velocity from maxwell’s distribution etc), exact and inexact differentials with their applications to thermodynamic properties.

Integral calculus, basic rules for integration*, integration by parts, partial fraction and substitution. Reduction formulae, applications of integral calculus.

Functions of several variables, partial differentiation, coordinate transformations (eg Cartesian to spherical polar), curve sketching.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Elementary differential equations
 

Variables- separable and exact first order differential equations, homogenous, exact and linear equations. Applications to chemical kinetics, secular equilibria, quantum chemistry etc. Solutions of differential equations by the power series method, fourier series, solutions of harmonic oscillator and legendre equation etc, spherical harmonics, second order differential equations and their solutions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Sequences and Series
 

Different types of series, Fourier series, theory behind fourier transform: legendre polynomials, Lagranche undetermined multipliers, stirling approximation.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Theory of probability
 

Permutations and combinations, probability and probability theorems, probability curves, average, root mean square and most probable errors, examples from the kinetic theory of gases etc, curve fitting(including least squares fit etc) with a general polynomial fit.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

 

[1]    Erich Steiner, The chemistry maths book, 2 nd Edition, Oxford university press, 2008.

[2]    Doggett and Sutcliffe, Mathematics for chemistry,  Longman Group Ltd, 2004.

[3]    Farrington Daniels, Mathematical preparation for physical Chemistry,  Mc Graw Hill,
         2003.

[4]    D.M.Hirst, Chemical mathematics, Longman.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]   J. R. Barrante, Applied mathematics for physical chemistry, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2008.

[2]    Peter Tebbutt, Basic mathematics for chemists, 2nd Edition, John Wiley and Sons, 1998.

Evaluation Pattern

Completely internal assessed course.

CIA 1: 10 MARKS

CIA 2:( Mid Semester Test) 30 MARKS

CIA 3 : 10 MARKS

FINAL EXAM: 50 MARKS

MCH112 - GENERAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course on general research methodology intends to make the students get an idea about research, its methods and significance.

Learning Outcome

In this introductory course the students acquire the required basic research knowledge.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Research Methodology
 

Introduction - meaning of research - objectives of research - motivation in research – research :a way of examining your practice-types of research - research approaches - significance of research -research methods versus methodology - research and scientific method - importance of knowing how research is done - research processes - criteria of good research - defining research problem - selecting the problem - necessity of defining the problem - techniques involved in defining a problem - research design - meaning of research design - need for research design - features of good design - different research designs - basic principles of experimental design.

    Originality in Research: Resources for research - research skills - time management - role of supervisor and scholar - interaction with subject experts.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Review of Literature
 

     Significance of review of literature - source for literature: books -journals – proceedings - thesis and dissertations.

     On-line Searching: Database – SciFinder – Scopus - Science Direct - Searching research articles.

    i) Computer Searches of Literature: ASAP Alerts, CA Alerts, ChemPort, Patent search  
        including STN International; Google Scholar

    ii) Steps to publishing scientific articles in journals: types of publications-
        communications, articles, reviews; where to publish, specific format required for
        submission, organization of the material, letters to editor and emails.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Writing a research proposal
 

Contents of a research proposal-introduction-The problem-relevance to the society-objectives-study design-methods-analysis-structure of the report-limitations-ethical issues.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Quantitative Techniques
 

General steps required for quantitative analysis - reliability of the data - classification of errors – accuracy – precision - statistical treatment of random errors - the standard deviation of complete results.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] C. R. Kothari, Research Methodology Methods and Techniques, 2nd. ed. New Delhi: New
Age International Publishers, 2009.

[2]  R. Panneerselvam, Research Methodology, New Delhi: PHI, 2005.

[3]  P. Oliver, Writing Your Thesis, New Delhi:Vistaar Publications, 2004.

[4]  J. W. Creswell, Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods
Approaches
, 3nd. ed. Sage Publications, 2008.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Kumar, Research Methodology: A Step by Step Guide for Beginners, 2nd. ed. Indian: PE,
2005.

[2] B. C. Nakra and K. K. Chaudhry, Instrumentation, Measurement and Analysis, 2nd. ed.
New Delhi: TMH publishing Co. Ltd., 2005.

[3]  Gregory, Ethics in Research, Continuum, 2005.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous internal assessment (CIA) forms 50% and the internal end semester examination forms the other 50% of the marks. CIA marks are awarded based on their performance in assignments (written material to be submitted and valued) and class assignments (Quiz, presentations, problem solving etc.) The internal end semester examination for each theory course will be for two hours duration.

MCH131 - INORGANIC CHEMISTRY - I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This introductory course on inorganic chemistry intends to make the students understand the basic concepts like chemical bonding, chemistry of elements and nuclear chemistry. This course gives awareness on utility of ecofriendly solvents and importance of trace elements to prevent malnutrition in children

Learning Outcome

In this introductory course the students will acquire knowledge of the basic concepts of inorganic chemistry

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Chemical Bonding
 

Prelearning: Periodic properties of elements,Types of bonds: ionic, covalent, and coordinate bonds.

Octet rule, oxidation numbers, octet rule, concepts of  resonance and hybridization, VSEPR model, shapes of molecules; Electronegativity and partial ionic character;  Bonds: covalent, coordinate, multicentre, quadruple and synergic, Agostic interactions with examples,   Hydrogen bond – types and detection; Intermolecular forces, metallic bond*.     

Ionic bond, Lattice energy, Born-Lande equation (derivation), Fajans rules, Slater’s rules, radius–ratio rules, structures of simple solids-NaCl, CsCl, ZnS, CaF2, TiO2, spinels and perovskites.  MO Theory: σ, π and δ molecular orbitals, MOs of diatomic molecules- NO, CO, triatomic species- H2O, NO2, BeH2; Walsh diagram, Electron Angular momentum - classification of states of H2 through O2.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Chemistry of the main group
 

Pre learning: Periodicity and general trends in properties

Allotropes of carbon and their applications, Polymorphisam of phosphorous and sulphur; properties, structure and bonding in boranes, Wade’s rule, carboranes and their classification, Properties, structure and bonding in borazines, phosphazenes, Xenon  compounds, Interhalogen compounds, Silicates–Principles of silicate structures, classification and structures, isomorphous replacement, pyroxenes, silicate glasses, borosilicate glass, silica gel, zeolites and molecular sieves*, condensed phosphates, polyhalides. Oxyacids of nitrogen, phosphorous, sulphur and halogens**

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Solvent systems
 

Bronsted and Lewis concept of acids and bases, Luxflood acid base theory, HSAB concept, acid – base concept in non- aqueous media, levelling effect, super acids, non-aqueous solvents-NH3, sulphuric acid, glacial acetic acid and anhydrous HF.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Bio inorganic Chemistry
 

Role of metal ions in biological systems-essential and trace metal, ion transport across membranes, sodium potassium pump*, ionophores, oxygen transport mechanism- haemoglobin and myoglobin*, metalloenzymes-carboxypeptidase, carbonic anhydrase, alcohol dehydrogenase, vitamin B12, metal complexes in medicine (cisplatin).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Nuclear chemistry
 

Sub-atomic particles and their properties, nuclear stability (Binding Energy, Packing fraction, Meson theory, Characteristics of nuclear forces), Liquid drop model and shell model of the nucleus.      

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  F. A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson, Advanced inorganic chemistry, 6th ed., John Wiley & sons, 2009.

[2]  J. E. Huheey, E. A. Keiter and R. L. Keiter, Inorganic Chemistry – Principles of Structure
and Reactivity
, 4th ed., Pearson Education Asia Pvt. Ltd., 2000.

[3]  D. F. Shriver, P. W. Atkins and C.H. Langford. Inorganic chemistry, 3rd ed., ELBS: Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1999. 

[4] N. N. Greenwood and A. E. Earnshaw, Chemistry of the elementals, 2nd ed., Butterworth
Heinemann, 1997.

[5] D. M. P. Mingos, Essential Trends in Inorganic chemistry, Oxford Univ. Press, 1998.

[6] J. D. Lee, Concise inorganic chemistry, 5th ed., Chapman&Hall: Hong Kong,Reprint 2009.

[7] K. F. Purcell and J C. Kotz, Inorganic Chemistry, Indian reprint, Cengage Learnining India  Pvt Ltd, 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] G. L. Miessler and D.A. Tarr, Inorganic Chemistry, 4th ed., Prentice Hall, 2010.

[2] K. Hussain Reddy, Bioinorganic Chemistry, New age International publishers, Reprint
2007.

[3] Asim K. Das, Bioinorganic Chemistry, 1st ed., Books and Allied P ltd., 2010.

[4] Bertini, H.B. Gray, S.J. Lippard and J.S.Valentine, Bioinorganic Chemistry, Viva Books,
1998.

[5] H. J. Arnikar, Essentials of nuclear chemistry, 4th ed., NAIL Pub, 1995.

[6] William M Portfield, Inorganic Chemistry-An Unified Approach (Indian Reprint) Academic
Press, 2005.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance(75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

MCH132 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY - I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course on organic chemistry intends to make the students understand the basic concepts like nature of bonding in organic molecules, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, free radical chemistry, natural products and vitamins. This course highlights the importance of conservation of plant life for human existence.

Learning Outcome

In this introductory course the students will acquire knowledge of the basic concepts of organic chemistry.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Nature of bonding in organic molecules
 

Hybridization, Delocalized chemical bonding*: Conjugation, cross conjugation, resonance, hyper conjugation. Field effects, steric effects and their influence on the properties of organic molecules (dipole moment, acidity, etc).  Concequences of  Delocalized chemical bonding and field effects on bond length, bond angle, dipolemoment, acidity and basicity. Tautomerism.  Huckel’s rule. Aromaticity in benzenoid, meso-ionic compounds and non-benzenoid compounds- Introduction, preparation of cyclopropenyl cations, cyclobutadienyl dications, cyclopentadienyl anions, cycloheptatrienium cation, cyclooctatatraenyl dication, Frost diagrams, [10], [14], and [18]-annulenes, azulene. Energy level of πmolecular orbital, antiaromaticity, homo-aromaticity.      

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
2. Reaction mechanisms: Structure and Reactivity
 

Types of reactions and mechanisms.  Potential energy diagrams, transition states and intermediates, Thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, Hammond’s postulate, Curtin-Hammett principle,  methods of determining mechanisms, isotope effects, hard and soft acids and bases.

      Generation, structure, stability and reactivity of carbocations*, carbonaions carbenes and nitrenes.

Effect of structure on reactivity –  The Hammett equation and linear free energy relationship, substituents and reaction constants, Taft equation.

      Nucleophilic substitution reaction at a saturated carbon: Limiting cases of SN1, SN2 and SNi  mechanisms.  Nucleophilicity, leaving group effects, ambident nucleophiles and substrates.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
3. Free-radical chemistry
 

Generation of free radicals: Thermal homolysis of per esters and azo compounds, photochemical methods. Hydrogen abstraction, chain process.

Stability: Steric, resonance and hypercojugative effects. Structure and stereochemistry of free radicals. Free radical reactions: Addition, elimination, rearrangement and electron transfer reactions. Use of free radicals in organic synthesis. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
4. Stereochemistry
 

      Fischer, Newman, Sawhorse and flying wedge projections and their interconversions. Optical isomerism: Elements of symmetry and chirality.  D-L and R-S conventions. Cram’s and Prelog’s rules. Felkin-anh model. Conformational analysis of acyclic compounds: ethane, propane, n-butane and  1,2–disubstituted ethanes.  Cyclic alkanes: cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclohexanes (monomethyl, iso-propyl, tert-butyl and di-substituted cyclohexanes e.g., dialkyl, dihalo, diols), and cycloheptane. Conformations of fused and bridged ring systems.  Prochirality: Enantiotropic and disastereotropic groups and faces. 

Geometrical isomerism: cis–trans and E-Z conventions.  Methods of interconversion of E and Z isomers.              

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
5. Carbohydrates
 

Determination of configuration of the monosaccharide. Conformational analysis of glucose and galactose*.   Structural elucidation of sucrose and maltose. Synthesis of aldonic, uronic, aldaric acids and alditols.  Structures of  gentiobiose, meliobiose and chitin.  Photosynthesis of carbohydrates.  Industrial and biological importance of glycosides.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
6. Vitamins
 

Biological importance and synthesis of Vitamins A*, Vit. B1(thiamine), Vit. B6 (pyridoxine), Vit. C, Vitamin E (α-tocopherol), Vit. H (biotin), Vit. K1, K2, folic acid, pantothenic acid and riboflavin. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] B. Smith Michael and March Jerry, March's Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reactions,
        Mechanisms, and Structure,
6th ed., Wiley publications, January 2007.

[2]   A. Carey Francis and J. Sundberg Richard, Advanced Organic Chemistry, 5th ed., Springer,
        
2007.

[3]   Stykes Peter, A guide book to mechanism in organic chemistry, Orient Longman Limited,
         2000.

[4] C. K. Ingold, Structure and mechanism of organic chemistry, Cornell University
          Press,1999.

[5]    H. Pine Stanley, Organic Chemistry, Tata McGraw-Hill Education, 2007.

[6]    R. T. Morrison and  R. N. Boyd, Organic chemistry, 6th-Edition, Prentice-Hall, 2008.

[7]    R. O. C. Norman and  J. M. Coxon,  Principles of organic synthesis,  Blackie Academic and
         Professional, 1996.

[8]    P. Y. Bruice, Organic Chemisty, Pearson Education, 2009.

[9]   D. Nasipuri, Stereochemistry of organic compounds, New Delhi, New-Age International,
         1999.

[10]  E. L. Eliel, S. H. Wilen and L. N. Mander, Stereochemistry of carbon compounds, John
          Wiley 2011.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] T. W. Graham Solomons and Craig Fryhle, Organic Chemistry, 8th ed., Wiley publication,
         2004.

[2]   I. L. Finar, Stereochemistry and The Chemistry Natural Products, 5th ed., Pearson Education
        Ltd., 2009.

[3]    N. Selwad and  H-D Jakubke, Peptides: Chemistry and Biology, Wiley – VCH, 2002.

[4]    J. Apsimon, Total synthesis of natural products,  Vol. I – Vol. VI, NY,  John Wiley, 2007.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2