Department of
ENGLISH-STUDIES






Syllabus for
Master of Philosophy (English Studies)
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
RES131 FOUNDATION OF RESEARCH 4 4 100
RES132 RESEARCH PUBLICATION 4 4 100
RHM131 METHODS IN RESEARCH FOR HUMANITIES 4 4 100
RSC131 METHODS IN RESEARCH FOR SCIENCE 4 4 100
RSS131 METHODS IN RESEARCH FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE 4 4 100
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
REN381 DISSERTATION AND VIVA VOCE 10 6 200
        

  

Assesment Pattern
  • Each unit is evaluated separately and all units have equal weightage
  • Not attending more than four hours of lectures of each unit will require the scholar to repeat the unit
Examination And Assesments
  • Internal Assessements are designed to improve knowledge of and skill in all sections of the course
Department Overview:
The Department of English in consonance with its mission statement is committed to promoting an intellectual climate through artistic creation, critical mediation and innovative ideation. The Department inculcates among its students a critical reading of the self, the society and the imagined with the aim of moulding them into responsible and socially sensitive citizens. The Department facilitates their holistic development by building emotional, academic, social, professional and global competencies. The Department aspires to create a nuanced understanding of canonical and non-canonical literary and cultural texts, their social milieu for an engaged and enduring understanding of life. The Department concurrently functions as a service department across the University and as a core Department under the Deanery of Humanities and Social Sciences. As a service department it offers English as a language to Undergraduate students of the Deaneries of Humanities and Social Sciences, Sciences, Commerce and Management. Additional English is offered in lieu of a second language to foreign students who have no prior knowledge of any Indian language or foreign language offered in the University and to Indian and NRI students who have not had a regional language in their school days. The Department offers the following core courses: English Studies and MA English with Communication Studies; two full time Research Programmes namely: MPhil and PhD
Mission Statement:
Vision Towards critically reading Self, Society and the Imagined Mission The Department of English aspires to promote an intellectual climate through artistic creation, critical mediation and innovative ideation in a culture of reciprocal transformation.
Introduction to Program:
The Master of Philosophy Programme in English Studies offered by the Department of English studies and Media Studies, Christ University aims at research skill development and knowledge production in the areas of English language, literature in English, literary criticism, critical theory, linguistics, the philosophy of language, folklore studies, cultural studies, creative writing, area studies, theatre, gender studies, violence studies, and linguistics. The programme desires to give a formal research platform for those who are interested in contributing newer questions and concerns related to English Studies.
Program Objective:
The programme aims at creating a resource pool of teachers, research scholars and work as the bridge programme for PhD.

RES131 - FOUNDATION OF RESEARCH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Philosophical foundations of research are the scenario of higher education provided. Various approaches to research,  review of literature and application of theory are also included.

Learning Outcome

  • Reflections on the hilosophical foundations of research
  • Knowledge of the history and context of higher education
  • Knkowledge about various approaches to research
  • Review of literature
  • Application of theory

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Philosophical foundations of Research
 

Ethics and values in Research, Scope of Interdisciplinary, multi-disciplinary and cross disciplinary research, Doctoral Supervision and supervisory styles, Types of Doctoral Research and implications, Pedagogy and Research: Research Informed teaching and Problem Based learning

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Higher Education
 

History of Higher Education, The notion of University, Disciplines and Domain knowledge, Accreditations and Educational Policy, The Public Intellectual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Approaches to Research & Review of literature
 

Quantitative, Qualitative and mixed methods, Relationship between Research Paradigms, Designs and methods, Research Designs and its types, Research methods, Conceptualisation of Research problem in different research approaches, Research questions, Review of literature: Research Topic, Review of Literature in quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods, Steps in conducting Literature Review, Literature map, Abstracting studies, Literature Summary matrix, , Types of Reviews, Identification of Research Gap, Overview of Style manuals, Operational and Theoretical Definitions

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Application of theory
 

Theory in quantitative research, Writing a Quantitative theoretical framework, Theory in Qualitative and mixed methods, Research proposals format for quantitative, Qualitative and mixed methods (Practical)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Creswel, J. W. (2009). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Los angeles: University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Altbach, P. G., Reisberg, L., & Rumbley, L. E. (2019). Trends in global higher education: Tracking an academic revolution. BRILL.
  • Denzin, N.K. and Lincoln, Y.S. (eds.). (2011). The Sage handbook of qualitative research. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Fink, A. (2019). Conducting research literature reviews: From the internet to paper. Sage
  • Fuller, S. (2019). Philosophy of science and its discontents. Routledge.
  • Herr, K. and Anderson, G.L. (2005). The action research dissertation. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Johnson, A.P. (2005). A short guide to action research. Boston: Pearson Education. 
  • Kindon, S., Pain, R., and Kesby, M. (eds). (2007). Participatory action research approaches and methods. NY: Routledge.
  • McNiff, J. and Whitehead, J. (2006). All you need to know about action research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 
  • Reason, P. and Bradbury, H. (eds.). (2006). Handbook of action research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 
  • Stringer, E.T. (2007). Action Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 
Evaluation Pattern
  • Internal Assessements are designed to improve knowledge of and skill in all sections of the course
  • Each unit is evaluated separately and all units have equal weightage
  • Not attending more than four hours of lectures of each unit will require the scholar to repeat the unit

RES132 - RESEARCH PUBLICATION (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the candidates to various journals, proceedings, books and conferences. It also helps them in collaborating with the scholars of various fields.

Learning Objectives

  • To provide the researchers the information, knowledge, and skills to identify academic journals of various quality
  • To be able to know about the industry of publishing journals 
  • To teach the researchers how to submit articles to journals
  • To understand the advantages, disadvantages, responsibilities and ethics of collaborative publishing

Learning Outcome

On Successful completion of this course, research scholars will be able to:

  • choose journals based on their quality
  • work in different processes in journal publishing
  • submit research articles independently
  • collaborate with scholars and researchers

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Quality Measures of Journals
 
  • The concept and history of indexing
  • Indexing Agencies
  • Various Review Methods
  • Indexing Parameters
  • Open Access Publications,
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Journal Publishing
 
  • Types of Journals
    • Domain based Journals
    • University Publications
    • Private Publications
    • Individual Publications
    • Regional Publications
    • Society/Association Publications
  • Economics of Journal Publishing
  • Article Processing Charges
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Article Submission
 
  • Journal Databases
  • Journal Template
  • Plagiarism
  • Submission Processes: Editorial Manager, OJS, Referee List
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Academic Collaboration
 
  • Collaboration in Research
  • Collaboration in Research Publication
  • Merits of Collaboration
  • Authorship preferences
  • Tools of Collaboration
  • Types of Authors
Text Books And Reference Books:

Coser, L. A., Kadushin, C., & Powell, W. W. (1982). Books: The culture and commerce of publishing (p. 22). New York: Basic Books.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Cross, R., Taylor, S & Zehner, D (2018). Collaboration Without Burnout,  Harvard Business Review, July–August,  pp.134–137.
  • Ferris LE & Winker MA, (2017). Ethical issues in publishing in predatory journals, Biochem Med (Zagreb). 27(2):279-284. doi: 10.11613/BM.2017.030.
  • Habibzadeh, F., & Simundic, A.-M. (2017). Predatory journals and their effects on scientific research community. Biochemia Medica, 27(2), 270–272. http://doi.org/10.11613/BM.2017.028
  • Laine, C., & Winker, M. A. (2017). Identifying predatory or pseudo-journals. Biochemia Medica, 27(2), 285–291. http://doi.org/10.11613/BM.2017.031
  • Lippi, G. (2017). How do I write a scientific article?—A personal perspective. Annals of Translational Medicine, 5(20), 416. http://doi.org/10.21037/atm.2017.07.43
  • Prater, C. 8 Ways to Identify a Questionable Open Access Journal, https://www.aje.com/en/arc/8-ways-identify-questionable-open-access-journal/ accessed on July 3, 2018
  • Saha, I & Paul, B (2017). Research submission: Some technicalities and vital links, Med J Armed Forces India. 74(2): 165–168. doi: 10.1016/j.mjafi.2017.10.006
  • Shewan, L. G., & Coats, A. J. (2010). Ethics in the authorship and publishing of scientific articles.
Evaluation Pattern
  • Internal Assessements are designed to improve knowledge of and skill in all sections of the course
  • Each unit is evaluated separately and all units have equal weightage
  • Each unit has about 12 lecture hours and 3 library/practical hours
  • Not attending more than four hours of lectures of each unit will require the scholar to repeat the unit

RHM131 - METHODS IN RESEARCH FOR HUMANITIES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course responds to the questions what is English Studies? What are socio/political/cultural contexts that have shaped research in English Studies historically? What kind of reading skill is beneficial to research in English Studies? 

The course engages with these questions theoretically at the same time does not lose sight of research as a skill. So the modules and pedagogy will balance theoretical foundations, lectures and application based activities.   

Objectives

  • To introduce researchers to advanced level of research reading and writing in literary studies 
  • To prepare the researcher to locate his/her work within the discipline of English studies
  • To familiarize the researcher with the key issues in the discipline

Learning Outcome

The scholar on the completion of the course

  • will be able to identify and apply appropriate theoretical framework
  • will be able to develop research questions for their research
  • will be able to locate the discipline historically

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
English- Then and Now
 

English education has a history of more than 6oo years in Britain, around 200 years in America. India and other colonies have a colonial and postcolonial legacy that shapes the English educational scene. A common thread that binds these different educational scene in different nations is language, texts chosen and shifts in the discourse of English education itself - a narrative that traces a culture of reservation regarding the rhetorical aspects, to the post-enlightenment emphasis on humanism to the twentieth century contextualizing in formalism and cultural studies and markers informing the narrative in the postmodern present. This module will examine the discipline’s relationship with the markers that have shaped the English education. 

The module will have a specific frame to examine English Education in India and its position within colonial culture and postcolonial attempts to find its identity. The readings will consist of historical importance and also narratives of different English departments across the globe with emphasis on Indian context. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Reading for Research
 

Locating research in a context - critical, cultural, historical, intellectual - is a conscious exercise. This module helps the researcher to understand the key elements of research in literary studies. The researchers will learn to identify appropriate critical and theoretical approaches suitable to their research area. It will also help researchers to understand literary criticism and theory as reading practices of texts, cultural contexts.·         Greene, Maxine. “Qualitative Research and the Uses of Literature.” Journal of Thought, vol. 21, no. 3, 1986, pp. 69–83. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/42589191.

  • Holbrook, S. (2015) How to Read (and Write About) Poetry. Broadview Press.
  • Knopf, Jeffrey W. “Doing a Literature Review.” PS: Political Science and Politics, vol. 39, no. 1, 2006, pp. 127–132. JSTOR,www.jstor.org/stable/20451692.
  • Palmer, William S. “Research: Reading Theories and Research: A Search for Similarities.” The English Journal, vol. 70, no. 8, 1981, pp. 63–66. JSTOR,www.jstor.org/stable/817749.
  •  Van de Poel-Knottnerus, Frederique, and J. David Knottnerus. “social life through literature: a suggested strategy for conducting a literary ethnography.” Sociological Focus, vol. 27, no. 1, 1994, pp. 67–80. JSTOR,www.jstor.org/stable/20831682.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:30
Critical thinking for research in literary studies
 

Literature review, Research questions, research design are significant elements of any research proposal. The module assumes that students are introduced to these elements in their Academic Writing course. However, this module focuses on transferring the general skills to a specific context, especially in view of skills acquired in the previous modules. Pedagogy need not be merely lectures but largely application.

Critical thinking skills:

  • How to select appropriate theory
  • Ability to deal with different methodologies and theory
  • Think critically and independently across the issues in their subject and form critical judgments.
  • Survey broad range of secondary material and locate own research within it.
Text Books And Reference Books:

Knowles, J. Gary, and Ardra L. Cole. Handbook of the arts in qualitative research: Perspectives, methodologies, examples, and issues. Sage, 2008.

To discuss and practice the critical thinking skills, following essays, books will be considered: 

·         Aitchison, Claire, and Alison Lee. "Research writing: Problems and pedagogies." Teaching in Higher Education 11.3 (2006): 265-278.

·         Baumeister, Roy F., and Mark R. Leary. "Writing narrative literature reviews." Review of general psychology 1.3 (1997): 311-320.

·         Fludernik, Monika. "New Wine in Old Bottles? Voice, Focalization, and New Writing." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 619-638.

·         Goatly, Andrew. Critical reading and writing: An introductory coursebook. Routledge, 2013. (Select chapters)

·         Grey, Christopher, and Amanda Sinclair. "Writing differently." Organization 13.3 (2006): 443-453.

·         Jaworski, A., & Coupland, N. (Eds.). (2014). The discourse reader (Vol. 2). Nueva York, NY: Routledge.

·         Kamler, Barbara. Relocating the personal: A critical writing pedagogy, 1-54. SUNY Press, 2001.

·         Monippally, Mathukutty M., and Badrinarayan Shankar Pawar. Academic writing: A guide for management students and researchers. SAGE Publications India, 2008.

·         Paltridge, Brian. Genre, frames and writing in research settings. John Benjamins, 1997.

·         Parker, Robert Dale. How to interpret literature: Critical theory for literary and cultural studies. Oxford University Press, 2011.

·         Smyth, T. R. "Thinking and Writing." The Principles of Writing in Psychology. Red Globe Press, London, 2004. 3-12.

·         Stern, Madeleine. "Characteristics of the literature of literary scholarship." College & Research Libraries 44.4 (1983): 199-209.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Aczel, Richard. "Understanding as Over-hearing: Towards a Dialogics of Voice." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 597-617.
  • Anand, S. (1999). “Sanskrit, English and Dalits”, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 34, No. 30 (Jul. 24-30, 1999), pp. 2053-2056.
  • Baral, Kailash C. "Postcoloniality, critical pedagogy, and English studies in India." Pedagogy 6.3 (2006): 475-491.
  • Birkenstein, C. and Graff, G. (2014) They Say/I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, 3rd ed. (New York and London: W.W. Norton & Co.
  • Brewington, Arthur W. “The English Language in India”, CEA Critic, Vol. 20, No. 6 (September, 1958), p. 3, 8.
  • Chandran, K. Narayana, (2006). “On English from India: Prepositions to Post-Positions”, The Cambridge Quarterly, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 151-168. 
  • Driggs Wolfenbarger, Carol, and Lawrence Sipe. "A unique visual and literary art form: Recent research on picturebooks." GSE Publications (2007): 32.
  • Eliot, Simon, Delia Da Sousa Correa, and W. R. Owens, eds. A handbook to literary research. Psychology Press, 1998.
  • Engler, Balz. (2000) ‘Englishness and English Studies.’ European English Studies: Contributions towards the History of a Discipline. Ed. Balz Engler and Renate Haas. Leicester: The English Association for the European Society for the Study of English,, 335-348.
  • Fludernik, Monica. "Commentary: Narrative Voices—Ephemera or Bodied Beings." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 707-710.
  • Gibson, Andrew. "'And the Wind Wheezing Through That Organ Once in a While': Voice, Narrative, Film." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 639-657.
  • Gibson, Andrew. "Commentary: Silence of the Voice." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 711-713. 
  • Hart, F. Elizabeth. "The epistemology of cognitive literary studies." Philosophy and Literature 25.2 (2001): 314-334.
  • Hogan, Patrick Colm, and Lalita Pandit, eds. Literary India: comparative studies in aesthetics, colonialism, and culture. SUNY Press, 1995.
  • Irvine, R. (2014). English literary studies: origin and nature. In D. Cavanagh (Ed.), Edinburgh Introduction to Studying English Literature. Edinburgh University Press.
  • Jackson, Tony E. "" Literary Interpretation" and Cognitive Literary Studies." Poetics Today 24.2 (2003): 191-205.
  • Kambourov, Dimitar, Literary Institutions and the Institution of Literature in the Wake of Theory. in: Topics in Feminism, History and Philosophy, IWM Junior Visiting Fellows Conferences, Vol. 6, edited by Rogers, Dorothy, Joshua Wheeler, Marína Zavacká, and Shawna Casebier. Vienna: IWM 2000.
  • Kothari, Rita. Translating India. Routledge, 2014.
  • Lakoff, George, and Mark Johnson. "Conceptual metaphor in everyday language." The journal of Philosophy 77.8 (1980): 453-486.
  • Lynn, Steven. Texts and contexts: Writing about literature with critical theory. HarperCollins College Publishers, 1994.
  • Mahanta, Banibrata, and Rajesh Babu Sharma, eds. English Studies in India: Contemporary and Evolving Paradigms. Springer, 2019.
  • Murdoch, Iris. Metaphysics as a Guide to Morals. London: Vintage Classics, 2003.
  • P. P. Raveendran. "Genealogies of Indian Literature." Economic and Political Weekly 41, no. 25 (2006): 2558-563. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4418380.
  • Rajan, Rajeswari Sunder, ed. The lie of the land: English literary studies in India. Oxford University Press, USA, 1992.
  • Rajan, Rajeswari Sunder. "After 'Orientalism': Colonialism and English Literary Studies in India." Social Scientist (1986): 23-35.
  • Rajan, Rajeswari Sunder. (2008). “English Literary Studies, Women's Studies and Feminism in India”, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 43, No. 43 (Oct. 25 - 31, 2008), pp. 66-71. 
  • Rajan, Rajeswari Sunder. (2008). “English Literary Studies, Women's Studies and Feminism in India”, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 43, No. 43 (Oct. 25 - 31, 2008), pp. 66-71. 
  • Richardson, Brian. "Commentary: Inhuman Voices." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 699-701.
  • Ricoeur, Paul. The Conflict of Interpretations: Essays in Hermeneutics. New York: Continuum International Publishing Group Ltd., 1989
  • Rimmon-Kenan, Shlomith. Narrative fiction: contemporary poetics. London: Routledge (2002)
  • Rooke, Constance. "Praise, the Academy, and the Common Reader." Relocating Praise: Literary Modalities and Rhetorical Contexts (2000): 2000-131.
  • Satchidanandan, K. “Reflections: On Indian Writing in English”, Indian Literature, Vol. 38, No. 3 (167) (May - June 1995), pp. 5-8
  • Sen, Krishna. (2009). “Post-Colonialism, Globalism, Nativism: Reinventing English in a Post Colonial Space”, in  Identity in Crossroad Civilisations:  Ethnicity, Nationalism, Globalism, edited by Erich Kolig, Vivienne SM. Angeles, Sam Wong. 
  • Seymour, David, and John Rooke. "The culture of the industry and the culture of research." Construction management and economics 13.6 (1995): 511-523.Singh, Jyotsna. "Different Shakespeares: The Bard in Colonial/Postcolonial India." Theatre Journal 41.4 (1989): 445-458.
  • Steiner, George. After Babel:Aspects of Language and Translation. Oxford:OUP, 1998.
  • Swift, Graham. Mothering Sunday. London. Scribner (2016)
  • Trivedi, H. (1995). Colonial transactions: English literature and India. Manchester University Press.
  • Viswanathan, Gauri. "The beginnings of English literary study in British India." Oxford Literary Review 9.1 (1987): 2-26.
Evaluation Pattern
  • Internal Assessements are designed to improve knowledge of and skill in all sections of the course
  • Each unit is evaluated separately and all units have equal weightage
  • Not attending more than four hours of lectures of each unit will require the scholar to repeat the unit

RSC131 - METHODS IN RESEARCH FOR SCIENCE (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces scholars to the Python Programming, MATLAB, Origin, Tikz and LaTeX Draw, thus enabling them to develop skills of numeric computation, data analysis and visualization, programming and algorithm development and application development. 

Course Learning Objectives

  • To provide the knowledge of MathLab, Origin and Python. 
  • To explore the possibilities of using Python language as a tool for learning Mathematics. 
  • To develop the skill of preparing documents using LaTeX also to develop the skill of drawing  figures using Tikz

Learning Outcome

On successful completion of the course, the students should be able to:

  • Explore and visualize data using MATLAB and ORIGIN commands and functions
  • Import data from heterogeneous sources
  • Build predictive models using MATLAB and ORIGIN Toolbox
  • Prepare documents using LaTeX
  • Draw mathematical figures using Tikz

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Origin: Data Analysis and Technical Graphics Software
 

Introduction to ORIGIN, Introduction to ORIGIN Graphing Elements, Creating Simple Graphs, Graph Customization and Technicalities, Workbook, Worksheets and Columns, Graphical Exploration of Data, Themes and Templates, Graphing Data from multiple sheets, Row Statistics, Data Analysis [Peak Analysis, Curve Fitting, Statistics].

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Python Programming
 

Installation, IDES, Introduction, Hardware components, Software components, The Operating system, Programming in Python, formatted printing, Visualizing data with graphs, Algebra and symbolic math with Symphy, Graphs as a python class, Graph Density, Distance and diameter of a graph, The complete python graph class.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Data analysis using MATLAB
 

Introduction to MATLAB [Variables, Matrices, Built-in Functions, Arrays, Structure, Cell], MATLAB Programming [Inline functions, control structures, Programming syntax, Script files and Functions files], solution of Differential equations, Data Visualization and Data Exploration Techniques [Data import/export, Plots, Statistics basics], Models for Data Analysis [Regression Models, Classification Models [Using of Statistic Toolbox].

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:16
Latex and Tikz
 

Introduction, Preparing an input file, The document, Document class, The title page, Changing the type style, Mathematical formulas, Mathematical Symbols, Defining commands and environments, Other document classes, Pictures and colors, Erros, The bibliography database, Reference manual, Drawing lines and curves using Tikz, Filling up areas, Putting labels in Pictures, Integration with beamer.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • A very minimal introduction to TikZ, Jacques Cremer, Toulouse School of Economics.
  • D. M. Etter, Introduction to MATLAB, 3rd ed., Prentice Hall, 2014.
  • Doing Maths with Python Amit Saha, no starch press:San Fransisco, 2015.
  • Origin 9.1 User Guide – OriginLab.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Deng, E., & Huang, L. (2019). An Elegant LATEX Template for Books.
  • Johansson, R. (2019). Introduction to computing with python. In Numerical Python (pp. 1-41). Apress, Berkeley, CA.
  • Lode, C. (2019). Better Books with LaTeX: Self-Publish Your Book on Amazon and Google. Clemens Lode Verlag eK.
  • Origin: Data Analysis and Technical Graphics Software, Microcal Software, Microcal Software Incorporated, 1999
  • Payne, J. R. (2019). Introduction to Computer Programming and Python. In Python for Teenagers (pp. 1-16). Apress, Berkeley, CA.
  • S. Attaway, MATLAB: A Practical Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving, 3rd Edition, 3rd ed., Elsevier Inc., 2013.
  • W. L. Martinez et. al., Exploratory Data Analysis with MATLAB, 2nd ed., CRC Press, 2010.
Evaluation Pattern
  • Internal Assessements are designed to improve knowledge of and skill in all sections of the course
  • Each unit is evaluated separately and all units have equal weightage
  • Not attending more than four hours of lectures of each unit will require the scholar to repeat the unit

RSS131 - METHODS IN RESEARCH FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Sampling Design, Development and validation of Tools, Qualitative Research Methods, Quantitative Research and Mixed methods and Quantitative data analysis

Learning Outcome

Scholars learn

  • to design experiments
  • to identify tools for research
  • to use methods of researh
  • to analyse the data

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Design, Development and Testing
 
  • Sampling Design, Development and validation of Tools
    • Introduction, Sample size, Representativeness of the sample, Access to sample, Sampling error, sampling strategy, Sampling strategy: Probability and non probability sampling, Types of sampling
  • Development of Tools
    • Classical and modern test theory: assumptions, equations and limitations
  • Process of Test development
    • Establishing psychometric properties of a Test, Developing questionnaires and interview schedules,
  • Validity and Reliability
    • Kinds of validity, Triangulation, Types of triangulation and their characteristics, Reliability in Quantitative research and Qualitative research, validity and reliability in interviews, experiments, questionnaires, observations, tests, life histories. Sources of unreliability
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Qualitative Research Methods
 
  1. Naturalistic and Ethnographic research: Features and Stages
  2. Historical and Documentary research: Data collection, Evaluation, Writing research report, Use of quantitative methods, Life histories, Research process in life history, types of documents, The context of document, the writer of the document, the researcher and the document, Reliability and validity in documentary analysis
  3. Case study: Hallmarks in case study, Typology observation studies, Participant observation, Planning a case study, Writing up a case study
  4. Interviews: Conception, purposes, types, Planning interview-based research procedures (Stages), Group interviewing, Interviewing Children, Focus Group interview, Telephone interview, Ethical issues
  5. Qualitative data analysis: Transcription and data management process, Data analysis in different tradition, Content analysis and grounded theory, Thematic analysis, Phenomenological analysis, Narrative analysis, Discourse and conversational analysis
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Quantitative Research and Mixed methods: Surveys
 
  • Longitudinal, cross sectional and trend studies
    • Pre-requisites of survey, Planning a survey, telephonic surveys, internet based surveys, Principles of constructing internet based surveys, advantages and key issues in internet based surveys, sampling in internet based surveys, Simulation methods, Geographical information systems,  Longitudinal, cross sectional and trend studies,  strengths and weaknesses
  • Experimental Research Design
    • Introduction to causality, Between-subjects design, within –subjects design, factorial design, Mixed Factorial experiments single-subject research design. T –Test and ANOVA in experimental designs, Meta analysis
  • Ex post facto research
    • Meaning, Co-relational and criterion groups designs, Characteristics, Designing a ex post facto investigation, Procedures
  • Mixed methods approach to research
    • Principles and decisions. Classification of mixed designs for social and behavioral research: multi strand designs, concurrent mixed designs, sequential mixed designs, multi strand conversion mixed designs, fully integrated mixed design model
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Questionnaire, Statistical Tools (using SPSS, AMOS and R), Non- Parametric tests
 

Questionnaire

  • Ethical issues, preliminary planning of a questionnaire, operationalising, Structured, semi-structured and unstructured questionnaire, Closed and open ended questions, Scales of data, Dichotomous questions,Multiple Choice questions, Rank ordering, Rating scales, Constant sum questions, Ratio data questions, Open ended questions, Matrix questions, Contingency questions, filters and branches, Layout, covering letter, Piloting, Practical considerations in designing a questionnaire, Administering questionnaires, Quantitative data analysis: Scales, Parametric and non-parametric data, Descriptive and inferential statistics, one-tailed and two-tailed tests, Dependent and Independent variables, Reliability test, Exploratory data analysis, frequencies, percentages and cross-tabulations, Statistical significance, Hypothesis testing, Effect size, Degrees of freedom, Test of Association, Coefficient of correlation

Statistical Tools (using SPSS, AMOS and R)

  • Normality test, Skewness and kurtosis, Parametric tests: Multivariate methods and analysis, Discriminant, Analysis, MANOVA,  Multiple, regression, Factor analysis, Structural equation modeling (SEM)  - Measurement model, Model fit, Moderator and Mediation Analysis using AMOS, Boot strapping

Non- Parametric tests

  • Median Analysis, Chi-Square Tests, Kruskal-Wallis Tests, Mann-Whitney U Tests, Wilcoxon Sign Test, Friedman Tests, Logit and Probit regression analysis
Text Books And Reference Books:

Cohen, L., Manion, L., & Morrison, K. (2002). Research methods in education. routledge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Babbie, E.R. (2010). The practice of social research. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. 
  • Bernard, H. R. (2002). Research methods in anthropology: Qualitative and quantitative approaches. Walnut Creek, CA: Alta Mira Press. 
  • Bernard, H. R. (2002). Research methods in anthropology: Qualitative and quantitative approaches. Walnut Creek, CA: Alta Mira Press. 
  • Best, J. (2004). More damned lies and statistics: How numbers confuse public issues. Berkeley: U of California P. 
  • Creswell, J. (2007). Qualitative inquiry and research design: choosing among five approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Denzin, N.K. and Lincoln, Y.S. (eds.). (2011). The Sage handbook of qualitative research. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Dytham, C. (2003). Choosing and using statistics: A biologist's guide. Malden, MA: Blackwell.
  • Fetterman, D.M. (2010). Ethnography: Step-by-step. Los Angeles: Sage.
  • Foster, J., Barkus, E., and Yavorsky, C. (2006). Understanding and using advanced statistics. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage
  • Handbook of methods in cultural anthropology. (1998). Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press. 
  • Jaccard, J. and Becker, M.A. (2010). Statistics for the behavioral sciences. 5th edition. Belmont, CA; Wadsworth. 
  • Johnson, B. & Christensen, L. (2012). Educational research: Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed approaches. Los Angeles, CA: Sage
  • Keller, D.K. (2006). The Tao of statistics. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 
  • Leedy, P.D. and Ormond, J.E. (2005). Practical research: planning and design. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill. 
  • Patten, M. (2007). Understanding research methods: An overview of the essentials. Sixth edition. Glendale, CA: Pyrczak Publishing.
  • Patten, M. (2007). Understanding research methods: An overview of the essentials. Sixth edition. Glendale, CA: Pyrczak Publishing.
  • Saldana, J. (2009). The coding manual for qualitative researchers. Los Angeles: Sage. 
  • Sanders, L.D. (2010). Discovering research methods in psychology: A student's guide. Malden, MA : British Psychological Society/Blackwell. 
  • Simons, H. (2009). Case study research in practice. Los Angeles: Sage.
  • Singleton, Jr., R.A. and Straits, B.C. (2005). Approaches to social research. NY: Oxford UP.
  • Thomas, R.M. & Brubaker, D.L. (2000). Theses and dissertations: A guide to planning, research, and writing. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.
  • Yin, R.K. (2009). Case study research: Design and methods. Los Angeles, CA: Sage. 
Evaluation Pattern
  • Internal Assessements are designed to improve knowledge of and skill in all sections of the course
  • Each unit is evaluated separately and all units have equal weightage
  • Not attending more than four hours of lectures of each unit will require the scholar to repeat the unit

REN381 - DISSERTATION AND VIVA VOCE (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:10
Max Marks:200
Credits:6

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Dissertation

Learning Outcome

Learning how to write a Dissertation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
Dissertation
 

Discussing with the Guides and writing

Text Books And Reference Books:

Primary Texts

Secondary Texts

Guide will presecribe

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Additional Reading by the students

Evaluation Pattern

Internal examiners marks 

External examiners marks