Department of
ECONOMICS






Syllabus for
Master of Philosophy (Economics)
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
RES131 FOUNDATION OF RESEARCH 4 4 100
RES132 RESEARCH PUBLICATION 4 4 100
RSS131 METHODS IN RESEARCH FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE 4 4 100
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
REC381 DISSERTATION 0 10 200
        

  

Assesment Pattern

Different components of CIAs.

Examination And Assesments

CIAs are composed of different components and carry 50% weightage.

 

Department Overview:
Established in 1969, the Department of Economics is one of the strongest and vibrant departments in South India. Currently, the department, under the leadership of Dean Dr. John Joseph Kennedy and Head Dr. Joshy K J along with fourteen accomplished faculty members, offers a wide array of undergraduate courses and a postgraduate programme with multiple specialisations. To promote the holistic development of the students and to sustain the academic creativity and inventiveness of the faculty the department engages in numerous workshops, seminars, industrial interfaces, faculty development programmes and many such endeavours.
Mission Statement:
Vision: Achieving excellence, broadening horizons, building competencies and developing a sustainable education model through critical thinking, ethical groundedness and commitment to society. Mission: Preparing students to understand and resolve the multitude of challenges in the economy through relevant research based education. We aim to educate our students to become successful professionals and socially responsible citizens who contribute positively to the socio-economic well-being.
Introduction to Program:
This is a full time research program of 12 to 18 months duration, in which scholars are trained to present their research findings. In preparation, they will complete prescribed courses aimed at giving them a thorough understanding of the principles of Economics and its application in various functional specializations. The ability to think systematically, and apply quantitative methods will give them the knowledge and skills to later work independently on their PhD dissertation.
Program Objective:
The programme aims to: 1. Provide a thorough grounding in the methodology of Economics Research 2. Train the students in the application of different statistical and econometric tools for analyzing economic issues 3. Equip the students with the necessary skills and competency in identifying research problems, collection of data, analyse and interpret the results 4. Prepare the prospective doctoral candidates.

RES131 - FOUNDATION OF RESEARCH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Philosophical foundations of research are the scenario of higher education provided. Various approaches to research,  review of literature and application of theory are also included.

Learning Outcome

  • Reflections on the hilosophical foundations of research
  • Knowledge of the history and context of higher education
  • Knkowledge about various approaches to research
  • Review of literature
  • Application of theory

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Philosophical foundations of Research
 

Ethics and values in Research, Scope of Interdisciplinary, multi-disciplinary and cross disciplinary research, Doctoral Supervision and supervisory styles, Types of Doctoral Research and implications, Pedagogy and Research: Research Informed teaching and Problem Based learning

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Higher Education
 

History of Higher Education, The notion of University, Disciplines and Domain knowledge, Accreditations and Educational Policy, The Public Intellectual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Approaches to Research & Review of literature
 

Quantitative, Qualitative and mixed methods, Relationship between Research Paradigms, Designs and methods, Research Designs and its types, Research methods, Conceptualisation of Research problem in different research approaches, Research questions, Review of literature: Research Topic, Review of Literature in quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods, Steps in conducting Literature Review, Literature map, Abstracting studies, Literature Summary matrix, , Types of Reviews, Identification of Research Gap, Overview of Style manuals, Operational and Theoretical Definitions

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Application of theory
 

Theory in quantitative research, Writing a Quantitative theoretical framework, Theory in Qualitative and mixed methods, Research proposals format for quantitative, Qualitative and mixed methods (Practical)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Creswel, J. W. (2009). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Los angeles: University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Altbach, P. G., Reisberg, L., & Rumbley, L. E. (2019). Trends in global higher education: Tracking an academic revolution. BRILL.
  • Denzin, N.K. and Lincoln, Y.S. (eds.). (2011). The Sage handbook of qualitative research. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Fink, A. (2019). Conducting research literature reviews: From the internet to paper. Sage
  • Fuller, S. (2019). Philosophy of science and its discontents. Routledge.
  • Herr, K. and Anderson, G.L. (2005). The action research dissertation. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Johnson, A.P. (2005). A short guide to action research. Boston: Pearson Education. 
  • Kindon, S., Pain, R., and Kesby, M. (eds). (2007). Participatory action research approaches and methods. NY: Routledge.
  • McNiff, J. and Whitehead, J. (2006). All you need to know about action research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 
  • Reason, P. and Bradbury, H. (eds.). (2006). Handbook of action research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 
  • Stringer, E.T. (2007). Action Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 
Evaluation Pattern
  • Internal Assessements are designed to improve knowledge of and skill in all sections of the course
  • Each unit is evaluated separately and all units have equal weightage
  • Not attending more than four hours of lectures of each unit will require the scholar to repeat the unit

RES132 - RESEARCH PUBLICATION (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the candidates to various journals, proceedings, books and conferences. It also helps them in collaborating with the scholars of various fields.

Learning Objectives

  • To provide the researchers the information, knowledge, and skills to identify academic journals of various quality
  • To be able to know about the industry of publishing journals 
  • To teach the researchers how to submit articles to journals
  • To understand the advantages, disadvantages, responsibilities and ethics of collaborative publishing

Learning Outcome

On Successful completion of this course, research scholars will be able to:

  • choose journals based on their quality
  • work in different processes in journal publishing
  • submit research articles independently
  • collaborate with scholars and researchers

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Quality Measures of Journals
 
  • The concept and history of indexing
  • Indexing Agencies
  • Various Review Methods
  • Indexing Parameters
  • Open Access Publications,
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Journal Publishing
 
  • Types of Journals
    • Domain based Journals
    • University Publications
    • Private Publications
    • Individual Publications
    • Regional Publications
    • Society/Association Publications
  • Economics of Journal Publishing
  • Article Processing Charges
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Article Submission
 
  • Journal Databases
  • Journal Template
  • Plagiarism
  • Submission Processes: Editorial Manager, OJS, Referee List
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Academic Collaboration
 
  • Collaboration in Research
  • Collaboration in Research Publication
  • Merits of Collaboration
  • Authorship preferences
  • Tools of Collaboration
  • Types of Authors
Text Books And Reference Books:

Coser, L. A., Kadushin, C., & Powell, W. W. (1982). Books: The culture and commerce of publishing (p. 22). New York: Basic Books.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Cross, R., Taylor, S & Zehner, D (2018). Collaboration Without Burnout,  Harvard Business Review, July–August,  pp.134–137.
  • Ferris LE & Winker MA, (2017). Ethical issues in publishing in predatory journals, Biochem Med (Zagreb). 27(2):279-284. doi: 10.11613/BM.2017.030.
  • Habibzadeh, F., & Simundic, A.-M. (2017). Predatory journals and their effects on scientific research community. Biochemia Medica, 27(2), 270–272. http://doi.org/10.11613/BM.2017.028
  • Laine, C., & Winker, M. A. (2017). Identifying predatory or pseudo-journals. Biochemia Medica, 27(2), 285–291. http://doi.org/10.11613/BM.2017.031
  • Lippi, G. (2017). How do I write a scientific article?—A personal perspective. Annals of Translational Medicine, 5(20), 416. http://doi.org/10.21037/atm.2017.07.43
  • Prater, C. 8 Ways to Identify a Questionable Open Access Journal, https://www.aje.com/en/arc/8-ways-identify-questionable-open-access-journal/ accessed on July 3, 2018
  • Saha, I & Paul, B (2017). Research submission: Some technicalities and vital links, Med J Armed Forces India. 74(2): 165–168. doi: 10.1016/j.mjafi.2017.10.006
  • Shewan, L. G., & Coats, A. J. (2010). Ethics in the authorship and publishing of scientific articles.
Evaluation Pattern
  • Internal Assessements are designed to improve knowledge of and skill in all sections of the course
  • Each unit is evaluated separately and all units have equal weightage
  • Each unit has about 12 lecture hours and 3 library/practical hours
  • Not attending more than four hours of lectures of each unit will require the scholar to repeat the unit

RSS131 - METHODS IN RESEARCH FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Sampling Design, Development and validation of Tools, Qualitative Research Methods, Quantitative Research and Mixed methods and Quantitative data analysis

Learning Outcome

Scholars learn

  • to design experiments
  • to identify tools for research
  • to use methods of researh
  • to analyse the data

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Design, Development and Testing
 
  • Sampling Design, Development and validation of Tools
    • Introduction, Sample size, Representativeness of the sample, Access to sample, Sampling error, sampling strategy, Sampling strategy: Probability and non probability sampling, Types of sampling
  • Development of Tools
    • Classical and modern test theory: assumptions, equations and limitations
  • Process of Test development
    • Establishing psychometric properties of a Test, Developing questionnaires and interview schedules,
  • Validity and Reliability
    • Kinds of validity, Triangulation, Types of triangulation and their characteristics, Reliability in Quantitative research and Qualitative research, validity and reliability in interviews, experiments, questionnaires, observations, tests, life histories. Sources of unreliability
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Qualitative Research Methods
 
  1. Naturalistic and Ethnographic research: Features and Stages
  2. Historical and Documentary research: Data collection, Evaluation, Writing research report, Use of quantitative methods, Life histories, Research process in life history, types of documents, The context of document, the writer of the document, the researcher and the document, Reliability and validity in documentary analysis
  3. Case study: Hallmarks in case study, Typology observation studies, Participant observation, Planning a case study, Writing up a case study
  4. Interviews: Conception, purposes, types, Planning interview-based research procedures (Stages), Group interviewing, Interviewing Children, Focus Group interview, Telephone interview, Ethical issues
  5. Qualitative data analysis: Transcription and data management process, Data analysis in different tradition, Content analysis and grounded theory, Thematic analysis, Phenomenological analysis, Narrative analysis, Discourse and conversational analysis
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Quantitative Research and Mixed methods: Surveys
 
  • Longitudinal, cross sectional and trend studies
    • Pre-requisites of survey, Planning a survey, telephonic surveys, internet based surveys, Principles of constructing internet based surveys, advantages and key issues in internet based surveys, sampling in internet based surveys, Simulation methods, Geographical information systems,  Longitudinal, cross sectional and trend studies,  strengths and weaknesses
  • Experimental Research Design
    • Introduction to causality, Between-subjects design, within –subjects design, factorial design, Mixed Factorial experiments single-subject research design. T –Test and ANOVA in experimental designs, Meta analysis
  • Ex post facto research
    • Meaning, Co-relational and criterion groups designs, Characteristics, Designing a ex post facto investigation, Procedures
  • Mixed methods approach to research
    • Principles and decisions. Classification of mixed designs for social and behavioral research: multi strand designs, concurrent mixed designs, sequential mixed designs, multi strand conversion mixed designs, fully integrated mixed design model
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Questionnaire, Statistical Tools (using SPSS, AMOS and R), Non- Parametric tests
 

Questionnaire

  • Ethical issues, preliminary planning of a questionnaire, operationalising, Structured, semi-structured and unstructured questionnaire, Closed and open ended questions, Scales of data, Dichotomous questions,Multiple Choice questions, Rank ordering, Rating scales, Constant sum questions, Ratio data questions, Open ended questions, Matrix questions, Contingency questions, filters and branches, Layout, covering letter, Piloting, Practical considerations in designing a questionnaire, Administering questionnaires, Quantitative data analysis: Scales, Parametric and non-parametric data, Descriptive and inferential statistics, one-tailed and two-tailed tests, Dependent and Independent variables, Reliability test, Exploratory data analysis, frequencies, percentages and cross-tabulations, Statistical significance, Hypothesis testing, Effect size, Degrees of freedom, Test of Association, Coefficient of correlation

Statistical Tools (using SPSS, AMOS and R)

  • Normality test, Skewness and kurtosis, Parametric tests: Multivariate methods and analysis, Discriminant, Analysis, MANOVA,  Multiple, regression, Factor analysis, Structural equation modeling (SEM)  - Measurement model, Model fit, Moderator and Mediation Analysis using AMOS, Boot strapping

Non- Parametric tests

  • Median Analysis, Chi-Square Tests, Kruskal-Wallis Tests, Mann-Whitney U Tests, Wilcoxon Sign Test, Friedman Tests, Logit and Probit regression analysis
Text Books And Reference Books:

Cohen, L., Manion, L., & Morrison, K. (2002). Research methods in education. routledge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Babbie, E.R. (2010). The practice of social research. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. 
  • Bernard, H. R. (2002). Research methods in anthropology: Qualitative and quantitative approaches. Walnut Creek, CA: Alta Mira Press. 
  • Bernard, H. R. (2002). Research methods in anthropology: Qualitative and quantitative approaches. Walnut Creek, CA: Alta Mira Press. 
  • Best, J. (2004). More damned lies and statistics: How numbers confuse public issues. Berkeley: U of California P. 
  • Creswell, J. (2007). Qualitative inquiry and research design: choosing among five approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Denzin, N.K. and Lincoln, Y.S. (eds.). (2011). The Sage handbook of qualitative research. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Dytham, C. (2003). Choosing and using statistics: A biologist's guide. Malden, MA: Blackwell.
  • Fetterman, D.M. (2010). Ethnography: Step-by-step. Los Angeles: Sage.
  • Foster, J., Barkus, E., and Yavorsky, C. (2006). Understanding and using advanced statistics. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage
  • Handbook of methods in cultural anthropology. (1998). Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press. 
  • Jaccard, J. and Becker, M.A. (2010). Statistics for the behavioral sciences. 5th edition. Belmont, CA; Wadsworth. 
  • Johnson, B. & Christensen, L. (2012). Educational research: Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed approaches. Los Angeles, CA: Sage
  • Keller, D.K. (2006). The Tao of statistics. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 
  • Leedy, P.D. and Ormond, J.E. (2005). Practical research: planning and design. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill. 
  • Patten, M. (2007). Understanding research methods: An overview of the essentials. Sixth edition. Glendale, CA: Pyrczak Publishing.
  • Patten, M. (2007). Understanding research methods: An overview of the essentials. Sixth edition. Glendale, CA: Pyrczak Publishing.
  • Saldana, J. (2009). The coding manual for qualitative researchers. Los Angeles: Sage. 
  • Sanders, L.D. (2010). Discovering research methods in psychology: A student's guide. Malden, MA : British Psychological Society/Blackwell. 
  • Simons, H. (2009). Case study research in practice. Los Angeles: Sage.
  • Singleton, Jr., R.A. and Straits, B.C. (2005). Approaches to social research. NY: Oxford UP.
  • Thomas, R.M. & Brubaker, D.L. (2000). Theses and dissertations: A guide to planning, research, and writing. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.
  • Yin, R.K. (2009). Case study research: Design and methods. Los Angeles, CA: Sage. 
Evaluation Pattern
  • Internal Assessements are designed to improve knowledge of and skill in all sections of the course
  • Each unit is evaluated separately and all units have equal weightage
  • Not attending more than four hours of lectures of each unit will require the scholar to repeat the unit

REC381 - DISSERTATION (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:0
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:200
Credits:10

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The important objectives of MPhil dissertation in Economics are:-

1) To provide rigorous training in economic theory, its techniques and applications, and in quantitative and qualitative research methods;

2) To develop students' competence in the assimilation of complex arguments, the analysis of practical issues, logical thought, quantitative and qualitative techniques, and effective communication, using a range of teaching methods;

Description

The course therefore intended to conduct a research dissertation based on the area of interest of the scholars in Economics. A faculty member would be allotted as a Supervisor to them from the department. Through regular discussion with the Supervisor, the scholar should be able to identify a relevant and feasible research problem and conduct a research using appropriate methods.

The scholar is expected to submit a first draft of synopsis/proposal to the Research Committee of the department in a specified format in the first semester of the course work. The proposal presentation for the dissertation work would be held within two months’ time. Four bimonthly presentations are compulsory in addition to Proposal and Pre-submission presentation. The dissertation will be submitted only when the supervisor concerned is satisfied that it is worthy of consideration in part fulfillment of the MPhil Degree. The application for submission of the dissertation shall also be countersigned by the Head of the Department.  

Five Copies of Dissertation Report must be submitted in a specified format to the research committee for evaluation purpose at the end of III semester. At least one paper presentation at a seminar/conference is a must by each candidate. Evidence for the same should be submitted during the final submission of the dissertation. Scholars are also encouraged to publish papers in the National/International journals. Appropriate weightage will be given for the published work based on Research Committee’s recommendations.

Learning Outcome

On completion of the MPhil degree students should have:

  1. acquired, a solid grounding in the principles and practice of various economic theories.  
  2. begun to acquire independent research skills and experience of putting them into practice;
  3. acquired sufficient knowledge and understanding of advanced economics to proceed to a career as a professional economist in industry or to a research degree.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
***
 

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Text Books And Reference Books:

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Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

***

Evaluation Pattern

The Dissertation marks include presentation of the project Proposal (25 Marks), Presentation of Dissertation (25 Marks), Final Dissertation (100 marks) – double Valuation, and Viva after evaluation of the dissertation (50 Marks). The title page of the dissertation, cover format, University logo, etc. should strictly conform to the format of presentation as prescribed by the University and the dissertation (all copies) should carry a declaration by the candidate and certificate duly signed and issued by the guide. The dissertation should be hardbound in grey/blue colour. The contents of the dissertation may be divided into different chapters including: Introduction, Review of Literature, Methodology, Results and Discussion, Summary and Conclusion, Appendix (if any), Literature cited, Publications (if any) etc. The MPhil dissertation may generally be written in English (for subjects other than Languages).  

The candidates will be granted up to a maximum period of 18 months, after commencement of the course to submit their MPhil dissertation. In exceptional cases, the candidates may be allowed extension of time to submit their dissertation on payment of prescribed fee subject to successful completion of applicable coursework. However, such extension shall be for a maximum period of one year only. The MPhil dissertation will not be accepted for assessment, unless the candidate has paid the prescribed fees. The candidate shall submit five hard-bound copies and a soft copy (CD with word and pdf files) of his/her dissertation work for assessment.