Department of
ECONOMICS






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Psychology, Sociology, Economics)
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN121 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ECO131 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 5 4 100
FRN121 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN121 HINDI 3 3 50
ISHOE1601 UNDERSTANDING TERRORISM AND COUNTER - TERRORISM 45 2 100
KAN121 KANNADA 3 03 100
PSY131 BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - I 5 5 100
SAN121 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
TAM121 TAMIL 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN221 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ECO231 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS 5 4 100
ENG221 ENGLISH 3 2 100
FRN221 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN221 HINDI 3 3 50
ISHOE1601 UNDERSTANDING TERRORISM AND COUNTER - TERRORISM 45 2 100
KAN221 KANNADA 3 03 100
PSY231 BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - II 5 5 100
SAN221 SANSKRIT 3 2 100
SOC231 FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY - II 5 5 100
TAM221 TAMIL 3 3 100
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 2 50
ECO331 FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 5 4 100
ENG321 ENGLISH 3 2 100
FRN321 FRENCH 3 2 50
HIN321 HINDI 3 2 50
KAN321 KANNADA 3 02 50
PSY331 LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT 5 5 100
PSY351 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS - I 2 2 50
SAN321 SANSKRIT 3 2 50
SOC331 CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES 5 4 100
TAM321 TAMIL 3 2 50
4 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 2 50
ECO431 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS 5 4 100
ENG421 ENGLISH 3 2 100
FRN421 FRENCH 3 2 50
HIN421 HINDI 3 2 50
KAN421 KANNADA 3 02 50
PSY431 BASIC SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 5 5 100
PSY451 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS - II 2 2 50
SAN421 SANSKRIT 3 2 50
SOC431 STUDY OF INDIAN SOCIETY 5 4 100
SOC471 SERVICE LEARNING 2 2 50
TAM421 TAMIL 3 2 50
5 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECO501 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY FOR ECONOMICS 2 2 50
ECO531 STATISTICS AND INTRODUCTORY ECONOMETRICS 4 4 100
ECO541A PUBLIC FINANCE 4 4 100
ECO541B MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR ECONOMICS 4 4 100
PSY531 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY532 INDUSTRIAL AND CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY551 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND RESEARCH METHODS - I 4 4 100
SOC531 METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH 60 4 100
SOC541A ANALYSIS OF CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS 4 3 100
SOC541C SOCIAL ECOLOGY 4 4 100
SOC541D SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION 4 4 100
6 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECO631 INDIAN ECONOMY 4 4 100
ECO641A ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
ECO641B FINANCIAL ECONOMICS 4 3 100
PSY631 POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY632 HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY651 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENTS AND RESEARCH METHODS - II 4 4 100
SOC631 WOMEN AND SOCIETY 4 3 100
SOC641A STUDY OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS 4 3 100
SOC641C SOCIOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT 4 4 100
SOC641D MEDIA AND SOCIETY 4 4 100
        

  

Assesment Pattern

The pattern for the Mid-exam is as follows:

Section A: 1 compulsory question for 10 marks

Section B: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each quest he pattern for the exam is given below:

The pattern for the End exam is given below:

 Section A: Attempt any 5 questions from the 8 options given. Each answer carried 20 marks 

  

Examination And Assesments

The evaluation pattern is as follows:   

    

Continuous Internal Assessment or CIA constitutes a total of 50 marks. The distribution is as follows:

 

  • CIA I is a 10 marks assignment 
  • CIA II is the 2 hour long Mid semester Examination (50 marks reduced to 25 mark weightage) conducted during August/January 
  • CIA III carries 10 marks and is based on an assignment that is set for the course. 
  • Attendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE) is conducted at the end of the semester. This is a 3 hour long exam for a weightage of 50 marks 

 

  

Department Overview:
The Department of Sociology was one of the first to be established at Christ College, now CHRIST (Deemed to be University), Bangalore, in 1969. Ever since the inception of the department it has been at the forefront of innovations in the pursuit of academic excellence. The Department was the first to offer a Master?s Program in Sociology. It was among the first few to offer Master of Philosophy (MPhil) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) programs within the University. The department offers Sociology in the BA (Sociology) of Arts (BA) Program. Sociology is also offered for the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) and Bachelor of Hotel Management (BHM). Department also handle courses on Population Studies and Social Problems for the University Studies Abroad Consortium, (USAC). USAC provides efficient and responsible programs where students studying abroad can accumulate credits for the basic requirements of their Bachelors Program.
Mission Statement:
Vision : The Vision of the Department of Sociology is to promote globally competent scholars who are grounded in knowledge and have the ability to use this to transform the world they live in. This Vision is deployed in all the programs that the Department handles. Promote pursuit of academic excellence globally within a dynamic academic environment ? To facilitate the development of socially sensitive holistic minds ? Cultivate professionals with critical insights ? Encourage academic r
Introduction to Program:
The Course in Sociology which is part of BA (Sociology) aims to provide a systematic introduction to Sociology. It lays emphasis on the theoretical and methodological foundations of Sociology. Equal importance is given to a systematic introduction to Sociology as a discipline, Classical Sociological Theories and Sociological studies in India. Contributions of eminent Indian Sociologists and substantial themes of Indian Society are included in the syllabus.
Program Objective:
Programme Objectives ? To facilitate the development of socially sensitive holistic minds ? To cultivate professionals with critical insights ? To encourage academic research balanced by fieldwork and internships ? To impart comprehensive learning through classroom-based and extramural activities. ? To mould tomorrow's leadersProgramme Objectives Programme Objectives This programme intends to: ? enable the student to engage with social surroundings from a sociological perspective and the objective vantages of Psychology and Economics ? develop an analytical and conceptual frame for the student to professionally study and understand human social realities ? help the student to develop a foundational understanding of research and career options in Sociology as well as in Psychology and Economics ? equip the student to understand the nuances of human existence in societies ? provide an insight into the multidisciplinary paradigms emerging in the field of social sciences Programme Outcomes (PO) for Bachelor of Arts (BA) at CHRIST By the end of the programme students should be able to: PO1. Academic expertise: Exhibit knowledge of the discipline Identify and explain seminal pieces of work in the area Conduct guided academic inquiries in various areas of interest in the chosen discipline Apply theoretical notions into practice in different forms PO2.Critical Thinking: Recognize the social structures underlying our society Identify the

AEN121 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Additional English course is offered as a second language course and seeks to introduce the students to the nuances of English literature in its varied forms and genres. The students who choose Additional English are generally proficient in the English language. Hence, instead of focusing on introducing them to language, challenging texts in terms of ideas, form, and technique are chosen. Additional English as a course is designed for students in place of a regional language. Non-Resident Indians (NRIs), foreign nationals and students who have not taken Hindi, Kannada, Tamil or French at the Plus 2 or Class XII levels are eligible to choose Additional English. The course is taught for students from different streams, namely, BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA in the first year and for BA, BSc and BCom (Regular) in the second year.

The first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian and Indian sub-continental voices in English in English translation for the Additional English students of the first year. This effort aims to familiarize the students with regional literatures in translation, Indian Writing in English (IWE) and literatures from Pakistan, Nepal and Srilanka, thereby, enabling the students to learn more about Indian culture and ethos through writings from different regions of the country. We have tried to represent in some way or the other the corners of India and the Indian sub-continent in this microcosmic world of short stories, poems and essays

 

There is a prescribed text bookfor the first year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

The first semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Nepal. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. An important addition to this syllabus is the preponderance of North-Eastern writing which was hitherto not well represented. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

  

 

Learning Outcome

Learning Outcome

 

The students will become

sensitive to cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities and help them engage with their peers and all around them in a more understanding and ‘educated’ manner.

 

it will also enable them through the activities conducted to become more proactive citizens/participants in society.

 

aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Keki N Daruwala     “Migrations”

 

2.      Kamala Das            “Forest Fire”

 

3.      Agha Shahid Ali      “Snow on the Desert”

 

4.      Eunice D Souza       “Marriages are Made”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Rabindranath Tagore    “Babus of Nayanjore”

 

2.      Ruskin Bond  “He said it with Arsenic”

 

3.      Bhisham Sahni       “The Boss Came to Dinner”

 

4.      N. Kunjamohan Singh    “The Taste of Hilsa”

 

5.      Mohan Thakuri                “Post Script”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Mahatma Gandhi       “What is True Civilization?” (Excerpts from Hind Swaraj)

 

2.      Ela Bhatt                    “Organising for Change”

 

3.      Sitakant Mahapatra     “Beyond the Ego: New Values for a Global Neighborhood

 

4.      B R Ambedkar             “Waiting for A Visa”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Contemporary knowledge of the soci-political situation in the sub-continent

The text book copy "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

On-line resources to appreciate the text through the Comprehension Questions

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  Classroom assignment for 20 marks keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

Total                   50

ECO131 - PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Develop the conceptual foundations and analytical methods used in micro economics; Familiarize the students with the basics of consumer behaviour, behaviour of firms and market equilibrium; Analyse the market structures of perfect competition, oligopoly and monopolies; Introduce the game theory and welfare economics

Learning Outcome

  • Understand that economics is about the allocation of scarce resources and how that results in trade-offs.
  • Understand the role of prices in allocating scarce resources in market economies and explain the consequences of government policies in the form of price controls.
  • Appreciate positive as well as normative view points on concepts of market failure and the need for government intervention.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Micro Economics and the Theory of Consumption
 

Ten principles of economics: How people make decisions, how people interact and how the economy as a whole works- Role of observations and theory in economics- Role of assumptions- Role of Economic models- Wants and resources; Problem of choice, Production Possibility Frontier; Opportunity costs.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Demand and supply
 

Law of demand, Reasons for the downward slope of the demand curve. Exceptions to the law; Changes in demand; Elasticity of Demand- Degrees of price elasticity with diagrams; Factors determining price elasticity, methods of measurement. Income elasticity demand; Cross elasticity demand; Laws of supply, Changes in supply- Consumers, Producers and the Efficiency of the Markets: Consumer‟s surplus (Marshall), Producer surplus and Market efficiency- Externalities and Market inefficiency- Public goods and common resources.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Theory of Production and Cost
 

Production function; Law of Variable proportions; Laws of returns, Economies of scale; Producer's Equilibrium with the help of iso-quants and iso-cost lines. Cost function - Important cost concepts. Short run and long run cost analysis (traditional theory) Modern theory of cost- Long run and short run - Revenue analysis - AR and MR.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:19
Product Pricing and Factor Pricing
 

Market structure. Perfect competition, Price and output determination. Role of time element in market price determination. Monopoly- Price output determination, Price discrimination Monopolistic Competition. Price and Output determination. Selling costs. Product differentiation. Wastes in monopolistic competition. Oligopoly Price determination (collusive pricing, price leadership), Features of Duopoly and Monopsony

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Theory of Consumer Choice and New Frontiers in Microeconomics
 

Cardinal utility analysis; Law of diminishing marginal utility; Consumer's surplus (Marshall), Ordinal utility analysis. Indifference curves- Properties, consumer's equilibrium, Price effect, Income Effect and substitution effect. New Frontiers in Microeconomics: Introduction to concepts of Asymmetric Information, Political economy, Behavioral Economics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. N. Gregory Mankiw (2012). Principles of Microeconomics, 4th Edition, Cengage Learning India.

2. Lipsey, R.G. and K.A. Chrystal (1999), Principles of Economics (IX Ed.), Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Ramsfield, E. (1997), Micro Economics (IX edition), W.W Norton and company, New York.

2. Pindyck and Rubinfield (2009), Micro Economics (VII edition), Pearson Education.

3. Ray,N.C.(1975), An Introduction to Micro economics, Macmillan company of India Ltd, New Delhi.

4. Samuelson, P.A. and W.D. Hague (1972), A textbook of Economic Theory, ELBS Longman group, London.

5. H.L. Ahuja, Principles ofMicroeconomics, S.Chand, New Delhi.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 1: 20 marks.

CIA - 2: Mid Semester Examination - 50 marks; 2 hours.

CIA - 3: 20 marks.

FRN121 - FRENCH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the UG program

Learning Outcome

Enhancement of linguistic competencies and sharpening of written and oral communicative skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Dossier 0- Discovery
 

1.      First and Last Names of French Families

2.      Few French and International personalities

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Dossier 1 - The Ones, the others
 

1.      Greetings- Usage of “tu” and “Vous”

2.      Telephone Numbers in France 

3.      Some cultural / festive events in Paris- The Francophone

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Dossier 2- Here, Elsewhere
 

1.      Pontoise and Ile de France- The City

2.      Annecy- Youth hostel and accommodation

3.      The wording of address in France- postal codes and departments

 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Dossier 3 Tell me who you are
 

1.      The French and sports- The Reality shows

2.      New ways of meeting- The Differences men/ women

3.      Surnames of married women/ children- Announcements and family functions

 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Dossier 4 Each person at his own pace
 

1.      Rhythm of Life and Rhythm of the city- Internet and media in daily life

2.      The Outings 

3.      Family life and Household chores- Routine and change in rhythm

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Tales
 

1.      The tooth of the cat – Renaud FABBRI 

2.      The Princess and the pea- Odile THIEVENAZ

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Berthet, Annie, Catherine Hugot et al. Alter Ego + A1. Paris : Hachette, 2012 

2.      Krishnan, Chitra. De Bouche à Oreille. New Delhi : Langers International Pvt Ltd., 2009

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Thakker, Viral. Plaisir d’écrire. New Delhi : Langers International Pvt. Ltd., 2011

2. French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN121 - HINDI (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The detailed text book “Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha” edited by Dr.N Mohanan is an anthology of contemporary Hindi Poems written by representative poets of Hindi Literature. From the medieval poetry ' Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur ke pad 'is also included.  The poets reflect on the social, cultural and political issues which are prevalent in our society since the medieval period. Hindusthani sangeeth-parampara eva kalakar is one of the module. Since translation is a significant area in language and literature, emphasis is being given on it in the syllabus.Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthik kalayein  Yakshagana,Kathakali,Ram Leela,Krishna Leela etc. included in the syllabus to enrich cultural values among students.

Course Objectves:

  • to impart the knowledge of poetics
  • to acquire translation skills
  • to expose students to veriety of texts to interact with them
  • to help students develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organisation of language
  • to help students understand the relationship between the world around them and the text
  • to improve their oral and written skills
  • to expose them to the world of music

Learning Outcome

Students will be exposed to the world of poetry and Music. Through translation and cultural studies, students can understand different languages, literature and culture. Grammar portions will help the students to develop their language proficiency.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection of contemporary Hindi Poems),Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur Ke Pad.
 

’  Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection ofcontemporary Poems)  Edited By: Mahendra Kulashreshta Rajpal and Son’s, New Delhi

 

Level of knowledge: Analytical

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Translation-Theory and Practice
 

                                                                                            

                                      

                                          

                                           

         

Translation-Practice                English to Hindi and vice- versa.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthic kalayen-
 

Ramleela,Krishnaleela,Yakshagaana,kathakali.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Hindusthani Sangeeth-parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav,Vikas aur paramparaein

Pramukh Sangeethkar-1.Bhimsen Joshi 2.Gulam Ali 3.Pandit Ravishankar 4. Bismillah Khan.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. 'Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha’ (Collection of Poems) Edited By: Dr.N Mohanan,  Rajpal and Son’s,New Delhi.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. A Hand Book of Translation Studies         By: Das Bijay Kumar.               

2. Saral Subodh Hindi Vyakaran,                 By: Motilal Chaturvedi. Vinod pustak mandir, Agra-2

3. Anuvad Evam Sanchar –                         Dr Pooranchand Tantan, Rajpal and Son’s, Kashmiri

4. Anuvad Vignan                                       By: Bholanath Tiwar

5. Anuvad Kala                                           By: N.E Vishwanath Iyer.

                                                                 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-Editing of Hindi article in Hindi Wikipedia )-20 marks

CIA-2(Mid semester examination)-50 marks

CIA-3(Digital learning-article creation in Hindi Wikipedia)-20 marks

End sem examination-50 marks

ISHOE1601 - UNDERSTANDING TERRORISM AND COUNTER - TERRORISM (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:45
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The course stresses the interdisciplinary nature of terrorism studies, the role of methodological and ethical commitments in knowing and understanding terrorism, and works to instil a critical disposition in students as they grapple with and consume information about the phenomenon.

Course Objectives:

  • To acquire a deep conceptual understanding of contemporary international terrorism from the point of view of both international relations (between nations) and comparative politics (within nations) 
  • To understand political, social, and economic theories regarding the causes of terrorism, its control, and the consequences of implementing those controls.
  • To identify geographical regions and states where the roots of terrorism are prevalent, precisely identifying those root causes where possible.
  • To analyze primary/umbrella terror groups, their organizational and inter-organizational characteristics, including their recruiting, financing, and operating strategies.
  • To evaluate the role and challenges of counter-terrorism mechanisms with special reference to India.

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the students should be in a position to:

  • acquire a deep conceptual understanding of contemporary international terrorism from the point of view of both international relations (between nations) and comparative politics (within nations) 
  • understand political, social, and economic theories regarding the causes of terrorism, its control, and the consequences of implementing those controls.
  • identify geographical regions and states where the roots of terrorism are prevalent, precisely identifying those root causes where possible.
  • analyze primary/umbrella terror groups, their organizational and inter-organizational characteristics, including their recruiting, financing, and operating strategies.
  • evaluate the role and challenges of counter-terrorism mechanisms with special reference to India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Understanding the Concept of ?Terrorism?
 

 Defining Terrorism: Various components

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Common Causes of terrorism
 

·       Socio-economic, politico-ideological (including religion), personal, ethno-nationalism

·       Radicalization process

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Strategies and tactics of terrorism
 

·       What do terrorists want?

·       How do they achieve?

·       How do they use technology to their advantage?

·       Various aspects of suicide terrorism.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Terrorism and its support system
 

·       Finance

·       State-sponsorship

·       People

·       Network

·       Role of Media

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Counter-terrorism: Policies and Practices
 

·       Intelligence

·       Military

·       Political

·       Social

·       Legislative

·       Diplomatic including international cooperation.

·       Impact of CT

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hoffman, Bruce, Inside Terrorism, Columbia University Press, 2006.

 

Whittaker, David. The Terrorism Reader, Routledge, 2007

 

Weinberg, Leonard et al., “The Challenges of Conceptualizing Terrorism,” Terrorism and Political Violence, 2004

Crenshaw, Martha, “The Causes of Terrorism,” Comparative Politics, July 1981

Andrew Kydd and Barbara F. Walter, "The Strategies of Terrorism," International Security, Vol. 31, No. 1.

 

Daniel Benjamin, Strategic Counterterrorism

 

John Mueller and Mark G. Stewart, Responsible Counterterrorism Policy, 10 September 2014.

Frank Bolz, The Counterterrorism Handbook

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ahmed, Imtiaz, Understanding Terrorism in South Asia, Manohar, 2006

 

Carpenter, William M. and David G. Wiencek (Eds.) Asian Security Handbook: Terrorism and the New Security Environment, Routledge, 2005

 

Ciment, James (ed.), World Terrorism: An Encyclopedia of Political Violence from Ancient Times to the Post-9/11 Era, Sharpe Reference, 2011

 

Crenshaw, Martha, Explaining Terrorism: Causes, Processes and Consequences, Routledge, 2011

 

Guelke, Adrian, The New Age of Terrorism and the International Political System, I.B. Tauris, 2009

 

Hoffman, Bruce. Inside Terrorism, Columbia University Press, 2006

 

Kanwal, Gurmeet and N. Manoharan, India’s War on Terror, Knowledge World, 2011

 

Mahadevan, Prem, The Politics of Counter Terrorism in India, IB Tauris, 2012

 

Manoharan N. and Dayani Panagoda,Developing Democracies, Counter-terror Laws and Security: Lessons from India and Sri Lanka, RCSS/Manohar, 2013

 

Martin, Gus, The SAGE Encyclopaedia of Terrorism, SAGE Reference, 2011

 

______, Essentials of Terrorism: Concepts and Controversies, SAGE, 2011

 

Mickolus, Edward E. and Susan I. Simmons, The Terrorist List [Five Volumes: Volume 1: Asia, Pacific and Sub-Saharan Africa; Volume 2: Western Europe; Volume 3: Eastern Europe; Volume 4: North America; and Volume 5: South America], Praeger, 2011

 

Muni SD, Responding to Terrorism in South Asia, Manohar, 2006

 

Nacos, Brigitte L., Terrorism and Counterterrorism, Longman, 2011

 

Neumann, Peter R., Old & New Terrorism, Polity Press, 2009

 

Pedazur, Ami, Israeli Secret Services and the Struggle Against Terrorism, Columbia University Press, 2008

 

Schmid, Alex P., The Routledge Handbook of Terrorism Research,Routledge, 2011

 

Whittaker, David, Terrorist and Terrorism in the Contemporary World, Routledge, 2004

 

Wilkinson, Paul, Terrorism Versus Democracy: The Liberal State Response, Routledge, 2007

 

Zimmerman, Doron, How States Fight Terrorism: Policy Dynamics in the West, Viva Books, 2008

 

Evaluation Pattern

Internal: 50 percent

End-term exam: 50 percent

KAN121 - KANNADA (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Select Old Kannada, Medieval Kannada and Modern Kannada Literatures are  introduced for I Semester BA/ BSc. courses in the syllabus. This will enrich the  Language and Communication  skills, Critical and analytical thinking of the students. this will help them to enhance their social sensitivity.  

Course Objectives

  • To expose learners to variety of texts to interact with them
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of Literature through the organization of Language
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text
  • To help lerarners to improve their oral and written skills for their respective career goals
  • To help improve their communiction skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

Learning Outcome

  •  Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analize the various literature they read and discuss  in class
  • Develop a more humane and service orented aproach to all forms of life around them
  • Ability to communicate effectively in speech and in writing
  • Ability to use better language to communicate effectively

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Poetry -Old, Medivial and Modern Kannada Literature
 

1. Poetry (Old Kannada literature)

1 Pampa-Bharata Bahubali Prasamga

2. Janna- Chitramapatre Ramate Naari

3. Raghavanka- Purada Punyam Purusha Roopinde Pogutide

 

2. Vachanas & Keerthanas (Medieval Kannada Literature)

          1. Devaradasimayya 2. Basavanna 3. Akkamahadevei

          4. Allamaprabhu 5. Urilingapeddi 6. Purandara Dasa

          7. Kanakadasa 8. Vadiraja  

  3. Modern Kannada Poetry

        1. B.M.Shree- Kaarihrggadeya Magalu

        2.  Bendre- Hakki Haarutide Nodidira

        3. Gopala Krishna Adiga- Neharu Nivruttaraguvudill

        4. G.S Shivarudrappa – Mumbai Jaataka

        5. T Yellappa- Avaru Mattu Naavu

       6. Muktayakka- Mooru Mukhagalu

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
. Prose: Short Stories
 

 

1. Ramana Savaari Santege Hodaddu- K Sadashiva

       2. Chappaligalu- Sara Abubakkar

       3. Aeroplane mattu Chitte- K.P. Poornachandra Tejaswi

       4. Gilikathe: Ravindranatha Tagore (Translated by   S.G. Kulakarni)

        

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Language Skills
 

 

     1.  A- H, L-l, N-n, Hrasva- Deerga, Ottakshara, Joining of words

     2. Report Writing

     3. Folk Art forms of Karnataka

Text Books And Reference Books:

       1. Adipurana- Pampa

       2. Yashodhara Charite- Janna

       3. Harishchandra Kavya- Raghavanka

       4. Shree Sahitya- B M Shreekantaiah


                                                                           

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Pampa Ondu Adhyayana- G S Shivarudrappa

2. Vachana Chandrike- L Basavaraju

3. Purandara Sahitya Darshana- S K Ramachandra Rao

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 Digital Learning - Wikipedia- 20 Marks

CIA-2 Mid Semsester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA-3 Digitization of Kannada Books - 20 Marks

End Semester Examination- 50 Marks

 

PSY131 - BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to the study of basic psychological processes offered to the first-semester undergraduate students of psychology. It is an introductory paper that gives an understanding about the field of psychology, scope, and the multiple perspectives and disciplines that provide a holistic picture of human behaviour. Students will learn the key concepts, classic examples, and modern and practical applications of fundamental psychological theories, methods, and tools. Emphasis is on the basic psychological processes of personality, learning, consciousness, motivation and emotion. This course allows them to learn the basics and demonstrate the skills that a student needs to move on to the more specific and in-depth psychology courses that follow. This course will help the learner to learn about

  • The world of Psychology with a brief historical sketch of the science of psychology, multiple perspectives and recent trends in the field.
  • The fundamental processes underlying human behaviour such as learning, motivation, emotion, personality and states of consciousness
  • Ethics in studying human behaviour and using them in academic assignments. Students will have an opportunity to develop skills such as writing, making presentations and using technology for academic purposes and teamwork.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Explain psychological concepts, including fundamental concepts, principles, theoretical perspectives, overarching themes, and arguments from across a range of psychology content domains like learning, personality, motivation, emotion and consciousness to various situations and contexts.
  • Critically evaluate the different schools of thought in psychology
  •  Analyse methods of scientific inquiry, evidence-based thinking, and critical thinking skills to psychological phenomena and examples of psychological science
  • Write assignments and make presentations demonstrating basic knowledge of APA (American Psychological Association) style.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History and Schools of Thought
 

In this unit, we will examine the history of Western psychological theorizing from its beginnings in ancient Greece, through to the schools and perspectives of psychology including Structuralism, Functionalism, Psychodynamic, Biological, Behavioristic, Gestalt, Cognitive, Cross-cultural, Humanistic and Evolutionary. The aim is both to build a familiarity with psychology’s intellectual origins and to foster an awareness of its many false steps, dead-ends, and alternative pathways to gain a better appreciation of the social, cultural, and, above all, psychological influences on the theorizing of psychologists. Students will be able to define psychology and understand what psychologists do and identify the major fields of study and theoretical perspectives within psychology and know their similarities and differences. In the end, students will gain a better appreciation of why contemporary psychology takes the shape it does.

  1. Describe the evolution of psychology and the major pioneers in the field
  2. Identify the various approaches, fields, and subfields of psychology along with their major concepts and important figures
  3. Describe the value of psychology and possible careers paths for those who study psychology
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Learning
 

This unit introduces students to the principles of learning and how those principles can be used to modify human behaviour. Explain the behavioural perspective of psychology and relate classical and operant conditioning concepts to student-generated scenarios. The course emphasises the application of learning theories and principles. Topics include reinforcement, extinction, punishment, schedules of reinforcement, stimulus discrimination, prompting and fading, stimulus-response chaining, generalisation, modelling, rule-governed behaviour, problem-solving, latent learning, observational learning, insight learning, concept learning, general case instruction, and stimulus equivalence. 

Laboratory Demonstration: Trial and Error learning, Habit Interference, Maze Learning 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Personality
 

This unit is an introduction to the psychological study of human personality, broadly speaking and more specifically in terms of how we may understand individual differences in personality and the personalities of individual persons. Personality psychologists use empirical methods of behavioural and clinical science to understand people in biological, social, and cultural contexts. Students will learn the strengths and weaknesses of the major personality theories, as well as how to assess, research and apply these theories. As much as possible, application to real-life situations will be discussed.

  1. Identify the various perspectives that are common in the area of personality psychology and critically evaluate each in terms of its explanatory and predictive power.
  2. Theories and perspectives of personality development: psychoanalytic, humanistic, trait, and social-cognitive.
  3. Understand classic and current empirical measurement tools and approaches to investigation for personality assessment in psychological and clinical science
  4. To develop an understanding of the concept of individual differences with the goal to promote self-reflection and understanding of self and others.

 Laboratory Demonstration: Sentence completion test, NEO-PI, Type A/B

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
States of Consciousness
 

Describe different states of consciousness and how these can vary across different situations (i.e., higher-level consciousness, lower-level consciousness, altered state of consciousness, and no consciousness). Topics including sleep, meditation, dreams, jet-lang and drug abuse will be discussed to illustrate the states of consciousness. Outline the different parts of sleep. Apply and evaluate strategies for getting a better night’s sleep.

  1. Describe consciousness and biological rhythms
  2. Describe what happens to the brain and body during sleep
  3. Explain how drugs affect consciousness
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Motivation and Emotion
 

The unit will explain how behaviour is energised and directed by the complex mixture of motives and emotions and describe the various theories that have been developed to explain motivation and emotion.

  1. Explain motivation, how it is influenced, and major theories about motivation
  2. Describe hunger and eating in relation to motivation, obesity, anorexia, and bulimia
  3. Describe sexual behaviour and research about sexuality
  4. Explain theories of emotion and how we express and recognise emotion

Laboratory Demonstration: Level of motivation, Achievement motivation, 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Weiten, W. (2014). Psychology: Themes and Variations (Briefer Version, 9th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

King, L. A. (2010). Experience Psychology. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Gazzaniga, Heatherton, Halpern (2015). Psychological Science, 5th Edition, Norton.

Feldman.S.R.(2009).Essentials of understanding psychology ( 7th Ed.) New Delhi : Tata Mc Graw Hill.

Baron, R.A and Misra, G. (2014). Psychology (Indian Subcontinent Edition).Pearson Education Ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

 CIA (CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT)    

 CIA I –Written Assignment /Individual Assignment  - Total Marks 20     

 CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                        - Total marks 50                          

 CIA III –Activity-based Assignment                        - Total marks 20

  CIA I + II + III                                                      = 90 /100 = 45/50 

  Attendance                                                            = 5 marks 

 Total                                                                      = 100 = 50 

 

End Semester Examination : Total Marks=100=50

Question paper pattern

 Section A        Brief, concepts, definitions, applications               2 marks x 10 = 20

 Section B         Short Answers: Conceptual/Application                5 marks x 4   = 20

 Section C        Essay Type: Descriptive/Conceptual                       15 marks x 3 = 45

 Section D        Compulsory: Case Study (Application)                    15 X 1           = 15

SAN121 - SANSKRIT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The I semeste B.A/B.Sc students are prescribed wih the text " Ruthusamharam"

Strotra shithya 

Learning Outcome

The students will have exposure for the  style of poetry. Ruthusamhara is the work based on the nature which makes the students to understand about changes in nature

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
test
 

poery Buddhacharitham III canto, up to 52 stanzas.

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual/ descriptive/ Analytical.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:35
Ruthusamharam
 

Ruthusamharam

Strotra sahithya 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Grammar
 

Grammar

Grammer- Sandhis and lakaras                                                          

 Level of Knowledge:  Analytical /Conceptual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
. Language component.
 

language component.

Translation from Sanskrit to english                                                     

Level of Knowledge:  Analytical/. Conceptual

Composition to write in Sanskrit                                                              

Level of Knowledge:  Analytical/. Conceptual

Comprehension in Sanskrit                                                                     

Level of Knowledge:  Analytical/. Conceptual

Text Books And Reference Books:

Ruthusamharam

 Strotra sahitya : Madhurashtaka and Geeta govinda                                    

                            M.S. Subbalakshmi , Balamurali Krishna 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1) Ruthusamharam- Shivaprasad Dvivedi

2) Ruthusamharam- Dr. K . Narayanabhatta

3) sanskrit grammar Translation from English to Sanskrit by M.R.Kale

4) Sanskrt Grammar Kannada version by Hegde. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1  Wikipedia  assignment   Evaluated for 20 marks

CIA 2 Midsemester examination   Evaluated for 50 marks

CIA 3  Wikipedia assignment   Evaluated for 20 marks

          End semester   Evaluated for 50 marks

 

TAM121 - TAMIL (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Poems of Bharatiyar and Bharatidasan and poems by women poets with feminine sensibilities  will initiate the students into the modern period with all its complexities. The short stories by Ambai offers a matured vision of life through a varied characters and situatins. A new concept, Cultural Studies, will take the students beyond prescribed syllabus to include music, theatre, painting and films out of whcih the art form of music is taken up for the first semester.

Learning Outcome

To make the students experience the impact made by Bharathiyar and Bharathidasan during the 20th century and to bring them to the realities of 21st century. They will also learn, on their own, about the nuances of music and a unique aesthetic experience it offers 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Modern Poetry
 

Poems of Bharathiyar, Bharathidasan and women poets

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Practical Grammar
 

2  Grammar as reflected in the poems

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Contemporary Cultural Issues
 

Prose including reference to contemporary literary issues

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Language Skills
 

Language Skills:  Piramozhichorkal

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Malliga, R et al (ed).Thamilppathirattu I.Bangalore: Prasaranga,2011

     ‘Oru Karuppuchilanthiyudan Or Iravu’ by Ambai,

 

      published by Kalachuvadu Publications, Nagercoil, 2014

 

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Varadarajan, Mu.  Thamil Ilakkia Varalaru . New Delhi:Sahitya Akademi, 2008

 Sivathambi, Ka.Thamil Sirukathaiyin Thorramum Valarchiyum.Coimbatore: NCBH, 2009

 Ragunathan,C.Bharathi: Kalamum Karuthum, Chennai:NCBH, 1971

 

Ramakrishnan S 100 Sirantha Sirukathaigal, Chennai: Discovery Books, 2013