Department of
MECHANICAL-AND-AUTOMOBILE-ENGINEERING






Syllabus for
Master of Technology (Machine Design)
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MTME131 EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS 4 3 100
MTME132 THEORY OF APPLIED STRESS 4 3 100
MTME133E2 MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING 3 3 100
MTME134E1 ADVANCED DESIGN OF MECHANICAL SYSTEM 3 3 100
MTME135 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND IPR 4 3 100
MTME151 ADVANCED CAD LABORATORY 4 2 50
MTME152 SIMULATION LABORATORY 4 2 50
2 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MTME231 ADVANCED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD 4 3 100
MTME232 ADVANCED THEORY OF VIBRATIONS 4 3 100
MTME233E1 TRIBOLOGY IN BEARING DESIGN 45 3 100
MTME234E1 DESIGN FOR MANUFACTURING 3 3 100
MTME251 ADVANCED DESIGN LABORATORY 4 2 50
MTME252 ANALYSIS LABORATORY 4 2 50
MTME271 MINI PROJECT 4 2 50
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CY01 CYBER SECURITY 2 2 50
MTME331E1 DESIGN FOR MANUFACTURE 4 3 100
MTME332E3 OPTIMUM DESIGN 4 3 100
MTME333E1 TRIBOLOGY AND BEARING DESIGN 4 3 100
MTME371 PROJECT WORK (PHASE-I) 4 3 100
MTME373 INTERNSHIP INDUSTRY/RESEARCH LAB 2 2 50
4 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MTME471 PROJECT WORK (PHASE-II) AND DISSERTATION 8 6 300
        

  

Assesment Pattern

For subjects having practical as part of the subject

            End semester practical examination                                      : 25 marks

            Records                                                                                   : 05 marks

            Mid semester examination                                                     : 10 marks

            Class work                                                                              : 10 marks

            Total                                                                                       : 50 marks

 

 

 

ASSESSMENT RULES

v  Assessment of Project Work(Phase I)

§  Continuous Internal Assessment:100 Marks

¨      Presentation assessed by Panel Members

¨      Assessment by the Guide

¨      Project  Progress Reports

 

v  Assessment of Project Work(Phase II) and Dissertation

§  Continuous Internal Assessment:200 Marks

¨      Presentation assessed by Panel Members

¨      Assessment by the Guide

¨      Project  Progress Reports

¨      Paper presentation in National/International conference or in Journal publications or at least acceptance letter is mandatory 

§  End Semester Examination:100 Marks

¨      Viva Voce

¨      Demonstration

¨      Project Report

§  Dissertation (Exclusive assessment of Project Report): 100 Marks

¨      Internal Review : 50 Marks

¨      External Review : 50 Marks

 

v  Assessment of Internship

 

30 Internship days at Industry/Research Laboratories is mandatory and a report should be submitted with certificate before IV semester.

Examination And Assesments

Assessment is based on the performance of the student throughout the semester.

Assessment of each paper

·        Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) for Theory papers: 50% (50 marks out

of 100 marks)

·        End Semester Examination(ESE) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

Components of the CIA

CIA I   : Assignments/Open book test/Seminar                  : 10 marks                  

CIA II  :  Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                      : 25 marks                               CIA III: Quizzes/Seminar/Case Studies/Project Work        : 10 marks

Attendance                                                                             : 05 marks

            Total                                                                                       : 50 marks

Assessment is based on the performance of the student throughout the semester.

Assessment of each paper

·        Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) for Theory papers: 50% (50 marks out

of 100 marks)

·        End Semester Examination(ESE) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

Components of the CIA

CIA I   : Assignments/Open book test/Seminar                  : 10 marks                  

CIA II  :  Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                      : 25 marks                               CIA III: Quizzes/Seminar/Case Studies/Project Work        : 10 marks

Attendance                                                                             : 05 marks

            Total                                                                                       : 50 marks

Department Overview:
The Mechanical Engineering Department has well established facilities for carrying out the activities of basic mechanical engineering. It is equipped to meet the present day technological advances and to meet the industrial requirements matching with the global standards. The department has the state of the art laboratories to meet the demand for practical knowledge by the present day industrial applications. One of the oldest, largest and diversified of all engineering disciplines is mechanical engineering. Rated as one of the most "evergreen" branches, students of mechanical engineering can look forward to an exciting and robust study in the field of Thermal, Design, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering. A Holistic blend of both theory and practicals ensure that students are ready to face the challenges of the industrial world.
Mission Statement:
VISION OF DEPARTMENT To develop Mechanical and Automobile Engineering professionals to be successful in chosen career through innovative academic processes for overall development, upholding integrity and ethics MISSION STATEMENT 1. To create excellent academic facilities and provide quality teaching learning experience 2. To nurture holistic development of individuals for excellence and service with ethics
Introduction to Program:
The goal of our program is to prepare our graduates for successful professional practice and advanced studies by providing a broad education in mechanical engineering and by offering the opportunity to deepen their technical understanding in a particular concentration area of related technical electives. Following are the course objectives. 1. Join a technically sophisticated workforce as successful, practicing engineers in a wide range of mechanical engineering fields. 2. Continuously improve and expand their technical and professional skills through formal means as well as through informal self-study. 3. Pursue advanced degrees in engineering, business, or other professional fields. 4. Advance themselves professionally and personally by accepting responsibilities and pursuing leadership roles
Program Objective:
PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (PEO?S): PEO-1: Provide students with the fundamental knowledge in basic science and engineering in the streams like Design, Thermal and Production engineering to recognize, analyze and solve problems to succeed in technical profession both in industry and higher studies PEO-2:Provide students with the necessary instruction and practical experience to work well in a team and multi-disciplinary environments and to be effective in written and oral communicators, both

MTME131 - EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•Describe variety of strain gauges, mounting techniques and strain gauge circuits.

•Understand the fundamental concepts of photo elasticity and experimental techniques.

•Explain the two and three dimensional photo elasticity concept on the practical problems.

•Explain different types of coatings, test strain data using brittle coating and Birefringent coating.

•Understand the Moire fringe method, analysis and its applications.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To be able to describe the Sensitivity & the construction of strain gauges. {L1,L2,L3}{PO1,2,3,4,7}

CO2: To elucidate the isoclinics & Fringe multiplication techniques. {L1,L2,L3}{PO1,2,3,4,5}

CO3: To be able to explain the stress separation methods of 3D Photoelasticity. {L1,L2,L3}{PO1,2,3,4,5}

CO4: To describe the Birefringence coating techniques. {L1,L2,L3,L4}{PO1,2,3,7,9}

CO5: To be able to describe the Moire’s Techniques. {L1,L2,L3}{PO1,2,3,4,5,6,7} 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
STRAIN ANALYSIS METHODS
 

Two element and three element, rectangular and delta rosettes, Correction for transverse strains effects, stress gage - plane shear gage, Stress intensity factor gage. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE STRAIN GAUGES
 

Strain sensitivity of gage metals, Gage construction, Gage sensitivity and gage factor, Performance characteristics, Environmental effects Strain, gage circuits, Potentiometer, Wheat Stone's bridges, Constant current circuits. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
TWO DIMENSIONAL PHOTOELASTICITY STRESS ANALYSIS
 

Separation methods shear difference method, Analytical separation methods, Model to prototype scaling.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
PHOTOELASTICITY
 

Nature of light, - wave theory of light,- optical interference - Polariscopes stress optic law - effect of stressed model in plane and circuclar Polariscopes, Isoclinics Isochromatics fringe order determination - Fringe multiplication techniques - Calibration Photoelastic model materials

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
THREE DIMENSIONAL PHOTOELASTICITY
 

Stress freezing method, General slice, Effective stresses, Stresses separation, Shear deference method, Oblique incidence method Secondary principals stresses, Scattered light photoelasticity, Principals, Polariscope and stress data analyses. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
COATING METHODS
 

a) Photoelastic Coating Method: Birefringence coating techniques Sensitivity Reinforcing and thickness effects - data reduction - Stress separation techniques Photoelastic strain gauges b) Brittle Coatings Method: Brittle coating technique Principles data analysis - coating materials, Coating techniques.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
MOIRE TECHNIQUE
 

Geometrical approach, Displacement approach- sensitivity of Moire data data reduction, In plane and out plane Moire methods, Moire photography, Moire grid production.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
HOLOGRAPHY
 

Introduction, Equation for plane waves and spherical waves, Intensity, Coherence, Spherical radiator as an object (record process), Hurter, Driffeld curves, Reconstruction process, Holograpic interferometry, Real-time. and double exposure methods, Displacement measurement, Isopachics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.Dally and Riley, "Experimental Stress Analysis", McGraw Hill, 3rd revised Edition, 1991.

T2.Sadhu Singh, “Experimental Stress Analysis", Khanna publisher, 4th revised Edition, 2009.

T3.Srinath L.S, “Experimental stress Analysis”, Tata Mc Graw Hill, 1984.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. M.M.Frocht, "Photoelasticity, Vol I and Vol II”, John Wiley & sons, 4th Revised Edition, 2003.

R2. Perry and Lissner, "Strain Gauge Primer", Mc Graw Hill, 2nd Revised Edition, 1962.

R3.Kuske, Albrecht & Robertson, "Photo Elastic Stress Analysis", John Wiley & Sons, 4th Revised Edition, 2003.

R4.Dave and Adam, "Motion Measurement and Stress Analysis", Merrill; First Edition, 1964

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50MARKS

ESE-50MARKS

MTME132 - THEORY OF APPLIED STRESS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•To obtain the stress strain relation for engineering materials.

•To know Yield criteria for ductile metal. 

•To understand the plastic stress-strain relations. 

•To learn Upper and lower bound theorems and corollaries. 

•To solve problems of tension compression, torsion and combined loading.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To Understand the concepts of stress and strain. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2}

CO2: To demonstrate Idealized stress-strain diagrams for different material models. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO3: To be able to formulate general stress-strain equations in cartesian and polar coordinate system. {L2, L3, L4} {PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4}

CO4: To understand the concept of yield criterion. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO5: To be able to solve Problems of uniaxial tension, compression, bending of beams and torsion. {L2, L3, L5} {PO1, PO2 PO3, PO4}

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION STRESS
 

Definition and Notation for forces and stresses. Components of stresses, equations of Equilibrium, Specification of stress at a point. Principal stresses and Mohr's diagram in three dimensions. Boundary conditions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION TO STRAIN
 

Deformation, Strain Displacement relations, Strain components, The state of strain at a point, Principal strain, Strain transformation, Compatibility equations, Cubical dilatation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
STRESS-STRAIN RELATIONS AND THE GENERAL EQUATIONS OF ELASTICITY
 

Generalized Hooke's law in terms of engineering constants. Formulation of elasticity Problems. Existence and uniqueness of solution, Saint -Venant's principle, Principle of super position and reciprocal theorem.

Idealised stress-strain diagrams for different material models, Engineering and natural strains, Mathematical relationships between true stress and true strains

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
TWO DIMENSIONAL PROBLEMS IN POLAR CO-ORDINATES
 

General equations, stress distribution symmetrical about an axis, Pure bending of curved bar, Strain components in polar co-ordinates, Rotating disk and cylinder, Concentrated force on semi-infinite plane, Stress concentration around a circular hole in an infinite plate

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
TWO DIMENSIONAL PROBLEMS IN CARTESIAN CO-ORDINATES
 

Airy's stress function, investigation for simple beam problems. Bending of a narrow cantilever beam under end load, simply supported beam with uniform load, Use of Fourier series to solve two dimensional problems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-4
 

Yield criteria for ductile metal, Von Mises, Tresca, Yield surface for Isotropic Plastic materials, Stress space, Experimental verification of Yield criteria, 

Yield criteria for an anisotropic material.

Stress  -  Strain Relations, Plastic stress-strain relations, PrandtlRoeuss Saint Venant, Levy  -  Von Mises, Experimental verification of the Prandtl-Rouss equation, Yield locus, Symmetry convexity, Normality rule., 

Upper and lower bound theorems and corollaries

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-5
 

Application to problems: Uniaxial tension and compression, bending of beams, Torsion of rods and tubes, Simple forms of indentation problems using upper bounds. Problems of metal forming I: Extrusion, and Drawing.

Problems of metal forming II: Rolling and Forging. Slip line theory, Introduction, Basic equations for incompressible two-dimensional flows, continuity equations, Stresses in conditions of plain strain convention for slip-lines, Geometry of slip lines, Properties of slip lines.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.Timoshenko and Goodier, "Theory of Elasticity", McGraw Hill, 1982.

T2.R.A.C..Slater, “Engineering Plasticity - Theory and Application to Metal Forming Process”, McMillan Press Ltd.2016.

T3.Sadhu Singh," Theory of Elasticity”, Khanna publishers, Delhi, 2003.

T4.Sadhu Singh, “Theory of Plasticity and Metal forming Process”, 8th Edition, Khanna Publishers, Delhi, 2015.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.L S Srinath, “Advanced Mechanics of Solids ", Tata Mcgraw-Hill, 2008.

R2.Phillips, Durelli and Tsao, " Introduction to the Theoretical and Experimental Analysis of Stress and Strain ", McGraw-Hill, 1st Edition,1958.

R3.W. & Mellor and P.B. Johnson, “Plasticity for Mechanical Engineers”, 1st Edition, D.Van Nostrand Company Inc., 1962.

R4.Oscar Hoffman and George Sachs, “Introduction to the Theory of Plasticity for Engineers”, 1st Edition, Literary Licensing, LLC., 2012.

R5.Chakraborty,”Theory of plasticity” 3rd Edition, Oxford: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann, 2007.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50marks

ESE-50marks

MTME133E2 - MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is outlined to those who intend to apply the subject at the proper place and time, while keeping him/her aware to the needs of the society where he/she can lend his/her expert service, and also to those who can be useful to the community without even going through the formal process of drilling through rigorous treatment of Mathematics.

Learning Outcome

CO1. Apply statistical techniques to analyze multivariate functions(L1,3,4) (PO1,2)

CO2. Identify and solve engineering problems by applying the knowledge of ordinary and partial differential equations (L1,3,4) (PO1,2)

CO3. Identify nature of a given wave equation and solve by applying D’Alembert    solution and/or method of solution of method of separation of variables (L1,3,4) (PO1,2,3)

CO4. Apply mathematical and computational methods to a range of problems in science and engineering (L1,3,4) (PO1,2)

CO5. Implement basic operations in Fourier series and Laplace transforms (L1,2,3) (PO1,2,4)

CO6. Evaluate partial derivatives of multivariate functions (L1,3,4) (PO1,2,3)

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Probability Theory
 

Probability Theory and Sampling Distributions. Basic probability theory along with examples. Standard discrete and continuous distributions like Binomial, Poisson, Normal, Exponential etc. Central Limit Theorem and its Significance. Some sampling distributions like 2, t, F

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Testing of Statistical Hypothesis
 

Testing a statistical hypothesis, tests on single sample and two samples concerning means and variances. ANOVA: One – way, Two – way with/without interactions.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Ordinary Differential Equations
 

Ordinary linear differential equations solvable by direct solution methods; solvable nonlinearODE’s.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Partial Differential Equations and Concepts in Solution to Boundary Value
 

First and second order partial differential equations; canonical forms

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Major Equation Types Encountered in Engineering and Physical Sciences
 

Solution methods for wave equation, D’Alembert solution, potential equation, properties of harmonic functions, maximum principle, solution by variable separation method

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ronald E, Walpole, Sharon L. Myers, Keying Ye, Probability and Statistics for  Engineers and Scientists (8th Edition), Pearson Prentice Hall, 07 

T2. J. B. Doshi, Differential Equations for Scientists and Engineers, Narosa, New Delhi, 10  

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Douglas C. Montgomery, Design and Analysis of Experiments (7th Edition), Wiley Student Edition, 09.

R2. S. P. Gupta, Statistical Methods, S. Chand & Sons, 37th revised edition, 08

R3. William W. Hines, Douglas C. Montgomery, David M. Goldsman, Probability and

Statistics for Engineering, (4th Edition), Willey Student edition, 06.

R4. Advanced Engineering Mathematics (9th Edition), Erwin Kreyszig, Wiley India (13)

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50MARKS

ESE-50MARKS

MTME134E1 - ADVANCED DESIGN OF MECHANICAL SYSTEM (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•To facilitate the students to appreciate the design function in machine elements and understand the role of failure prevention analysis in mechanical design.

•To be able to estimate the fatigue life estimation using stress-life approach and strain life approach.

•To understand the significance of statistical aspects in fatigue, LEFM, fatigue from variable amplitude loading etc.

•To impart the knowledge on various aspects of surface failure and dynamic contact stresses.  

•The course aims at enumerating the theoretical and practical aspects of design process.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: {Analyse the different types of failure modes and be able to judge which criterion is to be applied in which situation.} {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2}

CO2: {Discuss the overview of stress- life and strain life approach to understand the fatigue behaviour of materials.} {L1, L2 }{PO1, PO2}

CO3: {Explain the linear elastic behaviour in fracture of materials and understand the statistical aspects of fatigue.} { L1, L2, L3} {PO1, PO2}

CO4: {Describe the various counting methods, damage theories used in the fatigue design from variable amplitude loading.} { L1, L2, L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO5: {Classify different types of wear and illustrate the various surface failures.}{ L1, L2, L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
FATIGUE OF MATERIALS
 

Introductory concepts, High cycle and low cycle fatigue, Fatigue design models, Fatigue design methods, Fatigue design criteria, Fatigue testing, Test methods and standard test specimens, Fatigue fracture surfaces and macroscopic features, Fatigue mechanisms and microscopic features.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION
 

Role of failure prevention analysis in mechanical design, Modes of mechanical failure, Review of failure theories for ductile and brittle materials including Mohr’s theory and modified Mohr’s theory, Numerical examples. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
STRESS-LIFE (S-N) APPROACH
 

S-N curves, Statistical nature of fatigue test data, General S-N behavior, Mean stress effects, Different factors influencing S-N behavior, S-N curve representation and approximations, Constant life diagrams, Fatigue life estimation using S-N approach

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
STRAIN-LIFE(Ε-N)APPROACH
 

Monotonic stress-strain behavior ,Strain controlled test methods ,Cyclic stress-strain behavior ,Strain based approach to life estimation, Determination of strain life fatigue properties, Mean stress effects, Effect of surface finish, Life estimation by ε-N approach.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
LEFM APPROACH
 

LEFM concepts, Crack tip plastic zone, Fracture toughness, Fatigue crack growth, Mean stress effects, Crack growth life estimation. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
STATISTICAL ASPECTS OF FATIGUE
 

Definitions and quantification of data scatter, Probability distributions, Tolerance limits, Regression analysis of fatigue data, Reliability analysis, Problems using the Weibull distribution.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
FATIGUE FROM VARIABLE AMPLITUDE LOADING
 

Spectrum loads and cumulative damage, Damage quantification and the concepts of damage fraction and accumulation, Cumulative damage theories, Load interaction and sequence effects, Cycle counting methods, Life estimation using stress life approach.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
SURFACE FAILURE
 

Introduction, Surface geometry, Mating surface, Friction, Adhesive wear, Abrasive wear, Corrosion wear, Surface fatigue spherical contact, Cylindrical contact, General contact, Dynamic contact stresses, Surface fatigue strength.   

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ralph I. Stephens, Ali Fatemi, Robert .R. Stephens, Henry o. Fuchs, “Metal Fatigue in engineering”, Second edition, John wiley Newyork, 2001.

T2. Jack. A. Collins, “Failure of Materials in Mechanical Design”, John Wiley, Newyork 1992.

T3. Robert L. Norton, Machine Design, Pearson, 2005.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. S.Suresh, “Fatigue of Materials”, Cambridge university press, Cambridge, U.K., 1998.

 

R2. Julie.A. Benantine, “Fundamentals of Metal Fatigue Analysis”, Prentice Hall, 1990.

 

R3. “Fatigue and Fracture”, ASM Hand Book, Vol 19, 2002.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50MARKS

ESE-50MARKS

MTME135 - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND IPR (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•To understand some basic concepts of research and its methodologies.

•To identify appropriate research topics and developing hypothesis. 

•To select and define appropriate research problem and parameters.

•To organize and conduct research/project in a more appropriate manner.

•To enable the students to imbibe and internalize the Values and Ethical Behaviour in the personal and Professional lives.

•To discuss the importance of intellectual property rights and IPR law. 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To develop understanding of the basic framework of research process and techniques. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2, PO4}

CO2: To identify various sources of information for literature review and data collection. {L1, L2, L4} {PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4}

CO3: To appreciate the components of scholarly writing and evaluate its quality {L1, L2, L6} {PO8, PO10}

CO4: To develop an ethical behaviour under all situations. {L1, L2} {PO8, PO12}

CO5: To understand Trademark, Copy right and Patent Laws. {L1, L2} {PO8, PO12}

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Research methodology
 

Research methodology – definition and significance, Types of research – exploratory research, conclusive research, modelling research, algorithmic research, casual research, theoretical and empirical research, cross-sectional and time series research. Research process- steps, research problems, objectives, characteristics, hypothesis and research in an evolutionary perspective

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Research design
 

Research design- definition, types –descriptive and experimental, validity and reliability of instrument, Validity of findings- internal and external validity, Variables in Research, types of data – primary and secondary data, methods of a data collection for scientific and business research, experiments, construction and validation of questionnaire, measurement and scaling. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Hypothesis testing
 

Testing of hypotheses concerning means (one mean and difference between two means – one tailed and two tailed tests), concerning variance _ one tailed Chi-square test

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Sampling methods
 

Probability sampling methods – simple random sampling with replacement and without replacement, stratified sampling, cluster sampling. Non-probability sampling method – convenience sampling, judgment sampling, quota sampling

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Report writing
 

Report writing – types of report, guidelines to write report, typing instruction, need of summary, importance of language in the preparation of research report, oral presentation. Recording the findings of research – publication- contents to meet the journals standard – impact factor – citation and citation index, policy on academic honesty and integrity – academics cheating and plagiarism. Opportunities to carry out research projects with funding/assistance from various Government agencies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION TO INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
 

Multinational corporations- Environmental ethics- Computer ethics and Weapons developments. Meaning and Types of Intellectual Property, Intellectual Property. Law Basics, Agencies responsible for intellectual property registration, International Organizations, Agencies and Treaties, Importance of Intellectual Property Rights.

Introduction, Meaning of Patent Law, Rights under Federal Law, United States patent and Trademark Office, Patentability, Design Patents, Plants patents, Double Patenting.

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
FOUNDATIONS OF TRADEMARKS
 

Meaning of Trademarks, Purpose and Functions of Trademarks, types of Marks, Acquisition of Trademark rights, Common Law rights, Categories of Marks, Trade names and Business Name, Protectable Matter, Exclusions from Trademark Protection

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
FOUNDATIONS OF COPYRIGHTS LAW AND PATENT LAW
 

Meaning of Copyrights, Common Law rights and Rights under the 1976 copyright Act, Recent developments of the Copyright Act, The United States Copyright Office.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.Garg, B.L, Karadia R, Agarwal F, and Agarwal, “An introduction to Research Methodology”, RBSA Publishers, 2002.

T2.Kothari C.R, “Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques”, New Age International, 1990.

T3.Mike Martin and Roland Schinzinger “Ethics in Engineering”, TMH, 2009.

T4.Deborah E. Bouchoux, “Intellectual Property Rights”, Cengage 2005.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.Sinha, S.C and Dhiman A.K, “Research Methodology”, 2nd volume, Ess Publications, 2002.

R2.Trochim W.M.K, “Research Methods: the concise knowledge base”, Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005. 

R3.Donald R. Cooper and Pamela S. Schindler, business Research Methods, 9th edition, Tata Mcgraw Hill, 2006

R4.Jayashree Suresh & B.S.Raghavan “Human values and Professional Ethics”, S. Chand, 2009.

R5.Govindarajan, Natarajan and Senthilkumar “Engineering Ethics”, PHI:009.

R6.Nagarajan “A Text Book on Professional ethics and Human values”, New Age International, 2009.

R7.Charles & Fleddermann “Engineering Ethics”, Pearson, 2009.

R8.Rachana Singh Puri and Arvind Viswanathan, I.K.”Practical Approach to Intellectual Property rights”, International Publishing House, New Delhi. 2010.

R9.A.B.Rao “Business Ethics and Professional Values”, Excel, 2009.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50

ESE-50

 

MTME151 - ADVANCED CAD LABORATORY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•The students will be able use Commercial CAD tools for solving real life Engineering Mechanics related problems. 

•Students will be able to function as a design engineering team member. 

•Students will be able to write technical reports.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: The students will be able use Commercial CAD tools for solving real life Engineering Mechanics related problems. {PO1,2 & L1,2,3}

CO2: Students will be able to function as a design engineering team member. {PO1,2,3,4 & L4,5}

CO3: Students will be able to write technical reports. {PO3,4 & L4,5}

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
List of Exercise :
 

1.      Introduction to CAD Commercial Tool.

2.      Type of Modules and commands.

3.      Introduction to Sketching

4.      Introduction to Part Modelling.

5.      Introduction to Assembly drawing

6.      Introduction to drafting 3D model.

7.      Exercises on Part Modelling.

8.      Exercises on Assembly Drawing.

9.      Generation of Bill of Materials (BOM).

10.   Surface Modelling.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1: 'A Primer on Computer Aided Machine Drawing-2007’, Published by VTU, Belgaum.

T2: 'Machine Drawing', N.D.Bhat & V.M.Panchal, 2012.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1: 'A Text Book of Computer Aided Machine Drawing', S. Trymbaka Murthy, CBS Publishers, New Delhi, 2007

R2: 'Machine Drawing’, K.R. Gopala Krishna, Subhash Publication,2012.

R3: 'Machine Drawing with Auto CAD', Goutam Pohit & Goutham Ghosh, 1st Indian print Pearson Education, 2007

R4: 'Auto CAD 2015, for engineers and designers', Sham Tickoo. Dream tech 2015

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-25MARKS

ESE-25MARKS

MTME152 - SIMULATION LABORATORY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•The students will be able use Commercial FEM tools for solving real life Engineering Mechanics related problems. 

•Students will be able to function as a design engineering team member. 

•Students will be able to write technical reports.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: The students will be able use Commercial FEM tools for solving real life Engineering Mechanics related problems. {PO1,2 & L1,2,3}

CO2: Students will be able to function as a design engineering team member. {PO1,2,3,4 & L4,5}

CO3: Students will be able to write technical reports. {PO3,4 & L4,5}

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
List of Experiments:
 

1.      Introduction to FEM Commercial Tool.

2.      Types of Elements and their usages (1-D, 2-D and 3-D)

3.      Selection and Simplification of the geometry and Meshing Techniques.

4.      Beam and Frame Problems solving using FEM 3D tool.

5.      Static loading problem solution using FEM tool.

6.      Dynamic Loading problem solution using FEM tool.

7.      Mesh convergence study using above two problems.

8.      Effects of different types of friction on contact mechanisms.

9.      Three dimensional truss problems

10.   Study on natural frequency and influence of materials and boundary condition on it.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.  Hughes, T. J. R. (2007). Finite Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Anlaysis. New York: Dover Publications.

T2. Babuška, I., Whiteman, J. R., & Strouboulis, T. (2011). Finite Elements: An introduction to the method and error estimation. Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press.

T3. Gokhale, N. S. (2008). Practical finite element analysis. Maharashtra: Finte to Infinite.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Thompson, E. G. (2005). An introduction to the finite element method: Theory, programming, applications. New Delhi: Wiley.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-25MARKS

ESE-25MARKMS

MTME231 - ADVANCED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides an introduction to finite elements method with a focus on one and two dimensional problems in structures, heat transfer, static and dynamics.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To emonstrate understanding of FE formulation for linear problems in solid mechanics.

CO2: To classify a given problem on the basis of its dimensionality as 1-D, 2-D, or 3-D, time-dependence as Static or Dynamic, Linear or Non-linear.

CO3: To develop mathematical model of a problem following the Rayleigh Ritz and Galerkin weighted residual method.

CO4: To Find the shape function for different elements including higher order elements. 

CO5: To derive Stiffness matrices, load vectors for bar, truss, beam and heat transfer problems

CO6: To obtain consistent and lumped mass matrices for axial vibration of bars and transverse vibration of beams and obtain fundamental frequency of natural vibration using the methods mentioned in the curricula.

CO7: To use commercial software like ANSYS or ABAQUS for implementation of FEM to obtain stress concentration due to a small hole in a rectangular plate subjected to traction on edges and concentrated loads at points on the edges and prescribed boundary conditions.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:11
ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS-ANALYSIS OF BARS AND TRUSSES
 

Basic Equations and Potential Energy Functional, 1-0 Bar Element, Admissible displacement function, Strain matrix, Stress recovery, Element equations, Stiffness matrix, Consistent nodal force vector: Body force, Initial strain, Assembly Procedure, Boundary and Constraint Conditions, Single point constraint, Multi-point constraint, 2-D Bar Element, Shape functions for Higher Order Elements.          

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:11
INTRODUCTION
 

Engineering Analysis, History, Advantages, Classification, Basic steps, Convergence criteria, Role of finite element analysis in computer-aided design. Mathematical Preliminaries, 

Differential equations formulations, Variational formulations, weighted residual methods  

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
AXI-SYMMETRIC SOLID ELEMENTS-ANALYSIS OF BODIES OF REVOLUTION UNDER AXI-SYMMETRIC LOADING
 

Axisymmetric Triangular and Quadrilateral Ring Elements. Shape functions for Higher Order Elements. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Two-Dimensional Elements-Analysis Of Plane Elasticity Problems
 

Three-Noded Triangular Element (TRIA 3), Four-Noded Quadrilateral Element (QUAD 4), Shape functions for Higher Order Elements (TRIA 6, QUAD 8) 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Three-Dimensional Elements-Applications To Solid Mechanics Problems System
 

Basic Equations and Potential Energy Functional, Four-Noded Tetrahedral Element (TET 4), Eight-Noded Hexahedral Element (HEXA 8), Tetrahedral elements, Hexahedral elements: Serendipity family, Hexahedral elements: Lagrange family. Shape functions for Higher Order Elements. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Beam Elements-Analysis Of Beams And Frames
 

1–D Beam Element, 2–D Beam Element, Problems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
HEAT TRANSFER / FLUID FLOW
 

Steady state heat transfer, 1 D heat conduction governing equation, boundary conditions, One dimensional element, Functional approach for heat conduction, Galerkin approach for heat conduction, heat flux boundary condition, 1 D heat transfer in thin fins. Basic differential equation for fluid flow in pipes, around solid bodies, porous media.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Dynamic Considerations
 

Formulation for point mass and distributed masses, Consistent element mass matrix of one dimensional bar element, truss element, axisymmetric triangular element, quadrilatateral element, beam element. Lumped mass matrix, Evaluation of eigen values and eigen vectors, Applications to bars, stepped bars, and beams.                                    

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Chandrupatla T. R., “Finite Elements in engineering”- 2nd Edition, PHI, 2007.

T2. Lakshminarayana H. V., “Finite Elements Analysis”– Procedures in Engineering, Universities Press, 2004. 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Rao S. S. “Finite Elements Method in Engineering”- 4th Edition, Elsevier, 2006

R2. P.Seshu, “Textbook of Finite Element Analysis”-PHI, 2004.

R3. J.N.Reddy, “Finite Element Method”- McGraw -Hill International Edition. Bathe K. J. Finite Elements Procedures, PHI. 

R4. Cook R. D., et al. “Concepts and Application of Finite Elements Analysis”- 4th Edition, Wiley & Sons, 2003.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50MARKS

ESE-50MRAKS

MTME232 - ADVANCED THEORY OF VIBRATIONS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•To obtain the idea of classification of vibration, modal analysis.

•To acquire the knowledge of damping factor and measuring instruments.

•To know the DOF and the damping factors

•To understand the measuring instruments

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To learn the classification of mechanical vibration {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2, PO4}

CO2: To acquire the knowledge of damping factor and transient vibration.

 {L1, L2, L4} {PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4}

CO3: To learn about vibration control and the damping factors. {L1, L2, L6} {PO8, PO10}

CO4: To understand the working of measuring instruments and condition monitoring systems.  {L1, L2} {PO8, PO12}

CO5: To learn random vibration and continuous systems. {L1, L2} {PO8, PO12}

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
REVIEW OF MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS:
 

Basic concepts; free vibration of single degree of freedom systems with and without damping, Forced vibration of single DOF-systems, Force and motion isolation, Two DOF-systems, natural frequency.      

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
TRANSIENT VIBRATION OF SINGLE DEGREE-OF FREEDOM SYSTEMS
 

Impulse excitation, Arbitrary excitation, Laplace transform formulation, Pulse excitation and rise time, Shock response spectrum, Shock isolation, Finite difference numerical computation. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
VIBRATION CONTROL
 

Introduction, Vibration isolation theory, Vibration isolation theory for harmonic excitation, practical aspects of vibration analysis, shock isolation, Dynamic vibration absorbers, and Vibration dampers. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
VIBRATION MEASUREMENT AND APPLICATIONS
 

Introduction, Transducers, Vibration pickups, Frequency measuring instruments, Vibration exciters, Signal analysis. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
NON LINEAR VIBRATIONS
 

Introduction, Sources of nonlinearity, Qualitative analysis of nonlinear systems. Phase plane, Conservative systems, Stability of equilibrium, Method of isoclines, Perturbation method, Method of iteration, Self-excited oscillations. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
MODAL ANALYSIS & CONDITION MONITORING
 

Dynamic Testing of machines and Structures, Experimental Modal analysis, Machine Condition monitoring and diagnosis.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS
 

Vibrating string, Longitudinal vibration of rods, Torsional vibration of rods, Suspension bridge as continuous system, Euler equation for beams, Vibration of membranes.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
RANDOM VIBRATIONS
 

Random phenomena, Time averaging and expected value, Frequency response function, Probability distribution, Correlation, Power spectrum and power spectral density, Fourier transforms, FTs and response. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. William T. Thomson, Marie Dillon Dahleh, Chandramouli Padmanabhan, “Theory of Vibration with Application”, 5th edition Pearson Education, 2008. 

T2. S. Graham Kelly, “Fundamentals of Mechanical Vibration” 2nd edition, McGraw Hill, 2000. 

T3. S. S. Rao, “Mechanical Vibrations”, 4th edition Pearson Education, 2003. 

T4. W.T. Thomson and Marie Dillon Dahleh, “Theory of Vibration with Applications”, Pearson Education 5th edition, 2007.

T5. V.P. Singh, “Mechanical Vibrations”, Dhanpat Rai & Company Pvt. Ltd., 3rd edition, 2006.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.  S. Graham Kelly, Schaum’s Outlines, “Mechanical Vibrations”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2007.

R2. J.S. Rao & K. Gupta, “Theory & Practice of Mechanical vibrations” New Age International Publications, New Delhi, 2001.

R3. Leonanrd Meirovitch, “Elements of Vibrations Analysis”, Tata McGraw Hill, Special Indian edition, 2007.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50MARKS

ESE-50MARKS

MTME233E1 - TRIBOLOGY IN BEARING DESIGN (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:45
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•To study the types of contacts, types of bearing. 

•Design a bearing based on their application and types of load. 

•To know the response of idealized bearing systems.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To understand the principles of tribology for selecting compatible materials for minimizing friction and wear in machinery.  {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2}

CO2: To understand the principles of bearing selection based on the application. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO3: To learn the computations required for selecting and designing bearings in machines. {L2, L3, L4} {PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4}

CO4: To understand the fundamental principles of gas lubricated bearings. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO5: To understand the fundamental principles of magnetic bearings .{L2, L3, L5} {PO1, PO2 PO3, PO4}

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION TO TRIBOLOGY
 

Introduction, Friction, Wear, Wear Characterization, Regimes of lubrication, Classification of contacts, lubrication theories. Newton's Law of viscous forces, Effect of pressure and temperature on viscosity.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
HYDRODYNAMIC LUBRICATION:
 

Newton's Law of viscous forces, Flow through stationary parallel plates. Hagen's poiseuille's theory, viscometers. Numerical problems, Concept of lightly loaded bearings, Petroff's equation, Numerical problems.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
HYDRODYNAMIC BEARINGS
 

Pressure development mechanism. Converging and diverging films and pressure induced flow. Reynolds's 2D equation with assumptions. Introduction to idealized slide bearing with fixed shoe and Pivoted shoes. Expression for load carrying capacity. Location of centre of pressure, Numerical problems

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
JOURNAL BEARINGS
 

Introduction to idealized full journal bearings. Load carrying capacity of idealized full journal bearings, Sommerfeld number and its significance. Comparison between lightly loaded and heavily loaded bearings, Numerical problems.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
EHL CONTACTS
 

Introduction to Elasto - hydrodynamic lubricated bearings. Introduction to 'EHL' constant. Grubin type solution. Introduction to gas lubricated bearings. Governing differential equation for gas lubricated bearings.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
HYDROSTATIC BEARINGS
 

Types of hydrostatic Lubrication systems Expression for discharge, load carrying capacity, Flow rate, Condition for minimum power loss. Torque calculations. Numerical problems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
POROUS & GAS BEARINGS
 

Introduction to porous bearings. Equations for porous bearings and working principal, Fretting phenomenon and it's stages             

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
MAGNETIC BEARINGS
 

Introduction to magnetic bearings, Active magnetic bearings. Different equations used in magnetic bearings and working principal. Advantages and disadvantages of magnetic bearings, Electrical analogy, Magneto-hydrodynamic bearings

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. B.C. Majumdar "Introduction to Tribology of Bearing", Wheeler Publishing, New Delhi, 2001. 

T2. Susheel Kumar Srivasthava "Tribology in industry" S. Chand and Co, 2000. 

T3. D. Berthe, D. Dowson, M. Godet, C.M. Taylor, “Tribological Design of Machine Elements”, Elsevier Science, 1989.

T4.  E. Richard Booser, Michael M. Khonsari, “Applied Tribology Bearing Design and Lubrication” Wiley, 2017.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Dudley D. Fulier, "Theory and practice of Lubrication for Engineers", New York Company, 1998. 

R2. Moore "Principles and applications of Tribology" Pergamon press, 1st Edition, 1975.

R3. Pinkus .O. Stemitch. "Theory of Hydrodynamic Lubrication", Mc-Graw Hill Book Company Inc., New York, 1961.

R4. Gerhandschwetizer, Hannes Bleuler & Alfons Traxler, "Active Magnetic bearings", Authors working group, www.mcgs.ch., 2003. 

R5. Radixmovsky, "Lubrication of Bearings - Theoretical principles and design", The Oxford press Company, 2000. 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50MARKS

ESE-50MARKS

MTME234E1 - DESIGN FOR MANUFACTURING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•To know the design consideration for manufacturing of components.

•To describe the different types of features in the design for manufacturing the components. 

•To know the geometrical tolerance for manufacturing the components.

•To learn the theory behind Component design with machining considerations.

•To learn to design gauges, suitable for checking of components in assembly.

 

Learning Outcome

  • CO1: Outline the appropriate design for economical production and select the materials. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2}

    CO2: Select between various machining and metal joining processes. . {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

    CO3: Apply a systematic understanding of knowledge in the field of metal casting and forging. {L2, L3, L4} {PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4}

    CO4: Fabricate basic parts and assemblies using powered and non – powered machine shop equipment in conjunction with mechanical documentation. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

    CO5: To learn to design gauges suitable for checking of components in assembly. {L1, L3, L5} {PO1, PO2 PO3, PO4}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Tolerence Analysis
 

Tolerence Analysis: Process capability, mean, varience, skewness ,kurtosis, Process capability metrics, Cp, Cpk,  Cost aspects,  Feature tolerances,  Geometries  tolerances,  Geometric tolerances,  Surface finish,  Review of relationship between attainable tolerance grades and different machining process. Cumulative effect of tolerance- Sure fit law and truncated normal law.                

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Effect of Materials and Manufacturing Process on Design:
 

Effect of Materials and Manufacturing Process on Design:  Major phases of design. Effect of material properties on design Effect of manufacturing processes on design.  Material selection process-  cost per unit property, Weighted properties and limits on properties methods.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Datum Features
 

Datum Features : Functional datum, Datum for manufacturing, Changing the datum. Examples.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Selective Assembly:
 

Selective Assembly:  Interchangeable part manufacture and selective assembly, Deciding the number of groups  -Model-1 : Group tolerance of mating parts equal, Model total and group tolerances of shaft equal. Control of axial play-Introducing secondary machining operations, Laminated shims, examples.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Design Considerations
 

 Design Considerations :  Design of components with casting consideration. Pattern, Mould, and Parting line. Cored holes and  Machined holes.

Identifying the possible and probable parting line. Casting requiring special sand cores. Designing to obviate sand cores.                                                                                        

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Component Design :
 

Component Design :  Component design with machining considerations link design for turning components-milling, Drilling and other related processes including finish- machining operations.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
True positional theory:
 

True positional theory:  Comparison between co-ordinate and convention method of feature location. Tolerance and true position tolerancing virtual size concept, Floating and fixed fasteners. Projected tolerance zone. Assembly with gasket, zero position tolerance. Functional gauges, Paper layout gauging.                                                                                                                 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Design of Gauges
 

Design of Gauges: Design of gauges for checking components in assemble with emphasis on various types of limit gauges for both hole and shaft.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Harry Peck, “Designing for Manufacturing “- Pitman Publications, 1983.

T2. R.K. Jain ,”Engineering Metrology” - Khanna Publication ,2011.

T3. Corrado Poli, “Design for Manufacturing”, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2001.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Geoffrey Boothroyd, peter dewhurst, Winston Knight,”Product design for manufacture and assembly” - Merceldekker.Inc. New York, CRC Press, 3rd Edition, 2010.

R2. “Material selection and Design”, Vol. 20 - ASM Hand book.

R3. O. MolloyE.A. WarmanS. Tilley, “Design for Manufacturing and Assembly: Concepts, architectures and implementation”, Springer Science & Business Media, 1998.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1-10

CIA2-25

CIA3-10

ATTENDANCE-05

 

ESE- 50

 

 

MTME251 - ADVANCED DESIGN LABORATORY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•To develop skills in the field of design Engineering.

•Verify the principles of the course, Application of the theory, Understanding of fundamentals of the subject design Engineering.

•Be in a position to relate theory and practice

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Will be able to apply the concepts of design Engineering, appreciate its application in various engineering application {L1,2} {PO1,2,5}

CO2: Will be able to perform design engineering experiments for various mechanical elements. {L1,2,5} {PO1,2,5}

CO3: Calculate the stresses, strain and elongation/Contraction in a bars and beams. (L1,L2,L3) (PO1, PO2,PO3)

CO4: To correlate the theoretical principles with application based studies. {PO1,2,5}

CO5: Determine and illustrate principal stresses, maximum shearing stress, and the stresses acting on a structural Member. (L1,L2) (PO1, PO2)

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
List of Experiments
 

1.      Tensile, shear and compression tests of metallic and non metallic specimens using Universal Testing Machine.

2.      Bending Test on metallic and nonmetallic specimens.

3.      Preparation of specimen for Metallographic examination of different engineering materials. Identification of microstructures of plain carbon steel, tool steel, gray C.I, SG iron, Brass, Bronze & composites

4.      Determination of critical speed of a rotating shaft.

5.      Determination of Fringe constant of Photoelastic material using.

    1. Circular disc subjected to diametral compression.
    2. Pure bending specimen (four point bending )

6.      Determination of stress concentration using Photoelasticity for simple components like plate with a hole under tension or bending, circular disk with circular hole under compression, 2D Crane hook

7.      To study the wear characteristics of ferrous, non-ferrous and composite materials for different parameters.

8.      Determination of Pressure distribution in Journal bearing.

9.      Determination of Principal Stresses and strains in a member subjected to combined loading using Strain rosettes.

10.   Determination of stresses in Curved beam using strain gauge.

11.   Determination of natural frequency, logarithmic decrement, damping ratio and damping coefficient in a single degree of freedom vibrating systems (longitudinal and torsional)

12.   Non-destructive test experiments like,

            (a). Ultrasonic flaw detection

            (b). Magnetic crack detection

            (c). Dye penetration testing. To study the defects of Cast and   Welded               specimens

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.Mechanical Vibrations, S. S. Rao, Pearson Education Inc, 4th edition, 2003.

T2.Mechanical Vibrations, V. P. Singh, Dhanpat Rai & Company, 3rd edition, 2006.

T3. Egor P. Popov, Engineering Mechanics of Solids, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi,   2001.

T4. R. Subramanian, Strength of Materials, Oxford University Press, 2007.

T5. Ferdinand P. Been, Russel Johnson Jr and John J. Dewole, Mechanics of Materials, Tata McGrawHill Publishing Co. Ltd., New Delhi 2005.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. S.S. Rattan, "Strength of Materials", 3rd Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, 2011.

R3.K.V. Rao, G.C. Raju, “Mechanics of Materials", First Edition, 2007.

R4.Egor.P. Popov,"Engineering Mechanics of Solids", Pearson Edu. India, 2008.

R5.W.A. Nash, Schaum's Outlines Strength of Materials,Tata Mcgraw-Hill Publishing Company 2010.

R6R.K. Rajput“Strength of Materials”,S.Chand & co Ltd. New Delhi, 2015.

R7. R.KBansal, “Strength of Materials”,Lakshmi Publication (P) Ltd, New Delhi,2009.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-25MARKS

ESE-25MARKS

MTME252 - ANALYSIS LABORATORY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·        To understand the concept of Finite Element Analysis and their applications, advantages and disadvantages.
·        To understand the Steps involved in FEA and factors influencing FEA results.
·        Discuss the assumptions on material properties and boundary conditions.

Learning Outcome

CO1:  To gain the basic knowledge about FEM tools and their characteristics. {L1,2} {PO1,2,5}

CO2:  To elaborate the selection of geometry and it simplification. {L1,2,5} {PO1,2,5}

CO3:  To understanding of types of material data and application of boundary conditions. {L1,2,5} {PO1,2,5}

CO4:  To defining the solution parameters and defining output requests. {L1,2,5} {PO1,2,5}

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
List of Experiments
 

1.  Introduction to FEM Commercial Tool.

2. Types of Elements and their usages (1-D, 2-D and 3-D)

3. Bars of constant cross section area, tapered cross section area and stepped bar, Trusses – (Minimum 2 exercises)

4. Beams – Simply supported, cantilever, beams with UDL, beams with varying load etc. (Minimum 6 exercises)

5. Stress analysis of a rectangular plate with a circular hole

6. Thermal Analysis – 1D & 2D problem with conduction and convection boundary conditions(Minimum 4 exercises)     

7. Dynamic Analysis

a)     Fixed – fixed beam for natural frequency determination

b)     Bar subjected to forcing function

c)      Fixed – fixed beam subjected to forcing function

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Introduction to Finite Elements in Engineering, T.R.Chandrupatla, A.D Belegund, 3rd Ed PHI, 2002.

T2. Finite Element Method in Engineering, S.S. Rao, 5th Edition, Elsevier, 2011. 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Finite Element Methods for Engineers U.S. Dixit, Cengage Learning, 2009

R2. Concepts and applications of Finite Element Analysis, R.D. Cook D.S Maltus, M.E Plesha, R.J.Witt, Wiley 4th Ed, 2009.

R3. First Course in Finite Element Methods, Daryl. L. Logon, Cengage Learning 5th edition, 2012.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-25MARKS

ESE-25MARKS

MTME271 - MINI PROJECT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The mini project work extends for a single semester and exposes the student to develop and present his/her work related to specific topic. Student shall select the project topic in consultation with mentor/guide/supervisor to his/her area of specialization and work on it. Student will prepare a report outlining objective of the project work, importance of the study, review of literature published in the relevant field and possible areas for further work. The student shall present seminar on this report. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Student will be able to apply the skill of presentation and communication techniques

CO2: Student will be able to use the knowledge of the fundamentals of subjects to search the related literature

CO3: Student will be able to analyze the available resources and to select most appropriate one

CO4: Students will be able to apply a multidisciplinary strategy to address current, realworld issues. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
Guidelines for Mini Project
 

Mini project should be based on thrust areas in Mechanical Engineering (Machine Design aspect is appreciated) 2. Students should do literature survey and identify the topic of seminar/mini project and finalize in Consultation with Guide/Supervisor. 3. Students should use multiple literature a

Text Books And Reference Books:

a

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

a

Evaluation Pattern

overall-50marks

CY01 - CYBER SECURITY (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Cyber Security is defined as the body of technologies, processes and practices designed to protect networks, computers, programs and data from attack, damage or unauthorized access. Similar to other forms of security, Cyber Security requires coordinated effort throughout an information system.  This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the different facets of Cyber Security.  In addition, the course will detail into specifics of Cyber Security for all parties who may be involved keeping view of Global and Indian Legal environment. 

Learning Outcome

After learning the course for a semester, the student will be aware of the important cyber laws in the Information Technology Act (ITA) 2000 and ITA 2008 with knowledge in the areas of Cyber-attacks and Cyber-crimes happening in and around the world. The student would also get a clear idea on some of the cases with their analytical studies in Hacking and its related fields.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit-I
 

Security Fundamentals, Social Media and Cyber Security Security Fundamentals - Social Media –IT Act- CNCI – Legalities

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Unit-II
 

Cyber Attack and Cyber Services Vulnerabilities - Phishing - Online Attacks. – Cyber Attacks - Cyber Threats - Denial of Service Vulnerabilities  - Server Hardening  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Unit-III
 

Risk Management and Assessment - Risk Management Process - Threat Determination Process - Risk Assessment - Risk Management Lifecycle – Vulnerabilities, Security Policy Management - Security Policies  - Coverage Matrix, Business Continuity Planning - Disaster Types - Disaster Recovery Plan - Business Continuity Planning - Business Continuity Planning Process.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Unit-IV
 

Vulnerability - Assessment and Tools: Vulnerability Testing - Penetration Testing Architectural Integration: Security Zones - Devices viz Routers, Firewalls, DMZ Host, Extenuating Circumstances viz. Business-to-Business, Exceptions to Policy, Special Services and Protocols, Configuration Management - Certification and Accreditation

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Unit-V
 

Authentication and Cryptography: Authentication - Cryptosystems - Certificate Services Securing Communications: Securing Services - Transport – Wireless - Steganography and NTFS Data Streams, Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems: Intrusion - Defense in Depth - IDS/IPS  -  IDS/IPS Weakness and Forensic Analysis, Cyber Evolution: Cyber Organization - Cyber Future

Text Books And Reference Books:

TEXT BOOKS:   

  1. Jennifer L. Bayuk and Jason Healey and Paul Rohmeyer and Marcus Sachs, Cyber Security Policy Guidebook, Wiley; 1 edition , 2012,  ISBN-10: 1118027809 
  2. Dan Shoemaker and Wm. Arthur Conklin, Cybersecurity: The Essential Body Of Knowledge,   Delmar Cengage Learning; 1 edition (May 17, 2011) ,ISBN-10: 1435481690
  3. Jason Andress, The Basics of Information Security: Understanding the Fundamentals of InfoSec in Theory and Practice, Syngress; 1 edition (June 24, 2011) ,  ISBN-10: 1597496537
  1. Stallings, “Cryptography & Network Security - Principles & Practice”, Prentice Hall, 3rd Edition 2002. 
  2. Bruce, Schneier, “Applied Cryptography”, 2nd Edition, Toha Wiley & Sons, 2007. 
  3. Man Young Rhee, “Internet Security”, Wiley, 2003. 
  4. Pfleeger & Pfleeger, “Security in Computing”, Pearson Education, 3rd Edition, 2003.  

 

REFERENCES:

  1. Information Technology Act 2008 Online 2. IT Act 2000.

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Research papers from reputed journals.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal 50 Marks.

MTME331E1 - DESIGN FOR MANUFACTURE (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:50
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

  • ·        To know the design consideration for manufacturing of components.

    ·        To describe the different types of features in the design for manufacturing the components.

    ·        To know the geometrical tolerance for manufacturing the components.

    ·        To learn the theory behind Component design with machining considerations.

  • To learn to design gauges, suitable for checking of components in assembly.

Learning Outcome

  • CO1: Outline the appropriate design for economical production and select the materials. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2}

    CO2: Select between various machining and metal joining processes. . {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

    CO3: Apply a systematic understanding of knowledge in the field of metal casting and forging. {L2, L3, L4} {PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4}

    CO4: Fabricate basic parts and assemblies using powered and non – powered machine shop equipment in conjunction with mechanical documentation. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

    CO5: To learn to design gauges suitable for checking of components in assembly. {L1, L3, L5} {PO1, PO2 PO3, PO4}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Effect of Materials and Manufacturing Process on Design:
 

Effect of Materials and Manufacturing Process on Design:  Major phases of design. Effect of material properties on design Effect of manufacturing processes on design.  Material selection process-  cost per unit property, Weighted properties and limits on properties methods.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Tolerence Analysis
 

Tolerence Analysis: Process capability, mean, varience, skewness ,kurtosis, Process capability metrics, Cp, Cpk,  Cost aspects,  Feature tolerances,  Geometries  tolerances,  Geometric tolerances,  Surface finish,  Review of relationship between attainable tolerance grades and different machining process. Cumulative effect of tolerance- Sure fit law and truncated normal law.                

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Selective Assembly:
 

Selective Assembly:  Interchangeable part manufacture and selective assembly, Deciding the number of groups  -Model-1 : Group tolerance of mating parts equal, Model total and group tolerances of shaft equal. Control of axial play-Introducing secondary machining operations, Laminated shims, examples.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Datum Features
 

Datum Features : Functional datum, Datum for manufacturing, Changing the datum. Examples.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Design Considerations
 

 Design Considerations :  Design of components with casting consideration. Pattern, Mould, and Parting line. Cored holes and  Machined holes.

Identifying the possible and probable parting line. Casting requiring special sand cores. Designing to obviate sand cores.                                                                                        

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
True positional theory:
 

True positional theory:  Comparison between co-ordinate and convention method of feature location. Tolerance and true position tolerancing virtual size concept, Floating and fixed fasteners. Projected tolerance zone. Assembly with gasket, zero position tolerance. Functional gauges, Paper layout gauging.                                                                                                                 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Component Design :
 

Component Design :  Component design with machining considerations link design for turning components-milling, Drilling and other related processes including finish- machining operations.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Design of Gauges
 

Design of Gauges: Design of gauges for checking components in assemble with emphasis on various types of limit gauges for both hole and shaft.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Harry Peck, “Designing for Manufacturing “- Pitman Publications, 1983.

T2. R.K. Jain ,”Engineering Metrology” - Khanna Publication ,2011.

T3. Corrado Poli, “Design for Manufacturing”, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2001.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Geoffrey Boothroyd, peter dewhurst, Winston Knight,”Product design for manufacture and assembly” - Merceldekker.Inc. New York, CRC Press, 3rd Edition, 2010.

R2. “Material selection and Design”, Vol. 20 - ASM Hand book.

R3. O. MolloyE.A. WarmanS. Tilley, “Design for Manufacturing and Assembly: Concepts, architectures and implementation”, Springer Science & Business Media, 1998.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1-10

CIA2-25

CIA3-10

ATTENDANCE-05

 

ESE- 50

 

 

MTME332E3 - OPTIMUM DESIGN (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:50
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·        Introduction to classical optimization technique.

·        To learn non-linear programming

  • To know the constrained optimization techniques.

Learning Outcome

CO1. Students will know the principles of optimization. {L1,2}{PO1,2}

CO 2. Students will have knowledge of algorithms for design optimization. {L1,2}{PO1,2,3}

CO 3. Students will be able to formulate an optimization problem. {L3}{PO1,2,3}

CO 4. Students should be able to find the optimum solution of their problems using optimization techniques. {L3}{PO1,2,3}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
CLASSICAL OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES I
 

Single variable optimization, Multivariable optimization with no constraints.        

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
INTRODUCTION
 

Engineering application of optimization, Statement of optimization problem, Classification of optimization problems

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
NON - LINEAR PROGRAMMING
 

One - dimensional minimization methods: Unimodal function, Unrestricted search, Exhaustrive search, Dichotomous search, Fibonacci method, Golden section method.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
CLASSICAL OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES II
 

Multivariable optimization with equality constraints and inequality constraints, Kuhn - Tucker conditions.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
UNCONSTRAINED OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES
 

Direct search methods: Univariate method, Hook and Jeeves' method, Powell's method, Simplex method.                                                      

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
INTERPOLATION METHODS
 

Quadratic, Cubic and Direct root interpolation methods.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
DESCENT METHODS
 

Steepest descent, Conjugate gradient, Quasi - Newton, Davidon - Fletcher - Powell method

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
CONSTRAINED OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES
 

Direct methods: characteristics of a constrained problem, Indirect methods: Transformation techniques, Basic approach of the penalty function method.         

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
 

Introduction, Multistage decision processes, Principle of optimality, Computational Procedure in dynamic programming, Initial value problem, Examples.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. S. S. Rao, “Optimisation - Theory and Application” - Willey Eastern.

T2. R.L Fox,”Optimization methods for Engg. Design “Addison – Wesley.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Ram,“Optimisation and Probability in System Engg”VanNostrand.

R2. K. V. Mital and C. Mohan, “Optimization methods” - New age International Publishers, 2016

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1-10

CIA2-25

CIA3-10

ATTENDANCE-05

ESE- 50

MTME333E1 - TRIBOLOGY AND BEARING DESIGN (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:50
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·        To study the types of contacts, types of bearing.

 

·        Design a bearing based on their application and types of load.

  •       To know the response of idealized bearing systems.

Learning Outcome

  • CO1: To understand the principles of tribology for selecting compatible materials for minimizing friction and wear in machinery.  {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2}

    CO2: To understand the principles of bearing selection based on the application. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

    CO3: To learn the computations required for selecting and designing bearings in machines. {L2, L3, L4} {PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4}

    CO4: To understand the fundamental principles of gas lubricated bearings. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

    CO5:To understand the fundamental principles of magnetic bearings .{L2, L3, L5} {PO1, PO2 PO3, PO4}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Hydrodynamic Lubrication
 

Newton's Law of viscous forces, Flow through stationary parallel plates. Hagen's poiseuille's theory, viscometers.Numerical problems, Concept of lightly loaded bearings, Petroff's equation, Numerical problems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Tribology
 

Introduction, Friction, Wear, Wear Characterization, Regimes of lubrication, Classification of contacts, lubrication theories. Newton's Law of viscous forces, Effect of pressure and temperature on viscosity.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Hydrodynamic Bearings
 

Pressure development mechanism. Converging and diverging films and pressure induced flow. Reynolds's 2D equation with assumptions. Introduction to idealized slide bearing with fixed shoe and Pivoted shoes. Expression for load carrying capacity. Location of center of pressure, Numerical problems.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Journal Bearings
 

Introduction to idealized full journal bearings. Load carrying capacity of idealized full journal bearings, Sommerfeld number and its significance. Comparison between lightly loaded and heavily loaded bearings, Numerical problems.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
EHL Contacts
 

Introduction to Elasto - hydrodynamic lubricated bearings. Introduction to 'EHL' constant.Grubin type solution. Introduction to gas lubricated bearings. Governing differential equation for gas lubricated bearings.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Hydrostatic Bearings
 

Types of hydrostatic Lubrication systems Expression for discharge, load carrying capacity, Flow rate, Condition for minimum power loss. Torque calculations.Numerical problems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Porous & Gas Bearings
 

Introduction to porous bearings. Equations for porous bearings and working principal, Fretting phenomenon and it's stages

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Magnetic Bearings