Department of
CIVIL-ENGINEERING






Syllabus for
Master of Technology (Structural Engineering)
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AC131B DISASTER MANAGEMENT 2 2 0
MLC136 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND IPR 2 2 50
MTCE131 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS 3 3 100
MTCE132 ADVANCED SOLID MECHANICS 4 3 100
MTCE133C THEORY OF STRUCTURAL STABILITY 4 3 100
MTCE134B STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING 4 3 100
MTCE151 STRUCTURAL DESIGN LAB 2 2 100
MTCE152 ADVANCED CONCRETE LAB 2 02 50
2 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MTCE231 FEM IN STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 4 3 100
MTCE232 STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS 4 3 100
MTCE251 MODEL TESTING LAB 2 2 50
MTCE252 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS LAB 2 2 50
MTCE272 MINI PROJECT 2 2 50
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CY01 CYBER SECURITY 2 2 50
MTCE331 OPTIMIZATION TECHINIQUES 4 3 100
MTCE332EA ADVANCED CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY 4 04 100
MTCE333ED ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING STRUCTURES 4 3 100
MTCE371 PROJECT WORK (PHASE I) 6 3 100
MTCE375 INTERNSHIP 1 2 0
4 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MTCE471 PROJECT WORK (PHASE-II) AND DISSERTATION 9 9 300
        

  

Assesment Pattern

Assessment is based on the performance of the student throughout the semester.

Assessment of each paper

  • Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) for Theory papers: 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)
  • End Semester Examination(ESE) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

 Components of the CIA

CIA I:  Assignments                                                               : 10 marks

CIA II:   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                      : 25 marks                              

CIA III: Quizzes/Seminar/Case Studies/Project Work: 10 marks

Attendance                                                                             : 05 marks

            Total                                                                                       : 50 marks

For subjects having practical as part of the subject

            End semester practical examination                                     : 25 marks

            Records                                                                                   : 05 marks

            Mid semester examination                                                    : 10 marks

            Class work                                                                              : 10 marks

            Total                                                                                       : 50 marks

Mid-semester practical examination will be conducted during the regular practical hour with prior intimation to all candidates. End semester practical examination will have two examiners an internal and external examiner.

Assessment of Project Work (Phase I)

§  Continuous Internal Assessment:100 Marks

¨       Presentation assessed by Panel Members

¨       Guide

¨       Midsem Project Report

 Assessment of Project Work (Phase II) and Dissertation

§  Continuous Internal Assessment:100 Marks

¨       Presentation assessed by Panel Members

¨       Guide

¨       Mid sem Project Report

§  End Semester Examination:100 Marks

¨       Viva Voce

¨       Demo

¨       Project Report

§  Dissertation (Exclusive assessment of Project Report): 100 Marks

¨       Internal Review: 50 Marks

¨       External Review: 50 Marks

Assessment of Seminar

§  Continuous Internal Assessment:50 Marks

¨       Presentation assessed by Panel Members

 Assessment of Internship (M.Tech)

All students should complete an internship either in Industry/Research labs before the 3rd semester. This component carries 2 credits.

§  Continuous Internal Assessment:2 credits

o   Presentation assessed by Panel Members

Examination And Assesments

Question Paper pattern:

End Semester Examination (ESE):

Theory Papers:

The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration.

The syllabus for the theory papers is divided into FIVE units and each unit carries equal weightage in terms of marks distribution.

Question paper pattern is as follows.

Two full questions with either or choice will be drawn from each unit. Each question carries 20 marks. There could be a maximum of three sub divisions in a question. The emphasis on the questions is broadly based on the following criteria:

  • 50 % - To test the objectiveness of the concept
  • 30 % - To test the analytical skill of the concept
  • 20 % - To test the application skill of the concept

 

Laboratory / Practical Papers:

The ESE is conducted for 50 marks of 3 hours duration. Writing, Execution and Viva – voce will carry weightage of 20, 20 and 10 respectively.

Mid Semester Examination (MSE):

Theory Papers:

The MSE is conducted for 50 marks of 2 hours duration.

 Question paper pattern; Five out of Six questions have to be answered. Each question carries 10 marks.

Laboratory / Practical Papers:

The ESE is conducted for 50 marks of 2 hours duration. Writing, Execution and Viva-voce will carry weight age of 20, 20 and 10 respectively.

Department Overview:
Civil engineering courses are designed to meet the needs of modern Civil Engineering fields like Construction Technology, Geo-Technical Engineering, Irrigation Engineering, Transportation Engineering, Structural Engineering, Environmental Engineering, etc. By the time students complete this course, they will be fully trained to analyze and design the complicated structures,
Mission Statement:
VISION To be a centre for academic excellence in Civil Engineering to serve and excel in the constantly changing societal needs with ethics and integrity. MISSION To impart knowledge in Civil Engineering to achieve academic excellence. To carry out research through interaction with research organizations and industry. Inculcating ethical values in order to promote teamwork and leadership qualities befitting to societal requirements. Providing adaptability skills for sustaining in the dynam
Introduction to Program:
Engineering Science is a key area in the study of an Engineering Course. Sound knowledge of this area develops principles of physics, laws of Chemistry and mathematical analytical skills, thus enabling graduates to solve numerical problems encountered in daily life, particularly in the area of engineering. An educational institution that does not respond to the present requirement and changes and does not lead to research will remain on the wayside of the higher education missing the opportunities for going beyond. Keeping our vision Excellence and Service, Engineering Science introduces the student to those areas of Science which, from a modern point of view, are most important in connection with practical problems.
Program Objective:
PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES: M. Tech. programme aims to fulfil the following broad objectives: 1. To make aware students about the importance and symbiosis between Science and Engineering. 2. Developing a respectable intellectual level seeking to expose the various concepts in Science. 3. To enhance the students reasoning, analytical and problem-solving skills. 4. To cultivate a scientific habit of thought and reasoning. 5. To develop a research culture in young minds. 6. Development of students? competence by evolving a learner-centred curriculum. 7. To encourage the students to uphold scientific integrity and objectivity in professional endeavours. 8. To translate a given physical or other information and data into mathematical form. 9. Obtaining the solution by selecting and applying suitable mathematical models. PROGRAMME OUTCOMES 1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data 3. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet the desired needs. 4. An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams. 5. An ability to identify, formulate and solve the engineering problems. 6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities. 7. An ability to communicate effectively 8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context 9. Recognition of the need for and an abi

AC131B - DISASTER MANAGEMENT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:0
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Disaster Management (DM) is an emerging discipline which addresses all facets, namely, Mitigation, Preparedness, Response and Recovery. Global and national policies urge to consider its application in all branches of engineering, science, management and social sciences. The course would help the students to appreciate the importance of disaster science and its applications in reducing risks so as to contribute to national development. It would help the students to enhance critical thinking and to understand interdisciplinary approaches in solving complex problems of societies to reduce the risk of disasters.

Course Objectives

1.    To  demonstrate a critical understanding of key concepts in disaster risk reduction and humanitarian response 

2.    To critically evaluate disaster risk reduction and humanitarian response policy and practice from multiple perspectives. 

3.     To develop an understanding of standards of humanitarian response and practical relevance in specific types of disasters and conflict situations.

4.     To critically understand the strengths and weaknesses of disaster management approaches, planning and programming in different countries, particularly their home country or where they would be working 

Learning Outcome

At the end of this course, students will be able to

CO1: Appreciate critical thinking and would be able to develop disaster scenarios for modelling.

CO2: Apply Disaster Risk Reduction approaches and practices in achieving sustainable development goals

CO3: Be sensible towards social responsibilities through the lens of Disaster Management. 

CO4: Motivated in contributing to developing disaster resilient infrastructures.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
ITRRODUCTION
 

Disaster: Definition, Factors And Significance; Difference Between Hazard And Disaster; Disaster and Hazard characteristics (Physical dimensions)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
DISASTER IMPACTS
 

Repercussions of Disasters and Hazards: Economic Damage, Loss Of Human And Animal Life, Destruction Of Ecosystem. Disaster and Hazard typologies and their applications in Engineering. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
DISASTER PRONE AREAS IN INDIA
 

Study Of Seismic Zones; Areas Prone To Floods And Droughts, Landslides And Avalanches; Areas Prone To Cyclonic And Coastal Hazards With Special Reference To Tsunami; Post-Disaster Diseases And Epidemics

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
DISASTER PREPAREDNESS AND MANAGEMENT
 

Preparedness: Monitoring Of Phenomena Triggering A Disaster Or Hazard; Evaluation Of Risk: Application Of Remote Sensing, Data From Meteorological And Other Agencies, Media Reports: Governmental And Community Preparedness. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
RISK ASSESSMENT & DISASTER RISK
 

Concept And Elements, Disaster Risk Reduction, Global And National Disaster Risk Situation. Techniques Of Risk Assessment, Global Co-Operation In Risk Assessment And Warning, People’s Participation In Risk Assessment. Strategies for Survival.

Disaster Mitigation Meaning, Concept And Strategies Of Disaster Mitigation, Emerging Trends In Mitigation. Structural Mitigation And Non-Structural Mitigation, Programs Of Disaster Mitigation In India.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T2. Paul, B.K, “ Environmental Hazards and Disasters: Contexts, Perspectives and Management”, Wiley-Blackwell, 2011

T1. Coppola, D, “Introduction to International Disaster Management “. Elsevier, 2015.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1: Assignment 

CIA2: Assignment 

MLC136 - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND IPR (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Objectives

  1. To give an overview of the research methodology and explain the technique of defining a research problem 
  2. To explain the functions of the literature review in research. 
  3. To explain carrying out a literature search, its review, developing theoretical and conceptual frameworks and writing a review. 
  4. To explain various research designs and their characteristics. To explain the details of sampling designs, and also different methods of data collections. 
  5. To explain the art of interpretation and the art of writing research reports. 
  6. To explain various forms of intellectual property, its relevance and business impact in the changing global business environment. 
  7. To discuss leading International Instruments concerning Intellectual Property Rights

Learning Outcome

At the end of this course, students will be able to

CO1- Discuss research methodology and the technique of defining a research problem (L1, L2) 

CO2-Explain the functions of the literature review in research, carrying out a literature search, developing theoretical and conceptual frameworks and writing are view. (L1, L2) 

CO3-Explain various research designs and their characteristics (L1, L2) 

CO4-Explain the art of interpretation and the art of writing research reports (L1, L2, L3, L4) (L1, L2, L3, L4)

CO5-Discuss various forms of intellectual property, its relevance and business impact in the changing global business environment and leading International Instruments concerning IPR (L1, L2, L3, L4)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction & Approaches
 

Meaning of research problem, Sources of research problem, Criteria Characteristics of a good research problem, Errors in selecting a research problem, Scope and objectives of research problem. Approaches of investigation of solutions for research problem, data collection, analysis, interpretation, Necessary instrumentations 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Literature review study & Ethics
 

Effective literature studies approach, analysis, Plagiarism, Research ethics

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Reports & Proposals
 

Effective technical writing, how to write the report, Paper Developing a Research Proposal, Format of a research proposal, a presentation and assessment by a review committee Systems, Computer Software etc. Traditional knowledge Case Studies, IPR and IITs. References

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Intellectual property right
 

Nature of Intellectual Property: Patents, Designs, Trade and Copyright. Process of Patenting and Development: technological research, innovation, patenting, development.  International Scenario: International cooperation on Intellectual Property. Procedure for grants of patents, Patenting under PCT

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Trends in IPR
 

Patent Rights: Scope of Patent Rights. Licensing and transfer of technology. Patent information and databases. Geographical Indications.

New Developments in IPR: Administration of Patent System. New developments in IPR

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Stuart Melville and Wayne Goddard, “Research methodology: an introduction for science & engineering students’”, Kenwyn, South Africa: Juta & Co. Ltd., 1996.

T2. Wayne Goddard and Stuart Melville, “Research Methodology: An Introduction” Juta Academic, 2004 

T3. Ranjit Kumar, “Research Methodology: A Step by Step Guide for beginners”, 2nd Edition,  Sage Publication, 2014

T4. Halbert, “Resisting Intellectual Property”, Taylor & Francis Ltd, 2007.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Mayall , “Industrial Design”, McGraw Hill, 1992. 

R2. Niebel , “Product Design”, McGraw Hill, 1974. 

R3. Asimov , “Introduction to Design”, Prentice Hall, 1962. 

R4. Robert P. Merges, Peter S. Menell, Mark A. Lemley, “Intellectual Property in New Technological Age”, 2016. 

R5. T. Ramappa, “Intellectual Property Rights Under WTO”, S. Chand, 2008 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1: Assignment (50%); Test (open book) (50%)

CIA2: Mid Sem Exam- Written Test (50 Marks)

CIA3: Assignment 

Semester Exam (100 Marks)

MTCE131 - ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To analyse the structures using stiffness method and approximate methods.

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, students will be able to

CO1. Analyze the skeleton structures using stiffness analysis code.

CO2. Use direct stiffness method understanding its limitation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
FLEXIBILITY METHOD
 

Force-transformation matrix – Development of global flexibility matrix for continuous beams, plane trusses and rigid plane frames (having not more than six co-ordinates – 6 x 6 flexibility matrix). Analysis of continuous beams, plane trusses and rigid plane frames by flexibility method (having not more than 3 coordinates – 3 x 3 flexibility matrix) Effects of temperature change and lack of fit. Related numerical problems by flexibility method.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Stiffness method
 

 Displacement-transformation matrix – Development of global stiffness matrix for continuous beams, plane trusses and rigid plane frames (having not more than six co-ordinates – 6 x 6 stiffness matrix). Analysis of continuous beams, plane trusses and rigid plane frames by stiffness method (having not more than 3 coordinates – 3 x 3 stiffness matrix)

Effects of temperature change and lack of fit. Related numerical problems by flexibility and stiffness method.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Curved beams
 

  Introduction to curved beams &assumptions, WINKLER BACH equations, Limitation, Radius of neutral surface of rectangular, triangular sections, Trapezoidal and circular sections, Stress distribution on open curved members, hooks. Stress distribution in closed rings, Deformations of open, thin curved members, problems on thin curved members, Deformations of closed thin curved members such as rings,  problems on closed rings.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Beams on elastic foundations
 

Differential equation of elastic line, interpretation of constants of integration, infinite beam with concentrated load, infinite beam with moment UDL, infinite beam problems, semi-infinite beams with concentrated load and moment, semi-infinite beam with fixed and hinged conditions, problems on semi-infinite beams, finite beams with symmetrical load, problems on symmetrical load, finite beams with unsymmetrical load, problems on unsymmetrical load.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Tension coefficient method
 

 introduction to tension coefficient method. Application of TCM to 2D frames, Application of TCM to 3D frames, problems on 3D frames.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Matrix Analysis of Framed Structures, Weaver and Gere.

2. The Finite Element Method, Lewis P. E. and WardJ. P., Addison-Wesley Publication Co.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Computer Methods in Structural Analysis, MeekJ. L., E and FN, Span Publication.

2. The Finite Element Method, Desai and Able, CBS Publication.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

MTCE132 - ADVANCED SOLID MECHANICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of this course is to make students

  • To learn principles of Analysis of Stress and Strain
  • To predict the stress-strain behaviour of continuum
  • To evaluate the stress and strain parameters and their inter relations of the continuum.

Learning Outcome

Solve simple problems of elasticity and plasticity understanding the basic concepts.

CO1:      Apply numerical methods to solve continuum problems.( L2,L3)PO2,PO3,PO4)

CO1: Achieve Knowledge of design and development of problem solving  skills.(L2,L3)(PO1,PO2,PO4)

CO2:         Understand the principles of stress-strain behaviour of continuum .(L1,L2) )(PO1,PO2)

CO4:         Describe the continuum in 2 and 3- dimensions .(L1,L2) )(PO1,PO2,PO3,PO9)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Elasticity
 

Introduction to Elasticity: Displacement, Strain and Stress Fields, Constitutive Relations, Cartesian Tensors and Equations of Elasticity.

Strain and Stress Field: Elementary Concept of Strain, Stain at a Point, Principal Strains and Principal Axes, Compatibility Conditions, 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Strain and Stress Field
 

Strain and Stress Field : Stress at a Point, Stress Components on an Arbitrary Plane, Differential Equations of Equilibrium, Hydrostatic and Deviatoric Components.

Equations of Elasticity: Equations of Equilibrium, Stress- Strain relations, Strain Displacement and Compatibility Relations, Boundary Value Problems, Co-axialIty of the Principal Directions

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Two-Dimensional Problems of Elasticity
 

Plane Stress and Plane Strain Problems, Airy’s stress Function, Two-Dimensional Problems in Polar Coordinates. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Torsion of Prismatic Bars
 

Torsion of Prismatic Bars: Saint Venant’s Method, Prandtl’s Membrane Analogy, Torsion of Rectangular Bar, Torsion of Thin Tubes. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Plastic Deformation
 

Plastic Deformation: Strain Hardening, Idealized Stress- Strain curve, Yield Criteria, von Mises Yield Criterion, Tresca Yield Criterion, Plastic Stress-Strain Relations, Principle of Normality and Plastic Potential, Isotropic Hardening

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Timoshenko, S. and Goodier T.N. "Theory of Elasticity", McGraw Hill International Editions, New Delhi, Third Edition, 1970.
  2. Srinath. L.S, “Advanced Mechanics of Solids”, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, Third Edition, 2011.
  3. Sadhu  Singh, "Theory of Elasticity", Khanna Publishers, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi.
  4. Chenn, W.P. and Henry D.J. "Plasticity for Structural Engineers", Springer Verlag New York 1988
  5. Valliappan C, “Continuum Mechanics Fundamentals”, Oxford IBH Publishing Co. Ltd, New Delhi.
  6. Xi Lu, “Theory of Elasticity”, John Wiley, New Delhi
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.                 1.   Sadhu Singh.  “Applied Stress Analysis”, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi 

  1. Verma. P.D.S, “Theory of Elasticity”,Vikas,Publishing House, NeW Delhi, 1997.
  2. Sadd. M. H, “Elasticity Theory, Applications and Numerics”, Elsevier, New Delhi, 2nd Edition, 2012.
  3. Saada. A.S, “Elasticity Theory and Applications”, Cengage Learning, New Delhi, 2014.
  4. Landau. L. D and Lifshitz. E. M, “Theory of Elasticity”, Elsevier, Gurgaon, Third Edition, 2010.
  5. Sitharam. T.G and GovindaRaju. L, “Applied Elasticity”, Interline Publishing, Bangalore, 2005.
  6. PDS, "Theory of Elasticity",Vikas Publishing Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi -1997.
  7. Singh. S, "Theory of Plasticity", Khanna Publishers, New Delhi 1988.
  8. Valliappan C, “Continuum Mechanics Fundamentals”, Oxford IBH Publishing Co. Ltd, New Delhi.
  9. Engineering Solid Mechanics, RagabA.R., BayoumiS.E., CRC Press,1999.
  10. Computational Elasticity, AmeenM., Narosa,2005.
  11.  Solid Mechanics, KazimiS. M. A., Tata McGraw Hill,1994.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1

     --> Assignment 10 Marks

     --> Internal test 10 Marks

CIA-2

    -- > Midsem Examination 50 Marks

CIA-3

   --> Project Based Assignemts

         --> Presentation 10 Marks

         -->Report 10 Marks

MTCE133C - THEORY OF STRUCTURAL STABILITY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To give students a rigorous grounding in the behaviour of structural components and systems that suffer from failure due to geometric, rather than material, nonlinearity; the principal features being that failure primarily occurs in the elastic range and due to buckling. It is a course based on fundamental mechanics that is designed to give the theoretical background to the more practical design-based modules

Learning Outcome

On successfully completing this course, students will be

  1. Understand potential failure modes that can occur due to geometric nonlinearity
  2. Understand techniques to classify post-buckling phenomena
  3. Analyse geometrically perfect and imperfect systems for structural stability
  4. Analyze basic structural components and frames that are susceptible to instability
  5. Evaluate stability of columns and frames
  6. Evaluate stability of beams and plates
  7. Apply stability criteria and concepts for analysing discrete and continuous systems

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Criteria for Design of Structures
 

 Stability, Strength, and Stiffness, Classical Concept of Stability of Discrete and Continuous Systems, Linear and nonlinear behaviour .
Beam columns: Differential equation for beam columns – Beam column with concentrated loads – Continuous with lateral load – Couples – Beam column with built in ends – Continuous beams with axial load – Determination of allowable stresses

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Stability of Columns
 

Axial and Flexural Buckling, Lateral Bracing ofColumns, Combined Axial, Flexural and Torsion Buckling

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Stability of Frames
 

Member Buckling versus Global Buckling, Slenderness Ratio of Frame Members.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Stability of Beams and Plates
 

Lateral Buckling of simply supported Beams: Beams of rectangular cross section subjected for pure bending, buckling of I Section subjected to pure bending Plates- axialflexural buckling, shearflexural buckling, buckling under combined loads.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Inelastic Buckling
 

Dynamic Stability

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Theory of elastic stability, Timoshenko and Gere, Tata Mc Graw Hill,1961
  2. Principles of Structural Stability Theory, Alexander Chajes, Prentice Hall, New Jersey. 1978
  3. Structural Stability of columns and plates, Iyengar, N. G. R., Eastern west press Pvt. Ltd., 1989
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Strength of Metal Structures,Bleich F. Bucking, Tata McGraw Hill, New York, 1975
  2. G. Simitses and D. Hodges, “Fundamentals of Structural Stability,” Butterworth-Heinemann, Elsevier Inc., 2006, First Edition,
  3. C. H. Yoo and S. Lee, “Stability of Structures: Principles and Applications,” Butterworth-Heinemann, First Edition, Elsevier Inc., 2011,
  4. T.V. Galambos, “Guide to Stability Design Criteria for Metal Structures,” Wiley, 5th edition 1998.
  5. M. Lal Gambhir, “Stability Analysis and Design of Structures,” Springer, 1st edition 2004.
  6. Z. Bazant and L. Cedolin, “Stability of Structures,” Oxford University Press, Inc., 1991.
  7. M.S. El Naschie, “Stress, Stability and Chaos,” McGraw-Hill Book Co., UK, 1990.
  8. V. Bolotin, “The Dynamic Stability of Elastic Systems,” Holden-Day, Inc., 1964.
  9. Luis A. Godoy, “Theory of Elastic Stability: Analysis and Sensitivity,” Taylor & Francis Group, 2000.
  10. W. Xie, “Dynamic Stability of Structures,” Cambridge University Press, 2006.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 10 marks

CIA 2 - 25 Marks

CIA 3 - 10 Marks

MTCE134B - STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course involves the introduction and understanding of the fundamentals of structural health monitoring and study the various vibration-based techniques for structural health monitoring. Students will learn the structural health monitoring using fiber-optic, Piezoelectric sensors, the structural health monitoring using electrical resistance and electromagnetic techniques.

The course is catred such that the students will :

 

·         Learn the fundamentals of structural health monitoring,

 

·         Study the various vibration-based techniques for structural health monitoring

 

·         Gain knowledge of the various methods for repair of structures

 

 

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. To diagnose the kinds of distress in a structure by understanding the causes and factors.
  2. To understand the various facets of structural audit to assess structures. 
  3. To assess the health of structure using static field methods. 
  4. To assess the health of structure using dynamic field tests 
  5. To suggest repairs and rehabilitation measures of the structure 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
STRUCTURAL HEALTH
 

Factors affecting Health of Structures, Causes of Distress, Regular Maintenance.

Concepts, Various Measures, Structural Safety in Alteration.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
STRUCTURAL AUDIT
 

Assessment of Health of Structure, Collapse and Investigation, Investigation Management, SHM Procedures. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
STATIC FIELD TESTING
 

Types of Static Tests, Simulation and Loading Methods, sensor systems and hardware requirements, Static Response Measurement. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
DYNAMIC FIELD TESTING
 

Types of Dynamic Field Test, Stress History Data, Dynamic Response Methods, Hardware for Remote Data Acquisition Systems, Remote Structural Health Monitoring. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION TO REPAIRS OF STRUCTURES
 

Case Studies, piezo–electric materials and other smart materials, electro–mechanical impedance (EMI) technique, adaptations of EMI technique. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

1.      Structural Health Monitoring Daniel Balageas, Claus-Peter Fritzen and Alfredo Güemes, John Wiley-ISTE, London, 2006.

2.      Health Monitoring of Structural Materials and Components - Methods with Applications, Douglas E Adams, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2007.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.                   Structural Health Monitoring and Intelligent Infrastructure”, Vol.-1,J.P. Ou, H. Li and Z. D. Duan, Taylor & Francis, London, 2006.

2.                   Structural Health Monitoring with Wafer Active Sensors, Victor Giurglutiu, Academic Press Inc., 2007.

3.                   Smart Materials and Structures, M.V. Gandhi and B.D. Thompson, Springer, 1992.

4.                  Structural Health Monitoring: Current Status and Perspectives, Fu Ko Chang, Technomic, Lancaster, 1997.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 : 10 MARKS

CIA-2 : 20 MARKS

CIA-3 : 10 MARKS

ASSIGNMENTS : 5

ATTENDANCE : 5

END SEMESTER EXAM : 50

 

MTCE151 - STRUCTURAL DESIGN LAB (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:20
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of this course is:

  • To integrate the theoretical design concepts with practical approach of design.
  • To analyse and design RCC multi storey buildings using relevant IS codes.
  • To give students hands on experience of structural engineering software STAAD-PRO and ETABS.

 

Learning Outcome

Upon completing this course students will be able to:

CO1: Compute the loads on a multistoried building – L3 & L4

CO2: Decide column location and structural framing plan for simple residential buildings - L4

CO3: Analyse and design a multi storey building using ETABS – L5 & L6 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Manual analysis and design of RCC elements
 

Types of buildings, Loads on a multistoried building, introduction to IS 875 part 1 and part 2, Basic concept of analysis and design, design procedure of slab, beam, column, footing and stair case.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:2
Architectural and structural drawings
 

Architectural plan, section and elevation, deciding column location, structural framing plan and centerline.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Building modeling using ETABS
 

Local axis, global axis, coordinates, centerline grids, defining material properties like concrete and steel, defining member properties of slabs, beams, columns and shear wall. Modeling the multistoried building, application of dead load, live load, superimposed dead load. Introduction to IS 1893 and application of seismic loads.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Analysis using ETABS
 

Analysis for gravity and seismic loadings. Member forces, bending moment, shear force, torsion, support reactions and exporting report.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Design and detailing of multistoried building
 

Design of beams and columns using ETABS. Detailing of structural elements as per SP 34 and IS 13920.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Subramanian N, “Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures”,Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2014.

T2. Varghese P. C, “Limit state Design of Reinforced Concrete”, PHI Learning, 2013.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. IS 875 (Part 1): 1987, “Code of practice for design loads – Dead loads (other than earthquake for buildings and structures)”

R2. IS 875 (Part 2): 1987, “Code of practice for design loads – Live loads (other than earthquake for buildings and structures)”

R3. IS 456: 2000, “Plain and reinforced concrete – code of practice”

R4. SP 16: 1980, “Design aids for reinforced concrete to IS 456: 1978.”

R5. SP 34: 1987, “Hand book on concrete reinforcement and detailing”

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - Project Based Assessment

ESE - Viva-Voce & Model Demonstration.

MTCE152 - ADVANCED CONCRETE LAB (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:02

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

SUBJECT Description:This paper covers test to be conducted for a fresh and hardened concrete. This paper aims at enabling the students to study the behavior of artificial construction material in fresh and hardened state and strength test to be conducted

 

 SUBJECT Description:This paper covers test to be conducted for a fresh and hardened concrete. This paper aims at enabling the students to study the behavior of artificial construction material in fresh and hardened state and strength test to be conducted

 SUBJECT objectives: The objective of this subject is to study

(i) Details regarding the cement concrete

(ii) Properties of Cement and Concrete in Fresh and Hardened state

Level of knowledge: Basic/Advanced/Working

 

 

 

 

 

Learning Outcome

1.      On completion of this course the students willhave the knowledge of conduct experiments and being able to analyze and interpret data.

2.      The student will be able to assess the  quality of materials practically in the field and study the behavior of materials in their project as well as in the research work

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Determination of workability
 

1.      Determination of workability of concrete by

·         Flow table

·         Slump cone

·         V B Consistometer

·         Compaction factor apparatus

2.      Determination of entrapped air in a given sample of concrete.

3.      Determination of bulk density of a freshly mixed concrete sample.

4.      Determination of permeability of concrete

5.      Determination of flexural strength of concrete

6.      Mix design of various grades of concrete

7.      Determination of strain in a given concrete sample

8.      Determination of strength of hardened concrete

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Concrete technology - Nevelli

2. Concrete Technology - M.S. Shetty

3. Concrete Technology - Orchard

4. Concrete Manual- M L Gambir

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Concrete technology - Nevelli

2. Concrete Technology - M.S. Shetty

3. Concrete Technology - Orchard

4. Concrete Manual- M L Gambir

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

 

Grading

6-10

4-6

2-4

1-2

Appropriate materials were selected and creatively modified in ways that made them even better

Appropriate materials were selected and there was an attempt at creative modification to make them even better.

Appropriate materials were selected.

Inappropriate materials were selected and contributed to a product that performed poorly

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mid semester examination

End semester examination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MTCE231 - FEM IN STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: The objective of this course is to familiarize students to study the finite element method and to know the importance in analysis of structures.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Solve structural analysis problems using Finite Element Method L1}{PO1}{PSO3}

CO2: Execute the Finite Element Program/ Software.{L2}{PO1}{PSO4}

CO3: Solve continuum problems using finite element analysis.{L3}{PO1}{PSO3}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction:
 

History and Applications. Spring and Bar Elements, Minimum Potential Energy Principle, Direct Stiffness Method, Nodal Equilibrium equations, Assembly of Global Stiffness Matrix, Element Strain and Stress.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Method of Weighted Residuals
 

 Galerkin Finite Element Method, Application to Structural Elements, Interpolation Functions, Compatibility and Completeness Requirements, Polynomial Forms, Applications.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-3
 

Finite elements used for one, two- & three-dimensional problems

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Application to Solid Mechanics
 

Plane Stress, CST Element, Plane Strain Rectangular Element, Isoparametric Formulation of the Plane Quadrilateral Element, Axi- Symmetric Stress Analysis, Strain and Stress Computations

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Computer Implementation
 

Computer Implementation of FEM procedure, Pre-Processing, Solution, Post-Processing, Use of Commercial FEA Software.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Seshu P., “Finite Element Analysis”, Prentice-Hall of India,2005

T2. Cook R. D., “Concepts and Applications of Finite Element Analysis”, Wiley J., New York, 1995.

T3. Hutton David, “Fundamentals of Finite Element Analysis”, Mc-Graw Hill, 2004.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Buchanan G.R., “Finite Element Analysis”, McGraw Hill Publications, New York, 1995.

R2. Zienkiewicz O.C. & Taylor R.L. “Finite Element Method, Vol. I, II & III”, Elsevier, 2000.

R3. Belegundu A.D., Chandrupatla, T.R., “Finite Element Methods in Engineering”, Prentice Hall India, 1991. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1

     --> Assignment 10 Marks

     --> Internal test 10 Marks

CIA-2

    -- > Midsem Examination 50 Marks

CIA-3

   --> Project Based Assignemts

         --> Presentation 10 Marks

         -->Report 10 Marks

MTCE232 - STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: 

·         To understand the basic terminologies of dynamics like simple harmonic motion, natural frequency, time period, degrees of freedom, damping and the difference between statics and dynamics.

·         To derive the equation of motion and understand the behaviour of SDOF & MDOF systems subjected to free vibration and forced vibration.

 To understand the behaviour of structures when subjected to dynamic forces like earthquake and wind.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Compute the natural frequency and other dynamic parameters of SDOF system - L2 & L3

CO2: Compute the natural frequency and other dynamic parameters of MDOF system-L2 & L3

CO3: Interpret the behavior of structures subjected to dynamic loading - L4

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to structural dynamics
 

Introduction to structural dynamics:Difference between statics and dynamics, basic terminologies, degrees of freedom, mathematical model, simple harmonic motion, equation of motion of SDOF system subjected to free vibration.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Single degree of freedom system
 

Single degree of freedom system – free vibration:Solution for equation of motion of SDOF system subjected to free vibration, un-damped and damped systems, logarithmic decrement and numerical problems. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Single degree of freedom system
 

Single degree of freedom system – forced vibration:Equation of motion and solution to SDOF system subjected to forced vibration, resonance, dynamic load factor, half power band width, transmissibility ratio, response to impulsive loading, Duhamel’s Integral. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Multi degree of freedom system
 

Multi degree of freedom system:Shear building model, equation of motion and solution to MDOF system subjected to free vibration, Eigen value and Eigen vectors, Mode shapes, Normalization of modes, response of MDOF systems subjected to forced vibration, approximate methods of analysis and response of continuous systems. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Dynamic problems in civil engineering
 

Dynamic problems in civil engineering:Effect of seismic loading, effects of wind loading, moving loads and vibration caused by traffic, blast loads, foundations for industrial machinery and Base isolation techniques.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Chopra A.K Dynamics of Structures Theory and Applications to Earthquake Engineering, 5th Edition, Pearson, 2017.

T2. Paz Mario “Structural Dynamics Theory & Computation “, Springer, 5th Edition, 2006

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Clough R. W. and Penzien J “Dynamics of Structures”, McGraw Hill Education, 3rd Edition, 2003.

R2. Damodarasamy. S.R and Kavitha. S, Basics of Structural Dynamics and Aseismic Design PHI Learning private limited, 2012.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1

     --> Assignment 10 Marks

     --> Internal test 10 Marks

CIA-2

    -- > Midsem Examination 50 Marks

CIA-3

   --> Project Based Assignemts

         --> Presentation 10 Marks

         -->Report 10 Marks

MTCE251 - MODEL TESTING LAB (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:20
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·         To test structural elements like beam, slab and columns using loading frame.

To test building models for dynamic loading on electro dynamic shake table.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Test structural elements using loading frame (L2)

CO2: Prepare report for experimental testing (L3)

CO3: Calculate natural frequency of building models (L2)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Experiment-1
 

To test beam element on loading frame

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Experiment-2
 

To test column element on loading frame

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Experiment-3
 

To test Slab element on loading frame

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Experiment-4
 

To calculate the natural frequency of a scaled building model

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Experiment-5
 

Beam vibration and vibration isolation

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Advanced Structural Engineering Lab Manual

T2. Structural Dynamics Lab Manual

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1: Reinforced Concrete Design, Pillai S. U. and MenonD., Tata McGraw-Hill, 3rd Ed, 1999 

R2:Chopra A.K Dynamics of Structures Theory and Applications to Earthquake Engineering, 5th Edition, Pearson, 2017.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - Project Based Assessment

ESE - Viva-Voce & Model Demonstration.

MTCE252 - NUMERICAL ANALYSIS LAB (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The aim is to teach the student various topics in Numerical Analysis such as solutions of nonlinear equations in one variable, interpolation and approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, direct methods for solving linear systems, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations

Learning Outcome

CO1:Find Roots of non-linear equations by Bisection method and Newton’s method

CO2: Do curve fitting by least square approximations

CO3:Solve the system of Linear Equations using Gauss - Elimination/ Gauss - Seidal Iteration/Gauss - Jorden Method

CO4:To Integrate Numerically Using Trapezoidal and Simpson’s Rules

CO5:To Find Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations by Euler’s Method,

Runge- KuttaMethod.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Experiments
 

1.      Find the Roots of Non-Linear Equation Using Bisection Method.

2.      Find the Roots of Non-Linear Equation Using Newton’s Method.

3.      Curve Fitting by Least Square Approximations.

4.      Solve the System of Linear Equations Using Gauss - Elimination Method.

5.      Solve the System of Linear Equations Using Gauss - Seidal Iteration Method.

6.      Solve the System of Linear Equations Using Gauss - Jorden Method.

7.      Integrate numerically using Trapezoidal Rule.

8.      Integrate numerically using Simpson’s Rules.

9.      Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations by Euler’s Method.

Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations By Runge- Kutta Method.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Sastry S.S, IntroductoryMethods of Numerical Analysis, 5th Edition

T2. Shanker G. Rao, Numerical Analysis, 5th Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Mahinder Kumar Jain, Numerical Methods: Problems and Solutions 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - Project Based Assessment

ESE - Viva-Voce & Model Demonstration.

MTCE272 - MINI PROJECT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:20
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To  identification  the problem based on the literature review on the topic referring to latest literatures available. 

To write the objectives for the choosen problem statement

Learning Outcome

CO1: Identify structural engineering problems reviewing available literature.

CO2:Study different techniques used to analyze complex structural systems.

Co3: Work on the solutions given and present solution by using his/her technique applying engineering principles. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Mini Project
 

Mini Project will have mid semester presentation and end semester presentation. Mid semester presentation will include identification of the problem based on the literature review on the topic referring to latest literature available.  

End semester presentation should be done along with the report on identification of topic for the work and the methodology adopted involving scientific research, collection and analysis of data, determining solutions highlighting individuals’ contribution.   

Continuous assessment ofMini Project at Mid Sem and End Sem will be monitored by the departmental committee. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1: Journal papers

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1: Technical Reports

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - Project Based Assessment

ESE - Viva-Voce & Model Demonstration.

CY01 - CYBER SECURITY (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Cyber Security is defined as the body of technologies, processes and practices designed to protect networks, computers, programs and data from attack, damage or unauthorized access. Similar to other forms of security, Cyber Security requires coordinated effort throughout an information system.  This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the different facets of Cyber Security.  In addition, the course will detail into specifics of Cyber Security for all parties who may be involved keeping view of Global and Indian Legal environment. 

Learning Outcome

After learning the course for a semester, the student will be aware of the important cyber laws in the Information Technology Act (ITA) 2000 and ITA 2008 with knowledge in the areas of Cyber-attacks and Cyber-crimes happening in and around the world. The student would also get a clear idea on some of the cases with their analytical studies in Hacking and its related fields.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit-I
 

Security Fundamentals, Social Media and Cyber Security Security Fundamentals - Social Media –IT Act- CNCI – Legalities

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Unit-II
 

Cyber Attack and Cyber Services Vulnerabilities - Phishing - Online Attacks. – Cyber Attacks - Cyber Threats - Denial of Service Vulnerabilities  - Server Hardening  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Unit-III
 

Risk Management and Assessment - Risk Management Process - Threat Determination Process - Risk Assessment - Risk Management Lifecycle – Vulnerabilities, Security Policy Management - Security Policies  - Coverage Matrix, Business Continuity Planning - Disaster Types - Disaster Recovery Plan - Business Continuity Planning - Business Continuity Planning Process.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Unit-IV
 

Vulnerability - Assessment and Tools: Vulnerability Testing - Penetration Testing Architectural Integration: Security Zones - Devices viz Routers, Firewalls, DMZ Host, Extenuating Circumstances viz. Business-to-Business, Exceptions to Policy, Special Services and Protocols, Configuration Management - Certification and Accreditation

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Unit-V
 

Authentication and Cryptography: Authentication - Cryptosystems - Certificate Services Securing Communications: Securing Services - Transport – Wireless - Steganography and NTFS Data Streams, Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems: Intrusion - Defense in Depth - IDS/IPS  -  IDS/IPS Weakness and Forensic Analysis, Cyber Evolution: Cyber Organization - Cyber Future

Text Books And Reference Books:

TEXT BOOKS:   

  1. Jennifer L. Bayuk and Jason Healey and Paul Rohmeyer and Marcus Sachs, Cyber Security Policy Guidebook, Wiley; 1 edition , 2012,  ISBN-10: 1118027809 
  2. Dan Shoemaker and Wm. Arthur Conklin, Cybersecurity: The Essential Body Of Knowledge,   Delmar Cengage Learning; 1 edition (May 17, 2011) ,ISBN-10: 1435481690
  3. Jason Andress, The Basics of Information Security: Understanding the Fundamentals of InfoSec in Theory and Practice, Syngress; 1 edition (June 24, 2011) ,  ISBN-10: 1597496537
  1. Stallings, “Cryptography & Network Security - Principles & Practice”, Prentice Hall, 3rd Edition 2002. 
  2. Bruce, Schneier, “Applied Cryptography”, 2nd Edition, Toha Wiley & Sons, 2007. 
  3. Man Young Rhee, “Internet Security”, Wiley, 2003. 
  4. Pfleeger & Pfleeger, “Security in Computing”, Pearson Education, 3rd Edition, 2003.  

 

REFERENCES:

  1. Information Technology Act 2008 Online 2. IT Act 2000.

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Research papers from reputed journals.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal 50 Marks.

MTCE331 - OPTIMIZATION TECHINIQUES (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

           COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

             This is a core course in 3rd semester MTech. The syllabus covers different optimization techniques and its application in solving engineering problems.

1.      COURSE OBJECTIVES

 At the end of this course the student shall be able to know usefulness of optimization techniques and its applications in analysis and design of complicated civil engineering structures

Learning Outcome

Sl NO

DESCRIPTION

REVISED BLOOM’S TAXONOMY (RBT)LEVEL

1

Formulate the objective function by choosing the variables and define the constraints for a given problem.

 

L1

2

Solve a linear programming problem, including simplex, revised simplex and duality methods or non-linear programming problem by various techniques studied including geometric and dynamic programming problems.

L2, L3

3

Formulate the objective function for a structure and define the constraints and optimize the variables by various techniques studied.

L2, L3

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
INTRODUCTION
 

 History of Optimization, Introduction to optimization, engineering applications of optimization, Formulation of structural optimization problems as programming problems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES
 

Classical optimization techniques, single variable optimization, multivariable optimization with no constraints, unconstrained minimization techniques and algorithms constrained optimization solutions by penalty function techniques, Lagrange multipliers techniques and feasibility techniques

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
LINEAR PROGRAMMING
 

Linear programming, standard form of linear programming, geometry of linear programming problems, solution of a system of linear simultaneous equations, pivotal production of general systems of equations, simplex algorithms, revised simpler methods, duality in linear programming. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
NON-LINEAR PROGRAMMING
 

Non-linear programming, one dimensional minimization methods, elimination methods, Fibonacci method, golden section method, interpolation methods, quadratic and cubic methods, Unconstrained optimization methods, direct search methods, random search methods, descent methods.

Constrained optimization techniques such as direct methods, the complex methods, cutting plane method, exterior penalty function methods for structural engineering problems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
GEOMETRIC PROGRAMMING
 

Geometric programming, conversion of NLP as a sequence of LP/ geometric programming. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
 

Dynamic programming conversion of NLP as a sequence of LP/ Dynamic programming.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
STRUCTURAL OPTIMIZATION
 

Formulation and solution of structural optimization problems by different techniques.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[T1] Rao S. S., “Engineering Optimization – Theory and Practice”, New Age International Publishers, New Delhi, Third Enlarged Edition, 2012.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[R1] Bhavikatti S.S. “Structural optimization Using Sequential Linear Programming”-Vikas publishing house, New Delhi, 2003.

[R2] Belegundu. A. D, Chanrupatla. T. R, “Optimization Concepts and Applications in Engineering”, Cambridge University Press, New Delhi, Second Edition, 2011.

[R3] Chandra. S, Jayadeva, Mehra. A, “Numerical Optimization with Applications”, Narosa, New Delhi, 2011.

[R4] Ravindran. A, Ragsdell. K.M and Reklaitis, “Engineering Optimization – Methods and Applications”, Wiley India, New Delhi, Second Edition, 2011.

[R5] Chong. E. K. P and Zak. S. H, “An Introduction to Optimization” Wiley India, New Delhi, Second Edition, 2010.

[R6] Fletcher. R, “Practical Methods of Optimisation”, Wiley India, New Delhi, Second Edition, 2006.

[R7] Ganguli. R, “Engineering Optimization – A modern approach”, University Press, Hyderabad, 2011.

[R8] Mital. K.V and Mohan. C, “Optimization Methods in Operations Research and Systems Analysis”, New Age International Publishers, New Delhi, Revised Third Edition, 2011.

[R9] Joshi. M. C and Moudgalya.K, “Optimization – Theory and Practice”, Narosa, New Delhi, 2013.

[R10] Brinkhuis. J and Tikhomirov. V, “Optimization: Insights and Applications”, New Age International Publishers, New Delhi, 2010.

[R11] Christensen. P. W and Klarbring. A, “An Introduction to Structural Optimization”, Springer, Sewden, 2009.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Sl No.

Evaluation Component

Module

Duration

(min)

Nature of Component

Validation       (Max. Marks)

 

1

    

       CIA -I

Assignment

-

Solving Practical Problems

10

Class Test

40

Solving Practical Problems

10

2

      CIA -II

Written Test

120

Closed Book

50

 

3

    

      CIA -III

Project based learning

60

Case studies on optimization of structure

 

10

Class Test

40

Solving Practical Problems

10

4

ESE

ESE

180

Closed Book

100

The final marks calculated out of 100 marks is as follows:

CIA-I=10 marks

CIA-II=25 marks

CIA-III=10 marks

ESE=50 marks

Attendance= 5 marks 

MTCE332EA - ADVANCED CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:04

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

SUBJECT Description:This paper is designed to give an insight into the role of admixtures, mix design, in preparation of concrete, durability of concrete, testing of hardened concrete. Special concretes like Ready mixed concrete, fibre reinforced concrete, light weight, High density and High performance concrete.

 SUBJECT objective: At the end the student shall have a knowledge use of admixtures, design of mix, durability and testing concrete in hardened state and about special concretes.

Level of knowledge: Advanced      

Learning Outcome

On successful completion of this subject the students will be able to

  1. Have detailed understanding on the properties of concrete
  2. Independently perform concrete mix proportioning using Indian and International standards
  3. Develop interest in performing research in the area of concrete materials, specifically with respect to recycling and reuse of materials in concrete with sustainable approach
  4. Apply critical thinking on the topics related to special concrete and independently be able to review current research articles

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
PORTLAND CEMENT
 

UNIT-I (09 HOURS)

Importance of Bogue’s compounds, Structure of a Hydrated Cement Paste, Volume of hydrated product, porosity of paste and concrete, transition Zone, Elastic Modulus, factors affecting strength and elasticity of concrete, Rheology of concrete in terms of Bingham’s parameter. Properties on Cement, aggregates and their test, concrete-Types and tests on concrete         

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
ADMIXTURES
 

UNIT-II (10HOURS)

ADMIXTURES: CHEMICAL ADMIXTURES - Mechanism of chemical admixture, Plasticizers and Super-plasticizers and their effect on concrete property in fresh and hardened state, Marsh cone test for optimum dosage of super-plasticizer, retarder, accelerator, Air-entraining admixtures, new generation super-plasticizer.

 

 

 

MINERAL ADMIXTURE-Fly ash, Silica fume, GCBS, and their effect on concrete property in fresh state and hardened state.   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
CONCRETE MIX DESIGN
 

UNIT-III (08 HOURS)

MIX DESIGN - Factors affecting mix design, design of concrete mix by BIS method using IS: 10262 and current American (ACI)/ British (BS) methods.  Provisions in revised IS: 10262-2009

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
DURABILITY OF CONCRETE AND TESTS ON HARDENED CONCRETE
 

UNIT-IV (15HOURS)

DURABILITY OF CONCRETE - Introduction, Permeability of concrete, chemical attack, acid attack, efflorescence, Corrosion in concrete. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat. Alkali Aggregate Reaction, IS: 456-2000 requirement for durability.   

Test on Hardened concrete - Effect of end condition of specimen, capping, H/D ratio, rate of loading, moisture condition. Compression, tension and flexure tests. Tests on composition of hardened concrete-cement content, original w/c ratio. NDT tests concepts-Rebound hammer, pulse velocity methods.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:18
READY MIX, FRC, LIGHT WEIGHT, HIGH DENSITY AND HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE
 

UNIT-V (18HOURS)

READY MIXED concrete - manufacture, transporting, placing, precautions, Methods of concreting- Pumping, under water concreting, shotcrete, High volume fly ash concrete concept, properties, typical mix Self compacting concrete concept, materials, tests, properties, application and typical mix.

Fiber reinforced concrete - Fibers types and properties, Behavior of FRC in compression, tension including pre-cracking stage and post-cracking stages, behavior in flexure and shear.

FERRO CEMENT-materials, techniques of manufacture, properties and application       Light weight, High density & high performance concrete - Light weight concrete-materials properties and types. Typical light weight concrete mix, High density concrete and high performance concrete-materials, properties and applications, typical mix.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

REFRENCE BOOKS:

1.      “ACI: Code for Mix Design”

2.      “IS: 10262-2004”

3.      A M Neville J.J Brooks “Concrete Technology”,Pearson Education .

4.      Aitcin P C“High Performance Concrete”, E and FN, London.

5.      Gambhir M.L “Concrete Manual”, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, New Delhi

6.      John Newman“Advanced Concrete Technology Constituent materials”, Ban Seng Choo- London

7.      John Newman“Advanced Concrete Technology Processes”, Ban Seng Choo, - London.

8.      Krishna Raju N Concrete Mix Design”, Sehgal Publishers

9.      Mehta P K & P J M Monteiro, Concrete”, Prentice Hall, New Jersey (Special Student Edition by Indian Concrete Institute Chennai)

10.  Neville, A.M“Properties of Concrete”, ELBS Edition, Longman Ltd., London

11.  Power T.C“Properties of Fresh Concrete”, E and FN, London

12.  Prasad. J C G K Nair, Non-Destructive Test and Evaluation of Materials”, Mc Graw Hill.

13.  SanthakumarA R,“Concrete Technology”, Oxford University Press.

14.  Shetty M S“Concrete Technology”,

 


Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

1. Shetty M S“Concrete Technology”,S Chand & Company Pvt Ltd, Seventh edition, Reprint 2013

2. Neville, A.M“Properties of Concrete”, ELBS Edition, Longman Ltd., London, fifth Edition.

3. Power T.C“Properties of Fresh Concrete”, E and FN, London

4. Mehta P K & P J M Monteiro, “Concrete”, Prentice Hall, New Jersey (Special Student Edition by Indian Concrete Institute Chennai)

Evaluation Pattern

SI No.

Evaluation Component

Module

Duration

(min)

Nature of Component

Validation

1

CIA I

Quiz, assignment, test

----

Closed book/open book

Written test

2

CIA II

MSE

120

Closed book

MSE

3

CIA III

Seminar/assignment test

-----

Closed/open book

Seminar and test

4

Semester Exam

ESE

180

Closed book

ESE

MTCE333ED - ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING STRUCTURES (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The main objectives of the course are to impart knowledge regarding the analysis and design of various types of environmental engineering structures such as circular, rectangular, spherical and Intze type tanks, Swimming pools, Intake towers, settling tanks, clarifloculators and aeration tanks. Upon completion of this course the student would reliably demonstrate the ability to apply the knowledge of the Design of Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete for the design of Pipes and Liquid retaining structures

Learning Outcome

After the completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge of analysis and design principles of reinforced and prestressed concrete for the structural design of concrete pipes subjected to internal pressure, soil pressure
  2. Apply knowledge of analysis and structural design principles of reinforced concrete for structural design Cylindrical, Spherical and  Conical shapes roofing systems using membrane theory of shell as per IS
  3. Apply knowledge of analysis and structural design principles of reinforced concrete  for the structural design of folded plates roofing systems as per IS
  4. Apply knowledge of analysis and structural design principles of reinforced concrete for structural design of circular, rectangular, spherical and Intze type of tanks as per IS
  5. Apply knowledge of analysis and structural design principles of prestressed concrete for structural design of circular tank as per IS
  6. Apply knowledge of analysis and structural design principles of reinforced concrete for structural design of Underground reservoirs and swimming pools, Intake towers, settling tanks, clarifloculators, aeration tanks
  7. Identify different types of structural and non-structural cracks and evaluate rehabilitation methods for Masonry, Concrete and Steel Structure

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
DESIGN OF PIPES
 

Structural design of a) Concrete b) Prestressed Concrete c) Steel and d) Cast iron piping mains, sewerage tanks design - anchorage for pipes - massive outfalls - structural design and laying - hydrodynamic considerations. Advances in the manufacture of pipes

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF WATER TANKS
 

Design of concrete roofing systems a) Cylindrical b) Spherical and c) Conical shapes using membrane theory and design of various types of folded plates for roofing with concrete. IS Codes for the design of water retaining structures. Design of circular, rectangular, spherical and Intze type of tanks using concrete. Design of prestressed concrete cylindrical tanks - Economic analysis - introduction to computer aided design and packages.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
DESIGN OF SPECIAL PURPOSE STRUCTURES
 

Underground reservoirs and swimming pools, Intake towers, Structural design including foundation of water retaining structures such as settling tanks, clarifloculators, aeration tanks etc. - effect of earth pressure and uplift considerations - selection of materials of construction

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
REPAIR AND REHABILITATION OF STRUCTURES
 

Diagonising the cause and damage, identification of different types of structural and non-structural cracks – repair and rehabilitation methods for Masonry, Concrete and Steel Structures

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
STEEL WORKS
 

Exposure on Steel, Lattice Structures Used In Water and Sewerage Works

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1.    Green, J.K. and Perkins, P.H., “Concrete liquid retaining structures ", Applied Science Publishers, 1981.

 2.    Vazirani  & Ratwani, Concrete Structures,  Khanna Publishers, 1990

 3.  

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading