CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WORK

School of Social Sciences

Syllabus for

Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
SWC131 SOCIAL WORK PROFESSION Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC132 SOCIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC133 SOCIAL CASE WORK Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC134 SOCIAL GROUP WORK Core Courses 3 2 100
SWC135 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION AND SOCIAL ACTION Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC136 SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH METHODS - I Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC141A MEDIA AND SOCIAL WORK Discipline Specific Elective 3 2 50
SWC141B SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP Discipline Specific Elective 3 2 50
SWC141D GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Discipline Specific Elective 3 2 50
SWC141E YOUTH DEVELOPMENT Discipline Specific Elective 3 2 50
SWC151 SKILL LAB - I Skill Enhancement Course 3 2 50
SWC152 SERVICE LEARNING - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 50
SWC181 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE - I (RURAL CAMP AND INTERNSHIP - I) Core Courses 43 8 125
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
SWC231 THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS FOR SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC232 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND GOVERNANCE Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC233 EVIDENCE BASED INTERVENTION, ADVOCACY AND POLICY MAKING Core Courses 2 2 50
SWC234 MENTAL HEALTH Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC235 PUBLIC HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC236 SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH METHODS - II Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC251 SKILL LAB - II Skill Enhancement Course 3 2 50
SWC252 SERVICE LEARNING - II Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 50
SWC281 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE - II (INTERNSHIP II) Core Courses 43 9 150
SWC282 SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH PROJECT - I Core Courses 3 2 50
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
SWC331 GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON CHILD RIGHTS AND PROTECTION Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC332 STATISTICS FOR SOCIAL WORK Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC333 INTERNATIONAL SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Core Courses 3 2 5
SWC334 PROJECT CYCLE MANAGEMENT Core Courses 2 2 50
SWC335 INDIVIDUAL COUNSELLING Core Courses 3 2 100
SWC336 GROUP AND FAMILY COUNSELLING Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC351 SKILL LAB - III Skill Enhancement Course 3 2 50
SWC352 SERVICE LEARNING - III Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 50
SWC353 SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH METHODS - III Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC381 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE - III (INTERNSHIP - III) Core Courses 43 9 150
SWC382 SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH PROJECT - II Core Courses 3 2 50
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
SWC431 SOCIAL WELFARE ADMINISTRATION Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC432 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR AND DEVELOPMENT Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC433 PROGRAMMES FOR HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC434 CLINICAL SOCIAL WORK Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC435 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC441B COUNSELING AND EAP Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC441C MIGRATION, DISPLACEMENT AND REHABILITATION Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC441D FINANCIAL AND MARKETING MANAGEMENT Core Courses 3 3 50
SWC441F CHILD AND ADOLESCENT MENTAL HEALTH Core Courses 3 2 50
SWC452 SERVICE LEARNING - IV Skill Enhancement Course 3 2 50
SWC471 PRACTICE SEMINAR Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 50
SWC481 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE - IV (INTERNSHIP IV) Core Courses 43 9 150
SWC482 SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH PROJECT - III Core Courses 3 2 50
    

    

Introduction to Program:

MSW in clinical and community Practice is a post-graduate program offered by the Department of Sociology & Social Work. This programme aims at grooming students into high-quality professionals who can take up leadership positions in the development, health and welfare sectors. This two-year duration in the programme blends the core areas of the field with the emerging trends in Clinical and Community Practice. The curriculum carries some of the foundational and methods papers related to human behaviour, helping processes, development, health and welfare services. An optimal mix of theory and practice orientation is provided in this course. The onus of the curriculum besides knowledge sharing and knowledge creation is on creativity, critical thinking and skill development. An equal weightage is given both to classroom work as well as field-based learning. This programme provides the students with the opportunity to understand concepts and issues and to develop professional skills required for the two specializations- Community Development and Clinical Social Work. This programme provides numerous opportunities- insides as well as outsides the University to the students for their holistic development.

 

This course is designed to help students develop the skills, attitudes and values needed to understand the dynamics of society and work towards the goals of justice, equality and empowerment. This curriculum is a perfect blend of theory, research and practice-class room learning, action labs, projects, seminars, conferences, service-learning and field-based training- which provides exposure and helps students to manifest their passion for social responsibility. Students are trained to grow and develop into mature professionals, capable of taking decisions independently, having the ability to think critically and having the competence required to build purposeful relationships to empower individuals, groups and communities.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Exhibit professional demeanour with requisite skills, attitudes, and knowledge

PO2: Use research-based practices

PO3: Integrate indigenous with global practices within the ambit of ethics to exhibit cultural sensitivity

PO4: Demonstrate an understanding of leadership roles in development, social, health and industrial sectors

PO5: Work at the Micro, mezzo and macro levels to achieve sustainability and create holistic growth

PO6: Identify and adopt characteristics and skills to become Global citizen

PO7: Practice self-directed and lifelong learning

Assesment Pattern

Assessment of Theory papers

 

 Question Pattern

Total hrs: 2

Total Marks: 50

Section A

Answer any SIX from seven questions (6/7)                               6*5=30

 

Section B

Answer any TWO from three questions (2/3)                            2*10=20

Assessment of Electives

 

Total Marks: 50

 

This paper has no end semester examination. The teacher in charge of the paper evaluates based on the components given below and produce internal marks.

 

CIA I- 10 marks (Assignment)

CIA II- 25 marks (Mid Sem Exam)

CIA III- 10 marks (Assignment)

Attendance: 5 marks (As per university norms)

 

Assessment of Skill Lab

 

Course Codes: SWC151P, SWC251P & SWC351P Total marks – 50

 

This paper has no end semester examination. The teacher in charge of this paper will assess the knowledge on various skills through written examination (short notes/multiple choices) designed by the teacher and approved by the staff committee. The demonstration of the skills will be assessed by minimum of two teachers from the department.

 

Knowledge assessment – 25 marks Skills demonstration -           25 marks

 

Assessment of Practice Seminar

Course Code: SWC471

This paper has no end semester examination or marks. This paper has only grades based on the assessment made by minimum of two teachers.

 

Categories of grades are the following.

 

Marks

Grades

75 and above

Excellent (Grade A)

60-75

Good (Grade B)

50-60

Average (Grade C)

Less than 50

Needs improvement (Grade D)

 

Assessment of Service Learning

Course Code: SWC152, SWC252, SWC352, SWC452

 

This course has no end semester examination. Orientation about the project starts in the first semester and continues the activities till the fourth semester. Evaluation of the course is distributed throughout the semesters and students will be evaluated based on the reports submitted by them to the mentors in each semester and grades will be given based on their performance.

The student has to submit a final report in the fourth semester with the contents of all four semester reports in a publishable format and has to present their summary report to the panel of examiners. The evaluation criteria will be developed by the department.

 

Categories of grades are the following.

 

Marks

Grades

75 % and above

Excellent (Grade A)

60-75%

Good (Grade B)

50-60%

Average (Grade C)

Less than 50%

Needs improvement (Grade D)

 

Examination And Assesments

Theory paper, Electives and Practical work are assessed separately using different patterns. 

 

 Question Pattern

Total hrs: 2Total Marks:50

Theory Paper

Section A

Answer any SIX from seven questions (6/7)                               6*5=30

 

Section B

Answer any TWO from three questions (2/3)                            2*10=20

Assessment of Electives

 Total Marks: 50

This paper has no end semester examination. Instead, the teacher in charge of the paper evaluates based on the components given below and produce internal marks.

 

CIA I- 10 marks (Assignment)

CIA II- 25 marks (Mid Sem Exam)

CIA III- 10 marks (Assignment)

Attendance: 5 marks (As per university norms)

 

 

Competencies:  Clinical and Community Practice

 

  i.         Expected outcomes - competencies for basic practice

 

    1. Assess and diagnose psychosocial issues affecting individual functioning
    2. Facilitate group interaction that directs change.
    3. Identify community developmental needs; mobilize community resources involving the community to strategize community developmental initiatives.
    4. Work in alignment with the aims and objectives of welfare agencies.
    5. Nurture creativity, critical thinking and resilience.
    6. Be accountable, with supervision and support, for social work practice.
    7. Professional development and follow standards and ethics of social work.
    8. Demonstrate effective oral and written communication in working with individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities and colleagues.
    9. Work effectively with beneficiaries to deal with psychosocial distress.
    10. Transparency and accountability.

ii.         Expected outcomes - competencies for advanced practice

    1. Collaborate and network with government and non-government organizations.
    2. Resolve conflicts in relationships.
    3. Adapt and work in difficult settings such as communal conflicts, trauma and disasters, diverse cultures.
    4. Communicate and inform professional judgments effectively with stakeholders.
    5. Apply information technology in social work practice and research.
    6. Formulate research problems and elicit empirical evidence for practice and evaluation.
    7. Design, implement and evaluate welfare projects.

 

SWC131 - SOCIAL WORK PROFESSION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is the foundational paper that introduces students to the profession of Social Work.  It includes the philosophical, ideological, and religious foundations of the profession. It highlights how social work has come to be called a profession. In this paper, all the fields in which social work can be practiced are introduced.

 

1.   To help students understand the history and evolution of the Social Work Profession.

2.   To understand the philosophy, goals, ideals, and ethics of professional social work.

3.   To develop insight into the ideologies which have shaped professional social work

4.   To understand the field of social work practice.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate proficiency in the history and evolution of Social Work Profession.

CO2: Critique and differentiate professional social work, social service, charity, and volunteerism.

CO3: Discuss the philosophy, goals, ideas and ethics of professional social work in modern context.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Evolution of Social Work as Profession
 

Evolution of Social work as a profession in west. Attributes and Professionalization of Social Work, organized and scientific charity. Nature, Scope, Objectives, Philosophy, Goals, and Values and Ethics of Social Work. Functions and Principles of Social Work, Methods of Social Work. Understanding Social Work in view of Social Service, reforms, welfare, Security, Justice, development, empowerment and Volunteerism.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Ideologies guiding Social Work Profession
 

Social Services traditions and religious roots of Charity and Philanthropic approach towards person in need. Gandhian Ideologies, Human rights, Neo-liberalism and globalization, privatization Postmodernism, Feminism, Resurgence  of  the  civil  society,  Multiculturalism,  Ideology  of sustainable  and  people-centered  development,  Ideology  of  action groups  and  social  movements,  Ideology of  voluntary action  non-government organizations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Professional Social Work in India
 

Milestones of Indian social work practices, Social work education- scope, status and prospects and challenges to social work education and practice in India and special reference to Karnataka. Fields of Social work practice. Indigenous measures of Social Work Practice.   Professional Associations of Social work and Professionalization of social work  in India and Abroad

Text Books And Reference Books:

Banks, S. (1995). Ethics and values in social work. Hound Mills: MacMillan Publishers.

Compton, B. R. (1980). Introduction to social welfare and social work. Illinois: The Dorsey Press.

Gore, M.S. (1965). Social work education. New Delhi: Asia Publishing House.

Madan, G. (1967). Indian social problems: Social disorganization & reconstruction. Bombay: Allied Publishers.

Shaw, I., & Lishman,  J.  (1990). Evaluation and social work practice. London: Sage publishers.

Singh R.R. (1985).Fieldwork in social work education (ed). New Delhi: Concept Publishers.

Stroup, H.H. (1960). Social work education – An introduction to the field. New Delhi:      Eurasia Publishing.

Vedi, D. (1990-91). Social reforms movement in India: Historical perspective. India: Popular Prakashan.

Wadia, A. & Hormasji, N. (1968). History and philosophy of social work in India (2nd ed).          Bombay: Allied publishers.

Rao,  MSA (2018) Social Movements in India. Manohar, New Delhi

John Tomlinson (2018)  Globalization & Culture. Rawat Publication New Delhi

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Batra, N. (2004). Dynamics of social work in India. New Delhi: Raj Publishing.

House, B. (2006). Values & ethics in social work: An introduction. London: Routledge publication.

Bhattacharya, S. (2004). Social work: An integrated approach. New Delhi: Deep &Deep Publications. 

Chris, L. C. (2000). Social work ethics: Politics, principles and practice. Exeter: Learning Matters.

Crawford, K. (2004). Social work and human development: Transforming social work practice.  Exeter: Learning Matters.

Desai, M. (2004). Methodology of progressive social work education. Jaipur: Rawat.

            Publication.

Desai, M. (2004). Ideologies and social work: Historical and contemporary analyses. Jaipur: Rawat. Publication.

Horner, N. (2006). What is social work? Context and perspectives. London: Routledge     publication.

National Association of Social Workers (2000). Policy statements 2000-2003, Social work           speaks. National Association of Social Workers Policy Statements 2000-    2003. New        York: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Payne, M. (2007). What is professional social work? Jaipur:Rawat Publications.

381Pease, B. (1999).Transforming social work practice: Postmodern critical perspectives polity press. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.

Morales, A. (2004). Social workBoston: Pearson Education.

Timms, N. (1970).Social work. London: Routledge publishers.

World Bank (2005). Putting social development to work for the poor: An OED review of world bank activities. New York: World Bank.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Total Marks: 50

Total hrs: 2

Question Pattern

Section A

Answer any SIX from seven questions (6/7).                                                               6*5=30

Section B                                                                                                        

Answer any TWO from three questions (2/3).                                                            2*10=20

SWC132 - SOCIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to provide the students a conceptual and analytical orientation to the society and its dynamics so that as individuals they may be able to understand the realities and identify themselves as part of the larger system. It also introduces the student to the study of mental processes, experiences and behaviour of human beings in a socio-cultural context. This paper covers the basic knowledge behind the human behaviour. The course provides knowledge and understanding of the nature and determinants of basic psychosocial processes, the development of life stages from conception to old age

Course Objectives

1.  To develop basic knowledge of concepts and theories, to understand the social world around them.

2.  To know the significance of social institutions in social life.  

3.    To help the students to gain an insight into the components of general psychology.

4.    To enable the students to develop a theoretical perspective of understanding human development across the life span.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate proficiency in concepts and theories to understand the social world around them.

CO2: Relate the significance of social institutions in social life.

CO3: Demonstrate an understanding of the dynamics of human behaviour in terms of heredity and environment as shapers of personality.

CO4: Propose the relationship between general psychology and human development across lifespan

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Society- Foundational & Theoretical Understanding
 

Individual & society; Community, Sociological Imagination; Culture; Socialization; Social stratification; Social control; Social change;  Social institutions: Family, Marriage, Education, Religion; Capability Approach by Amartya Sen

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Psychological Foundations and Theories
 

Psychology as a Foundation to Social Work. Hereditary and Environmental Determinants of Human behaviour. Learning, Memory Process, Intelligence, Cognition, Motivation and Emotion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Life Span Development
 

Lifespan Development, Stages in the Life Span- Conception, Pregnancy and Birth; Infancy, Early and Middle Childhood, Adolescence, Early and Middle Adulthood and Old Age

Text Books And Reference Books:

Giddens Anthon.(2006). Sociology.  Cambridge: Polity Press.

Haralambos, M., &Heald, R.M.  (2006). Sociology: Themes and perspective. London: Harper Collins.

Henslin, J. (2009). Sociology: A down to earth approach  (10th ed.).USA: Pearson.

Horton, P. B., & Hunt. (1990). Sociology. Singapore: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Jayaram, N. (1988). Introductory sociology. Madras: Macmillan.

MacIver, R.M., Page, C.H. (2000).Society an Introductory Analysis. New Delhi: Macmillan Publishers India.

Becvar, D.S., &Becvar, R.J. (2006). Family therapy a systemic integration (6th ed). Boston: Pearson.

Carter, B., & Mcgoldrick, M. (1989). The expanded family life cycle: individuals, family and social perspectives (3rd edition). London: Allyn And Bacon.

Coleman, J.C. (1976). Abnormal psychology and modern life. London: Allyn & Bacon.

Hurlock, E.B. (1953). Developmental psychology. New York: Tata McGraw-Hill.

Morgan.  K., Weisz., & Schopler. (1993). Introduction to psychology. New York: Tata McGraw-Hill.

Wiebke Kuklys (2005). Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach. Berlin: Springer.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bauman, Z. (1990). Thinking sociologically. London: Blackwell.

Berger, P. (1966). An invitation to sociology: A humanist perspective. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Deshpande, S. (2003). Contemporary India:  A sociological view. Viking Publishers: New Delhi.

Dhanagare, D. N. (1993). Themes and perspectives in Indian sociology; Jaipur: Rawat publications.

Francis Abraham (2006). Contemporary Sociology.  Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press.

Merton, R., & Nisbet. (1966) Contemporary social problems. New York: Harcourt, Brace and World.

Mills, C. W. (1967). The sociological imagination. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Rajan, Sethi. (2010).  Social Change: Theory and Perspective, Delhi: Educational Publishers and Distributors.

Shankar, Rao. C.N. (2004). Sociology of Indian society.  New Delhi : S Chand & Co. Ltd.

Bee, H. (1999). Lifespan development. Pearson Higher Education.

Dacey., & Travers. (1996). Human development: Across the lifespan. McGraw-Hill.

Davenport, G.C. (1994). An introduction to child development. HarperCollins Publishers.

Ian, S. (2000). The Psychology of ageing. Jessica Kingsley Publish.

Lindon, J. (1998). Understanding child development. Thomson Learning.

McMahon., McMahon., & Romano. (1990). Psychology and you. West Publishing                    company.

Morgan, C. T., King, R. A., Robinson, N.N. (1970). Introduction to psychology. New Delhi:T M Hall publishers.

Neven, & Schmidt, R. (1997). Emotional milestones from birth to adulthood. Jessica       Kingsley Publishers.

Norlin, J., Chess, W., Dale, O., & Smith, R. (2003). Human behavior and the social environment: social systems theory (4th Ed). Boston: Allyn Bacon.

Robert, F. S. (1990). Understanding psychology. Lindon: McGraw-Hill.

Robert, S. J. (1997). Pathways to psychology. Harcourt: Brace College Publishers.

Schimberg, L.B. (1985).  Human Development, London: Macmillan Pub. Co. 2nd Ed. 

Evaluation Pattern

Question Pattern

Total hrs: 2

Total Marks: 50

 

 

Section A

Answer any SIX from seven questions (6/7)                               6*5=30

 

Section B

Answer any TWO from three questions (2/3)                            2*10=20

SWC133 - SOCIAL CASE WORK (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Social Casework is one of the three primary methods of social work. Practitioners commonly call this method as working with individuals (Case work). It is the basis for all the other methods. This paper gives a foundational aspect of this method that orients the students about the comprehensive nature and its effectiveness in practice.

Objectives

  1. To understand casework as a method of social work and appreciate its place in social work practice.

2.      To understand the scope of social case work practice.

3.      To understand and learn the values and principles while working with individuals.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand casework as a method of social work and appreciate its place in social work practice.

CO2: To understand the scope of social case work practice.

CO3: To comprehend and apply the values and principles while working with individuals.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Social Work with Individuals
 

Emergence and development of social work with individuals as a method.  Philosophical   assumptions   and   values   of   social   casework. Principles and Components of Social Case Work. Similarities and differences between Social Case work, Counselling and Psychotherapy.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Social Case Work Process & Approaches
 

Social Case Work Process: psychosocial study, diagnosis, treatment, evaluation, termination and follow-up. Transference and counter transference. Sources of information: home visit and collateral contacts. Diagrammatic presentation: Genogram and Eco map.

Basic understanding of approaches commonly use in social work

Problem solving approach, Solution focused approach, Strength Based Approach, Psychosocial approach, Behavioral approach, Functional approach, Crisis intervention and Eclectic approach

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Social Case Work Intervention- Tools / Techniques/Skills
 

Ventilation, Reassurance, Reflective thinking, Motivation, Support, Interpretation, Education, Insight, Suggestion,

Enhancing Social Support, Environmental Modification, Resource mobilization, Resource   Utilization, Advocacy, Reinforcement, Limit Setting, Confrontation, Renewing Family Relationships, Externalization, Universalisation, Spirituality.

Skills Training: Assertiveness Skills, Social Skills, Communication Skills, Interpersonal Relationship Skills, Coping with Emotions

Case Work Recording & Documentation: Principles and Formats: Session wise .(Note Taking), Verbatim, Summary.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhattacharya, S. (2003). Social work an integrated approach. New Delhi: Deep & Deep

             Publications Pvt. Ltd.

Dean, H. & Hepworth, R. H. (2010). Theory and skills in social   work.   New   Delhi: Cengage

             Learning India Private limited.

Hepworth, D., Ronald, H., Rooney, G. & Gottfried, K. (2017). Direct Social Work Practice:

            Theory and Skills. Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Mathew, Grace. (1992). An introduction to social case work. Mumbai: TISS

Perlman, H. (1957). Social Casework: a Problem-Solving Process. Chicago: University of

             Chicago Press.

Upadhyay, RK., (2003). Social case work: a therapeutic approach. New Delhi: Rawat

             Publications.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Beistek Felix (1957). Case Work Relationship. Chicago: Loyola University Press.

Lindsay, T. (2013). Social Work Intervention. London: SAGE/Learning Matters.

Walsh, J. (2013). Theories for Direct Social Work Practice. Belmont, Calif: Cengage Learning.



Evaluation Pattern

Total Marks: 50

Total hrs: 2

Question Pattern

 

Section A

Answer any SIX from seven questions (6/7)                                                       6*5=30

Section B

Answer any TWO from three questions (2/3)                                                                2*10=20

 

SWC134 - SOCIAL GROUP WORK (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces social group work as amethod and practice related to the strengths, capacities and resources of individuals within groups. The course also attempts to develop skills for intervention in order to help to alleviate critical social problems and enhance group well-being.

1.   To appraise the importance of groups in the life of an individual.

2.   To identify the specific characteristics of group work and its contributions as a method of social work intervention.

3.   To create an understanding about various concepts, group formation, dynamics, approaches and theories in relation to all types of groups.

Course Outcome

CO1: Appraise the importance of group work in the practice of professional social work.

CO2: Demonstrate proficiency in examining the specific characteristics of group work.

CO3: Discover and analyse issues of group members, needs, resources, and assets within a framework of group processes, dynamics, and developmental stages.

CO4: Demonstrate an understanding of various concepts, group dynamics, theory.

CO5: Apply a variety of group approaches and theories for group interventions

CO6: Determine and evaluate social group work effectiveness in relation to all types of groups.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Social Group Work
 

Concept and Definition of Social Group Work, Characteristics of Social Group Work, Values in Social Group Work, Principles in Social Group Work, Assumptions underlying Social Group Work and philosophy of Social Group Work; Factors of group formation, Formulation of goals and identification of problems for work.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Theories and models of Social Group Work and its application in various settings
 

Theories applicable to group work practice; Models in group work practice;  Applications  of  group  work  in  community development  centers,  children's  institution,  hospitals,  correctional settings, schools and industries; Scope and application of group work in relation to other social work methods. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Phases of Group Work Practice
 

Pre-group and initial Phase, Formulation of objectives and programme planning, Implementation, Evaluation, Termination and follow up; Importance of group processes, Stages of group development, Bond, Sub-groups, Role, Leadership, Isolation, Decision making, Contagion, Conflict, Communication; Skills and Techniques for effective work with group/problem solving; Group Games.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhattacharya, S. (2003). Social work an integrated approach. New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publications Pvt. Ltd.

Dean H. Hepworth, R. H. (2010). Theory and skills in social   work.   New   Delhi: Cengage Learning India Private limited.

Garvin, C. D., Galinsky, M. J., &Gutierrrez, L. M. (2007). Handbook of social work with groups.  New Delhi: Rawat Publications.

Mishra, P., & Mishra, B. (2008). Social group work: Theory and practice. Lucknow: New Royal Book Company.

Siddiqui, H. (2008). Group work: Theories and practices. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Daniel, L. (2007). Group dynamics for teams. Los Angeles: Sage Publication.

Konopka, G. (1983 3rd Ed.), Social group work a helping process. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Lindsay, T., & Orton, S. (2008). Group work practice in social work. UK: Learning Matters Ltd.

Lupe, A.-C., & Randy, A. C. (2009). Group work: A practical guide to developing groups in agency settings. New Jercy: Wiley.

Mark, D. (2006). Using group work. New York: Routledge.

Rameshwari Devi and Ravi Prakash.( 2004). Social work methods, perspectives and practices. Jaipur: Mangal Deep Publications.

Rich, R., Bender, D., & Kimberly. (2009). An experiential approach to group work. Chicago: Lyceum Books.

Trecker, H. B. (1955). Group work foundations & frontiers. New York: Whiteside Inc & William Morrow & Co.

Trecker, H. B. (1970). Social group work: Principles & practice. New York: Association Press.

Zastrow, C. H. (2010). The practice of social work: A comprehensive work text. USA: Brooks/Cole.

Evaluation Pattern

Total Marks: 50

Total hrs: 2

Question Pattern

Section A

Answer any SIX from seven questions (6/7)                                                                6*5=30

Section B

Answer any TWO from three questions (2/3)                                                             2*10=20

SWC135 - COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION AND SOCIAL ACTION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Community Organization and Social Action

 

Course Description: This paper helps in understanding Community Organization and Social action as methods of social work. These methods are primarily seen as means to facilitate communities towards self- directed change. The practice of community organization and social action comprises of methodological process of providing, building, and enhancing opportunities for community development. This paper enables the student to organize the community to work towards problem solving. 

 

Course Objectives

1.To impart knowledge and skills of Community Organization as a method in Social Work Practice.

2.To learn the role of Social Worker in working with the community.

3.   To identify and apply the critical elements of community organization practice.

 

4.   To impart knowledge and skills in demonstrating Social Action

Course Outcome

1: CO1: Exhibit proficiency with regard to the relevance of community organization and social action as a method in social work practice.

2: CO2: Demonstrate the critical elements, models, approaches and theories of community organization practice and social action

3: CO3: Demonstrate an understanding in the developmental issues and community development strategies adopted by Governmental and Non- governmental organizations

4: CO4:Apply the steps in community organisation cycle and enable the students to learn the role of Social Worker in Social Action.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Community Organization
 

Community organization: Definition, Objectives, Principles, Skills; Similarities & difference between Community organisation and community development, Models of Community Organization.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Community Mobilization
 

Community mobilization: concept, goals, community mobilization cycle; Theories of CO: Systems theory, Conflict theory, Structural theories, Feminist theories, Resource mobilization theory, Corporate governance and community organization.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Social Action
 

Social action: concept, goals, principles; Social movements, contributions of Saul Alinsky, Paulo Freire; Scope of social action in India; Role of Social Worker in Social Action.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhattacharya, S. (2006). Social work administration and development. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.

Boraian, M. P. (2008). Community development: An outreach approach.  New Delhi: Anmol Publications.

Joseph, S. (2013). Community organisation in Social Work. New Delhi: Discovery Publishing House.

Ledwith, M. (2005). Community development a critical approach. New Delhi: Rawat Publications.

Pawar, M. (2014). Social and community development practice. SAGE Publications India.

Popple, Keith-Analysing community work_ theory and practice-McGraw-Hill,  Open University Press (2015)

Reisch, M. L. Ohmer (eds.)-The Handbook of Community Practice-SAGE Publications, Inc (2012)

Ross, M. G. (1967). Community organizations: theory, principles, and practice. New York: Harper and Row Publishers. 

Siddique, H. Y. (1984). Social work and social action. New Delhi: Harnam Publications.

William G Brueggemann-The Practice of Macro Social Work-Cengage Learning (2013)

Yadav C.P. (2007). Encyclopedia of social work and community organization. New Delhi: Anmol Publications Pvt.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings

Austin,  Michael,  J.  &  Jane  Isaacs  Lowe  (Eds.)  (1994).  Controversial issues in communities and organizations.  Massachusetts: Allyn and Bacon

Brager, George, Harry Specht, & James Torczyner (1987). Community organizing.  New York: Columbia University Press.

Clarke, Stephen J.G. (2000). Social work as community development: a management model for social change. England: Aldershot.

Dunham, Arthur, ( 1962). The new community organization. New York: Thomas Crowell Co.

Friedlander, Walter, A. (1976). Concepts and Methods of Social Work. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

Gangrade K. D.(1971). Community organization in India.  Bombay:  Popular Prakashan. 

Hardcastle, David A., Stanley Wenocur, & Patricia Powers (1996). Community practice: Theories and skills for social workers. New York: Oxford University Press.

Harper, E. P. and Dunham, A. (Ed.) (1959). Community Organization in Action. New York:  Basic literature and critical comments, Association Press.

Kuppuswamy, B. (2010). Social change in India. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House (P) Ltd.

Ramachandran, P. (1996). Towards an understanding of people’s movements:   History from below.  Institute for Community Organization Research.

Rivera, Felix F. & John Erlich. (1995). Community organizing in a diverse society. (2nd  ed.). Massachusetts:  Allyn and Bacon. 

Siddique, H. Y. (1997). Working with Communities - Introduction to community work. New Delhi: Hira Publications.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Total marks: 50 Duration 2 Hours

Section A

Answer any SIX from seven questions (6/7)              6*5=30

 

Section B

Answer any TWO from three questions (2/3)     2*10=20

SWC136 - SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH METHODS - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The social work research course covers the entire process of research, including research methods/ techniques, concepts, variables, hypotheses, and Report writing. The procedures used while drawing samples and the construction of research tools are also part of this paper.

 

Objectives :

1.     To familiarize students with the basic concept of social work research as a method of social work.

2.     To formulate research questions for the dissertation

3.     To formulate research proposals for dissertation

Course Outcome

1: Students demonstrate the capacity in terms of understanding the basic concepts in social work research methods

2: Students exhibit the knowledge and confidence to formulate research questions for the dissertation work

3: Students prove their understanding in formulating the research proposals for dissertation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Social Work Research
 

Social work Research: Definition, concepts (Theory -Inductive and Deductive, Data, variables), objectives, Types of research, Scope of social work Research, Social work research process, Research Design. Research-Based Practice: Research-informed practice and practice-informed research

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Sampling and Data Collection
 

Population and Sampling: Concepts- Types of Sampling, Sampling Size, Errors in sampling.

Data Collection: Primary and Secondary data collection methods.

Questionnaire design: process of designing the questionnaire. Secondary data collection: Scoping review and Review of Literature.

Measurement and Scaling Techniques: Basic measurement scales. Attitude measurement scale.

Problem Formulation in research. Hypothesis: Introduction, Type I Error, Type II Error, Basics of Analysis.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Report writing and Presentation
 

Report writing: Importance of report writing, types of the research report, report structure, guidelines for effective documentation. Referencing styles, Plagiarism, Citation and paraphrasing.  Writing Social work Research Article, Social Work Research Proposals and Reports

Text Books And Reference Books:

Burns, R.B (2002) Introduction to Research Methods. New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Babbie, E. R. (2014). The basics of social research (6th ed.). New Delhi: Cengage Learning.

Doane, D. P., & Seward, L. E. (2013). Applied statistics: In business and economics. New Delhi: McGraw-Hill Education.

Gravetter. F. (2013). Statistics for the behavioral science (9th ed). Andover: Cengage learning.

Jefferies, J., & Diamonds, I. (2001).  Beginning statistics: An introduction for social scientists. London: Sage Publication.

Lal Das, D. K.  (2000). Practice of social research: Social work perspective. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Aggarwal, B M. (2014). Essentials of business statistics. New Delhi: Ane Books.

Sharma, J. K. (2013). Business statistics. New Delhi: Pearson.

Smith, R. S. (Roger Shipley). (2013). Doing social work research. New Delhi: Rawat     Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Total Marks: 50

Total hrs: 2

Question Pattern

 

Section A

Answer any SIX from seven questions (6/7)                                                       6*5=30

Section B

Answer any TWO from three questions (2/3)                                                                2*10=20

 

SWC141A - MEDIA AND SOCIAL WORK (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Media has become an indispensable tool for a social work practitioner in today ‘s scenario where collective representations are necessary to high light pressing social issues and mark contemplative positive reforms. From a larger perspective the student gets to know the role of the media in resisting or bringing forth a social change and to induce social action wherever and whenever applicable. This paper consists of practical, descriptive and conceptual knowledge to promote understanding and develop skills to align media with a social prism.

 

Course Objectives:

  1. To understand the basics of media and its various forms.
  2. Give in-depth knowledge of the process of print media and documentary making.

Course Outcome

C01: CO1: Exhibit skills and knowledge of employing various media.

C02: CO2: Produce effective media to impact social issues and affect behaviour change.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Media and Social work
 

Media Basics, Interface of Media with Social Work; Different mediums of messaging-Folk/Traditional (folk art, painting, clay modelling) and Modern (collage/posters, wealth from waste concepts, digital imaging), Community radio.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Print and Photography
 

Constructing   a   message-Slogan, Caption, Prose   and   Poetry, Investigative Journalism style of reporting (5W ‘s and 1H and Inverted Pyramid) on   social   issues; Photojournalism   and   conceptual photography.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Documentary Making
 

Preproduction-concept and scriptwriting; Production-camera, lighting and sound; Postproduction-rerecording, voice-over and editing.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Mathur, K. B.  (1994). Communication for development and social change. New Delhi: Allied Publications.

Melkote, S.R., &Steeves, H. L. (2001).Communication for development in the third world: theory and practice for empowerment (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Modi, B. (2007). Designing messages for development. New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Mollison, M. (1996). Producing videos: A complete guide. Australia: Allen and Unwin.

Raghavan, G. N. S. (2004).Development and communication in India: Elicit growth and mass deprivation. New Delhi: Gian Publishing House

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Capila, A. (2001). Images of women in the folk songs of Garhwal Himalayas. New Delhi: Concept Publishers.

Joseph, D. (1990). The dynamics of mass communication. London: McGraw-Hill.

Mcquail, D. (1994). Mass communication theory: An introduction (3rd ed.). London: Sage Publication.

Yadav, J.  S., &Mohnot, A. (1983). Advertising and social responsibility (Vol. 1), Content analyses. New Delhi: Dept. of Communication Research.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Total Marks: 50 

Total hrs: 2 

Question Pattern

Section A

Answer any SIX from seven questions (6/7)                                                                                                               6*5=30

Section B

Answer any TWO from three questions (2/3)                                                                                                            2*10=20

SWC141B - SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the field of social entrepreneurship and the best practices of starting and growing successful mission-driven ventures. This field is rapidly garnering attention around the world from entrepreneurs, investors, philanthropists, foundations, and consulting firms. Social ventures aim to achieve a “double bottom line” with meaningful social returns, as well as sustainable or competitive financial returns --through their products, services and other business practices. Entrepreneurial solutions to education, healthcare, environment, workforce development, international development, and other large societal issues are being addressed through both -profit and non-profit ventures. The course aims to give an awareness about starting an enterprise and its various processes. The course aims to give an awareness about starting an enterprise and its various processes.

 

Course Objectives

1. To introduce the concept of entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship.

2. To familiarise with the development of business models.

3. To learn how to write a business plan.

4. To study the company registration process.

5. To understand the strategies used by social entrepreneurs

Course Outcome

CO1: 1. Demonstrate entrepreneurship skill.

CO2: 2. Identify various strategies used by social entrepreneurs for sustainability.

CO3: 3. Develop Business models.

CO4: 4. Motivated to start enterprise

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Entrepreneurship
 

Concept and Characteristics of Entrepreneurship, Social Entrepreneurship, Understanding the difference between entrepreneurs and social entrepreneurs, Charity Vs Social Enterprises, The Socio-Economic Context of Social Entrepreneurship, Opportunities, challenges, and issues facing social entrepreneurs, Learning from Real-Life social enterprises (Cases).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Business Model
 

Social Enterprise Formation, writing a Business Plan, Selecting an Organizational Form, Attracting Investors,Planning for Growth, finding capital, Measuring Social Impact, Governance of Social Enterprises.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Strategies for Social Enterprises
 

Company registration Process and strategies adopted by Enterprises and Social Enterprises, scaling up of Social Enterprises, Enterprises, Design Thinking in Social context, Communication Strategies. Replication Strategies, Exit Strategies, The qualities, skills and values for a social entrepreneur.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Banks, K. (2016). Social entrepreneurship and innovation: International case studies and practice. London: Kogan Page.

Ellis, T. (2010). The new pioneers: sustainable business success through social innovation and social entrepreneurship. New York: Wiley.

Kumar, S. (2013). Dynamics of social entrepreneurship. New Delhi: AK Publications.

London, M., &Morfopoulos, R. G. (2010). Social entrepreneurship: how to start successful corporate social responsibility and community-based initiatives for advocacy and change. New York: Routledge.

Praszkier, R., & Nowak, A. (2012). Social Entrepreneurship: theory and practice. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Mair, J., Robinson, J., & Hockerts, K. (Eds.). (2006). Social entrepreneurship (p. 3). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Bornstein, D., & Davis, S. (2010). Social entrepreneurship: What everyone needs to know. Oxford University Press.

Praszkier, R., & Nowak, A. (2011). Social entrepreneurship: Theory and practice. Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Banks, K. (2016). Social entrepreneurship and innovation: International case studies and practice. London: Kogan Page.

Ellis, T. (2010). The new pioneers: sustainable business success through social innovation and social entrepreneurship. New York: Wiley.

Kumar, S. (2013). Dynamics of social entrepreneurship. New Delhi: AK Publications.

London, M., & Morfopoulos, R. G. (2010). Social entrepreneurship: how to start successful corporate social responsibility and community-based initiatives for advocacy and change. New York: Routledge.

Praszkier, R., & Nowak, A. (2012). Social Entrepreneurship: theory and practice. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Mair, J., Robinson, J., & Hockerts, K. (Eds.) (2006). Social entrepreneurship (p. 3). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Bornstein, D., & Davis, S. (2010). Social entrepreneurship: What everyone needs to know. Oxford University Press.

Praszkier, R., & Nowak, A. (2011). Social entrepreneurship: Theory and practice. Cambridge University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Total Marks: 50

 

This paper has no end semester examination. Teacher in charge of the paper evaluates based on the components given below and produce internal marks.

CIA I- 10 marks (Assignment)

CIA II- 25 marks (Mid Sem Exam)

CIA III- 10 marks (Assignment)

Attendance: 5 marks (As per university norms)

 

 

SWC141D - GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course will critically examine how development processes affect women and men and gender relations. The course will provide theoretical and practical experience in gender and development.

1.  To understand the concepts, approaches and strategies related to gender and development.

2.  To familiarise the practices and issues related to gender and development.

3. To understand the linkages of Gender and Development from Regional, National and International perspectives

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the various concepts, approaches and strategies related to gender and development.

CO2: Illustrate the practical issues and practices related to gender and development.

CO3: Relate and modify the linkages of Gender and Development from Regional, National and International perspectives

CO4: Exhibit a critical awareness of gender equity

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Gender and Development: Introduction
 

Concept, Approaches and Strategies. Gender Analysis. Gender-sensitive Planning and Policy Making. Gender appraisal of Development programmes and Research projects.  Third Gender: Concept, Policy and Issues

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Gender and Development :Practices and Issues
 

Gender Audit and Gender Budgeting. Gender Mainstreaming.  Contemporary issues in Gender and Development. Approaches in Gender and Development.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Gender and Development: Regional, National and International perspectives.
 

Gender and Entrepreneurship Development. Political Participation and Governance, Gender Training and Empowerment. Gender and Financial Inclusion, Gender, Law and Human Rights.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chant, S., & Sweetman, C. (2012). Fixing women or fixing the world? “Smart economics, efficiency approaches, and gender equality in development. Gender & Development20 (3): 517–529. November.

Guijt, I. S., &, Meera, K. (2006). Myth of Community: Gender Issues in Participatory Development, Rugby, UK: Intermediate Technology Publications.

Kapadia, K. (2002). The violence of development: The Politics of identity, gender & social inequities in India. New Delhi: Zubaan Publications.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Krishnaraj,     M.,   Abusaleh   S.,   &   Sudarshan,   M. R. (1998). Gender, population and development, Oxford: University Press.

Nalini, V., Duggan L., & Nisonoff, L., (1997). Women, gender & development. New Delhi: Reader.

Pandey, A K.( 2004). Gender equality development and women empowerment, New Delhi: Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd

Evaluation Pattern

Total Marks: 50

 

This paper has no end semester examination. Teacher in charge of the paper evaluates based on the components given below and produce internal marks.

CIA I- 10 marks (Assignment)

CIA II- 25 marks (Mid Sem Exam)

CIA III- 10 marks (Assignment)

Attendance: 5 marks (As per university norms)

 

 

SWC141E - YOUTH DEVELOPMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This elective course introduces the issues facing youth.  The conceptual understanding as well as a psychosocial issues related to youth is looked into. Students of social work also get an idea of current Indian youth intervention programmes delivered both by the government and the non-government sectors.

 Course Objectives

1.      To understand the status of youth in different contexts

2.      To develop insights on the status and problems faced by youths in different contexts

3.      To become familiar with the needs of youth

4.      To develop knowledge, skills and strategies on how to apply youth development programmes while working with the youths.

5.      To become familiar with the policies addressing youth issues

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts related to youth and youth development

CO2: Illustrate insights on the status and problems faced by youths in different contexts

CO3: Identify various needs of youths in a different context

CO4: Exhibit knowledge, skills and application of youth development programmes while working with the youths.

CO5: Demonstrate proficiency in various youth policies and welfare initiatives of governmental and nongovernmental organizations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Concept of youth
 

Legal, cultural, social connotations of the concept. Needs and issues related to youth in rural and urban settings; changes in modern Indian society and challenges facing youth; patterns of youth culture in modern India, cultural gaps and generational conflicts among youth.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Needs of youth
 

Needs of youth - physical, intellectual, emotional, social and religious needs. Socialization of youth -influence of the family peer, neighborhood, reference groups, religion. Issues impacting youth-unemployment, alienation, crime, health issues and substance abuse.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Policies and Programme for Youth Development
 

National youth policy, scheme and programmes for the youth, Youth counselling, vocational guidance, self-employment measures, skill training for the youth, youth leadership training programmes.  Case studies of interventions of International bodies, INGOs and NGOs.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Ministry of Youth Affairs & Sports, (2014) National youth policy, New Delhi, Government of India.

Nehru Yuva Kendra Sangathan.  Government of India website: http://nyks.org/

McMichael, P. (2011). Development and Social Change: A Global Perspective. Sage Publications.

Wyn, J., & White, R. (1997). Rethinking youth.  London: Sage Publications limited. 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Gore, M.S. (1978). Indian youth: Process of socialization.  New Delhi: Vishva Yuvak Kendra.

Harper and Malcolm. (1996). Empowerment through enterprise. London:  Intermediate Technology Publications.

Kenyon, et. al.  (1996). Youth policy 2000- Formulating and implementing national youth policies: Module 9. Chandigarh: CYP. Asia Regional Centre. 

Macwan’gi M - Zambia. (1998) Promoting enterprise and economic development: Module 11.  Chandigarh: CYP. Asia Regional Centre.

Evaluation Pattern

Total Marks: 50

 

This paper has no end semester examination. The teacher in charge of the paper evaluates based on the components given below and produce internal marks.

CIA I- 10 marks (Assignment)

CIA II- 25 marks (Mid Sem Exam)

CIA III- 10 marks (Assignment)

Attendance: 5 marks (As per university norms)

 

 

SWC151 - SKILL LAB - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper provides opportunity to the students for developing foundational professional and soft skills required to develop their professional life. The units will be conducted in skills labs where learning happens through practice. This course follows assessment that consists of demonstration of skills by students.

Course objectives

1.  To gain the basic skills, process skills and soft skills required for Clinical and Community Professionals.

 

2.  To impart and equip students to handle people and programmes using modern means of communication as a Clinical and Community Professional.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students exhibit basic skills, process skills and soft skills required to practice social work methods.

CO2: Students will be proficient in communication skills, soft skills and documentation skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Foundational skills
 

Academic Writing, Report Writing, Documentation of  Programmes and Projects Professional Communication, Interviewing, Team Building, Motivation and Leadership

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Process skills
 

 Introduction to Computer based skills: Editing, layout and Media coverage.  Web designing, Blog designing, Developing Videos, Poster Designing and Application development

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Soft skills
 

Types of Soft Skills, Employability

Of Skills, Communication, Listening Skills, Presentation Skills, Public Speaking, Assertiveness, Empathy, Negotiation, Critical thinking, creative thinking, Professional Etiquette, Work Life Balance and Stress Management, Fund Raising Techniques in Social Work

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bradbury, A. (2010). Successful presentation skills. London: Kogan Page. Kumar, P. (2010). Communication and soft skills. New Delhi: Centrum press. Murty, G. R. K.(2008). Soft skills for success. Hyderabad: ICFAI.

 

Rae, L. (2005). Skills of interviewing. Mumbai: Jaico.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Excel books (2004). Effective call center training: soft skills. New Delhi:Excel books. Hariharan, S., Sundararajan, N., &Shanmugapriya, S.P. (2010). Soft skills, communication skills,

employability skills, corporate skills. Chennai: MJ Publishers.

Schwartz, B. M., Landrum, R. E., & Gurung, R. A. R. (2014). An easy guide to APA style. Los Angeles: Sage Publications.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Total marks – 50

This course has no end semester examination. The teacher in charge of this paper will assess the knowledge on various skills through written examination (short notes/multiple choices) designed by the teacher and approved by the staff committee. The demonstration of the skills will be assessed by minimum of two teachers from the department.

 

Knowledge assessment – 25 marks

Skills demonstration -      25 marks

 

SWC152 - SERVICE LEARNING - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Service-learning provides students with opportunities to capitalize on their cognitive, affective, intuitive, and societal characteristics—those characteristics which differentiate learners from other learners. Through service learning, students are empowered to explore their own interests and passions, attempt to solve societal problems, employ leadership skills, and examine their own sense of justice while investigating authentic community issues and concerns. The scope of this course is to provide students an opportunity to build their capacity in the areas of Service Learning. They will be trained to identify and assess the community needs and develop intervention projects in this semester.

This project will be carried out in all four semesters and the progressive outcome among the students will be assessed and evaluated. Each student will be placed under a faculty mentor for support and reflection on the service learning activities.

 Course Objectives:

1.  To understand the basics of service-learning

2.  To attain the basic skills such as the need assessment and developing intervention project to carry out service learning projects

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to learn the purpose of service-learning as well as gets introduced to its basic concepts and skills such as need assessment, programme planning with various collaborative organizations, programme formulation and developing intervention programme to carry out service-learning projects.

CO2: Students will show proficiency in conducting street plays, campaigns and documentaries.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Capacity building on the Process of Service Learning
 

Introduction to         service           learning;        Concept, Models,Training (Capacity Building) Programmes on Need Assessment, Programme Formulation, Programme Implementation, Impact Assessment and Documentation; Capacity building on Street Plays, Campaigns and Documentaries; Collaborative programmes and projects with partner NGOs and Government organizations

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

   Berger Kaye, C. (2010). The complete guide to service learning: Proven, practical ways to engage students in civic responsibility, academic curriculum, & social action. MN, USA: Free Spirit publishing.

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Butin, D. (2010). Service-Learning in theory and practice. USA: Palgrave Macmillan.

Stoecker, R., & Tryon, E. A. (2009). The unheard voices: Community organizations and service learning. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

http://www.compact.org

www.aahe.org/service/srv-lrn.htm

www.lsaexchange.org

www.ncte.org/service/

 

Evaluation Pattern