Department of MECHANICAL AND AUTOMOBILE ENGINEERING

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Technology (Automobile Engineering)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AU332P THERMODYNAMICS AND THERMAL ENGINEERING - 5 4 100
AU334P FLUID MECHANICS AND FLUID MACHINES - 5 4 100
BS351 ENGINEERING BIOLOGY LABORATORY - 2 2 50
EVS321 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE - 2 0 0
HS321 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS - 2 2 50
MA331 MATHEMATICS - III - 3 3 100
ME333P STRENGTH OF MATERIALS - 5 4 100
MIA351 FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN - 6 04 100
MICS331P INTRODUCTION TO DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS - 5 4 100
MIMBA331 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT - 4 3 100
MIME331 SENSORS AND DATA ACQUISITION - 45 4 100
MIPSY331 UNDERSTANDING HUMAN BEHAVIOR - 4 4 100
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AU431 AUTOMOTIVE TRANSMISSION - 2 2 50
AU432P AUTOMOTIVE MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY - 5 4 100
AU433P AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS - 5 4 100
AU434P AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES - 5 4 100
AU435 KINEMATICS AND THEORY OF MACHINES - 3 3 100
AU436 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT - 2 2 50
CY421 CYBER SECURITY - 2 0 50
MIA451A ENVIRONMENTAL DESING AND SOCIO CULTURAL CONTEXT - 6 04 100
MIA451B DIGITAL ARCHITECTURE - 6 04 100
MIA451C COLLABORATIVE DESIGN WORKSHOP - 6 04 100
MICS432P INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING PARADIGN - 5 4 100
MIMBA431 ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR - 4 3 100
MIPSY432 PEOPLE THOUGHTS AND SITUATIONS - 4 4 100
5 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AU531 DESIGN OF AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS - 2 2 50
AU532P AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE SYSTEMS - 5 4 100
AU533 COMPUTER AIDED MACHINE DRAWING - 3 3 100
AU544E1 AUTOMOTIVE AERODYNAMICS - 3 3 100
AU544E2 HYDRAULICS AND PNEUMATIC CONTROL - 3 3 100
AU544E3 ENERGY ENGINEERING - 3 3 100
AU544E4 OPERATIONS RESEARCH - 3 3 100
AU544E5 SOLID MECHANICS - 3 3 100
AU551 COMPUTATIONAL LABORATORY - 2 1 100
CEOE561E01 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT - 3 3 100
CEOE561E03 DISASTER MANAGEMENT - 4 3 100
CSOE561E04 PYTHON FOR ENGINEERS - 3 3 100
ECOE5603 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS - 3 3 100
ECOE5608 FUNDAMENTALS OF IMAGE PROCESSING - 3 3 100
ECOE5610 EMBEDDED BOARDS FOR IOT APPLICATIONS - 3 3 100
EE536OE03 INTRODUCTION TO HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES - 4 3 100
EE536OE06 ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION - 4 3 100
HS522 PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE - 3 3 100
IC521 CONSTITUTION OF INDIA - 2 0 50
ME561E03 BASIC AUTOMOBILE ENGINERING - 3 3 100
ME561E04 SMART MATRIALS AND APPLICATIONS - 3 3 100
ME561E05 BASIC AEROSPACE ENGINEERING - 3 3 100
MICS533P BASICS OF COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND OPERATING SYSTEMS - 5 4 100
MIMBA531 ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - 4 4 100
MIPSY533 HUMAN ENGINEERING - 4 4 100
PH536OE1 NANO MATERIAL AND NANO TECHNOLOGY - 4 3 100
6 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AU631 AUTOMATIVE EMISSIONS AND CONTROL - 2 2 50
AU632 AUTOMOTIVE CHASSIC VEHICLE BODY ENGINEERING AND SAFETY - 3 3 100
AU633P HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE AND RENEWABLE ENERGY - 4 3 75
AU635P COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING - 4 3 75
AU637 SERVICE LEARNING - 2 2 50
AU644E1 AUTOMOTIVE STYLING - 3 3 100
AU644E2 COMBUSTION THERMODYNAMICS AND HEAT TRANSFER - 3 3 100
AU644E3 TURBO MACHINES - 3 3 100
AU644E4 TROUBLE SHOOTING SERVICING AND MAINTRNANCE OF AUTOMOBILES - 3 3 100
AU644E5 PRODUCT DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING - 3 3 100
AU651 ADVANCED MACHINING LABORATORY - 2 1 50
MICS634P INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER NETWORKS - 5 4 100
MIMBA631 DATA ANALYSIS FOR MANAGERS - 4 4 100
MIPSY634 SCIENCE OF WELL BEING - 4 4 100
7 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AU731 NOISE VIBRATION AND HARSHNESS CONTROL - 3 3 100
AU732 ENGINEERING ECONOMICS AND AUTOMOTIVE COST ESTIMATION - 3 3 100
AU733P AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS - 5 4 100
AU734P HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER - 5 4 100
AU736 SERVICE LEARNING - 4 2 50
AU781 INTERNSHIP - 30 2 50
BTGE 732 ACTING COURSE - 2 2 100
BTGE 734 DIGITAL WRITING - 2 2 100
BTGE 737 PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY - 4 2 100
BTGE 744 DIGITAL MARKETING - 2 2 100
BTGE 745 DATA ANALYTICS THROUGH SPSS - 2 2 100
BTGE735 DIGITAL MEDIA - 2 2 100
BTGE736 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS - 4 2 100
BTGE738 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - 2 2 100
BTGE739 CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION - 2 2 100
BTGE741 GERMAN - 2 2 100
BTGE749 PAINTING AND SKETCHING - 2 2 100
BTGE750 PHOTOGRAPHY - 2 2 100
BTGE754 FUNCTIONAL ENGLISH - 2 2 50
ME751 ANALYSIS LABORATORY - 2 1 50
8 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AU831E1 AUTOMOTIVE EMISSIONS AND CONTROL - 3 3 100
AU831E2 TURBO MACHINES - 3 3 100
AU831E3 MECHANICS OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS - 3 3 100
AU831E4 NON-TRADITIONAL MACHINING - 3 3 100
AU831E5 OPERATIONS RESEARCH - 3 3 100
AU831E6 AUTOMOTIVE AERODYNAMICS - 3 3 100
AU832E1 ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR COMMUNICATION AND LEADERSHIP - 3 3 100
AU832E2 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT - 3 3 100
AU832E3 HYDRAULICS AND PNEUMATIC CONTROL - 3 3 100
AU832E4 NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING - 3 3 100
AU832E5 RAPID PROTOTYPING - 3 3 100
AU832E6 AUTOMOTIVE HEATING VENTILATION AND AIR CONDITIONING - 3 3 100
AU832E7 AUTOMOTIVE TESTING AND CERTIFICATION - 3 3 100
AU833E1 HYBRID AND ELECTRIC VEHICLES - 3 3 100
AU833E2 FRACTURE MECHANICS - 3 3 100
AU833E3 TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT - 3 3 100
AU833E4 NANOTECHNOLOGY - 3 3 100
AU833E5 PROJECT AND MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - 3 3 100
AU833E6 SMART MATERIALS - 3 3 100
AU833E7 TRIBOLOGY - 3 3 100
AU881 PROJECT WORK - 12 6 200
AU882 COMPREHENSION - 2 2 50
CY821 CYBER SECURITY - 2 2 50
IC821 CONSTITUTION OF INDIA - 2 0 50

AU332P - THERMODYNAMICS AND THERMAL ENGINEERING (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

1. Understanding of the first law of thermodynamics and various forms of work that can occur.

2. An ability to evaluate entropy changes in a wide range of processes and determine the reversibility or irreversibility of a process from such calculations.

3. An understanding of the use of the Gibbs and Helmholtz free energies as equilibrium criteria, and the statement of the equilibrium condition for closed and open systems. 

Learning Outcome

CO1. Understand concept of temperature measurements, work and its interaction, heat and its interaction, different types of thermodynamics systems. [L1, 2, 4] [PO1, 2, 4]

CO 2. Understand concept of reversibility and irreversibility, entropy and available energy. [L1, 2, 4] [PO1, 2, 4]

CO 3. Evaluate efficiency of heat efficiency of heat engine and coefficient of performance of heat pump & refrigerator. [L1, 2, 4] [PO1, 2, 4]

CO 4. Evaluate the properties of pure substance and efficiency of vapor power cycles using pure substance. [L1, 2, 4] [PO1, 2, 4]

CO 5. Understand the concept of moist air and its effect on air-conditioning. [L1, 2, 4] [PO1, 2, 4]

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Basic Thermodynamics
 

Systems – Zeroth low – First law – Steady flow energy equation – Heat and work transfer in flow and non-flow processes – Second law – Kelvin-Planck statement – Clausius statement – Concept of Entropy Clausius inequality – Entropy change in non-flow processes – Properties of gases and vapours - Introduction to thermoelectricity.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Air Standard Cycle and Compressors
 

Otto – Diesel – Dual combustion and Brayton cycles – Air standard efficiency – Mean effective pressure – Reciprocating compressors. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Steam and Jet Propulsion
 

Properties of steam – Rankine cycle – Steam Nozzles – Simple jet propulsion system – Thrust rocket motor – Specific impulse.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning
 

Principles of psychometry and refrigeration – Vapour compression – Vapour absorption types – Coefficient of performance – Properties of refrigerants – Basic Principle and types of Air conditioning.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Heat Transfer
 

Conduction in parallel – Radial and composite wall – Basics of Convective heat transfer – Fundamentals of Radiative heat transfer – Flow through heat exchangers.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. “Basic and Applied Thermodynamics” by P.K. Nag, Tata McGraw Hill, 3rd Edi. 2002

2. “Thermodynamics an engineering approach”, by Yunus A. Cenegal and Michael A. Boles. Tata McGraw hill Pub. 2002

3. Nag. P.K., “Basic and applied thermodynamics”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2007.

4. S. Domkundwar, C.P. Kothandaraman, Anand Domkundwar “A Course in Thermal Engineering, Dhanpat Rai & Co., 2013

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Engineering Thermodynamics. By Rajput, Laxmi Publications pvt ltd., 3rd Edi. 2007.

2. Engineering Thermodynamics by J.B. Jones and G.A.Hawkins, John Wiley and Sons.

3. Thermo Dynamics by S.C.Gupta, Pearson Edu. Pvt. Ltd., 1st Ed. 2005.

4. Holman.J.P., “Thermodynamics”, McGraw-Hill, 2007

5. Arora C.P, “Thermodynamics”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2003.

6. Radhakrishnan E., “Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics”, Prentice-Hall India, 2005.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with theory and practical

70

30

COURSES WITH THEORY AND PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

Theory CIA

30

-

30

2

Theory ESE

30

12

30

3

Practical CIA

35

14

35

4

Attendance

05

-

05

5

Aggregate

100

40

100

 

DETAILS OF MARK FOR COURSES WITH THOERY AND PRACTICAL

THEORY

PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

CIA-1

20

10

-

10

Overall CIA

50

35

14

35

2

CIA-2

50

10

-

10

3

CIA-3

20

10

-

10

4

Attendance

05

05

-

05

Attendance

NA

NA

-

-

5

ESE

100

30

12

30

ESE

NA

NA

-

-

 

 

TOTAL

65

-

65

TOTAL

 

35

14

35

AU334P - FLUID MECHANICS AND FLUID MACHINES (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To learn about the application of mass and momentum conservation laws for fluid flows

To understand the importance of dimensional analysis

To obtain the velocity and pressure variations in various types of simple flows

To analyse the flow in water pumps and turbines.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Explain pressure measurement by simple and differential manometer using Pascals law, and explain viscosity, surface tension and capillarity by comprehending the properties of fluids. {L3}

CO2: Determine metacentric height using conditions of equilibrium, and explain stream function, potential function and vorticity using basic concepts of inviscid flow. {L3}

CO3: Execute derivation of Bernoulli’s equation from Euler’s equation, and explain flow rate measurement using venturimeter, orifice meter, pitot tube, and V and rectangular notches. {L3}

CO4: Determine dimensionless groups for fluid flow analysis through Buckingham pi theorem and Rayleigh’s method, and explain direct measurements, analogue methods, flow visualization and components of measuring systems by comprehending concepts of experimental fluid mechanics. {L3}

CO5: Calculate pressure drop in pipe flow, and drag and lift coefficients in external flow using experimental relations, and determine Mach number by comprehending basic concepts of compressible flow. {L3}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Statics
 

Basics: Introduction, Properties of fluids-mass density, weight density, specific volume, specific gravity, viscosity, surface tension, capillarity, vapour pressure, compressibility and bulk modulus. Pascal’s law, Absolute, gauge, atmospheric and vacuum pressures. Pressure measurement by simple, differential manometers and mechanical gauges.

Fluid Statics: Buoyancy, center of buoyancy, meta center and meta centric heightits application in shipping, stability of floating bodies.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Fluid Kinematics and Dynamics
 

Fluid Kinematics: Types of Flow-steady , unsteady, uniform, non-uniform, laminar, turbulent, one, two and three dimensional, compressible, incompressible, rotational, irrotational, stream lines, path lines, streak lines, velocity components, convective and local acceleration, velocity potential, stream function, continuity equation in Cartesian co-ordinates.

Fluid Dynamics:

Euler’s equation, Integration of Euler’s equation to obtain Bernoulli’s equation, Bernoulli’s theorem, Application of Bernoulli’s theorem such as venturi meter, orifice meter, rectangular and triangular notch, pitot tube, orifices etc., related numericals.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Major and Minor losses in Pipes
 

Major and Minor losses in Pipes: Energy consideration in pipe flow, Loss of Pressure Head due to Fluid Friction, Chezy’s equation, Darcy Weishach formula, major and minor losses in pipes, Moody equation/ diagram. Pipes in series, parallel, equivalent pipe, Related Numericals and simple pipe design problems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Flow Over Bodies & Dimensional Analysis
 

Flow Over Bodies: Basic concept of Lift and Drag, Types of drag, Co-efficient of drag and lift, streamline body and bluff body, flow around circular bodies and airfoils, Lift and drag on airfoil, Numerical problems.

Dimensional Analysis: Need for dimensional analysis, Dimensions and units, Dimensional Homogeneity and dimensionless ratios, methods of dimensional analysis, Rayleigh’s method, Buckingham Pi theorem, Numerical problems.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Compressible Flows & CFD
 

Compressible Flows: Introduction, thermodynamic relations of perfect gases, internal energy and enthalpy, speed of sound, pressure field due to a moving source, basic Equations for one-dimensional flow, stagnation and sonic Properties, normal and oblique shocks.

Introduction to CFD: Necessity, limitations, philosophy behind CFD, and applications.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Bansal. R.K, “Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics Machines”, 9th edition, Laxmi publications {P} Ltd., New Delhi,2017

T2. Yunus A Cengel & John M. Cimbala, Fluid Mechanics, Tata McGraw Hill Edition New Delhi, 2013

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. White. F.M, “Fluid Mechanics”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 8th Edition, New Delhi, 2016

R2. Streeter V.L., Benjamin Wylie, “Fluid Mechanics”, Mc Graw Hill Book Co., New Delhi,1999

R3. Robert W. Fax, Philip J. Pritchard, Alan T. McDonald, “Introduction to Fluid Mechanics”, Wiley India Edition {Wiley Student Edition 8th  2014}

R4. Modi P.N, & Seth S.M, “Hydraulics and Fluid Mechanics”, Standard Book House,New Delhi, 14th edition, 2002

R5. Shiv Kumar, “Fluid Mechanics & Fluid Machines: Basic Concepts & Principles”, Ane Books Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 2010

Evaluation Pattern

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with theory and practical

70

30

 

COURSES WITH THEORY AND PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

Theory CIA

30

-

30

2

Theory ESE

30

12

30

3

Practical CIA

35

14

35

4

Attendance

05

-

05

5

Aggregate

100

40

100

 

DETAILS OF MARK FOR COURSES WITH THOERY AND PRACTICAL

THEORY

PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

CIA-1

20

10

-

10

Overall CIA

50

35

14

35

2

CIA-2

50

10

-

10

3

CIA-3

20

10

-

10

4

Attendance

05

05

-

05

Attendance

NA

NA

-

-

5

ESE

100

30

12

30

ESE

NA

NA

-

-

 

 

TOTAL

65

-

65

TOTAL

 

35

14

35

BS351 - ENGINEERING BIOLOGY LABORATORY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Understanding and application of MATLAB and TINKERCAD for biological analysis which would results in better healthcare and any engineer, irrespective of the parent discipline (mechanical, electrical, civil, computer, electronics, etc.,) can use the disciplinary skills toward designing/improving biological systems. This course is designed to convey the essentials of human physiology.

 

The course will introduce to the students the various fundamental concepts in MATLAB and TINKERCAD for numerical analysis and circuit design using arduino.

 

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1Perform basic mathematical operation and analysis on biological parameters as BMI, ECG using MATLAB.L4

CO2Perform basic image processing on RGB images pertaining to medical data using MATLABL4

CO3Perform analysis on biological parameters using TinkerCad and design mini projects applicable for healthcare and biosensing.L4

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
 

1.      To familiarize with Matlab Online and getting used to basic functionalities used in Matlab (arrays, matrices, tables, functions)

2.      To calculate the Body Mass Index (BMI) of a person and determine under what category the person falls under – underweight, normal, overweight

3.      To determine the R peaks in given ECG and to find HRV using Matlab.

4.      To determine the R peaks in given ECG and to find HRV using Matlab.

5.      To determine the R peaks in given ECG and to find HRV using Matlab.

6.      Introduction to Tinkercad and using the various tools available for running a simple program of lighting a LED bulb using Arduino (digital).

7.      To design a driver motor in Tinkercad using Arduino and driver motor

8.      To design a temperature sensor in Tinkercad using Arduino and TMP36

9.      To design and simulate gas sensors using potentiometers, Arduino and servo motors

10.  To design and simulate measuring pulse sensors using photodiodes, IR LED and Arduino

11.  Preparation of biopolymers (polylactic acid) at home using home-based ingredients.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

 

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

As per university norms

EVS321 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:0
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To understand the scope and importance of environmental science towards developing a conscious community for environmental issues, both at global and local scale.  

Learning Outcome

CO1. Explain the components and concept of various ecosystems in the environment (L2, PO7)

CO2. Explain the necessity of natural resources management (L2, PO1, PO2 and PO7)

CO3.Relate the causes and impacts of environmental pollution (L4, PO1, PO2, and PO3, PO4)

CO4.Relate climate change/global atmospheric changes and adaptation (L4,PO7)

CO5. Appraise the role of technology and institutional mechanisms for environmental protection (L5, PO8)

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction
 

Environment and Eco systems – Definition, Scope and importance. Components of environment. Concept and Structure of eco systems. Material Cycles – Nitrogen, Carbon, Sulphur, Phosphorous, Oxygen. Energy Flow and classification of Eco systems.   

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Natural Resources
 

Classification and importance- Forest, Water, Mineral, Food, Energy. Management of natural resources – challenges and methods. Sustainable development – Goals, Agriculture, Industries

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Environmental Pollution
 

Causes and Impacts – Air pollution, Water pollution, Soil Pollution, Noise Pollution, Marine Pollution, Municipal Solid Wastes, Bio Medical and E-Waste. Solid Waste Management

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Climate change/Global Atmospheric Change
 

Global Temperature, Greenhouse effect, global energy balance, Global warming potential, International Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) Emission scenarios, Oceans and climate change. Adaptation methods. Green Climate fund. Climate change related planning- small islands and coastal region. Impact on women, children, youths and marginalized communities

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Environmental Protection
 

Technology, Modern Tools – GIS and  Remote Sensing,. Institutional Mechanisms - Environmental Acts and Regulations, Role of government, Legal aspects. Role of Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) , Environmental Education and Entrepreneurship

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1Kaushik A and Kaushik. C. P, “Perspectives in Environmental Studies”New Age International Publishers, New Delhi, 2018 [Unit: I, II, III and IV]

T2Asthana and Asthana, “A text Book of Environmental Studies”, S. Chand, New Delhi, Revised Edition, 2010 [Unit: I, II, III and V]

T3Nandini. N, Sunitha. N and Tandon. S, “environmental Studies” , Sapana, Bangalore,  June 2019 [Unit: I, II, III and IV]

T4R Rajagopalan, “Environmental Studies – From Crisis to Cure”, Oxford, Seventh University Press, 2017, [Unit: I, II, III and IV]

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.Miller. G. T and Spoolman. S. E, “Environmental Science”, CENAGE  Learning, New Delhi, 2015

R2.Masters, G andEla, W.P (2015), Introduction to environmental Engineering and Science, 3rd Edition. Pearson., New Delhi, 2013.

R3.Raman Sivakumar, “Principals of Environmental Science and Engineering”, Second Edition, Cengage learning Singapore, 2005.

R4.P. Meenakshi, “Elements of Environmental Science and Engineering”, Prentice Hall of India Private Limited, New Delhi, 2006.

R5.S.M. Prakash, “Environmental Studies”, Elite Publishers Mangalore, 2007

R6.ErachBharucha, “Textbook of Environmental Studies”, for UGC, University press, 2005.

R7. Dr. Pratiba Sing, Dr. AnoopSingh and Dr. PiyushMalaviya, “Textbook of Environmental and Ecology”, Acme Learning Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi.

Evaluation Pattern

No Evaluation

HS321 - PROFESSIONAL ETHICS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper deals with the various organizational behaviours like learning, perception, motivation and method of managing stress and conflicts and the basic principles of communication.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To communicate in an effective manner in an organization. {L1, PO1}

CO2: To motivate the team members in an organization. {L3, PO2}

CO3: To Study the various motivational theories {L2, PO3}

CO4: To study the various methods of learning. {L1, PO2}

CO5: To effectively manage the stress and conflicts in an organization.{L1, PO1} 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction
 

Definition of Organization Behaviour and Historical development, Environmental context (Information Technology and Globalization, Diversity and Ethics, Design and Cultural, Reward Systems).

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
The Individual
 

Foundations of individual behaviour, individual differences. Ability. Attitude, Aptitude, interests. Values.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Perception
 

Definition, Factors influencing perception, attribution theory, selective perception, projection, stereotyping, Halo effect.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Learning
 

Definition, Theories of Learning, Individual Decision Making, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, social learning theory, continuous and intermittent reinforcement.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
The Groups
 

Definition and classification of groups, Factors affecting group formation, stages of group development, Norms, Hawthorne studies, group processes, group tasks, group decision making.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Motivation
 

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs theory, Mc-Gregor's theory X and Y, Hertzberg's motivation Hygiene theory, David Mc-Clelland’s three needs theory, Victor Vroom's expectancy theory of motivation.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Conflict & Stress management
 

Definition of conflict, functional and dysfunctional conflict, stages of conflict process. Sources of stress, fatigue and its impact on productivity.Job satisfaction, job rotation, enrichment, job enlargement and reengineering work process.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Principle of Communication
 

Useful definitions, communication principles, communication system, role of communication in management, barriers in communication, how to overcome the barriers, rule of effective communication.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Organizational Behaviour, Stephen P Robbins, 9th Edition, Pearson Education Publications, ISBN-81-7808-561-5 2002

T2: Organizational Behaviour, Fred Luthans, 9th Edition, Mc Graw Hill International Edition, ISBN-0-07-120412-12002

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.Organizational Behaviour, Hellriegel, Srocum and Woodman, Thompson Learning, 9th Edition, Prentice Hall India, 2001

R2.Organizational Behaviour, Aswathappa - Himalaya Publishers. 2001

R3.Organizational Behaviour, VSP Rao and others, Konark Publishers.2002

R4.Organizational Behaviour, {Human behaviour at work} 9th Edition, John Newstron/ Keith Davis. 2002

Evaluation Pattern

 CIA 1 

MSE

CIA 3

Weightage for ESE

20

50

20

50

MA331 - MATHEMATICS - III (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To enable the students to find the Fourier series and harmonic analysis of a periodic function, solve the boundary value problems using Fourier series, ordinary differential equations by series solution method and describe functionals and solve variational problems.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Develop the trigonometric series as Fourier expansion. {L4 }{PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4}

CO2: Classify the nature of partial differential equations and hence solve it by different methods. {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO3: Solve boundary value problems using Fourier series {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO4: Solve ordinary differential equation using series solution method {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO5: Apply Euler’s equation to solve the optimal values of the functional. {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
FOURIER SERIES
 

Periodic functions, Dirichlet’s conditions, General Fourier series, Odd and even functions, Half range sine and cosine series, Harmonic Analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
 

Formation of PDE, Solution of homogeneous PDE involving derivative with respect to one independent variable only (Both types with given set of conditions), solution of non- homogeneous PDE by direct integration, Solution of Lagrange’s linear PDE of the type P p +Q q= R

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS
 

Various possible solutions of one-dimensional wave and heat equations, two-dimensional Laplace’s equation by the method of separation of variables. Solution of all these equations with specified boundary conditions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
SERIES SOLUTION OF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
 

Power Series solutions of differential equations, ordinary point, singular point, Frobenius method

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
CALCULUS OF VARIATIONS
 

Variation of a function, Variational problems, Euler’s equation and its solution, Standard variation problems including geodesics, minimal surface of revolution, hanging chain and Brachistochrone problems. Functional; functional involving higher order derivatives.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.  Dr. B. Grewal, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, 43rd Edition, Khanna Publishers, July 2014.

T2.  H. K. Das & Rajnish Verma, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, 20th Edition, S. Chand & Company Ltd., 2012

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Erwin Kreyszig, “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, 10th Edition, John Wiley & Sons,Inc. 2011.

R2. B.V. Ramana, 6th Reprint, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, Tata-Macgraw Hill, 2008

R3. George F. Simmons and Steven G. Krantz, “Differential Equation, Theory, Technique and Practice”, Tata McGraw – Hill, 2006.

R4. M. D. Raisinghania, “Ordinary and Partial Differential Equation”, Chand (S.) & Co. Ltd., India, March 17, 2005

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1

20

CIA-2

25

CIA-3

20

Attendance

05

ESE

50

ME333P - STRENGTH OF MATERIALS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To study the behaviour of material under different loading conditions, and study of various stress, strain and deformation on a material without undergoing failure or plastic deformation.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of stress-strain generated with in ductile and brittle material for simple and compound loading conditions. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2}

CO2: Determine the shear force, shear stress, bending moment and bending stress distribution for various beam with different loading conditions. {L1, L2, L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO3: Finding the maximum deflection of beam by double integration and Macaulay’s method. {L1, L2, L4} {PO1, PO2, PO4}

CO4: Understand the solid and hollow shaft behaviour subjected to pure torsion. {L1, L2, L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO5: Illustrate the knowledge of calculating deformation in thick, thin cylinder and spherical shell. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Compound Stresses and Strains
 

Two-dimensional system, stress at a point on a plane, principal stresses and principal planes, Mohr’s circle of stress.

Activity: Determination of Plane stress 2D element using Matlab.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Simple Stresses and Strains
 

Deformation in Solids, Hooke’s law, Stress Strain curve for ductile and brittle materials,Principle of super position, Shear stresses, Temperature Stress, Elastic constants and their relations - Volumetric, linear and shear strains.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Bending moment and Shear Force Diagrams
 

Bending moment (BM) and shear force (SF) diagrams for cantilever, simply supported and over hanging beams for point load (PL), uniformly distributed load (UDL), Uniformly varying load (UVL) and Couple.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Theory of bending stresses
 

Assumptions in the simple bending theory, derivation of formula: its application to beams of rectangular, circular and channel sections, Composite beams, bending and shear stresses in composite beams.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Deflection of Beams
 

Relationship between moment, slope and deflection, Double integration method, Macaulay’s method. Use of these methods to calculate slope and deflection for cantilever and simply supported beams subjected to point load, UDL, UVL and Couple.

Activity: Determination of Neutral axis for any regular or composite beam section using Matlab or Excel.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Simple Torsional Theory
 

Derivation of torsion equation and its assumptions. Applications of the equation of the hollow and solid circular shafts, torsional rigidity, Combined torsion. Analysis of close-coiled-helical springs.

Activity: Determination of Torsion in shaft using Matlab.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Thick and Thin Cylinders
 

Axial and hoop stresses in cylinders subjected to internal pressure, deformation of thick and thin cylinders, deformation in spherical shells subjected to internal pressure.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Egor P. Popov, Engineering Mechanics of Solids, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi,   2001.

T2. R. Subramanian, Strength of Materials, Oxford University Press, 2007.

T3. Ferdinand P. Been, Russel Johnson Jr and John J. Dewole, Mechanics of Materials, Tata Mc GrawHill Publishing Co. Ltd., New Delhi 2005.

T4. R.C. Hibbeler, "Mechanics of materials", 9th Edition, Printice hall. pearson edu., 2014.

T5. James. M. Gere; Stephe Timoshenko, "Mechanics of materials",2nd Edition CBS      Publishers, 2016.

T6. Ferdinand P Beer; E. Russel Johnson; John T Dewolf; David F Mazurek; Sanjeev.    Sanghi,"Mechanics of materials", Tata mc-grawhill- 2013.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. S.S. Rattan, "Strength of Materials", 3rd Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, 2011.

R2. S.S. Bhavikatti, “Strength of Materials", 4th Edition, Vikas publications House Pvt. Ltd., 2013.

R3. K.V. Rao, G.C. Raju, “Mechanics of Materials", First Edition, 2007

R4. Egor. P. Popov, "Engineering Mechanics of Solids", Pearson Edu. India, 2008.

R5. W.A. Nash, Schaum's Outlines Strength of Materials, Tata Mcgraw-Hill Publishing Company 2010.

R6  R.K. Rajput “Strength of Materials”, S.Chand & co Ltd. New Delhi, 2015

R7  R.KBansal, “Strength of Materials”, Lakshmi Publication {P} Ltd, New Delhi, 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

COURSES WITH THEORY AND PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Minimum marks

to pass

Maximum

marks

1

Theory CIA

30

-

30

2

Theory ESE

30

12

30

3

Practical CIA

35

14

35

4

Attendance

05

-

05

4

Aggregate

100

40

100

MIA351 - FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:04

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The studio intends to contextualize the student towards aesthetical approach and sensitize them towards local and heterogeneous culture of ours. Today, the biggest challenge is lying in the areas of aesthetical thinking and process-based techniques, where we try to enhance aesthetic sense, creativity, responsive and reflective ecology in which they live and connect. They connect their creativity and aesthetical sensibility to local knowledge and culture of their own environment. Also, there are things to learn and adapt from the diversity of craftsmanship and knowledge system. 

  1. Introduction to different media and rendering techniques.
  2. Introduction to principles of composition, developing keen sensitivity to space, scale, proportion, light, wind, sound, texture.
  3. To understand basic principles of freehand drawing and color.
  4. Introduction to the representation of the human body and anthropometrics /ergonomics.
  5. To translate abstract principles of design into architectural processes, forms, and solutions.
  6. To introduce the Architectural Design Language – technical drafting and presentation and to impart the appropriate manual skills for visualization and technical representation.

Learning Outcome

CO1:  To have a comprehensive understanding of architectural drawing techniques and pictorial presentation.

Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to sensitively observe and record various aspects of the immediate environment including human relationships, visual language, aesthetic characteristics and space, elements of nature, etc. 

Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to achieve skills of visualization and communication, through different mediums and processes.

Level: Basic 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Familiarizing surrounding
 

Observing, experiencing, analyzing the manmade environment and organic environment.

To create awareness of human abilities like perception, intuition, Identification, and observation, enjoying our senses through a nature walk, (by seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, and tasting)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Principles of art & drawing
 

To understand basic principles of art and drawing as an extension of seeing and a tool to create awareness of different visualization techniques.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Elements of Design & theory of visual perception
 
  1. Elements of design, Developing skills of analysis, synthesis, interpretation, and communication through elements and composition.
  2. Introduction to the theory of visual perception through color, form, space, light and shadow, texture, and tones.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:30
Pictorial Projections, Sciography & Rendering
 
  1. Developing pictorial representations -Isometric Projection, Axonometric projection, and Perspective projections 
  2. Introduction to Sciography and principles of shades and shadows.
  3. Rendering the pictorial projections.
Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.  Cari LaraSvensan and William Ezara Street, Engineering Graphics.

T2. Bhatt, N. D., Engineering Drawing, Charotar Publishing House Pvt. Ltd

T3. Venugopal, K., Engineering Drawing and Graphics, New Age International Publishers. 

T4. S. Rajaraman, Practical Solid Geometry.

 
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Francis D. K. Ching, ‘Drawing, Space, Form, Expression’.

R2. Alexander W. White, ‘The Elements of Graphic Design, Allworth Press

R3. Alexander W. White, ‘The Elements of Graphic Design, Allworth Press; 1 edition (Nov 1, 2002)

Evaluation Pattern

 The Evaluation pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE).

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE, VIVA-VOCE): 50 Marks

TOTAL:100 Marks

Note: For this course, a minimum of 50% marks in CIA is required to be eligible for VIVA-VOCE which is conducted as ESE.

MICS331P - INTRODUCTION TO DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To learn the systematic way of solving problems.
  • To understand the different methods of organizing large amounts of data.
  • To efficiently implement the different data structures.
  • To efficiently implement solutions for specific problems.

Learning Outcome

Sl NO

DESCRIPTION

REVISED BLOOM’S TAXONOMY (RBT)LEVEL

1.

Explain the basic concepts of data structures and solve the time complexity of the algorithm

L3

2.

Experiment with various operations on Linear Data structures

L3

3.

Examine the Structures and Operations of Trees and Heaps Data Structures

L4

4

Compare various given sorting techniques with respect to time complexity

L4

5

 Choose various shortest path algorithms to determine the minimum spanning path for the given graphs

L5

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
INTRODUCTION
 

Definition- Classification of data structures: primitive and non-primitive- Operations on data structures- Algorithm Analysis.

LAB Programs:

1a. Sample C Programs 1b. To determine the time complexity of a given logic. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:17
LISTS, STACKS AND QUEUES
 

Abstract Data Type (ADT) – The List ADT – The Stack ADT: Definition,Array representation of stack, Operations on stack: Infix, prefix and postfix notations Conversion of an arithmetic Expression from Infix to postfix. Applications of stacks. 

The Queue ADT: Definition, Array representation of queue, Types of queue: Simple queue, circular queue, double ended queue (de-queue) priority queue, operations on all types of Queues 

LAB Programs:

2. Implement the applications Stack ADT.

3. Implement the applications for Queue ADT.

4.Operations on stack[e.g.: infix to postfix, evaluation of postfix]

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
TREES
 

Preliminaries – Binary Trees – The Search Tree ADT – Binary Search Trees – AVL Trees – Tree Traversals – Hashing – General Idea – Hash Function – Separate Chaining – Open Addressing –Linear Probing – Priority Queues (Heaps) – Model – Simple implementations – Binary Heap.

LAB PROGRAMS:

5. Search Tree ADT - Binary Search Tree

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
SORTING
 

Preliminaries – Insertion Sort – Shell sort – Heap sort – Merge sort – Quicksort – External Sorting.

LAB PROGRAMS

6. Heap Sort.

7. Quick Sort.

8.Applications of Probability and Queuing Theory Problems to be implemented using data structures. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
GRAPHS
 

Definitions – Topological Sort – Shortest-Path Algorithms – Unweighted Shortest Paths – Dijkstra‘s Algorithm – Minimum Spanning Tree – Prim‘s Algorithm – Applications of Depth- First Search – Undirected Graphs – Bi-connectivity – Introduction to NP-Completeness-case study

LAB PROGRAMS

9. Implementing a Hash function/Hashing Mechanism.

10. Implementing any of the shortest path algorithms. 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

TEXT BOOK

1.Mark Allen Weiss , “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C”, 2nd  Edition, Addison-Wesley, 1997

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Michael T. Goodrich, Roberto Tamassia and Michael H. Goldwasser , ―Data Structures and Algorithms in Python  ‖, First  Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2013.ISBN1118476735, 9781118476734

Evaluation Pattern

Components of the CIA

CIA I : Assignment/MCQ  and Continuous Assessment : 10 marks

CIA II : Mid Semester Examination (Theory) : 10 marks

CIA III : Closed Book Test/Mini Project and Continuous Assessment: 10 marks

Lab marks :35 marks

Attendance : 05 marks

End Semester Examination(ESE) : 30% (30 marks out of 100 marks)

Total: 100 marks

MIMBA331 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This is offered as a core course in first trimester. This course will provide a general introduction to management principles and theories, and a brief outline on history and development of management thought.

Course Objectives: This course describes the steps necessary to understand an organisation that are aligned with business objectives and provides an insight to address a range of challenges that every manager encounters. It aims to prepare students for an exciting challenging and rewarding managerial career through case studies on ‘Global Perspective’.

Learning Outcome

 Course Learning Outcomes: On having completed this course students should be able to:

 CLO1   Understand different management approaches

 CLO2   Demonstrate planning techniques

 CLO3   Able to work in dynamic teams within organizations

CLO4   Analyze different processes in staffing and controlling

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Nature, Purpose and Evolution of Management Thought
 

Meaning; Scope; Managerial levels and skills; Managerial Roles; Management: Science, Art or Profession; Universality of Management.

Ancient roots of management theory; Classical schools of management thought; Behavioral School, Quantitative School; Systems Approach, Contingency Approach; Contemporary Management thinkers & their contribution. Ancient Indian Management systems & practices. Comparative study of global management systems & practices. Social responsibility of managers, Managerial Ethics.

Evolution of Management: Teaching management through Indian Mythology (Videos of Devdutt Pattanaik, Self-learning mode)

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Planning
 

Types of Plans; Steps in Planning Process; Strategies, level of Strategies, Policies and Planning; Decision making, Process of Decision Making, Techniques in Decision Making, Forecasting & Management by Objectives (MBO).

Planning: Emerald Case and Projects of Events

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Organizing
 

Organizational structure and design; types of organizational structures; Span of control, authority, delegation, decentralization and reengineering. Social responsibility of managers, Managerial Ethics.

Organizing: Holacracy form of organization structure

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Staffing
 

Human resource planning, Recruitment, selection, training & development, performance appraisal, managing change, compensation and employee welfare.

Motivation: Concept, Forms of employee motivation, Need for motivation, Theories of motivation, Stress Management

Staffing: Stress Management & Career path, Emerald Case

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Leading and Controlling
 

Leadership concept, leadership Styles, leadership theories, leadership communication.

Nature of organizational control; control process; Methods and techniques of control; Designing control systems, Quality Management

Leading: Article on Styles of leadership by Daniel Goleman

Controlling: Projects of Events

           

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Koontz, H. & Heinz, W. (2013). Management (13th Edition). Tata McGraw Hill Publications.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Reading

1.     Daft, R. L. (2013). The new era of management (10th Edition). Cengage Publications.

2.     Prasad, L.M., Principles and practices of management. New Delhi: Sultan Chand & Sons.     

3.     Stoner, J.F., Freeman, E. R., & Gilbert, D.R. (2013). Management (6th Edition). Pearson Publications.

4.      Joseph L Massie, Essentials of Management. Prentice-Hall India, New York.

Evaluation Pattern

Test & Exam

 Exam conducted for

Marks conversion

Weightage

Total

CIA-I

20

10

20%

10

CIA-II

50

25

25%

25

CIA-III

20

10

10%

10

Attendance

 

5

5%

5

CIA – I, II, and III

50

50%

50

End-term

100

50

50%

50

Total

100

MIME331 - SENSORS AND DATA ACQUISITION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:45
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:  

  • To know about the types of transducers available.
  • To understand the function of signal generators and analyzers.
  • To gain information about data acquisition, data logging, and application of sensors incondition-based monitoring.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes:

CO1. Summarize the working and construction of sensors measuring various physical
parameters.

CO2. Design suitable signal conditioning and filter circuits for sensors.

CO3. Outline operations of various data acquisition and transmission systems.

CO4. Distinguish smart sensors from normal sensors by their operation and construction.

C05. Classify various sensing methods used in condition monitoring

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
SENSORS AND TRANSDUCERS
 

Sensors and classifications – Characteristics environmental parameters – Selectionand specification of sensors – Introduction to Acoustics and acoustic sensors- Ultrasonicsensor- Types and working of Microphones and Hydrophones – Sound level meter, Humidity
sensor, and Nuclear radiation sensor – Stress- Strain measurements Strain gauges (resistiveand Optical) types Uniaxial and Multiaxial strain gauges with signal conditioning circuits(half, quarter, and full bridges)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
SMART SENSORS
 

Introduction - primary sensors, characteristic, Information coding / processing, Datacommunication - Recent trends in sensors and Technology - Film sensor, MEMS and NanoSensors.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
SIGNAL CONDITIONING
 

Amplification, Filtering – Level conversion – Linearization - Buffering – Sample andHold circuit – Quantization – Multiplexer / Demultiplexer – Analog to Digital converter –Digital to Analog converter- I/P and P/I converter - Instrumentation Amplifier-V/F and F/V converter.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
DATA ACQUISITION
 

Data Acquisition conversion-General configuration-single channel and multichanneldata acquisition – Digital filtering – Data Logging – Data conversion – Introduction to DigitalTransmission system.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
SENSORS FOR CONDITION MONITORING
 

Introduction to condition monitoring - Non destructive testing (vs) condition
monitoring- Intelligent fault detection- Accelerometers- Acoustic Emission sensors- Thermalimaging cameras- Vibration Signature based monitoring techniques - Acoustic emissionholography - oil Analysis- Ultrasound based Non Destructive Evaluation techniques.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Patranabis. D, “Sensors and Transducers”, PHI, New Delhi, 2ndEdition, 2003.

T2. Ernest O. Doebelin, “Measurement Systems – Applications and Design”, TataMcGraw-Hill, 2009.

T3. David G. Alciatore and Michael B. Histand, “Introduction to Mechatronics andMeasurement systems”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2nd Edition, 2008.

T4. John Turner and Martyn Hill, Instrumentation for Engineers and Scientists, OxfordScience Publications, 1999.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Cornelius Scheffer and PareshGirdhar “Practical Machinery Vibration Analysis andPredictive Maintenance” Elsevier, 2004.

R2. A.K. Sawney and PuneetSawney, “A Course in Mechanical Measurements andInstrumentation and Control”, 12th edition, DhanpatRai& Co, New Delhi, 2001.

R3.Mohamed Gad-el-Hak, “The MEMS handbook”, Interpharm/CRC. 2001

R4. Dr.Ing.B.V.A. RAO, “Monograph on Acoustics & Noise control”, NDRF, TheInstitution of Engineers (India), 2013.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Marks: 50

ESE Marks: 50

 

MIPSY331 - UNDERSTANDING HUMAN BEHAVIOR (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course focuses on the fundamentals of psychology. It is an introductory paper that gives an overall understanding about the human behavior. It will provide students with an introduction to the key concepts, perspectives, theories, and sub-fields on various basic processes underlying human behavior.

  1. To understand the fundamental processes underlying human behavior
  2. To become aware of one’s idiosyncrasies and predispositions
  3. To apply the understanding of concepts in day-to-day activities

Learning Outcome

After the completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. Explain human behaviors using theoretical underpinnings
  2. Understand oneself and others, respecting the differences
  3. Demonstrate their understanding of psychological processes in daily activities

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Sensation
 

Definition, Characteristics of Sensory modalities: Absolute and difference threshold; Signal detection theory; sensory coding; Vision, Audition, Other Senses. Assessment of Perception and Sensation

Practicum: Aesthesiometer

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Perception
 

Definition, Understanding perception, Gestalt laws of organization, Illusions and Perceptual constancy; Various sensory modalities; Extrasensory perception.

Practicum:  Muller-Lyer Illusion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Learning and Memory
 

Learning:Definition, Classical conditioning, Instrumental conditioning, learning and cognition; Memory:  Types of Memory; Sensory memory, working memory, Long term memory, implicit memory, Constructive memory, improving memory; Assessment of memory.

Practicum: Memory drum

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Individual Differences
 

Concepts and nature of Individual differences; Nature vs. nurture; Gender difference in cognitive processes and social behavior; Intelligence: Definition, Contemporary theories of intelligence; Tests of intelligence; Emotional, Social and Spiritual intelligence.

Practicum: Bhatia’s Battery of Performance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Personality
 

Definition, Type and trait theories of personality, Type A, B & C. Psychoanalytic -  Freudian perspective; Types of personality assessment.

Practicum: NEO-FFI 3

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baron, R. A. (2001). Psychology. New Delhi: Pearson Education India.

Rathus, S. A. (2017). Introductory Psychology, 5thEd. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Nolen-Hoeksema, S., Fredrickson, B.L. & Loftus, G.R. (2014). Atkinson & Hilgard'sIntroduction to Psychology.16th Ed. United Kingdom: Cengage Learning.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Feldman, R. S. (2011). Understanding Psychology. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

Morgan, C. T., King, R. A., & Schopler, J. (2004). Introduction to Psychology. New Delhi: Tata     McGraw Hill.

Kalat, J. W. (2016). Understanding Psychology. New York: Cengage Learning

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Evaluation pattern

Group Assignment

Individual Assignment

Mid semester

20

20

25

 

Mid Semester Examination

Section A

(Definition)

Section B

(Short note)

Section C

(Essay)

Section D

(Case Question)

Total

5×2=10

4×5=20

1×10=10

1×10=10

50

 

End Semester Examination

Section A

(Definition)

Section B

(Short note)

Section C

(Essay)

Section D

(Case Question)

Total

5×2=10

4×5=20

1×10=10

1×10=10

50

 

 

AU431 - AUTOMOTIVE TRANSMISSION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims to impart basic skills and understanding of automobile transmission systems basic components their working principle, classification and performance characteristics.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To explain various types of clutch and gear box systems present in the vehicle.[L1, 2] [PO1, 2, 4, 5]

CO2: To do demonstrate on quantity of energy conversion of Fluid Coupling and torque converters.[L1, 2] [PO1, 2, 4, 5]

CO3: To explore current trend torque converters.[L1, 2] [PO1, 2, 4, 5]

CO4: To describe different types of transmission systems.[L1, 2] [PO1, 2, 4, 5]

CO5: To explore various hydrostatic drives and its limitation in a vehicle.[L1, 2] [PO1, 2, 4, 5]

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Clutch and Gear Box
 

Role of Clutch in driving system - Requirements of transmission system – Design aspects - Construction and working principle of different types of clutches - Designing the torque capacity, axial force of single plate clutch and typical problems involving the above principles.

Objective of the Gear Box - Setting top, bottom and intermediate gear ratios, Problems involving these derivations - Performance characteristics at different speeds - Construction and operations of Sliding-mesh gear box - Constant-mesh gear box - Synchro-mesh gear box - Planetary gear box - Problems on above aspects

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Fluid coupling
 

Fluid coupling - Principle of operation - Construction details - Torque capacity - Performance characteristics - Problems on design - Reduction of drag torque

Torque converter - Principle of operation - Constructional details – Performance characteristics, Converter coupling – Construction - Free wheel – Characteristic performance

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Multi-stage hydro-kinetic torque converter
 

Multi-stage hydro-kinetic torque converter - Poly-phase hydro-kinetic torque converter - Construction, working and performance

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Principle of working of epi-cyclic gear train
 

Principle of working of epi-cyclic gear train - Construction and working principle of Ford-T model gear box - Wilson gear box- construction, working and derivation of gear ratios - Cotal electromagnetic transmission - Automatic over-drive - Hydraulic control system for automatic transmission. Chevrolet automatic transmission - Turbo glide transmission - Power glide transmission - Toyota “ECT-i” [Automatic transmission with intelligent electronic control systems] - Mercedes Benz automatic transmission - Hydraulic clutch actuation system for automatic transmission

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Hydrostatic drive
 

Hydrostatic drive – principle, types, advantages, limitations - Comparison of hydrostatic drive with hydrodynamic drive - Construction and working of typical Janny hydrostatic drive. Lay-out of elective drive - Principle of early and modified ward Leonard control systems – advantages, limitations, performance characteristics

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. “Automotive Transmissions: Fundamentals, Selection, Design and Application”, 2nd Edition, Springer, 2011.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Heldt P. M, “Torque converters”, Chilton Book Co., 1992.

2. Newton Steeds & Garrot, “Motor Vehicles”, SAE International and Butterworth Heinemann, 2001.

3. CDX Automotive, “Fundamentals of Automotive Technology: Principles and Practice”, Jones & Bartlett Publishers, 2013.

4. Judge A.W, “Modern Transmission Systems”, Chapman and Hall Ltd., 1990.

5. SAE Transactions 900550 & 930910.

6. Crouse W.H, Anglin D.L, “Automotive Transmission and Power Trains construction”, McGraw Hill, 1976.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with only theory

25

25

 

Category

PCC

CIA Marks

25

ESE Marks

25

Exam Hours

2

AU432P - AUTOMOTIVE MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of the course is to provide the basic knowledge needed to explore the application of materials science and engineering in automobile field. 

1.         To develop the knowledge of the properties of materials and its alloys

2.         To introduce the modern materials and alloys.

3.         To develop knowledge in recent trends in manufacturing techniques of automobile components.

Learning Outcome

CO1:   Describe the types of Ferrous & Non-Ferrous alloys [L1, 2] [PO1, 2, 4, 5]

CO2:   Discuss the Mechanical surface treatment and coatings done on materials [L2, 4] [PO1, 2, 4, 5]

CO3:   Describe the need for modern materials and its alloys. [L2, 4] [PO1, 2, 4, 5]

CO4:   Discuss the material used to manufacture Engine and describe the manufacturing process [L2, 4] [PO1, 2, 4, 5]

CO5:   Discuss and explain the trends in manufacturing Automobile components [L2, 4] [PO1, 2, 4, 5]

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Ferrous & Non-Ferrous Automotive Materials
 

Classification of Engineering Materials, Properties of Materials, History, Factors Contributing Sustainable Mobility, Importance of light weight Material, Alloys, Phase Diagram, Iron-Carbon Equilibrium diagrams, Micro Structures & their properties.

Light Weight material: Aluminum, Magnesium Alloys, potential in Automotive Light Weighting (wrt Ashby Diagram), Magnesium and Mg Alloys Designation, Manufacturing Methods, Aluminum & its wide application in Automotive, Wrought and Cast Al Alloy Designation.

Steels, Classification of steels, Carbon steels: Low, Medium & High; Alloy Steels: Low and High Alloy Steels, High Strength low Alloy(HSLA) Steels, Alloying Elements in Steel, Effects of Alloying Elements on steels.

Cast Iron: Basic Metallurgy of Cast Iron, Classification of Cast Iron, Gray CI, Ductile Iron, Malleable Iron, Compacted Graphite Irons.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Surface Engineering
 

Introduction, Groups of Methods, Functions and Purpose of a Product, Mechanical Surface Treatment: Surface Cleaning, Finishing Processes, Mass Finishing & Short Pining. Heat Treatment: Grain Size, Micro-Structure, Hardenability, Fe-C Phase Diagram, Types of heat treatment, Normalizing, annealing, Spherodising, Quenching and Tempering, Carbonizing, Nitriding, Carbo- Niriding, Nitro- Carbonizing, Laser Surface hardening.

Coating: Organic & Inorganic Coating, Powder Coating, Hot Dip Coating, Electroplating,  Electroless coating, Metallizing of Plastics and Ceramics, Physical vapor Deposition, Chemical vapor Deposition.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Advances in Automotive Materials
 

Passenger Cars Body Materials: Evolutions in Advance Steels, Current and Future Trends, DP Steel, CP Steel, MART Steel, FB Steel, HF Steel, TRIP Steel, TWIP Steel, AHSS: Nano Steel, Usage and Automotive Applications.

Forging Grades  Steel, High Temperature Super Alloy, SMART Materials

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Engine materials and manufacturing
 

Requirements & Trends, New  & Typical Materials, Selection Process, Cylinder Block & Head, Cylinder Head Gasket, Valve, Seats & guides, Piston & Pin, Piston Ring & Liner, Con Rod, Crankshaft & Bearings, Turbocharger, After-treatment Devices

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Recent Trends in manufacturing Auto components
 

Special processing techniques-Hydroforming-stretch forming-Recent developments in auto body panel forming-squeeze casting of pistons, Aluminium composite brake rotors-sinter diffusion bonded idler sprocket-Gas injection moulding of window channel-Cast con process for auto parts-computer modeling and simulation-material characterestics and failure analysis.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.         Callister W.D. (2006) “Material Science and Engineering- An introduction”, Wiley –Eastern

2.         Flinn R. A. and Trojan P. K., (1999)”Engineering Materials and their Applications”, Jaico.

3.         Arthur C.Reardon (2011) “Metallurgy for the Non- Metallurgist”, ASM International Publication.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.         Kenneth Budinski – (1988) “Surface Engineering for wear resistance", Prentice Hall.

2.         Avner S.H., (2006) “Introduction to physical metallurgy” –Tata McGraw Hill.

3.         Haslehurst.S.E., " Manufacturing Technology ", ELBS, London, 1990.

4.         Rusinoff, " Forging and Forming of metals ", D.B. Taraporevala Son & Co. Pvt Ltd., Mumbai,1995. . Sabroff.A.M. & Others, " Forging Materials & Processes ", Reinhold Book Corporation, New York,

5.         Upton, " Pressure Die Casting ", pergamon Press, 1985. High Velocity " Forming of Metals ", ASTME, prentice Hall of India (P) Ltd., New   Delhi, 1990.

6.         ASM Handbook Volume 4 & 4A: Heat Treatment

7.         ASM Handbook Volume 5: Surface Engineering.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with theory and practical

70

30

 

COURSES WITH THEORY AND PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

Theory CIA

30

-

30

2

Theory ESE

30

12

30

3

Practical CIA

35

14

35

4

Attendance

05

-

05

5

Aggregate

100

40

100

 

DETAILS OF MARK FOR COURSES WITH THOERY AND PRACTICAL

THEORY

PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

CIA-1

20

10

-

10

Overall CIA

50

35

14

35

2

CIA-2

50

10

-

10

3

CIA-3

20

10

-

10

4

Attendance

05

05

-

05

Attendance

NA

NA

-

-

5

ESE

100

30

12

30

ESE

NA

NA

-

-

 

 

TOTAL

65

-

65

TOTAL

 

35

14

35

AU433P - AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•To make the students understand the working principle of transducers and sensors. 

•To understand various types of lighting system and charging system.

•To understand various types of sensors used in engine and application of each sensor.

•To have a broad knowledge about electrical and electronic components in the vehicle.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To explain various electronic systems present in the vehicle. [L1, 2, 3] [PO1, 2, 3]

CO2: To do demonstrate on quantity of energy conversion through calculations for actual processes [L1, 2, 3] [PO1, 2, 3]

CO3: To explore current trend automotive electronic engine management. [L1, 2, 3] [PO1, 2, 3]

CO4: To describe electronic engine management system [L1, 2, 3] [PO1, 2, 3]

 

CO5: To explore various sensors in a vehicle. [L1, 2, 3] [PO1, 2, 3]

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Batteries and Accessories
 

Principle and construction of lead acid battery, characteristics of battery, rating capacity and efficiency of batteries, various tests on batteries, maintenance and charging. Standard Battery rating for various vehicles, other battery types and overview of battery management system.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Starting System
 

Condition at starting, behaviour of starter during starting, series motor and its characteristics, principle and construction of starter motor, working of different starter drive units, care and maintenances of starter motor, starter switches.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Charging System and Lighting
 

Generation of direct current, shunt generator characteristics, armature reaction, third brush regulation, cut-out. Voltage and current regulators, compensated voltage regulator, alternators principle and constructional aspects and bridge rectifiers, new developments.

Lighting system: insulated and earth return system, details of head light and side light, LED lighting system, head light dazzling and preventive methods – Horn, and wiper system, advances in lighting system (adaptive front lighting system – AFLS).

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Fundamentals of Automotive Electronics
 

Current trends in automotive electronic engine management system, electromagnetic interference /electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC), electronic dashboard instruments, on board diagnostic system (OBD), security and warning system.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Sensors and Actuators
 

Types of sensors: sensor for speed, throttle position, exhaust oxygen level, manifold pressure, crankshaft position, coolant temperature, exhaust temperature, air mass flow for engine application. Solenoids, stepper motors, relay.Case study of any one of the automotive sensor-based application.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Allan Bonnick, “Automotive Computer Controlled Systems”, ISBN1138177172 2016.

T2. Tom Weather Jr and Cland C.Hunter, “Automotive Computers and Control System”, Prentice Hall Inc., New Jersey.

T3. Young A. P & Griffiths L, “Automobile Electrical and Electronic Equipments”, English Languages Book Society & New Press, 1990.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Santini Al, “Automotive Electricity and Electronics”, Cengage Learning, 2012..

R2. Tom Denton, “Automotive Electrical and Electronic System”, SAE International, 2004.

R3. William B. Ribbens, “Understanding Automotive Electronics”, 6th Edition, Newnes, 2003.

R4. BOSCH, “Automotive Handbook”, 8th Edition, BENTLEY ROBERT Incorporated, 2011.

R5. Norm Chapman, “Principles of Electricity and electronics for the Automotive Technician”, Delmar Cengage Learning,2nd edition 2009.

R6. Judge A.W, “Modern Electrical Equipment of Automobiles”, Chapman & Hall, London, 1992.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with theory and practical

70

30

COURSES WITH THEORY AND PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

Theory CIA

30

-

30

2

Theory ESE

30

12

30

3

Practical CIA

35

14

35

4

Attendance

05

-

05

4

Aggregate

100

40

100

 

DETAILS OF MARK FOR COURSES WITH THOERY AND PRACTICAL

THEORY

PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

CIA-1

20

10

-

10

Overall CIA

50

35

14

35

2

CIA-2

50

10

-

10

3

CIA-3

20

10

-

10

4

Attendance

05

05

-

05

Attendance

NA

NA

-

-

5

ESE

100

30

12

30

ESE

NA

NA

-

-

 

 

TOTAL

65

-

65

TOTAL

 

35

14

35

AU434P - AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•To make students familiar with engine components.

•To understand about carburetion, and types of petrol injection systems.

•To introduce combustion inside the engine.

•To introduce students to lubrication and cooling systems, supercharging turbocharging and scavenging.

Learning Outcome

CO 1 : Understand engine construction based on mechanism of working. [L1, 2, 3] [PO1, 2, 3]

CO2: Summarize stoichiometric air-fuel ratio by using stoichiometric combustion       equation for fuels. [L1, 2, 4] [PO1, 3, 4]

CO 3 : Understand the stages of combustion in S.I engine to reduce knocking. [L1, 2, 3] [PO1, 2, 6]

CO 4 : Explain the importance of air swirl, turbulence and tumble in combustion chamber to increase the rate of combustion. [L2, 3] [PO1, 2, 4]

CO 5 : Understand and apply formula to know the various engine performance parameters with respect to different engine dimensions. [L2, 4] [PO1, 2, 4, 5]

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Engine Construction and Operation
 

Four stroke SI and CI engines - Working principle - function, materials, constructional details of engine components - Valve timing diagram - Firing order and its significance – relative merits and demerits of SI and CI engines Two stroke engine construction and operation. Comparison of four-stroke and two-stroke engine operation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Combustion and Fuels
 

Combustion fundamentals, Conversion of gravimetric to volumetric analysis -Determination of theoretical minimum quantity of air for complete combustion -Determination of air fuel ratio for a given fuel. 

Properties and rating of fuels (petrol and diesel), chemical energy of fuels, reaction equations, combustion temperature, combustion chart. Combustion in premixed and diffusion flames - Combustion process in IC engines.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Alternate fuels:
 

CNG, LPG, Alcohols, Hydrogen and Vegetable oil as a fuel:-modification required to use in engines. -performance and emission characteristics.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Combustion in SI Engines
 

Stages of combustion in SI engine- Flame propagation - Flame velocity and area of flame front - Rate of pressure rise - Cycle to cycle variation – Abnormal combustion - Theories of detonation - Effect of engine operating variables on combustion. Combustion chambers - types, factors controlling combustion chamber design, Emissions from SI engine, SI emission reduction techniques.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Combustion in CI Engines
 

Importance of air motion - Swirl, squish and turbulence - Swirl ratio. Fuel air mixing - Stages of combustion - Delay period - Factors affecting delay period, Knock in CI engines - methods of controlling diesel knock. CI engine combustion chambers - Combustion chamber design objectives - open and divided. Induction swirl, turbulent combustion chambers. - Air cell chamber - M Combustion chamber. Emissions from CI engine, CI emission reduction techniques

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Other Technologies:
 

Basic Purpose, Construction, and Working of: a.Turbocharger b.Supercharger c.Catalytic converter d.Exhaust Gas Recirculation e.Selective Catalytic Reduction

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Engine Performance
 

Measurement and calculation techniques of performance parameters - BP, FP, IP, Torque specific fuel consumption, Specific Energy consumption, volumetric efficiency, thermal efficiency, mechanical efficiency, Engine specific weight, and heat balance, Testing of engines – different methods, Emission measurement techniques, Numerical problems.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.Ganesan V, “Internal combustion engines”, 4th edition, Tata McGraw Hill Education, 2012

2.Rajput R. K, “A textbook of Internal Combustion Engines”, 3rd edition, Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd, 2016.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

•John. B, Heywood, “Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals”, McGraw Hill Education; 1 edition (17 August 2011)

•Ramalingam K. K, “Internal Combustion Engines”, Second Edition, Scitech Publications.

•Sharma S. P, Chandramohan, “Fuels and Combustion”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co, 1987.

•Mathur and Sharma, “A course on Internal combustion Engines”, DhanpatRai& Sons, 1998.

•Edward F, Obert, “Internal Combustion Engines and Air Pollution”, Intext Education Publishers.

•Yunus A Cengel & John M. Cimbala, Fluid Mechanics, Tata McGraw Hill Edition, New Delhi, 2006

Evaluation Pattern

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with theory and practical

70

30

COURSES WITH THEORY AND PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

Theory CIA

30

-

30

2

Theory ESE

30

12

30

3

Practical CIA

35

14

35

4

Attendance

05

-

05

4

Aggregate

100

40

100

 

DETAILS OF MARK FOR COURSES WITH THOERY AND PRACTICAL

THEORY

PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

CIA-1

20

10

-

10

Overall CIA

50

35

14

35

2

CIA-2

50

10

-

10

3

CIA-3

20

10

-

10

4

Attendance

05

05

-

05

Attendance

NA

NA

-

-

5

ESE

100

30

12

30

ESE

NA

NA

-

-

 

 

TOTAL

65

-

65

TOTAL

 

35

14

35

AU435 - KINEMATICS AND THEORY OF MACHINES (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

1.To understand the kinematics and rigid- body dynamics of kinematically driven machine components.

2.To understand the motion of linked mechanisms in terms of the displacement, velocity and acceleration at any point in a rigid link.

3.To be able to design some linkage mechanisms and cam systems to generate specified output motion.

4.To understand the kinematics of gear trains.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Summarize the fundamentals of kinematics and Planar mechanisms. {L1} {PO1}

CO2:Analyse velocity and acceleration parameters in various four bar mechanisms using instantaneous centre method and relative velocity method. {L2, L3} {PO2}

CO3:Develop the displacement diagram for a required output and design cam profiles for inline and offset followers. {L4}{PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO4: Explain the fundamentals of gear profiles and extrapolate various parameters of Spur gear teeth. {L2}{PO1, PO2}

CO5:Design gear trains for power transmission. {L2}{PO1, PO2, PO3}

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Classification of mechanisms
 

Classification of mechanisms- Basic kinematic concepts and definitions- Degree of freedom, mobility- Grashoff’s law, Kinematic inversions of four bar chain and slider crank chains-Limit positions- Mechanical advantage- Transmission angle- Description of some common mechanisms- Quick return mechanism, straight line generators- Universal Joint- Rocker mechanisms.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Displacement, velocity and acceleration analysis of simple mechanisms.
 

Displacement, velocity and acceleration analysis of simple mechanisms, graphical velocity analysis using instantaneous centers, velocity and acceleration analysis using loop closure equations- kinematic analysis of simple mechanisms- slider crank mechanism dynamics- Coincident points- Coriolis component of acceleration- introduction to linkage synthesis-three position graphical synthesis for motion and path generation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Classification of cams and followers
 

Classification of cams and followers- Terminology and definitions- Displacement diagrams-Uniform velocity, parabolic, simple harmonic and cycloidal motions- derivatives of follower motions- specified contour cams- circular and tangent cams- pressure angle and undercutting, sizing of cams, graphical and analytical disc cam profile synthesis for roller and flat face followers

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Involute and cycloidal gear profiles
 

Involute and cycloidal gear profiles, gear parameters, fundamental law of gearing and conjugate action, spur gear contact ratio and interference/undercutting- helical, bevel, worm, rack & pinion gears, epicyclic and regular gear train kinematics.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Surface contacts
 

Surface contacts- sliding and rolling friction- friction drives- bearings and lubrication-friction clutches- belt and rope drives- friction in brakes.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ghosh A. and Mallick A.K., Theory of Mechanisms and Machines, Affiliated East-West Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, 1988.

T2. Ratan.S.S, “Theory of Machines”, 4th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing company Ltd. 2014.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Thomas Bevan, Theory of Machines, 3rd edition, CBS Publishers & Distributors, 2005.

R2. CleghornW.L. , Mechanisms of Machines, Oxford University Press, 2005.

R3. Robert L. Norton, Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery, Tata McGrawHill, 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with only theory

50

50

 

Continuous Internal Assessment {CIA}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

End Semester Examination {ESE}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

Components of the CIA 

CIA I:  Subject Assignments / Online Tests: 10 marks 

CIA II:   Mid Semester Examination {Theory}: 25 marks

CIA III: Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications: 10 marks

Attendance: 05 marks

Total: 50 marks

AU436 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·     To develop entrepreneurship qualities and skills.

·     To motivate young engineers to identify new business opportunities in the emerging area of science and technology and to understand the steps involved in setting up the business.

·     To identify the source of finance, loans, capital structure, costing and application of it in new business venture.

·     To understand the demand forecasting, product life cycle, sales strategies, distribution channel and adventuring in business.

To understand the concept, magnitude, causes and measures for small scale business enterprises.

Learning Outcome

CO1: {Develop the entrepreneurship skills and identify the traits of entrepreneur.} {L3} {PO6,PO9,PO10,PO11}

CO2: {Identify the source of information and the steps involved in setting up a business.}{ L3}{PO6,PO9,PO10,PO11}

CO3: {Illustrate the principles of marketing and growth strategies based on the assessment of the market.}{ L2}{PO6,PO9,PO10,PO11}

CO4: {Make use of available source of finance and effective management of work, capital, loans, taxation, pricing and procedures in a business.}{ L3}{PO6,PO9,PO10,PO11}

CO5: {Explain the concept, magnitude, causes and measures in the institutional support to entrepreneurs.}{L2}{PO6,PO9,PO10,PO11,PO12}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Entrepreneurship
 

Entrepreneur – Types of Entrepreneurs – Difference between Entrepreneur and Entrepreneur – Entrepreneurship in Economic Growth, Factors Affecting Entrepreneurial Growth

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Motivation
 

Major Motives Influencing an Entrepreneur – Achievement Motivation Training, self-Rating, Business Game, Thematic Apperception Test – Stress management, Entrepreneurship Development Programs – Need, Objectives

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Business
 

Small Enterprises – Definition, Classification – Characteristics, Ownership Structures –Project Formulation – Steps involved in setting up a Business – identifying, selecting a Good Business opportunity, Market Survey and Research, Techno Economic Feasibility Assessment – Preparation of Preliminary Project Reports – Project Appraisal – Sources of Information – Classification of Needs and Agencies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Financing and Accounting
 

Need – Sources of Finance, Term Loans, Capital Structure, Financial Institution, management of working Capital, Costing, Break Even Analysis, Network Analysis Techniques of PERT/CPM – Taxation – Income Tax, Excise Duty – Sales Tax.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Support to Entrepreneurs
 

Sickness in small Business – Concept, Magnitude, causes and consequences, Corrective Measures – Government Policy for Small Scale Enterprises – Growth strategies in small industry – Expansion, Diversification, Joint Venture, Merger and Sub Contracting.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. B.B. Goel-Project Management-Deep and Deep Publications, New Delhi, 2004

2. Choudhury-S. Project Management –Tata Mc Grew –Hill- Publishing Company

Limited, New Delhi,2005

3. Datta.A.K. Integrated Material Management

4. Gopalakrishnan.P. And Sthuram. M. Material management-An integral Approach

     5. M.V.Varma –Material Management

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Hisrich R D and Peters M P, “Entrepreneurship” 5th Edition Tata McGraw-Hill, 2002.

2. Mathew J Manimala,” Enterprenuership theory at cross roads: paradigms and praxis” Dream tech 2nd edition 2006.

3. Rabindra N. Kanungo “Entrepreneurship and innovation”, Sage Publications, New Delhi, 1998.

4. EDII “Faulty and External Experts – A Hand Book for New Entrepreneurs Publishers: Entrepreneurship Development” Institute of India, Ahmadabad, 1986

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with only theory

25

25

 

CY421 - CYBER SECURITY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This mandatory course is aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the different facets of Cyber Security.  In addition, the course will detail into specifics of Cyber Security with Cyber Laws both in Global and Indian Legal environments

Learning Outcome

SI. NO

DESCRIPTION

REVISED BLOOM’S TAXONOMY (RBT)LEVEL

CO -1

Describe the basic security fundamentals and cyber laws and legalities.

L2

CO -2

Describe various cyber security vulnerabilities and threats such as virus, worms, online attacks, Dos and others.

L2

CO -3

Explain the regulations and acts to prevent cyber-attacks such as Risk assessment and security policy management.

L3

CO -4

Explain various vulnerability assessment and penetration testing tools.

L3

CO -5

Explain various protection methods to safeguard from cyber-attacks using technologies like cryptography and Intrusion prevention systems.

L3

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 1
 

Security Fundamentals-4 As Architecture Authentication Authorization Accountability, Social Media, Social Networking and Cyber Security.Cyber Laws, IT Act 2000-IT Act 2008-Laws for Cyber-Security, Comprehensive National Cyber-Security Initiative CNCI – Legalities

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 2
 

Cyber Attack and Cyber Services Computer Virus – Computer Worms – Trojan horse.Vulnerabilities -  Phishing -  Online Attacks – Pharming - Phoarging  –  Cyber Attacks  -  Cyber Threats -  Zombie- stuxnet - Denial of Service Vulnerabilities  - Server Hardening-TCP/IP attack-SYN Flood

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 3
 

Cyber Security Management Risk Management and Assessment - Risk Management Process - Threat Determination Process -Risk Assessment - Risk Management Lifecycle.Security Policy Management - Security Policies - Coverage Matrix Business Continuity Planning - DisasterTypes  -  Disaster Recovery Plan - Business Continuity Planning Process

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 4
 

Vulnerability - Assessment and Tools: Vulnerability Testing - Penetration Testing Black box- white box.Architectural Integration:  Security Zones - Devicesviz Routers, Firewalls, DMZ. Configuration Management - Certification and Accreditation for Cyber-Security.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 5
 

Authentication and Cryptography: Authentication - Cryptosystems - Certificate Services, Securing Communications:  Securing Services -  Transport  –  Wireless  -  Steganography and NTFS Data Streams. Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems:   Intrusion -  Defense in Depth  -  IDS/IPS  -IDS/IPS Weakness and Forensic AnalysisCyber Evolution: Cyber Organization – Cyber Future

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Matt Bishop, “Introduction to Computer Security”, Pearson, 6th impression, ISBN: 978-81-7758-425-7.

R2. Thomas R, Justin Peltier, John, “Information Security Fundamentals”, Auerbach Publications.

R3. AtulKahate, “Cryptography and Network Security”,  2nd Edition, Tata McGrawHill.2003

R4. Nina Godbole, SunitBelapure, “Cyber Security”, Wiley India 1st Edition 2011

R5. Jennifer L. Bayuk and Jason Healey and Paul Rohmeyer and Marcus Sachs, “Cyber Security Policy Guidebook”, Wiley; 1 edition , 2012

R6. Dan Shoemaker and Wm. Arthur Conklin, “Cyber security: The Essential Body Of Knowledge”,   Delmar Cengage Learning; 1 edition, 2011

R7. Stallings, “Cryptography & Network Security - Principles & Practice”, Prentice Hall, 6th Edition 2014

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NIL

Evaluation Pattern

Only CIA will be conducted as per the University norms. No ESE

Maximum Marks : 50

MIA451A - ENVIRONMENTAL DESING AND SOCIO CULTURAL CONTEXT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:04

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Elective subjects have been suggested which are related to specialized areas in Architecture. The student may choose any one subject of interest. The detailed syllabus of the electives chosen and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty in charge.

Course Objective: To expose the students to specialized areas of architecture.

Learning Outcome

To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization; to apply or innovate the fundamentals and details learnt, in design.

Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:90
Environmental Design & Socio-cultural Context
 

The understanding of habitat in a cultural setting where architecture is explored in the context of craft-making – ecology, people, and architecture.

Reading of the context and site intuitively and technically and initiate the design exercise of a Pavilion.

Exploration of local material resources that inform architecture.

Design development of a Pavilion comprising of a simple function for “Me and my environment”.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.Ingersoll, R. And Kostof, S. (2013). World architecture: a cross-cultural history. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

T2. Rapoport, A (1969). House Form and Culture. Prentice-Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, NJ USA Pearson

T3. Bary, D. & Ilay, C. (1998) Traditional Buildings of India, Thames & Hudson, ISBN-10 : 0500341613

T4. McHarg I. (1978), Design with Nature. NY: John Wiley & Co.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Tillotsum G.H.R. (1989) The tradition of Indian Architecture Continuity, Controversy – Change since 1850, Delhi: Oxford University Press.

R2. René Kolkman and Stuart H. Blackburn (2014). Tribal Architecture in Northeast India. 

R3. Richardson, V. (2001) New Vernacular Architecture; Laurance King Publishing.

R4. Kenneth, F. (1983). Towards a Critical Regionalism: Six points for an architecture of resistance, In the Anti-Aesthetic: Essays on Postmodern Culture. (Ed.) Hal, F. Seattle: Bay Press.

R5. Brunskill, R. W. (1987). Illustrated Handbook of Vernacular Architecture. Castle Rock: Faber & Faber.

R6. Frampton, K., & Cava, J. (1995). Studies in tectonic culture: The poetics of construction in nineteenth and twentieth century architecture. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

Evaluation Pattern

The Evaluation pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE).

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE, VIVA-VOCE): 50 Marks

TOTAL:100 Marks

Note: For this course, a minimum of 50% marks in CIA is required to be eligible for VIVA-VOCE which is conducted as ESE.

MIA451B - DIGITAL ARCHITECTURE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:04

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

Elective subjects have been suggested which are related to specialized areas in Architecture. The student may choose any one subject of interest. The detailed syllabus of the electives chosen and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty in charge.

Course objectives: To expose the students to specialized areas of architecture.

 

Learning Outcome

To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization; to apply or innovate the fundamentals and details learned, in design.

 

Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:90
Digital Architecture
 
  1. Imparting the knowledge of creative planning and execution of visual communication and the latest technological advancements in architecture.
  2. Concepts of geometries and surface, media and architecture.
  3. Spatial and regional designs with help of diagrams, geometry, and surface parameters.
  4. Contemporary Design approach with the help of theories.
Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Achim Menges, Sean Ahlquist . (2011) Computational Design thinking

T2: Fox, M. (2009) Interactive Architecture: Adaptive World, Princeton Architectural Press, ISBN-10 : 1616894067.

T3: Linn C. D. & Fortmeyer, R. (2014) Kinetic Architecture: Designs for Active Envelopes, Images Publishing Group Pty Ltd., ISBN-10 : 1864704950

T4: Ali Rahim, 'Contemporary Process in Architecture', John Wiley & Sons, 2000.

T5. Ali Rahim (Ed), 'Contemporary Techniques in Architecture, Halsted Press, 2002.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Arturo Tedeschi.(2014) AAD_Algorithms-Aided Design.

R2. Kostas Terzidis.(2006) Algorithmic Architecture

R4. Lisa Iwamoto.(2009) Digital Fabrications: Architectural and Material Techniques, Architecture Briefs

R5.Eisenmann, P. (1999) Diagram Diaries, Universe Publishing, ISBN-100789302640.

Evaluation Pattern

The Evaluation pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE).

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE, VIVA-VOCE): 50 Marks

TOTAL:100 Marks

Note: For this course, a minimum of 50% marks in CIA is required to be eligible for VIVA-VOCE which is conducted as ESE.

MIA451C - COLLABORATIVE DESIGN WORKSHOP (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:04

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Elective subjects have been suggested which are related to specialized areas in Architecture. The student may choose any one subject of interest. The detailed syllabus of the electives chosen and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty in charge.

Course objective: To expose the students to specialized areas of architecture.

Learning Outcome

To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization; to apply or innovate the fundamentals and details learned, in design.

Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:90
Collaborative Design Workshop
 

Engage in a rural outreach program through an architecture design project by adopting appropriate technology that seeks solutions to environmental, social concerns and addresses the sustainability paradigm.

Design and execution of an architectural project of a dwelling environment of a small community, with a focus on ideas of type and typology through site studies and analysis.

Study of correlation between climate-environmental parameters and social-cultural patterns as generators of an architectural space.

Construction and commissioning of the approved architectural design that is externally funded.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Dean, A., & Hursley, T. (2002). Rural Studio: Samuel Mockbee and an Architecture of Decency. Princeton Architectural Press.

T2. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.

T3. Givoni, B. (1969). Man, climate and architecture. Elsevier.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Minke. G (2012). Building with Bamboo, Design and Technology of a Sustainable Architecture. Birkhauser, Basel Switzerland.

R2. Rapoport, A (1969). House Form and Culture. Prentice-Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, NJ USA Pearson

R3. Clark, R. H., & Pause, M. (2012). Precedents in architecture: Analytic diagrams, formative ideas, and partis (4th ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons

R4. Carter, R. (2012). On and By Frank Lloyd Wright: A Primer of Architectural Principles. Phaidon Press.

R5. Curtis, W. (1994). Le Corbusier: Ideas and Forms. Phaidon Press; Revised edition. R6. Mertins, D., & Lambert, P. (2014). Mies. New York: Phaidon.

Evaluation Pattern

The Evaluation pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE).

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE, VIVA-VOCE): 50 Marks

TOTAL:100 Marks

Note: For this course, a minimum of 50% marks in CIA is required to be eligible for VIVA-VOCE which is conducted as ESE.

MICS432P - INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING PARADIGN (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Software development in business environment has become more sophisticated, the software implementation is becoming increasingly complex and requires the best programming paradigm which helps to eliminate complexity of large projects. Object Oriented Programming (OOP) has become the predominant technique for writing software at present. Many other important software development techniques are based upon the fundamental ideas captured by object-oriented programming. The course also caters to the understanding of event driven programming, generic programming and concurrent programming.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the fundamental concepts of Object Oriented Programming.

CO2: Make use of the inheritance and interface concepts for effective code reuse.

CO3: Inspect dynamic and interactive graphical applications using AWT and SWING.

CO4: Build an application using generic programming and exception handling concepts.

CO5: Assess and design concurrent and parallel applications using multithreaded concepts.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING : FUNDAMENTALS
 

Review of OOP - Objects and classes in Java – defining classes – methods - access specifiers – static members – constructors – finalize method – Arrays – Strings - Packages – JavaDoc comments.

 

LAB:

1. Implementation of Simple Java programs to understand data types, variables, operators, strings, input and output, control flow, arrays.

2.  Implementation of Classes and Objects – static fields, methods, method parameters, object construction.     

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING : INHERITANCE
 

Inheritance – class hierarchy – polymorphism – dynamic binding – final keyword – abstract classes – the Object class – Reflection – interfaces – object cloning – inner classes.

 

LAB:

 

3. Implementation of Inheritance – how inheritance is handled using java keywords: extends and implements.

4. Implementation of Interfaces – programs on usage.

 5. Implementation of Inner classes – programs on inner classes.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
EVENT-DRIVEN PROGRAMMING
 

Graphics programming – Frame – Components – working with 2D shapes – Using color, fonts, and images - Basics of event handling – event handlers – adapter classes – actions – mouse events – AWT event hierarchy – introduction to Swing – Model-View- Controller design pattern – buttons – layout management – Swing Components

LAB:

7.  Implementation of event driven programming

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
GENERIC PROGRAMMING
 

Motivation for generic programming – generic classes – generic methods – generic code and virtual machine – inheritance and generics – reflection and generics – Exceptions – exception hierarchy – throwing and catching exceptions.

 

LAB:

 7. Implementation of Generic programming.

 8.  Implementation of Exceptions.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
CONCURRENT PROGRAMMING
 

Multi-threaded programming – interrupting threads – thread states – thread properties – thread synchronization – synchronizers – threads and event-driven programming, Parallel programming –fork, join framework.

 

LAB:

9.  Implementation of Multithreaded programs

 10. Implementation of Debugging using Assertions, logging and using a debugger.        

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Cay S. Horstmann and Gary Cornell, “Core Java, Volume I – Fundamentals ” ,Ninth Edition, Prentice Hall, 2012.

T2.  Martina Seidl, Marion Scholz, Christian Huemer and GertiKappel , “UML @ Classroom An Introduction to Object-Oriented Modeling Series: Undergraduate Topics in Computer Science”, Springer, 2015.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Cay S. Horstmann , “Java SE8 for the Really Impatient: A Short Course on the  Basics (Java Series)”, 2014.

R2. Herbert Schildt,  “Java: The Complete Reference (Complete Reference Series)”, Ninth Edition, 2014.

R3. Bruce Eckel, “Thinking in Java”, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall Professional, 2006.

R4. Doug Rosenberg and Matt Stephens, “Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML: Theory and Practice (Expert's Voice in UML Modeling)”,APress, 2013.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I : Assignment and Continuous Assessment : 10 marks

CIA II : Mid Semester Examination (Theory) : 10 marks

CIA III : Closed Book Test and Continuous Assessment: 10 marks

Lab marks :35 marks

Attendance : 05 marks

End Semester Examination(ESE) : 30% (30 marks out of 100 marks)

Total: 100 marks

MIMBA431 - ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course is offered as a mandatory core course for all students in Trimester II.  The course introduces students to a comprehensive set of concepts and theories, facts about human behaviour and organizations that have been acquired over the years. The subject focuses on ways and means to improve productivity, minimize absenteeism, increase employee engagement and so on thus, contributing to the overall effectiveness. The basic discipline of the course is behavioral science, sociology, social psychology, anthropology and political science.

Course Objectives: To make sense of human behaviour, use of common sense and intuition is largely inadequate because human behaviour is seldom random. Every human action has an underlying purpose which was aimed at personal or societal interest. Moreover, the uniqueness of each individual provides enough challenges for the managers to predict their best behaviour at any point of time. A systematic study of human behaviour looks at the consistencies, patterns and cause effect relationships which will facilitate understanding it in a reasonable extent. Systematic study replaces the possible biases of intuition that can sabotage the employee morale in organizations.

Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcomes: On having completed this course student should be able to:

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

CLO1: Determine the individual and group behavior in the workplace. 

CLO2: Assess the concepts of personality, perception and learning in Organizations. 

CLO3: Analyze various job-related attitudes. 

CLO4: Design motivational techniques for job design, employee involvement, incentives, rewards & recognitions. 

CLO5: Manage effective groups and teams in organizations.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Unit-1: Introduction to Organizational Behaviour
 

Historical Development, Behavioural sciences and Organizational behaviour, Meaning, Importance, Basic concepts, methods and tools for understanding behaviour, Challenges and Opportunities, OB model, ethical issues in organizational Behaviour.

Cross-cultural management, managing multicultural teams, communicating across cultures, OB in the digital age.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit-2: Individual Behaviour ? Personality, Perception and Learning
 

Personality:  Foundations of individual behaviour, Personality, Meaning and Importance, Development of personality, Determinants of personality, Theories of personality, Relevance of personality to managers.

Perception: Nature, Importance and Definition of Perception, Factors involved in perception, The Perceptual Process, Perceptual Selectivity and Organization, Applications in Organizations.

Learning: Definition and Importance, Theories of learning, Principles of learning, Shaping as managerial tool.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Unit-3: Attitudes, Values & Job Satisfaction
 

Attitudes: Sources and types of attitudes, Attitude formation and change, Cognitive Dissonance Theory. Effects of employee attitude, Job related attitudes

Values: meaning, importance, source and types, and applications in organizations.

Job satisfaction: Measuring Job Satisfaction, Causes of Job Satisfaction, impact of satisfied and dissatisfied employees on the workplace.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Unit-4: Motivation
 

Meaning, process and significance of motivation, Early Theories of motivation: Hierarchy of Needs, Theory X Theory Y, Two Factor theory, McClelland Theory of Needs, Contemporary Theories of Motivation: Goal Setting theory, Self-Efficacy theory, Equity theory/Organizational justice, Expectancy theories, Motivation theories applied in organizations: Job design, employee involvement, rewards and global implications

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Unit-5: Groups & Teams
 

Groups: Meaning, classification and nature of groups, Stages of group development, an alternative model for Temporary Groups with punctuated equilibrium model, Group properties: Roles, Norms, Status, Size and Cohesiveness, Group decision making.

Teams: Meaning of teams, Types of teams, Creating Effective teams, what makes individuals into effective team players, Team development, Team decision making. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Core Text Books:

T1. Robbins, S P., Judge, T A and Vohra, N (2018).  Organizational Behavior. 18th Edition, Prentice Hall of India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Rao V S P & V Sudeep 2018, Managing Organisational Behavior, Trinity Press, 3rd edition, New Delhi.

Evaluation Pattern

Test & Exam

Exam conducted for

Marks conversion

Weightage

Total

CIA – I

20

10

20%

10

CIA – II

50

25

25%

25

CIA – III

20

10

10%

10

Attendance

5

5%

5

CIA – I, II, and III

 

50

50%

50

End – term

100

50

50%

50

Total

100

MIPSY432 - PEOPLE THOUGHTS AND SITUATIONS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is an exploration of the prevailing theories and empirical methods that explain about people’s thoughts, feelings and behaviors in a social context. This throws light on cognitive and social factors that influence human behavior, especially in situations populated by others.

 

  1. To understand different ways of thinking about people and the perception of self in social situations
  2. To comprehend factors of affect related to cognition in a social context
  3. To develop knowledge about the dynamics of person in different situation in a social living

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course students will be able:

  1. To understand the thinking patterns of people and the perception of self in various cultural contexts
  2. To comprehend factors of affect related to cognition in a social context
  3. To inculcate dynamics of person in different situation
  4. To evaluate the person and situation by using psychometric tests

 

 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Self
 

Definition, Person perception; Self-concept; Self-presentation; Self-esteem.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Affect and Cognition
 

Emotions - Positive and negative affect; Thoughts and expressions; Selective attention; Information processing; Memory; Cognitive appraisal; Judgment and Decision Making; Problem Solving. 

Practicum: Decision making & Problem Solving scale

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
The Person in the Situation - I
 

 

Justifying our actions, Social Relations: Stereotypes; Prejudice: Definition and Types, Sources of Prejudice, Consequences of Prejudice; Strategies to reduce prejudice; Attribution, Attitude and Attitude Change.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
The Person in the Situation - II
 

Aggression: Perspectives, Causes; Prevention and Control of Aggression; Pro-social Behavior.

Practicum: Pro-social behavior scale

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Group Dynamics
 

Nature of Groups; Basic Processes, Group Performance, Group Decision Making; Group Interaction (Facilitation, Loafing)

Practicum: Sociometry

Text Books And Reference Books:

Myers, D.G (2002) Social Psychology,.New York: McGraw Hill Companies.

Baron, Robert A. and Byrne, D. (2001) .Social Psychology 8 th Edition (Reprint).New Delhi:Prentice-Hall of India Pvt Ltd.

Baumeister.R.F. and Bushman,B.J. (2008).Social Psychology and Human nature. Belmont,CA:Thomson Wadsworth

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Tuffin, K. (2005). Understanding critical social psychology. London: Sage Publications.

Brehm, S.S. and Kassin, SN. (1996) Social Psychology. Boston : Houghton Mifflin Company.

Crisp, R.J. and Turner, R.N. (2007), Essential Social Psychology. New Delhi: Sage Publications India Pvt., Ltd.

Taylor ,S .E, Peplau, L.A and Sears, D.O. (2006) Social Psychology. New Delhi: Pearson Prentice-Hall of India.

Misra, G., & Dalal, A. K. (2001). Social Psychology in India: Evolution and Emerging Trends. In K. A. Dala, & G. Misra, New Directions in Indian Psychology. New Delhi: Sage.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Evaluation pattern

Group Assignment

Individual Assignment

Mid semester

20

20

25

 

Mid Semester Examination

Section A

(Definition)

Section B

(Short note)

Section C

(Essay)

Section D

(Case Question)

Total

5×2=10

4×5=20

1×10=10

1×10=10

50

 

End Semester Examination

Section A

(Definition)

Section B

(Short note)

Section C

(Essay)

Section D

(Case Question)

Total

5×2=10

4×5=20

1×10=10

1×10=10

50

 

AU531 - DESIGN OF AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•The student shall gain appreciation and understanding of the design function in mechanical engineering, the steps involved in designing and the relation of design activity with manufacturing activity. 

•Shall be able to choose proper materials to different machine elements depending on their physical and mechanical properties. Thus he shall be able to apply the knowledge of material science in real life usage. 

•Student shall gain a thorough understanding of the different types of failure modes and criteria. He will be conversant with various failure theories and be able to judge which criterion is to be applied in which situation. 

•Student shall gain design knowledge of the different types of elements used in the machine design process. Eg.,gears, crankshaft, flywheel etc. and will be able to design these elements for each application.

Learning Outcome

 

CO1: Discuss the function of machine elements in mechanical engineering, the steps involved in designing and the relation of design activity with manufacturing activity {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2}

CO2: Apply the knowledge of the piston and cylinders in determining the stresses developed for its real time usage { L1, L2} {PO1, PO2}

CO3: Apply the knowledge of the spur and helical gears in determining the stresses developed for its real time usage { L1, L2, L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO4: Design the different types of elements used in the machine design process. Eg. Bevel and worm gears etc. and will be able to design these elements for each application { L1, L2, L3} { PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO5: Select the type of spring required for the application and will be able to calculate dimensions of spring { L1, L2, L3} { PO1, PO2, PO3}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Engineering Materials
 

Engineering materials - Introduction Engineering Materials and their mechanical   properties,   Stress-Strain   diagrams,   Stress   Analysis,   Design considerations: Codes and Standards. endurance limit, notch sensitivity.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Design of Cylinder, Piston and Connecting Rod
 

Choice of material for cylinder and piston, design of cylinder, piston, and piston pin, piston rings, piston failures, lubrication of piston assembly

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Design of Spur and Helical Gears
 

Spur Gears:Definitions, stresses in gear tooth: Lewis equation and form factor, Design for strength, Dynamic load and wear load.

Helical Gears:Definitions, formative number of teeth, Design based on strength, dynamic and wear loads.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Design of Bevel Gears
 

Nomenclature, Straight teeth bevel gears, Cone angle, Virtual number of teeth, Face width, Static strength, Dynamic Strength, Wear Strength.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Worm Gears
 

Nomenclature, Materials, Reversibility, Mechanical advantage, Strength design, Efficiency, Heat dissipation.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Design of Springs
 

Types  of  springs  -  stresses  in  Helical  coil  springs  of circular  and  non-circular  cross  sections.  Tension  and  compression  springs, springs  under  fluctuating  loads,  Leaf  Springs:  Stresses  in  leaf  springs.  Equalized stresses and Energy stored in springs. the barriers, rule of effective communication.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.Kulkarni S. G, “Machine Design”, Tata McGraw-Hill Education, 2008.

2.Bhandari V, “Design of Machine Elements”, Tata McGraw-Hill Education, 2010.

3.Design  of  Machine  Elements 2, K Raghavendra, CBS Publishers and Distributors Private Limited, New Delhi, 1nd Edition 2017.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.William Orthein, “Machine Component Design”, Jaico Publishing House, 1998 - 99.

2.Prabhu T. J, “Design of Transmission Systems”, Private Publication, 2000.

3.Shigley J, “Mechanical Engineering Design”, McGraw Hill 10 edition (1 February 2014).

4.Joseph Edward Shigley and Charles R.Mischke, “Mechanical Engineering Design”, McGraw-Hill International Edition, 1989.

2.GitinM.Maitra and LN Prasad, “Hand Book of Mechanical Design”, Tata McGraw Hill, 185.

3.Norton R.L, “Design of Machinery”, McGraw Hill, 1999.

4.Spots M. F, “Design of Machine Elements”, Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd., New Delhi, 1983.

5.William Orthwein, “Machine Component Design”, Vol. I and II, JaicoPublising house, Chennai, 1996.

6.Maitra, “Handbook of Gear Design”, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1986.

7.Design Data, PSG College of Technology, 2008.

8.Maitra, “Handbook of Gear Design”, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1986. 

9.Design Data, PSG College of Technology, 2008.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with only theory

25

25

AU532P - AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE SYSTEMS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

•To make students familiar with the intake and exhaust system components.

●To understand about carburetion, and types of petrol injection systems.

●To introduce students to diesel injection systems and the function of components like pumps, mechanical and pneumatic governors, fuel injectors and injection nozzles.

●To introduce students to lubrication and cooling systems, supercharging turbocharging and scavenging.

Learning Outcome

CO1:   Understand how make a perfect Design of Intake manifold for proper air flow and back pressure in exhaust manifold of engines. L1,2, PO1,2,4,5

CO2:   Learns to improve the carburettor design for defining the rich and lean mixture. L1,2, PO1,2,4,5

CO3:   Understand various methods of injection systems for C.I. Engines for improving the combustion process. L1,2, PO1,2,4,5

CO4:   Understand the Heat Exchangers phenomenon to improve cooling method in radiators and other cooling systems. L1,2, PO1,2,4,5

CO5:   Tells the importance of charging method for engines which improves engine efficiency. L1,2, PO1,2,4,5

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Intake and Exhaust Systems
 

Intake system components - Discharge coefficient, Pressure drop - Air filter, intake manifold, Connecting Pipe - Exhaust system components – Exhaust manifold and exhaust pipe - Spark arresters - Exhaust mufflers, Types, operation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Carburetion and Gasoline Injection
 

Mixture requirements for steady state and transient operation, Mixture formation studies of volatile fuels, design of elementary carburettor Chokes - Effects of altitude on carburetion - Carburettor for 2-stroke and 4-stroke engines – carburettor systems for emission control.

Petrol injection- Open loop and closed loop systems, mono point, multi-point and direct injection systems - Principles and Features, Bosch injection systems.

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Diesel Injection
 

Requirements - Air and solid injection - Function of components - Jerk and distributor type pumps- pump calibration .Pressure waves - Injection lag – Unit injector - Mechanical and pneumatic governors - Fuel injector - Types of injection nozzle - Nozzle tests - Spray characteristics - Injection timing - Factors influencing fuel spray atomization, penetration and dispersion of diesel.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Lubrication and Cooling
 

Need for cooling system - Types of cooling system - Liquid cooled system: Thermosyphon system, Forced circulation system, pressure cooling system - properties of coolant, additives for coolants Need for lubrication system - Mist lubrication system, wet sump any dry sump lubrication - Properties of lubricants, consumption of oil.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Supercharging and Scavenging
 

Objectives - Effects on engine performance - engine modification required -Thermodynamics of supercharging and Turbocharging – Turbo lag-Windage losses- Turbo charging methods - Engine exhaust manifold arrangements. Classification of scavenging systems -Mixture control through Reed valve induction - Charging Processes in two-stroke cycle engine - Terminologies -Shankey diagram - perfect displacement, perfect mixing.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ganesan V, “Internal combustion engines”, 4th edition, Tata McGraw Hill Education, 2012

T2. Rajput R. K, “A textbook of Internal Combustion Engines”, 3rd edition, Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd, 2016.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Ramalingam K. K, “Internal Combustion Engine”, Scitech Publication (India) Pvt.Ltd. 2000.

R2. Duffy Smith, “Auto Fuel Systems”, The Good Heart Willcox Company Inc., Publishers, 1987.

R3. Edward F, Obert, “Internal Combustion Engines and Air Pollution”, Intext Education Publishers, 1980.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with theory and practical

70

30

 

COURSES WITH THEORY AND PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

Theory CIA

30

-

30

2

Theory ESE

30

12

30

3

Practical CIA

35

14

35

4

Attendance

05

-

05

5

Aggregate

100

40

100

 

DETAILS OF MARK FOR COURSES WITH THOERY AND PRACTICAL

THEORY

PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

CIA-1

20

10

-

10

Overall CIA

50

35

14

35

2

CIA-2

50

10

-

10

3

CIA-3

20

10

-

10

4

Attendance

05

05

-

05

Attendance

NA

NA

-

-

5

ESE

100

30

12

30

ESE

NA

NA

-

-

 

 

TOTAL

65

-

65

TOTAL

 

35

14

35

AU533 - COMPUTER AIDED MACHINE DRAWING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·       To visualize an object and convert it into a drawing.

·       To gain knowledge of conventional representation of various machining and mechanical details as per IS.

·       To become conversant with 2-D and 3-D drafting.

·       Gaining the knowledge of CAD software and its features for effective representation of machine components and their assembly.

·       Understand the format and Standards of Machine Drawing.

·       Understand the technical information on machine drawings.

·       Understanding and drawing of various views and machine components.

Learning how to assemble and disassemble important parts used in major mechanical engineering applications.

Learning Outcome

CO1: {Students will be able to understand the concept and importance of limits fits and tolerance in the manufacturing drawing.  } {L1,L2} {PO1,PO2}

CO2: {Students will be able to understand the thread terminologies, different types of fasteners, keys and joints and couplings used in machine parts.  }{L1,L2,L5}{PO1,PO2,PO5}

CO3: {Student will be able to perform both 2D to 3D drawings of any components using the modeling software.}{ L1,L5}{PO1,PO5}

CO4: {Students will be able to visualize and model different parts of a machine.}{L1,L5}{PO1,PO5}

CO5:{ Students will be able to construct assemblies and drawing of various machines like screw jack, machine vice, tail stock of lathe from the concepts learnt using the modeling software.}{ L1,L2,L5}{PO1,PO2,PO5}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction: Sections of Solids
 

Review of graphic interface of the software. Review of basic sketching commands and navigational commands. Starting a new drawing sheet. Sheet sizes. Naming a drawing, Drawing units, grid and snap.

Sections of Solids: Sections of Pyramids, Prisms, Cubes, Tetrahedrons, Cones and Cylinders resting only on their bases (No problems on, axis inclinations, spheres and hollow solids). True shape of sections. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction: Orthographic Views
 

Orthographic Views: Conversion of pictorial views into orthographic projections. of simple machine parts with or without section. (Bureau of Indian Standards conventions are to be followed for the drawings) Hidden line conventions. Precedence of lines.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Fasteners
 

Hexagonal headed bolt and nut with washer (assembly), square headed bolt and nut with washer (assembly) simple assembly using stud bolts with nut and lock nut. Flanged nut, slotted nut, taper and split pin for locking, counter sunk head screw, grub screw, Allen screw. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Thread Forms
 

Thread terminology, sectional views of threads. ISO Metric (Internal & External) BSW (Internal & External) square and Acme. Sellers thread, American Standard thread.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Keys & Joints
 

Parallel key, Taper key, Feather key, Gibhead key and Woodruff key

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Riveted Joints
 

Single and double riveted lap joints, butt joints with single/double cover straps (Chain and Zigzag, using snap head rivets). cotter joint (socket and spigot), knuckle joint (pin joint) for two rods.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Couplings
 

Split Muff coupling, Protected type flanged coupling, pin (bush) type flexible coupling, Oldham's coupling and universal coupling (Hooks' Joint) 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to GD&T
 

Introduction to dimensional analysis, GD&T and its tools, Datum’s and concepts, manufacturing GD&T and its application, application of GD&T and its Principles. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:13
Assembly Drawings
 

 

1. Plummer block (Pedestal Bearing)

2. Rams Bottom Safety Valve

3. I.C. Engine connecting rod

4. Screw jack (Bottle type)

5. Tailstock of lathe

6. Machine vice

7. Tool head of the shaper

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. 'A Primer on Computer Aided Machine Drawing-2007’, Published by VTU, Belgaum.

T2. 'Machine Drawing', N.D.Bhat & V.M.Panchal.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. 'A Text Book of Computer Aided Machine Drawing', S. Trymbaka Murthy, CBS R2. Publishers, New Delhi, 2007

R3. 'Machine Drawing’, K.R. Gopala Krishna, Subhash Publication.

R4. 'Machine Drawing with Auto CAD', Goutam Pohit & Goutham Ghosh, 1st Indian print Pearson Education, 2005

R5. 'Auto CAD 2006, for engineers and designers', Sham Tickoo. Dream tech 2005

R6. 'Machine Drawing', N. Siddeshwar, P. Kanniah, V.V.S. Sastri, published by Tata Mc GrawHill,2006

R7. Fundamentals of Geometric Dimension & Tolerancing, by Alex Krulikowski

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with only theory

50

50

 

Continuous Internal Assessment {CIA}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

End Semester Examination {ESE}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

Components of the CIA 

CIA I:  Subject Assignments / Online Tests: 10 marks 

CIA II:   Mid Semester Examination {Theory}: 25 marks

CIA III: Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications: 10 marks

Attendance: 05 marks

Total: 50 marks

AU544E1 - AUTOMOTIVE AERODYNAMICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides the basic knowledge about types of aerodynamic drag and the optimization techniques for minimum drag on automotive bodies. On completion of this course, the students are exposed to understand the concept of shape optimization and vehicle handling to minimize different types of aerodynamic drag.

Learning Outcome

CO 1: Discuss aerodynamics drag and its effect on a vehicle at different conditions of operation. L1, L2, PO1,2,8,9

CO2:   Describe strategies to reduce aerodynamic drag L1, L2, PO1,2,8,9

CO3:   Analyse cabs for better aerodynamics L1, L2,L3, L4 PO1,2,8,9

CO4:   Analyse of vehicle body considering the forces and moments caused by the aerodynamics of a car.  L1, L2,L3, L4 PO1,2,8,9

CO5:   Discuss wind tunnel and its application for simulating aerodynamics in a real time scenario L1, L2, PO1,2,8,9

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction
 

Scope – Historical development trends – Fundamentals of fluid mechanics – Flow phenomenon related to vehicles Types of aerodynamic drag. Forces and moments influencing drag. Effects of forces and moments. Various body optimization techniques for minimum drag. – External & Internal flow problems. Resistance to vehicle motion – Performance – Fuel consumption and performance – Potential of vehicle aerodynamics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Aerodynamic Drag of Cabs
 

Car as a bluff body – Flow field around car – drag force – types of drag force – analysis of aerodynamic drag – drag coefficient of cars – strategies for aerodynamic development – low drag profiles.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Shape Optimization of Cabs
 

Front and modification – front and rear wind shield angle – Boat tailing – Hatch back, fast back and square back – Dust flow patterns at the rear – Effect of gap configuration – effect of fasteners

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Vehicle Handling
 

The origin of force and moments on a vehicle – side wind problems – methods to calculate forces and moments – vehicle dynamics under side winds – the effects of forces and moments – Characteristics of forces and moments – Dirt accumulation on the vehicle – wind noise – drag reduction in commercial vehicles.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Wind Tunnels For Automotive Aerodynamics
 

Introduction – Principles of wind tunnel technology Flow visualization techniques. Testing with wind tunnel balance (scale models).– Limitation of simulation – Stress with scale models – full scale wind tunnels – measurement techniques – Equipment and transducers – road testing methods – Numerical methods

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Hucho, W.H., Aerodynamics of Road vehicles, Butterworths Co. Ltd., 2013.

2. Pope,A., Wind Tunnel Testing, John Wiley & Sons, 2nd Edn., New York.

3. Aerodynamics by AJ Clancy

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Automotive Aerodynamics: Update SP-706, SAE, 1987.

2. Vehicle Aerodynamics, SP-1145, SAE, 1996.

3. Aircraft Flight by AC Kermode.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with only theory

50

50

 

Continuous Internal Assessment {CIA}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

End Semester Examination {ESE}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

Components of the CIA 

CIA I:  Subject Assignments / Online Tests: 10 marks 

CIA II:   Mid Semester Examination {Theory}: 25 marks

CIA III: Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications: 10 marks

Attendance: 05 marks

Total: 50 marks

AU544E2 - HYDRAULICS AND PNEUMATIC CONTROL (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • Upon completion of this course students will demonstrate an understanding of Hydraulic and Pneumatic principles, equipment, Seals
  • Students will be able to identify and describe the basic operation of Hydraulic / Pneumatic systems, the various equipment used in their operation,
  • Students will be able to troubleshoot Hydraulic/Pneumatic equipment

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the operating principle, performance and selection procedure of hydraulic elements and machines {L1} {PO1,}

CO2: Understand the working principle of actuators and evaluate actuator performance and justify selection of actuators for various applications{L2} {PO1}

CO3: Identify different types of control valves and understand their working principle and application. {L2} {PO2}

CO4: Design and analyse hydraulic circuits. {L3} {PO2}

CO5: Design and analyse pneumatic and electro-pneumatic circuit. {L3} {PO2}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Hydraulic Power
 

Introduction to Hydraulic Power: Definition of hydraulic system, advantages, limitations, applications, Pascal's law, structure of hydraulic control system, problems on Pascal's law.

The source of Hydraulic Power: Pumps Classification pumps, Pumping theory of positive displacement pumps, construction and working of Gear pumps, Vane pumps, Piston pumps, fixed and variable displacement pumps, Pump performance characteristics, pump Selection factors, problems on pumps.                                                                                                

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Hydraulic Actuators and Motors
 

Classification cylinder and hydraulic motors, Linear Hydraulic Actuators [cylinders], single and double acting cylinder, Mechanics of Hydraulic Cylinder Loading, mounting arrangements, cushioning, special types of cylinders, problems on cylinders, construction and working of rotary actuators such as gear, vane, piston motors, Hydraulic Motor Theoretical Torque, Power and Flow Rate, Hydraulic Motor Performance, problems, symbolic representation of hydraulic actuators (cylinders and motors). 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Control Components in Hydraulic Systems:
 

Classification of control valves, Directional Control Valves- Symbolic representation, constructional features of poppet, sliding spool, rotary type valves solenoid and pilot operated DCV, shuttle valve, check valves, Pressure control valves - types, direct operated types and pilot operated types. Flow Control Valves - compensated and non-compensated FCV, needle valve, temperature compensated, pressure compensated, pressure and temperature compensated FCV, symbolic representation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Hydraulic Circuit Design And Analysis
 

Control of Single and Double ­Acting Hydraulic Cylinder, Regenerative circuit, Pump Unloading Circuit, Double Pump Hydraulic System, Counter balance Valve Application, Hydraulic Cylinder Sequencing Circuits, Automatic cylinder reciprocating system, Locked Cylinder using Pilot check Valve, Cylinder synchronizing circuit using different methods, factors affecting synchronization, Hydraulic circuit for force multiplication, Speed Control of Hydraulic Cylinder, Speed Control of Hydraulic Motors, Safety circuit, Accumulators, types, construction and applications with circuits.                                                     

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Pneumatic Control
 

Definition of pneumatic system, advantages, limitations, applications, Choice of working medium. Characteristic of compressed air. Structure of Pneumatic control System, fluid conditioners and FRL unit.          

Pneumatic Actuators: Linear cylinder - Types, Conventional type of cylinder- working, End position cushioning, seals, mounting arrangements- Applications. Rod - Less cylinders types, working, advantages, Rotary cylinders- types construction and application, symbols.  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Maintenance of Hydraulic System
 

Hydraulic Oils - Desirable properties, general type of Fluids, Sealing Devices, Reservoir System, Filters and Strainers, wear of Moving Parts due to solid -particle Contamination, temperature control (heat exchangers), Pressure switches, trouble shooting.                                                                                             

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Pneumatic Control Valves
 

DCV such as poppet, spool, suspended seat type slide valve, pressure control valves, flow control valves, types and construction, use of memory valve, Quick exhaust valve, time delay valve, shuttle valve, twin pressure valve, symbols. 3 Simple Pneumatic Control: Direct and indirect actuation pneumatic cylinders, speed control of cylinders - supply air throttling and Exhaust air throttling and Exhaust air throttling.          

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Signal Processing Elements
 

 Use of Logic gates - OR and AND gates in pneumatic applications. Practical Examples involving the use of logic gates, Pressure dependant controls- types - construction - practical applications, Time dependent controls principle. Construction, practical applications.        

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Multi- Cylinder Application
 

Coordinated and sequential motion control, Motion and control diagrams. Signal elimination methods, Cascading method- principle, Practical application examples (up to two cylinders) using cascading method (using reversing valves).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Electro- Pneumatic Control
 

Principles - signal input and output, pilot assisted solenoid control of directional control valves, Use of relay and contactors. Control circuitry for simple signal cylinder application.          

Compressed Air: Production of compressed air- Compressors Preparation of compressed air-Driers, Filters, Regulators, Lubricators, Distribution of compressed air ­Piping layout.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. “Fluid Power with Applications”, Anthony Esposito, Sixth edition, Pearson Education, Inc., 2000.
  2. 'Pneumatics and Hydraulics', Andrew Parr, Jaico Publishing Co
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      'Oil Hydraulic systems', Principles and Maintenance S. R. Majurr, Tata Mc Graw Hill Publishing Company Ltd. - 2001

2.      'Industrial Hydraulics', Pippenger, Hicks" McGraw Hill, New York

3.      'Hydraulic & Pneumatic Power for Production', Harry L. Stewart

4.      'Pneumatic Systems', S. R. Majumdar, Tata Mc Graw Hill Publish 1995

5.       Power Hydraulics' Michael J Pinches & John G Ashby, Prentice Hall

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with only theory

50

50

 

Continuous Internal Assessment {CIA}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

End Semester Examination {ESE}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

Components of the CIA 

CIA I:  Subject Assignments / Online Tests: 10 marks 

CIA II:   Mid Semester Examination {Theory}: 25 marks

CIA III: Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications: 10 marks

Attendance: 05 marks

Total: 50 marks

AU544E3 - ENERGY ENGINEERING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of the course is to familiarize the students about the utilization of various alternative sources of energy technologies for thermal and electrical needs with environmental merits.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Compare the types of fuels used in a power plant based on their advantages and disadvantages {L1,L2}{PO1,PO2,PO7}

CO2: Design of chimney by calculating the height of chimney to produce a draft pressure and design of layout of a diesel power plant based on capacity.{L1,L2,L3,L4,L5}{PO1,PO2, PO3,PO4,PO6,PO7}

CO3: Compare the advantages and disadvantages hydel and nuclear power plant. {L1,L2,L3 }{PO1,PO2,PO4,PO6,PO7}

CO4: Compare the advantages and disadvantages of wind, solar and tidal energy. {L1,L2,L3 }{PO1,PO2,PO4,PO6,PO7}

CO5: Describe the working of fuel cell, geothermal and bio-mass energy to understand the scope for each. {L1,L2,L3 }{PO1,PO2,PO4,PO6,PO7}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Steam Power Plant
 

Different Types of Fuels used for steam generation, Equipment for burning coal in lump form, strokers, different types, Oil burners.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Pulverized Coal And Furnace
 

Advantages and Disadvantages of using pulverized fuel, Equipment for preparation and burning of pulverized coal, unit system and bin system. Pulverized fuel furnaces, cyclone furnace, Coal and ash handling, Generation of steam using forced circulation, high and supercritical pressures.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Steam Generators
 

Chimneys - Natural, forced, induced and balanced draft, Calculations and numericals involving height of chimney to produce a given draft. Cooling towers and Ponds, Accessories for the Steam generators such as Superheaters, Desuperheater, control of superheaters, Economizers, Air pre-heaters and re-heaters.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Diesel Engine Power Plant:
 

Applications of Diesel Engines in Power field, Method of starting Diesel engines, Auxiliaries like cooling and lubrication system, filters, centrifuges, Oil heaters, intake and exhaust system, Layout of diesel power plant.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Nuclear Power Plant:
 

Principles of release of nuclear energy; Fusion and fission reactions, Nuclear fuels used in the reactors, Multiplication and thermal utilization factors, Elements of the nuclear reactor; moderator, control rod, fuel rods, coolants. Brief description of reactors of the following types - Pressurized water reactor, Boiling water reactor, Sodium graphite reactor, Fast Breeder reactor, Homogeneous graphite reactor and gas cooled reactor, Radiation hazards, Shieldings, Radio-active waste disposal.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Hydro-Electric Plants:
 

Hydrographs, flow duration and mass curves, unit hydrograph and numericals. Storage and pondage, pumped storage plants, low, medium and high head plants, Penstock, water hammer, surge tanks, gates and valves, General layout of hydel power plants.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Solar Energy:
 

Solar Extra-terrestrial radiation and radiation at the earth surface, radiation-measuring instruments, working principles of solar flat plate collectors, solar pond and photovoltaic conversion (Numerical Examples).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Wind and Tidal Power:
 

Properties of wind, availability of wind energy in India, wind velocity and power from wind; major problems associated with wind power, wind machines; Types of wind machines and their characteristics, horizontal and vertical axis wind mills, coefficient of performance of a wind mill rotor.

Tidal Power: Tides and waves as energy suppliers and their mechanics; fundamental characteristics of tidal power, harnessing tidal energy, limitations.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Direct Energy Conversion Systems:
 

Basic principle of Thermo-electric and Thermo-ionic power generations, Fuel cell - principle, types, applications, Magneto hydrodynamic power generation - Principle, open cycle and closed cycles, Hydrogen energy - Production, storage, and applications.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
OTEC, Geothermal Energy and Biomass:
 

OTEC:Principle of working, Rankine cycle. Geothermal Energy Conversion:Principle of working, types of geothermal station with schematic diagram. Biomass: Biomass, sources of biomass, thermo-chemical and bio-chemical conversion of biomass - pyrolysis, gasification, combustion and fermentation, Gasifiers, Digesters, economics of biomass power generation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.P. K. Nag“Power Plant Engineering”, Tata McGraw Hill, 4th ed. edn 2014.

2.Domakundawar“Power Plant Engineering”, Dhanpath Rai sons. 2015.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.R. K. Rajput “Power Plant Engineering”, Laxmi publication, New Delhi.

2.A. W. Culp Jr. “Principles of Energy conversion”, McGraw Hill. 1996.

3.G D Rai, “Non-conventional Energy sources”, Khanna Publishers.

4.B H Khan “Non-conventional resources”, TMH - 2009.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with only theory

50

50

 

Continuous Internal Assessment {CIA}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

End Semester Examination {ESE}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

Components of the CIA 

CIA I:  Subject Assignments / Online Tests: 10 marks 

CIA II:   Mid Semester Examination {Theory}: 25 marks

CIA III: Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications: 10 marks

Attendance: 05 marks

Total: 50 marks

AU544E4 - OPERATIONS RESEARCH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

• One or more advanced courses on applications in: supply chain and manufacturing systems; data analysis; information engineering; financial engineering; or service systems.

• A collaborative systems design experience.

• Collaborative project experiences involving both written and oral presentations.

• Courses with significant experiential learning components.

• Experiences with identifying, accessing, evaluating, and interpreting information and data in support of assignments, projects, or research.

• Course experiences with large-scale datasets.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Express the applications of Operations Research and mathematical modeling in solving industrial problems and to solve Engineering and managerial situations as LPP.(L2)(PO1,PO2,PO12)

CO2: Compute Engineering and managerial situations as Transportation and Assignment problems using quantitative methods which include MODI method and Hungarian method .(L3)(PO1,PO2,PO11)

CO3: Evaluate the trouble spots in a  project namely the delays , interruptions by determining the critical factors using CPM and PERTH technique 

CO4: Solve for the congestions and delays of waiting in line using Queuing Theory.(L3)(PO1,PO2)

CO5: Solve for competitive situations using analytical and graphical methods of Game theory. (L3)(PO1,PO2)

CO6: Selection of appropriate order in which jobs (operations)are assigned to facilities using Sequencing methodology   (L3)(PO1,PO2)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction:
 

Evolution of OR, definition of OR, scope of OR, application areas of OR, steps (phases) in OR study, characteristics and limitations of OR, models used in OR, linear programming (LP) problem-formulation and solution by graphical method.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Solution of Linear Programming Problems:
 

The simplex method-canonical and standard form of an LP problem, slack, surplus and artificial variables, big M method and concept of duality, dual simplex method.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Transportation Problem:
 

Formulation of transportation problem, types, initial basic feasible solution using different methods, optimal solution by MODI method, degeneracy in transportation problems, application of transportation problem concept for maximization cases. Assignment Problem-formulation, types, application to maximization cases and travelling salesman problem. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
PERT-CPM Techniques:
 

Introduction, network construction - rules, Fulkerson’s rule for numbering the events, AON and AOA diagrams; Critical path method to find the expected completion time of a project, floats; PERT for finding expected duration of an activity and project, determining the probability of completing a project, predicting the completion time of project; crashing of simple projects.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Queuing Theory:
 

Queuing systems and their characteristics, Pure-birth and Pure-death models (only equations), empirical queuing models – M/M/1 and M/M/C models and their steady state performance analysis.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Sequencing:
 

Basic assumptions, sequencing ‘n’ jobs on single machine using priority rules, sequencing using Johnson’s rule-‘n’ jobs on 2 machines, ‘n’ jobs on 3 machines, ‘n’ jobs on ‘m’ machines. Sequencing 2 jobs on ‘m’ machines using graphical method.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Game Theory:
 

Formulation of games, types, solution of games with saddle point, graphical method of solving mixed strategy games, dominance rule for solving mixed strategy games.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. P K Gupta and D S Hira,  “Operations Research”, 6th edition, Chand Publications, New Delhi , 2014.

T2.Taha H A, “Operations Research”, 10th edition, Pearson Education, 2016.

T3.El-Ghazali Talbi, “Metaheuristics: From Design to Implementation”, 2013 Edition,     Wiley  Publishers, ISBN-13: 978-0470278581

T4.Kalavathy.S, “Operation research”, 4th Edition, Vikas Publishing House, 2013 ISBN:978-93-259-6347-4

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. A P Verma, “Operations Research”, 7th edition, S K Kataria &Sons, , 2016(reprint)

R2.Paneerselvam, “Operations Research”, 2nd edition, PHI, 2006.

R3.RA M Natarajan and P Balasubramani, “Operations Research”, 4th impression, Pearson Education, 2009.

R4.Hiller and Liberman, “Introduction to Operations Research”, 9th edition, McGraw Hill, 2012.

R5.RS.D. Sharma, “Operations Research”, Ledarnath Ramanath & Co, 2002.

R6.Mitsuo Gen & Runwei Cheng, “Genetic Algorithm and engineering Design”, 1997 Edition, A Wiley- Interscience Publication, ISBN:0-471-12741-8

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with only theory

50

50

 

Continuous Internal Assessment {CIA}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

End Semester Examination {ESE}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

Components of the CIA 

CIA I:  Subject Assignments / Online Tests: 10 marks 

CIA II:   Mid Semester Examination {Theory}: 25 marks

CIA III: Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications: 10 marks

Attendance: 05 marks

Total: 50 marks

AU544E5 - SOLID MECHANICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

1.To facilitate the students to appreciate the various mathematical relations of stress and strain.

2.To develop analytical skills in solving problems of plain stress, plain strain and axisymmetric conditions.

3.To be able to analyse some real time problem and to formulate the conditions for application in thick cylinders, rotating discs, torsion of non-circular cross-sections etc.

4.To impart knowledge of engineering application of plasticity and thermo-elasticity.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Discuss the various concepts of stress-strain and its mathematical relations. {L1, L2} {PO1, PO2}

CO2: Develop the linear elastic model for different boundary conditions. {L1, L2} { PO1, PO2}

CO3: Analyse and solving the plane stress and plain strain problems. {L1, L2, L3} { PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO4: Apply the knowledge of stresses in designing the thick cylinders, rotating discs, torsion of non-circular cross-sections etc. {L1, L2, L3} { PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO5: Explain the basic concepts of plasticity and thermos-elasticity. {L1, L2, L3} { PO1, PO2}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Cartesian tensors, Strains:
 

Introduction to Cartesian tensors, Strains: Concept of strain, derivation of small strain tensor and compatibility, Stress: Derivation of Cauchy relations and equilibrium and symmetry equations, principal stresses and directions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Constitutive equations:
 

Constitutive equations: Generalized Hooke’s law, Linear elasticity, Material symmetry; Boundary Value Problems: concepts of uniqueness and superposition.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Plane stress and plane strain problems
 

Plane stress and plane strain problems, introduction to governing equations in cylindrical and spherical coordinates, axisymmetric problems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Application to thick cylinders
 

Application to thick cylinders, rotating discs, torsion of non-circular cross-sections. Stress concentration problems.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Thermo-elasticity, 2-D contact problems.
 

Thermo-elasticity, 2-D contact problems. Solutions using potentials. Energy methods. Introduction to plasticity.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. G. T. Mase, R. E. Smelser and G. E. Mase, “Continuum Mechanics for Engineers”, Third Edition, CRC Press, 2004.

T2. Y. C. Fung, “Foundations of Solid Mechanics, Prentice Hall International”, 1965.

T3. Lawrence. E. Malvern, “Introduction to Mechanics of a Continuous Medium”, Prentice Hall international, 1969.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. L. S. Srinath, “Advanced Mechanics of solids”, Tata Mc. Graw Hill, 3rd edition, 2009.

R2. S. P. Timoshenko and J. N Gordier, “Theory of Elasticity”, 3rd edition, Mc.Graw Hill International, , 2010.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with only theory

50

50

 

Continuous Internal Assessment {CIA}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

End Semester Examination {ESE}: 50% {50 marks out of 100 marks}

Components of the CIA 

CIA I:  Subject Assignments / Online Tests: 10 marks 

CIA II:   Mid Semester Examination {Theory}: 25 marks

CIA III: Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications: 10 marks

Attendance: 05 marks

Total: 50 marks

AU551 - COMPUTATIONAL LABORATORY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

FEA tools are used vastly by industries to validate the design and improvement of overall product experience. Hence, students will be trained for using FEM by using commercial tools. This will not only improve their knowledge but also will help them to secure better job with in Industry.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To known the latest vastly used commercial tool {L1,2} {PO1,2,5}

CO2: Virtual testing of product or mechanical components. {L1,2,5} {PO1,2,5}

CO3: Improvement of product/ part design by using FEM tools. {L1,2,5} {PO1,2,5}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
List of Experiments
 

List of Experiments (If any):

Practical Hours

1.     Linear Static Analysis of Cantilever Beam

4

2.     Non-linear Analysis of Skew Plate

4

3.     Cargo Crane – Critical Load Estimation

4

4.     Eigenvalue Buckling of a Square Tube

3

5.     Static Post-buckling Analysis: Cargo Crane – Riks Analysis

3

6.     Static Post-buckling Analysis: Buckling of a Square Tube with Imperfections

2

7.     Damped Static Post-buckling Analysis: Cargo Crane – Stabilized Static Analysis

2

8.     Damped Static Post-buckling Analysis: Cargo Crane – Dynamic Analysis

2

9.     Introduction to Contact Modeling : Hinge Model

2

10.  Introduction to Contact Modeling : Clip and Plate Model

2

11.  Bolted Connection Modeling: Pump Model – Bolt Loading

2

12.  Bolted Connection Modeling: Beam-Column Connection with Fasteners

2

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Huebner, K. (2001). The finite element method for engineers. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

T2. Ataei, H. and Mamaghani, M. (2017). Finite element analysis. 1st ed. createspace Independent.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Huebner, K. (2001). The finite element method for engineers. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

R2. Ataei, H. and Mamaghani, M. (2017). Finite element analysis. 1st ed. CreateSpace Independent.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Category

Weightage for CIA

Weightage for ESE

1

Courses with only Practical

50

50

 

●       Continuous Internal Assessment {CIA}: 50% {25 marks out of 50 marks}

●       End Semester Examination {ESE} : 50% {25 marks out of  50 marks}

CEOE561E01 - SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course give  introduction to solid waste management, collection and transportation, treatment/processing techniques, incineration , composting, sanitary land filling, disposal methods, recycle and reuse.

 Objective of this course is to provide insight to manage  solid waste. It is designed as a source of information on solid waste management , includiing the principles of solid waste management , processing and treatment, final disposal, recycle and reuse

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1Define and explain important concepts in the field of solid waste management, such as waste hierarchy, waste prevention, recirculation, municipal solid waste etc.

CO2 Suggest and describe suitable technical solutions for biological and thermal treatment.

CO3Suggest, motivate and describe a way to tackle the problem from a system analysis approach.

CO4 Describe the construction and operation of a modern landfill according to the demands

CO5 Discuss social aspects connected to handling and recirculation of solid waste from a local as well as global perspective.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Sources
 

Classification and characteristics – municipal, commercial & industrial. Methods of quantification

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Definition, Land Pollution – scope and importance of solid waste management, functional elements of solid waste management. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Collection and Transportation
 

Systems of collection, collection equipment, garbage chutes, transfer stations – bailing and compacting, route optimization techniques and problems.                               

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Treatment/Processing Techniques
 

Components separation, volume reduction, size reduction, chemical reduction and biological processing problems.                     

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Incineration
 

Process – 3 T’s, factors affecting incineration process, incinerators – types, prevention of air pollution, pyrolsis, design criteria for incineration.                              

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Composting
 

Aerobic and anaerobic composting, factors affecting composting, Indore and Bangalore processes, mechanical and semi mechanical composting processes. Vermi composting.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Sanitary land filling
 

Different types, trench area, Ramp and pit method, site selection, basic steps involved, cell design, prevention of site  pollution, leachate & gas collection and control methods, geo-synthetic fabricsin sanitary landfills.   

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Recycle and Reuse
 

Material and energy recovery operations, reuse in other industries, plastic wastes, environmental significance and reuse.     

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Disposal Methods
 

Open dumping – selection of site, ocean disposal, feeding to hogs, incineration, pyrolsis, composting, sanitary land filling,  merits and demerits, biomedical wastes and disposal.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1 Bhide and Sunderashan “Solid Waste Management in developing countries”,

T2 Tchobanoglous “Integrated Solid Waste Management”, Mc Graw Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Peavy and Tchobanoglous “Environmental Engineering”,

R2. Garg S K “Environmental Engineering”, Vol II

R3. “Biomedical waste handling rules – 2000”.

R4. Pavoni J.L. “Hand book on Solid Waste Disposal”

Evaluation Pattern

Sl No.

Evaluation Component

Module

Duration

(min)

Nature of Component

Validation

1

CIA I

Quiz, assignment, & test

------

Closed Book/ Open book

Written test

2

CIA II

MSE

120

Closed Book

MSE

3

CIA  III

Seminar/assignment, Test

-----

Closed/Open Book

Seminar and test

4

Semester Exam

ESE

180

Closed Book

ESE

CEOE561E03 - DISASTER MANAGEMENT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course would help to understand the scope and relevance of Multi Disciplinary approach in Disaster Management in a dynamic  world and to realize the responsibilities of individuals and institutions for effective disaster response and disaster risk reduction

 

Learning Outcome

CO1 : Explain Hazards and Disasters (L2, PO 4)

CO2 :Assess managerial aspects of Disaster Management,  plan and explain risk analysis (L3, PO5)

CO3 : Relate Disasters and Development (L4, PO7)

CO4 : Compare climate change impacts and develop scenarios (L5, PO6)

CO5: Categorize policies and institutional mechanisms in Disaster Management and the impacts on society (L5, PO7)

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Hazard and Disasters
 

 Principles of Disaster Management, Hazards, Risks and Vulnerabilities;  Natural Disasters (Indicative list: Earthquake, Floods, Fire, Landslides, Tornado, Cyclones, Tsunamis, Human Induced Disasters (e.g  Nuclear, Chemical, Terrorism. Assessment of Disaster Vulnerability of a location and vulnerable groups; Pandemics

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Disaster Management Cycle and Humanitarian Logistics
 

Prevention, Preparedness and Mitigation measures for various Disasters, Post Disaster Relief & Logistics Management, Emergency Support Functions and their coordination mechanism, Resource & Material Management, Management of Relief Camp, Information systems & decision making tools, Voluntary Agencies & Community Participation at various stages of disaster, management.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Natural resources and Energy sources
 

 

Renewable and non-renewable resources, Role of individual in conservation of natural resources for sustainable life styles. Use and over exploitation of Forest resources. Use and over exploitation of surface and ground water resources, Conflicts over water, Dams- benefits and problems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Global Environmental Issues
 

 

Global Environmental crisis, Current global environment issues, Global Warming, Greenhouse Effect, role of Carbon Dioxide and Methane, Ozone Problem, CFCs and Alternatives, Causes of Climate Change Energy Use: past, present and future, Role of Engineers.

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:11
Disaster Risk Reduction and Development
 

Disaster Risk Reduction and Institutional Mechanisms Meteorological observatory – Seismological observatory - Volcanology institution - Hydrology Laboratory; National Disaster Management Authority (India); Disaster Policies of Foreign countries.

Integration of public policy: Incident Command System; National Disaster Management Plans and Policies; Planning and design of infrastructure for disaster management, Community based approach in disaster management, methods for effective dissemination of information, ecological and sustainable development models for disaster management.

Technical Tolls for Disaster Management: Monitoring,  Management program for disaster mitigation ;  Geographical Information System(GIS) ; Role of Social Media in Disaster Management

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

T1. Paul, B.K, “Environmental Hazards and Disasters: Contexts, Perspectives and Management”, Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. (Unit 1 – Chapter 1; Unit 2 – Chapter 1, 3; Unit 3 – Chapter 4; Unit 4 – Chapter 5 & 6)

T2. Keller, Edward, and Duane DeVecchio. “Natural hazards: earth's processes as hazards, disasters, and catastrophe”s. Pearson Higher Education AU, 2015. (Unit 5 – Chapter 6 & 7)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.  Coppola, D, “Introduction to International Disaster Management “Elsevier, 2015.

 

R2. Fookes, Peter G., E. Mark Lee, and James S. Griffiths. "Engineering geomorphology: theory and practice." Whittles Publications, 2007.

 

R3. Tomasini, R. And Wassanhove, L.V (2009). Humanitarian Logistics. Pangrave Macmillan.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Ser No

Evaluation Component

Module

Duration (Mins)

Nature Of Component

Weightage Of Module

Validation

1

CIA I

Assignment

Quizes

 

Open Book

Assignment 50%  Quiz 30% Class participation 20% 100%

 

2

CIA II

MSE

120

CLOSED BOOK

 

 

4

SEMESTER EXAM

ESE

180

CLOSED BOOK

 

Written Test

 

CSOE561E04 - PYTHON FOR ENGINEERS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Specifically, the course has the following objectives. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

•Develop a working knowledge for how computers operate and how computer programs are executed.

•Evolve critical thinking and problem-solving skills using an algorithmic approach.

•Learn about the programmer’s role in the software development process.

•Translate real-world issues into computer-solvable problems.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the basic methods of formatting, outputting data, kinds of data, operators and variables.

CO2: Interpret with the concepts of Boolean values, utilization of loops and operators.

CO3: Experiment with functions, passing arguments and data processing.

CO4: Illustrate the concept of modules, exceptions, strings and lists.

CO5: Apply the fundamentals of OOP and its implementation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION
 

Introduction to Python and computer programming: Programming – absolute basics, Python – a tool, not a reptile, First program, Python literals, Operators – data manipulation tools, Variables.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
CONDITIONAL STATEMENTS LOOPING AND ARRAY
 

Making decisions in Python, Python's loops, Logic and bit operations in Python, Lists – collections of data, Sorting simple lists – the bubble sort algorithm, Lists – some more details, Lists in advanced applications.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
FUNCTIONS
 

Writing functions in Python, How functions communicate with their environment, Returning a result from a function, Scopes in Python. Creating functions, Tuples and dictionaries.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
MODULES
 

Using modules, Some useful modules, Package, Errors, The anatomy of an exception, Some of the most useful exceptions, Characters and strings vs. computers, The nature of Python's strings, String methods, Strings in action.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
FUNDAMENTALS OF OOP
 

Basic concepts of object programming, A short journey from the procedural to the object approach, Properties, Methods, and Inheritance – one of object programming foundations, Generators and closures, Processing files, Working with real files.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Eric Matthes,  “Python Crash Course”, 2nd Edition: A Hands-On, Project-Based Introduction to Programming, No Starch Press, Inc, 2016

T2. Paul Barry, “Head first Python”, 2nd Edition, O’Reilly, 2017.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1: Paul Barry, “Head First Python: A Brain-Friendly Guide”, Shroff/O'Reilly; Second edition, 2016.

R2: Martin C. Brown,”Python: The Complete Reference”, McGraw Hill Education; Fourth edition, 2018.

 

Evaluation Pattern

        Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)        : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

        End Semester Examination(ESE)                  : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

ECOE5603 - AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The aim of this course is to enable student to understand the complete dynamics of automotive electronics, design and implementation of the electronics that contributes to the safety of the automobiles, add-on features, and comforts. 

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student will be able to :

CO1:Implement various control requirements in the automotive system

CO2: Comprehend dashboard electronics and engine system electronics

CO3:Identify various physical parameters that are to be sensed and monitored for maintaining the stability of the vehicle under dynamic conditions

CO4:Understand and implement the controls and actuator system pertaining to the comfort and safety of commuters

CO5: Design sensor network for mechanical fault diagnostics in an automotive vehicle

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
AUTOMOTIVE FUNDAMENTALS
 

Use of Electronics In The Automobile, Antilock Brake Systems, (ABS), Electronic steering control, Power steering, Traction control, Electronically controlled suspension

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
AUTOMOTIVE INSTRUMENTATION CONTROL
 

Sampling, Measurement and signal conversion of various parameters.  Sensors and Actuators, Applications of sensors and actuators

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
BASICS OF ELECTRONIC ENGINE CONTROL
 

Integrated body- Climate controls, Motivation for Electronic Engine Control, Concept of An Electronic Engine Control System, Definition of General Terms, Definition of Engine Performance Terms, Electronic fuel control system, Engine control sequence, Electronic Ignition,  air flow rate sensor, Indirect measurement of mass air flow, Engine crankshaft angular position sensor, Automotive engine control actuators, Digital engine control, Engine speed sensor ,Timing sensor for ignition and fuel delivery, Electronic ignition control systems, Safety systems,

Interior safety, Lighting, Entertainment systems

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
VEHICLE MOTION CONTROL AND AUTOMOTIVE DIAGNOSTICS
 

Cruise control system, Digital cruise control, Timing light, Engine analyzer, On-board and off-board diagnostics, Expert systems. Stepper motor based actuator, Cruise control electronics, Vacuum – antilock braking system, Electronic suspension system Electronic steering control, Computer-based instrumentation system, Sampling and Input\output signal conversion, Fuel quantity measurement, Coolant temperature measurement, Oil pressure measurement, Vehicle speed measurement, Display devices, Trip-Information- Computer, Occupant protection systems

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
FUTURE AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS
 

Alternative Fuel Engines, Collision Wide Range Air/Fuel Sensor, Alternative Engine, Low Tire Pressure Warning System, Collision avoidance Radar Warning Systems, Low Tire Pressure Warning System, Radio Navigation, Advance Driver information System. Alternative-Fuel Engines, Transmission Control , Collision Avoidance Radar Warning System, Low Tire Pressure Warning System, Speech Synthesis Multiplexing in Automobiles, Control Signal Multiplexing, Navigation Sensors, Radio Navigation, Sign post Navigation , Dead Reckoning Navigation Future Technology, Voice Recognition Cell Phone Dialing Advanced Driver information System, Automatic Driving Control

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.A William B. Ribbens, "Understanding Automotive Electronics",6th Edition SAMS/Elsevier publishing, 2007

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Robert Bosch Gmbh,"Automotive Electrics and Automotive Electronics-Systems and Components, Networking and Hybrid Drive", 5th Edition, Springer, Vieweg,  2007

Evaluation Pattern

As per university norm

ECOE5608 - FUNDAMENTALS OF IMAGE PROCESSING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The aim of this course is to introduce image processing fundamentals making the students to understand the different methods available to process an image and also give them an insight about the toolbox in MATLAB which can be used to do simulations in image processing. 

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student will be able to :

CO1: Understand the basic principles of image processing

CO2: Understand the tools used for image processing applications

CO3: Analyze the methods used for image preprocessing

CO4: Apply the compression techniques and analyze the results

CO5: Develop an image processing system for a given application

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
DIGITAL IMAGE FUNDAMENTALS
 

Concept of Digital Image, conversion of analog image to digital, General Applications of image processing, Fundamental Steps in Digital Image Processing. Components of an Image Processing System. Elements of Visual Perception. Light and the Electromagnetic Spectrum. Image Sensing and Acquisition. Image Sampling and Quantization

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
MATLAB USING IP TOOL BOX
 

Introduction to MATLAB, Introduction to IP Tool box, Exercises on image enhancement, image restoration, and image segmentation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
IMAGE PROCESSING TECHNIQUES PART 1
 

Image Enhancement in the Spatial Domain: Some Basic Gray Level Transformations. Histogram Processing. Enhancement Using Arithmetic/Logic Operations. Basics of Spatial Filtering. Smoothing Spatial Filters. Sharpening Spatial Filters. Importance of Image Restoration, Model of the Image Degradation/Restoration Process. Noise Models. Filters for Image Restoration: Minimum Mean Square Error (Wiener) Filtering. Constrained Least Squares Filtering. Geometric Mean Filter

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
IMAGE PROCESSING TECHNIQUES PART 2
 

Image Compression: Fundamentals. Image Compression Models. Elements of Information Theory. Error-Free Compression. Lossy Compression. Image Compression Standards. Image Segmentation: Detection of Discontinuities. Edge Linking and Boundary Detection. Thresholding. Region-Based Segmentation. Segmentation by Morphological Watersheds

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
APPLICATION OF IMAGE PROCESSING
 

Applications of image processing in the field of Biomedical, Remote sensing, Machine vision, Pattern recognition, and Microscopic Imaging

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.Gonzalez and woods, Digital Image Processing using MATLAB, PHI, 2005

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

As per university norms

ECOE5610 - EMBEDDED BOARDS FOR IOT APPLICATIONS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description