Department of ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Technology (Electrical and Electronics Engineering)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CY321 CYBER SECURITY - 2 2 50
EE332P ELECTRICAL MACHINES - I - 4 4 100
EE333P ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS - 6 4 100
EE334 ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT ANALYSIS - 4 3 100
EE335 ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS - 4 3 100
EEHO341VT ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS - 5 4 100
HS316 TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION - 2 2 50
MA333 MATHEMATICS -III - 3 3 100
MIA351 FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN - 6 04 100
MICS331P INTRODUCTION TO DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS - 5 4 100
MIMBA331 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT - 4 3 100
MIME331 SENSORS AND DATA ACQUISITION - 45 4 100
MIPSY331 UNDERSTANDING HUMAN BEHAVIOR - 4 4 100
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BS451 ENGINEERING BIOLOGY LABORATORY - 2 2 50
EE431P ELECTRICAL MACHINES-II - 6 4 100
EE432P CONTROL SYSTEMS - 6 4 100
EE433 SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS - 4 3 100
EE434 GENERATION AND TRANSMISSION - 4 3 100
EEHO441VT VEHICULAR COMMUNICATIONS - 5 4 100
EVS421 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE - 2 0 0
HS424 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS - 2 2 50
MIA451A ENVIRONMENTAL DESING AND SOCIO CULTURAL CONTEXT - 6 04 100
MIA451B DIGITAL ARCHITECTURE - 6 04 100
MIA451C COLLABORATIVE DESIGN WORKSHOP - 6 04 100
MICS432P INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING PARADIGN - 5 4 100
MIMBA431 ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR - 4 3 100
MIME432 ROBOTICS AND MACHINE VISION - 45 4 100
MIPSY432 PEOPLE THOUGHTS AND SITUATIONS - 4 4 100
5 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CEOE561E01 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT - 3 3 100
CEOE561E03 DISASTER MANAGEMENT - 4 3 100
CSOE561E04 PYTHON FOR ENGINEERS - 3 3 100
ECOE5603 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS - 3 3 100
ECOE5608 FUNDAMENTALS OF IMAGE PROCESSING - 3 3 100
ECOE5610 EMBEDDED BOARDS FOR IOT APPLICATIONS - 3 3 100
EE531P POWER ELECTRONICS - 6 4 100
EE532P EMBEDDED AND REAL TIME MICROCONTROLLERS - 6 4 100
EE533 POWER SYSTEMS - I - 6 4 100
EE534P ADVANCED COMPUTER PROGRAMMING - 5 4 100
EE545D INTERNET OF THINGS - 3 3 100
EEHO541VT VEHICULAR DYNAMICS AND CONTROL - 4 4 100
IC521 CONSTITUTION OF INDIA - 2 0 50
MICS533P BASICS OF COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND OPERATING SYSTEMS - 5 4 100
MIMBA531 ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - 4 4 100
MIPSY533 HUMAN ENGINEERING - 4 4 100
PH536OE1 NANO MATERIAL AND NANO TECHNOLOGY - 4 3 100
6 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EE631P HIGH VOLTAGE ENGINEERING AND PROTECTION - 3 4 100
EE632P POWER SYSTEMS - II - 5 4 100
EE633 DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING - 3 3 100
EE645A UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY - 3 3 100
EE645B OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING - 3 3 100
EE645C NANOMATERIALS FOR ELECTRICAL APPLICATIONS - 3 3 100
EE645D DATA SCIENCE FOR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS - 3 3 100
EEHO641VT AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES - 4 4 100
HS621 PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE - 3 3 100
MICS634P INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER NETWORKS - 5 4 100
MIMBA631 DATA ANALYSIS FOR MANAGERS - 4 4 100
MIPSY634 SCIENCE OF WELL BEING - 4 4 100
7 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BTGE 732 ACTING COURSE - 2 2 100
BTGE 734 DIGITAL WRITING - 2 2 100
BTGE 737 PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY - 4 2 100
BTGE 744 DIGITAL MARKETING - 2 2 100
BTGE 745 DATA ANALYTICS THROUGH SPSS - 2 2 100
BTGE735 DIGITAL MEDIA - 2 2 100
BTGE736 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS - 4 2 100
BTGE738 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - 2 2 100
BTGE739 CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION - 2 2 100
BTGE741 GERMAN - 2 2 100
BTGE749 PAINTING AND SKETCHING - 2 2 100
BTGE750 PHOTOGRAPHY - 2 2 100
BTGE754 FUNCTIONAL ENGLISH - 2 2 50
EE731 DESIGN OF ELECTRICAL MACHINES - 4 3 100
EE732P HIGH VOLTAGE ENGINEERING AND STANDARDS - 4 3 100
EE733 VLSI DESIGN - 4 3 100
EE737 SERVICE LEARNING - GREEN ELECTRICITY - 4 2 50
EE744E INTRODUCTION TO HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES - 4 3 100
EE745D ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION - 4 3 100
EE781 INTERNSHIP - 2 2 50
EEHO741VT AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES - 5 4 100
EEHO742VT PROJECT WORK - 4 4 100
8 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CY821 CYBER SECURITY - 2 2 50
EE831 MODERN CONTROL THEORY - 4 3 100
EE842A EXTRA HIGH VOLTAGE AC TRANSMISSION - 3 3 100
EE842B POWER APPARATUS AND INSULATION DESIGN - 3 3 100
EE842C HIGH VOLTAGE DC TRANSMISSION - 3 3 100
EE842D ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS - 3 3 100
EE842E SMART GRID - 4 3 100
EE842F POWER QUALITY - 3 3 100
EE843A MOBILE COMMUNICATION NETWORKS - 3 3 100
EE843B COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS - 3 3 100
EE843C DIGITAL COMMUNICATION - 3 3 100
EE843D OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATION - 3 3 100
EE843E WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS - 4 3 100
EE843F OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING - 3 3 100
EE881 PROJECT WORK - 12 6 200
EE882 COMPREHENSION - 2 2 50
IC821 CONSTITUTION OF INDIA - 2 0 50

CY321 - CYBER SECURITY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This mandatory course is aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the different facets of Cyber Security.  In addition, the course will detail into specifics of Cyber Security with Cyber Laws both in Global and Indian Legal environments

Learning Outcome

CO -1

Describe the basic security fundamentals and cyber laws and legalities.

L2

CO -2

Describe various cyber security vulnerabilities and threats such as virus, worms, online attacks, Dos and others.

L2

CO -3

Explain the regulations and acts to prevent cyber-attacks such as Risk assessment and security policy management.

L3

CO -4

Explain various vulnerability assessment and penetration testing tools.

L3

CO -5

Explain various protection methods to safeguard from cyber-attacks using technologies like cryptography and Intrusion prevention systems.

L3

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 1
 

Security Fundamentals-4 As Architecture Authentication Authorization Accountability, Social Media, Social Networking and Cyber Security.Cyber Laws, IT Act 2000-IT Act 2008-Laws for Cyber-Security, Comprehensive National Cyber-Security Initiative CNCI – Legalities

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 2
 

Cyber Attack and Cyber Services Computer Virus – Computer Worms – Trojan horse.Vulnerabilities -  Phishing -  Online Attacks – Pharming - Phoarging  –  Cyber Attacks  -  Cyber Threats -  Zombie- stuxnet - Denial of Service Vulnerabilities  - Server Hardening-TCP/IP attack-SYN Flood

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 3
 

Cyber Security Management Risk Management and Assessment - Risk Management Process - Threat Determination Process -Risk Assessment - Risk Management Lifecycle.Security Policy Management - Security Policies - Coverage Matrix Business Continuity Planning - DisasterTypes  -  Disaster Recovery Plan - Business Continuity Planning Process

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 4
 

Vulnerability - Assessment and Tools: Vulnerability Testing - Penetration Testing Black box- white box.Architectural Integration:  Security Zones - Devicesviz Routers, Firewalls, DMZ. Configuration Management - Certification and Accreditation for Cyber-Security.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 5
 

Authentication and Cryptography: Authentication - Cryptosystems - Certificate Services, Securing Communications:  Securing Services -  Transport  –  Wireless  -  Steganography and NTFS Data Streams. Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems:   Intrusion -  Defense in Depth  -  IDS/IPS  -IDS/IPS Weakness and Forensic AnalysisCyber Evolution: Cyber Organization – Cyber Future

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Matt Bishop, “Introduction to Computer Security”, Pearson, 6th impression, ISBN: 978-81-7758-425-7.

R2. Thomas R, Justin Peltier, John, “Information Security Fundamentals”, Auerbach Publications.

R3. AtulKahate, “Cryptography and Network Security”,  2nd Edition, Tata McGrawHill.2003

R4. Nina Godbole, SunitBelapure, “Cyber Security”, Wiley India 1st Edition 2011

R5. Jennifer L. Bayuk and Jason Healey and Paul Rohmeyer and Marcus Sachs, “Cyber Security Policy Guidebook”, Wiley; 1 edition , 2012

R6. Dan Shoemaker and Wm. Arthur Conklin, “Cyber security: The Essential Body Of Knowledge”,   Delmar Cengage Learning; 1 edition, 2011

R7. Stallings, “Cryptography & Network Security - Principles & Practice”, Prentice Hall, 6th Edition 2014

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NIL

Evaluation Pattern

Only CIA will be conducted as per the University norms. No ESE

Maximum Marks : 50

EE332P - ELECTRICAL MACHINES - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·    To summarize the concept of rotating machines and the principle of electromechanical energy conversion in single and multiple excited systems.

·    To discuss the generation of D.C. voltages by using different type of generators and study their performance.

·    To analyze the working principles of D.C. motors and their load characteristics, starting and methods of speed control.

·    To identify the constructional details of different type of transformers, working principle and their performance.

·    To estimate the various losses taking place in D.C. machines and transformers and to study the different testing method to arrive at their performance.

·    To conduct standard tests on DC machines and transformers and analyse their results

Learning Outcome

Course Outcomes

CO1. Understand the operating principles of a DC generators and analyze the characteristics of  self and separately excited DC generators

CO2. Analyze the characteristics and speed control  of different types of DC motors and determine the application possibilities of shunt , series and compound motors

CO3. Understand the operational principle of a transformer and analyze the transformer performance on  no load and  on load.

CO4. Understand the protection methods of transformers and the application of special purpose transformers

CO5. Understand testing methods employed for DC machines and transformers determine the efficiency on no load and on load.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
DC GENERATORS
 

Fundamental principles – constructional details- armature windings - single layer winding and double layer winding - lap winding and wave winding -classification

- generators, motors– emf equation of generator– Characteristics of series, shunt and compound generators – Armature reaction and commutation – Parallel operation of DC shunt and compound generators. Losses and efficiency

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
DC MOTORS
 

Principle of operation of DC motors – Back emf and torque equation – Characteristics of series, shunt and compound motors - Losses and efficiency, Starting of DC motors – Types of starters – Speed control of DC series and shunt motors

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
TRANSFORMERS- I
 

Constructional details of core and shell type transformers – Types of windings – Principle of operation – emf equation – Transformation ratio – Transformer on no-load – Parameters referred to HV / LV windings – Equivalent circuit – Transformer on load – Regulation – Parallel operation of single phase transformers, 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
TRANSFORMERS- II
 

Three phase transformers – construction and types of connections, phase conversions, cooling methodology of transformers- conservators, breathers, Protection of transformers- Bucholz relay, Auto transformers and tap changing transformers Pulse transformer , isolation transformer ,welding transformer , potential transformer, current transformer.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
TESTING OF DC MACHINES AND TRANSFORMERS
 

Testing of DC machines – Losses and efficiency in DC machines ,condition for maximum efficiency , Brake test, Swinburne’s test, Retardation test and Hopkinson’s test

Testing of transformers –Losses and efficiency in transformers, condition for maximum efficiency,  All day efficiency, Polarity test, load test, open circuit and short circuit tests , Sumpner’s test 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:30
Laboratory Experiments
 
  1. Open circuit and load characteristics of D.C separately and self -excited shunt generator
  2. Load characteristics of D.C. compound generator with cumulative connection
  3. Load characteristics of D.C. shunt motor
  4. Load characteristics of  DC compound motor
  5. Load characteristics of D.C series motor
  6. Swinburne’s test  on D.C shunt motor
  7. Hopkinson’s test on D.C motor – generator set
  8. Load test on single-phase transformer and three phase transformer connections
  9. Open circuit and short circuit tests on single phase transformer
  10. Sumpner’s test on transformers
Text Books And Reference Books:

TEXT BOOKS:                       

1.     D.P. Kothari and I.J. Nagrath, ‘Electric Machines’, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company Ltd, 2002 Reprint 2010

2.     P.S. Bimbhra, ‘Electrical Machinery’, Khanna Publishers, 2011.

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1.     A.E. Fitzgerald, Charles Kingsley, Stephen. D. Umans, ‘Electric Machinery’, Tata McGraw Hill publishing Company Ltd, 2013.

2.     J.B. Gupta, ‘Theory and Performance of Electrical Machines’, S.K.Kataria and Sons, 2013.

          3.      K. Murugesh Kumar, ‘Electric Machines’, Vikas publishing house Pvt Ltd, 2010.    

Evaluation Pattern

ASSESSMENT OF THEORY COURSE WITH PRACTICAL COMPONENT

 

·       CIA                      : 70 marks

·       End sem exam   : 30 marks

           TOTAL                  : 100 marks

 

CIA Evaluation:

CIA 1 (theory): 10 marks

CIA 2(theory): 10 marks

CIA 3(theory): 10 marks

Attendance: 05 marks

Lab CIA : 35 marks

    

 Components of lab CIA

  End sem exam       : 20 marks

·       Observations/Lab Record    : 15 marks

                TOTAL                       : 35 marks

 

End Semester Exam for lab

The ESE is conducted for 3 hours duration.

·       Write up & Viva – voce : 10 marks

·       Execution                        : 10 marks

                        TOTAL                                  : 20 marks

 

THEORY END SEM EXAMINATION

 Eligibility:Student has to score minimum of 40 % marks in Lab CIA

                    The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration, scaled to 30 %

Components of theory CIA

CIA I    :   Assignments/tests/quiz                            : 10marks               

CIA II:  Mid Semester Examination (Theory)            :10 marks

CIA III: Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project Work/

 Online Course (optional) /projects/publications/innovativeness           : 10 marks

Attendance    :05 marks

Total    : 35 marks

 

EE333P - ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description 

This course describes the applications of the Electronic devices in the analog and digital areas.

Course Objectives

This course deals electronic devices and their application as switches, amplifiers and their applications. This course also deals with digital logic systems, combinational and sequential circuits and programmable devices

Learning Outcome

Course Outcomes

At the end of this course, students will demonstrate the ability to

CO1. Understand the characteristics of transistors.

CO2. Design and analyse various operational amplifier circuits.

CO3. Design and implement Combinational and Sequential logic circuits.

CO4. Understand the process of Analog to Digital conversion and Digital to Analog conversion.

CO5. Be able to use PLDs to implement the given logical problem.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Electronic Switches
 

P-N junction diode, I-V characteristics of a diode, clamping and clipping circuits. BJT Structure, I-V characteristics of BJT, BJT as a switch, MOSFET: Structure and I-V characteristics. MOSFET as a switch. MOSFET as an amplifier: small-signal model and biasing circuits, common-source, common-gate and common-drain amplifiers; small signal equivalent circuits - gain, input and output impedances, transconductance, high frequency equivalent circuit.  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Differential, multi-stage and operational amplifiers
 

Differential amplifier; power amplifier; direct coupled multi-stage amplifier; internal Structure of an operational amplifier, ideal op-amp, non-idealities in an op-amp (Output offset voltage, input bias current, input offset current, slew rate, gain bandwidth product). Applications of op-amp: PID controllers, Zero Crossing Detector, Square-wave and triangular-wave generators. Peak detector and monoshot.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Digital systems and logic families
 

Number systems, one’s and two’s complements arithmetic, codes, error detecting and correcting codes, characteristics of digital lCs, digital logic families, TTL, Schottky TTL and CMOS logic, interfacing CMOS and TTL

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Combinational and sequential circuits
 

Combinational Circuits:

Multiplexer, De-Multiplexer/Decoders, Adders, Subtractors, BCD arithmetic, carry look ahead adder, serial adder, digital comparator, parity checker/generator, code converters, priority encoders, decoders/drivers for display devices, Q-M method of function realization. 

Sequential Circuits:

SR flip flop, J- K-T and D-types flip flops, shift registers, serial to parallel converter, parallel to serial converter, ring counter, sequence generator, ripple(Asynchronous) counters, synchronous counters, special counter IC’s,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Converters, memories and Programmable logic devices
 

Digital to analog converters: weighted resistor/converter, R-2R Ladder D/A converter, specifications for D/A converters, examples of D/A converter lCs, sample and hold circuit, analog to digital converters: quantization and encoding, parallel comparator A/D converter, successive approximation A/D converter, dual slope A/D converter.

Memory organization and operation, expanding memory size, classification And characteristics of  memories, sequential  memory,  read only  memory (ROM),  read and write  memory(RAM), content addressable memory (CAM), charge de coupled device memory (CCD), commonly used memory chips, ROM as a PLD, Programmable logic array, Programmable array logic, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:30
Lab Experiments
 

List of experiments

  1. Symbols, identification and checking of electronic components.
  2. PN Diode Characteristics, HW and FW rectifiers.
  3. Zener Diode characteristics & Regulators.
  4. Transistors Characteristics CB, CE and CC configurations.
  5. Frequency response of CB, CE and CC amplifier in self bias and fixed bias.

6.     Op-Amp Applications.

7.     RC & LC Oscillators.

8.     Applications of 555 timers.

9.     Design & implementation of binary adder/subtract or using basic gates.

10.  Design & implementation of application using multiplexers.

11.  Design & implementation of synchronous and asynchronous counters.

12.  Design & implementation of shift registers.

Coding combinational circuits using HDL

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Text Books

 

1.    

1..........1..  “Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory”, Robert L. Boylestad and Louis Nashelsky, PHI/Pearson Eduication. 2012.

       2.Jacob Millman & Christos C.Halkias, Electronic Devices and Circuits, Tata  McGraw–Hill,   2010 .

3.       3. Millman J. and Halkias .C. “Integrated Electronics ", Tata McGraw-Hill. Reprint 2010

4.      4.  M. Morris Mano, Digital Design, 3.ed., Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 2013/Pearson Education (Singapore) Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 2013 – (Unit I, II, V)

5.      5.  John .M Yarbrough, Digital Logic Applications and Design, Thomson- Vikas publishing house, New Delhi, 2002. (Unit III, IV)

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

  1. Donald A. Neaman, Semiconductor Physics and Devices 3rd Ed., Tata McGraw-Hill 2011.
  2. Ben G. Streetman and Sanjay Banerjee, Solid State Electronic Devices, Pearson Education 2015.
  3. David A. Bell, Electronic Devices and Circuits, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall of India, 2008.

4.      Charles H.Roth. “Fundamentals of Logic Design”, Thomson Publication Company, 2013.

5.      Donald P.Leach and Albert Paul Malvino, Digital Principles and Applications, 5 ed., Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi, 2013.

6.      R.P.Jain, Modern Digital Electronics, 3 ed., Tata McGraw–Hill publishing company limited, New Delhi, 2013.

7.      Thomas L. Floyd, Digital Fundamentals, Pearson Education, Inc, New Delhi, 2013

 Online Resources: https://nptel.ac.in/courses/analog circuits/digital electronics

Evaluation Pattern

CIA: 50 Marks(Average of 3 components...CIA-1, CIA-2 & CIA-3)

ESE: 50 Marks

EE334 - ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT ANALYSIS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To discuss the concept of circuit elements lumped circuits, waveforms, circuit laws

and network reduction and various theorems to perform the same.

o To analyze the transient response of series and parallel A.C. circuits and to solve

problems in time domain using Laplace Transform.

o To discuss the concept of active, reactive and apparent powers, power factor and

resonance in series and parallel circuits.

o To perform three phase circuit analysis.

o To discuss the basic concepts of network topology and two port network parameters.

o To Examine Electronic Design Automation and Printed Circuit Board.

Learning Outcome

CO1  To analyze DC and AC circuits using circuit theorems. L3

CO2 To solve Three phase AC circuits using complex quantities L2

CO3 To solve networks using graph theory and to solve two port networks L3

CO4 To analyse response of series networks to standard input signals L3

CO5 To explain EDA process and PCB technologies L2

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
DC and AC Circuit Analysis
 

DC Circuit analysis (With dependent and independent sources), Reciprocity, Substitution, Norton’s, Tellegen’s and maximum power transfer theorems. Review of ac circuit analysis, Network theorems in ac circuits- Thevenins, Norton, Maximum Power Transfer theorem,Resonance in series and parallel circuits: Q factor, half-power frequencies and bandwidth of resonant circuits.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Three Phase Circuits
 

Three phase balanced sinusoidal wave forms, line voltage and phase voltage, line current and phase current, analysis of 3-phase circuit with balanced supply voltage and with star/delta connected balanced loads. Measurement of 3-phase power. Unbalances- effects, Digital Energy meters.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
NETWORK TOPOLOGY & TWO PORT NETWORK PARAMETERS
 

Graph of a network, Concept of tree and co-tree, incidence matrix, tie-set and cut- set schedules Formulation of equilibrium equations in matrix form, solution of resistive networks, principle of duality. Definition of z, y, h and transmission parameters, modelling with these parameters, elationship between parameters sets, multiport networks

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
RESPONSE OF ELECTRIC CIRCUITS
 

Time response of RL, RC and RLC circuits for step and sinusoidal inputs, Concept of complex frequency – pole – Zero plots – frequency Response.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
ELECTRICAL DESIGN AUTOM ATION AND PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD
 

Electronic Design Automation - Analog Circuit Simulation - Types of SPICE Analysis – SPICE component model - Types of PCBs - PCB Technologies – PCB Design Flow – PCB Layout –PCB Manufacturing and Assembly Techniques - Comparison of EDA Tools – Comparison of PCB Design Tools – DC Power supply/Rectifier circuit simulation and PCB Design.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.    De-carlo and Lin, Linear Circuit Analysis 2 ed., Oxford University Press, 2009

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     R.C. Dorf, “Introduction to Electric Circuits, John Wiley & Sons Inc, New York, Second Edition, 2013.

2.     Charles K. Alexander, Mathew N.O. Sadiku, Fundamentals of Electric Circuits, McGraw Hill, N.Y, 2006.

Evaluation Pattern

ASSESSMENT - ONLY FOR THEORY COURSE (without practical component)

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

End Semester Examination(ESE)          : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

Components of the CIA

CIA I   :  Subject Assignments / Online Tests                        : 10 marks

CIA II  :   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                     : 25 marks                       

CIAIII: Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/

Innovative assignments/ presentations/ publications             : 10 marks

Attendance                                                                              : 05 marks

            Total                                                                           : 50 marks

Mid Semester Examination (MSE): Theory Papers:

The MSE is conducted for 50 marks of 2 hours duration.

Question paper pattern; Five out of Six questions have to be answered. Each question carries 10 marks

End Semester Examination (ESE):

The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration.

The syllabus for the theory papers are divided into FIVE units and each unit carries equal Weightage in terms of marks distribution.

Question paper pattern is as follows.

Two full questions with either or choice will be drawn from each unit. Each question carries 20 marks. There could be a maximum of three sub divisions in a question. The emphasis on the questions is to test the objectiveness, analytical skill and application skill of the concept, from a question bank which reviewed and updated every year

The criteria for drawing the questions from the Question Bank are as follows

50 % - Medium Level questions

25 % - Simple level questions

25 % - Complex level questions

EE335 - ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·         To analyze fields a potentials due to static changes

·         To evaluate static magnetic fields

·         To understand how materials affect electric and magnetic fields

·         To understand the relation between the fields under time varying situations

To understand principles of propagation of uniform plane waves.

Learning Outcome

After the successful completion of the course student should be able to:

·         Apply vector calculus to static electric-magnetic fields in different engineering situations.

·         Analyze Maxwell’s equation in different forms (differential and integral) and apply them to diverse engineering problems.

·         Examine the phenomena of wave propagation in different media and its interfaces and in applications of microwave engineering.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
STATIC ELECTRIC FIELDS
 

Introduction to Co-ordinate System – Rectangular – Cylindrical and Spherical Co-ordinate System – Introduction to line, Surface and Volume Integrals – Definition of Curl, Divergence and Gradient – Meaning of Strokes theorem and Divergence theorem Coulomb’s Law in Vector Form – Definition of Electric Field Intensity – Principle of Superposition – Electric Field due to discrete charges – Electric field due to continuous charge distribution – Electric Field due to charges distributed uniformly on an infinite and finite line – Electric Field on the axis of a uniformly charged circular disc – Electric Field due to an infinite uniformly charged sheet.Electric Scalar Potential – Relationship between potential and electric field - Potential due to infinite uniformly charged line – Potential due to electrical dipole - Electric Flux Density – Gauss Law – Proof of Gauss Law – Applications.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
STATIC MAGNETIC FIELD
 

The Biot-Savart Law in vector form – Magnetic Field intensity due to a finite and infinite wire carrying a current I – Magnetic field intensity on the axis of a circular and rectangular loop carrying a current I – Ampere’s circuital law and simple applications. Magnetic flux density – The Lorentz force equation for a moving charge and applications – Force on a wire carrying a current I placed in a magnetic field – Torque on a loop carrying a current I – Magnetic moment – Magnetic Vector Potential.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC FIELDS IN MATERIALS
 

Poisson’s and Laplace’s equation – Electric Polarization-Nature of dielectric materials- Definition of

Capacitance – Capacitance of various geometries using Laplace’s equation – Electrostatic energy and

energy density – Boundary conditions for electric fields – Electric current – Current density – point

form of ohm’s law – continuity equation for current. Definition of Inductance – Inductance of loops

and solenoids – Definition of mutual inductance – simple examples. Energy density in magnetic fields

– Nature of magnetic materials – magnetization and permeability - magnetic boundary conditions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
TIME VARYING ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC FIELDS
 

Faraday’s law – Maxwell’s Second Equation in integral form from Faraday’s Law – Equation

expressed in point form. Displacement current – Ampere’s circuital law in integral form – Modified

form of Ampere’s circuital law as Maxwell’s first equation in integral form. Pointing Vector and the

flow of power –Instantaneous Average and Complex Pointing Vector.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES
 

Electromagnetic waves and its properties, Reflection and Refraction, Propagation of EM waves, Wave

Equation – Uniform Plane Waves – Maxwell’s equation in Phasor form. Wave equation for a

conducting medium– Propagation in good conductors – Skin effect.

Antennas – Conventional antennas and Microstrip antennas, characteristics and applications.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.    William H.Hayt : “Engineering Electromagnetics” TATA 2013 (Unit I,II,III ).

2.      2. E.C. Jordan & K.G. Balmain “Electromagnetic Waves and Radiating Systems.” Prentice Hall of India 2nd edition 2013. (Unit IV, V). McGraw-Hill, 9th reprint

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Ramo, Whinnery and Van Duzer: “Fields and Waves in Communications Electronics” John Wiley & Sons (3rd edition 2013)

2.      Narayana Rao, N : “Elements of Engineering Electromagnetics” 4th edition, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 2012.

3.      M.N.O.Sadiku: “Elements of Engineering Electromagnetics” Oxford University Press, Third edition.2014

Evaluation Pattern

II. ASSESSMENT - ONLY FOR THEORY COURSE (without practical component)

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

End Semester Examination(ESE)          : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

Components of the CIA

CIA I  :  Subject Assignments / Online Tests             : 10 marks

CIA II:   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                      : 25 marks                   

CIAIII: Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/

Innovative assignments/ presentations/ publications              : 10 marks

Attendance                                                                             : 05 marks

            Total                                                                            : 50 marks

Mid Semester Examination (MSE): Theory Papers:

The MSE is conducted for 50 marks of 2 hours duration.

Question paper pattern; Five out of Six questions have to be answered. Each question carries 10 marks

End Semester Examination (ESE):

The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration.

The syllabus for the theory papers are divided into FIVE units and each unit carries equal Weightage in terms of marks distribution.

Question paper pattern is as follows.

Two full questions with either or choice will be drawn from each unit. Each question carries 20 marks. There could be a maximum of three sub divisions in a question. The emphasis on the questions is to test the objectiveness, analytical skill and application skill of the concept, from a question bank which reviewed and updated every year

The criteria for drawing the questions from the Question Bank are as follows

50 % - Medium Level questions

25 % - Simple level questions

25 % - Complex level questions

EEHO341VT - ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Objectives

·       To understand the chemistry of traction batteries.

·       To understand the characteristics of Li ion cells.

·       To model algorithms for Battery & Energy Management Systems.

·       To integrate Battery Management Systems with other EV/PHEV subsystems.

·       To understand energy conservation and grid integration process of EV/PHEVs.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes

1.     To understand concepts behind Traction battery cell chemistries and the battery packaging.

2.     To recognize the requirement of Battery Management Systems in Li ion battery packs in terms of protection, regulation, monitoring and life span.

3.     To understand the SoC, SoH and traction battery life determination and impact of various Battery management system algorithms on accurate determination.

4.     To understand the Energy flow regulation in EV/PHEVs and the role of Energy Management systems.

5.     To analyse the requirements in integration of an EV/PHEV with the grid for bi directional power flow regulation and its impact on traction batteries.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Battery fundamentals
 

Lead Acid Battery – Construction- Working – Characteristics – Li ion Battery - Construction- Working – Characteristics- LiFePo Battery-  NiMH - Construction- Working – Characteristics – Fuel Cells- Construction- Working – Characteristics- Introduction to latest batteries- Zinc Air- Aluminium Battery. Li-ion cell- equivalent-circuit model- static model- dynamic model - constant-voltage control- constant-power control-EV battery pack sizing.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Battery Management Systems
 

Voltage sensing - High-voltage control- Battery pack protection- interface- performance management- diagnostics- Cell Aging- Cell failure-BMS topologies

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Cell Parameter Estimation
 

SoC measurement – Need for SoC- terminal voltage method- Coulumb counting method- Joule counting method- SoC state estimation – Kalman filter method. SoH measurement- Cell Degradation – cell capacity estimation- Total capacity estimation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Energy Management Systems
 

Max. SOC-of-PPS Control- Engine On-Off/ Thermostat Control- Fuzzy Logic Control- Constrained Engine On-Off Control- Dynamic Programming Control- Regenerative Braking Control methods.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Vehicle Grid Power Management
 

V2G – G2V- Charging Station – Grid

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:30
List of Experiments
 

Experiments on MATLAB on

Battery characteristics

Performance under loads

Battery Management Systems

Energy Management systems

Development of battery packs

Development of battery management systems

Development of energy management systems

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Battery Technology for Electric Vehicle, Albert N. Link, Alan C. O'Connor, Troy J. Scott · 2015

2. Battery Management Systems for Large Lithium-ion Battery Packs, By Davide Andrea · 2010

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Battery Management Systems Design by Modelling, By H.J. Bergveld, W.S. Kruijt, P.H.L Notten · 2013

Evaluation Pattern

DETAIL OF MARK FOR COURSES WITH THOERY AND PRACTICAL

THEORY

PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Min. marks to pass

Max. marks

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Min. marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

CIA-1

20

10

-

10

Overall CIA

50

35

14

35

2

CIA-2

50

10

-

10

3

CIA-3

20

10

-

10

4

Attendance

05

05

-

05

Attendance

NA

NA

-

-

5

ESE

100

30

12

30

ESE

NA

NA

-

-

TOTAL

65

-

65

TOTAL

 

35

14

35

HS316 - TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The goal of this course is to prepare engineering students with individual and collaborative technical writing and presentation skills that are necessary to be effective technical communicators in academic and professional environments.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the basics of technical communication and the use of formal elements of specific genres of documentation. {L1}{PO 10}

CO2: Demonstrate the nuances of technical writing, with reference to english grammar and vocabulary. {L2}{PO5, PO10}

CO3: Recognize the importance of soft skills and personality development for effective     communication. {L2}{PO6,PO9}

 CO4:   Understand the various techniques involved in oral communication and its application. {L3}{PO9,PO10,PO12}

 CO5:   Realize the importance of having ethical work habits and professional etiquettes. {L2}{PO6,PO8,PO12}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Technical Communication
 

Communication – Process, Flow , Barriers. Analysing  different kinds of technical documents, Reports – types, Engineering reports – Types, Importance, Structure of formal reports, Factors information and document design. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Grammar and Editing
 

Vocabulary for professional writing. Idioms and collocations, Writing drafts and revising,   writing style and language. ,advanced  grammar, Writing Emails, resumes, Video resume, Interviews , types of interviews.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Soft Skills and Self Development
 

Self development process, Personality development, Types of personality, Perception and attitudes, Emotional intelligence, Time Management, Values and belief, Personal goal setting, Creativity, Conflict management, Career planning.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Oral Communication
 

Public speaking, Writing a speech, Formal presentations, Presentation aids, Group communication, Discussions, Organizational GD, Meetings & Conferences. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Business Etiquettes
 

Email etiquettes, Telephone Etiquettes, Engineering ethics, Time Management, Role and responsibility of engineer, Work culture in jobs

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1 : David F. Beer and David McMurrey, Guide to writing as an Engineer, John Willey. New    York, 2004 

T2: T2: Diane Hacker, Pocket Style Manual, Bedford Publication, New York, 2003. (ISBN 0312406843)

T3: Raman Sharma, Technical Communications, Oxford Publication, London, 2004

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.Dale Jungk, Applied Writing for Technicians, McGraw Hill, New York, 2004. (ISBN: 07828357-4)

R2. Sharma, R. and Mohan, K. Business Correspondence and Report Writing, TMH New Delhi 2002.

R3. Xebec, Presentation Book, TMH New Delhi, 2000. (ISBN 0402213)

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 10 MARKS

Mid Semester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA 2 -10 Marks

End Semester Examination - 50 Marks

Attendance - 5 marks

MA333 - MATHEMATICS -III (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To enable the students to transform the coordinate system, solve the boundary value problems using Fourier series and Fourier transforms, solve higher order partial differential equations, solve algebraic and transcendental equations, interpolate and extrapolate the given data and solve difference equations using Z – transform

Learning Outcome

CO1: Apply vector operators to transform the cartesian coordinate system into spherical and cylindrical forms {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO2: Predict the nature of partial differential equation, and solve it by the method of variable separable {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4}

CO3: Deduce the periodic functions as Fourier series expansion. {L4} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO4. Evaluate non periodic functions by using the Fourier transformation. {L4} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO5: Solve difference equations using Z – transform {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

      

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
COORDINATE SYSTEMS
 

Curvilinear Coordinate System, Gradient, divergent, curl and Laplacian in cylindrical and Spherical Coordinate system, Cylindrical Coordinates, Spherical Coordinates, Transformation between systems.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
 

Formation of partial differential equations by elimination of arbitrary constants and arbitrary functions – Solution of standard types of first order partial differential equations – Lagrange’s linear equation – Linear partial differential equations of second and higher order with constant coefficients.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
FOURIER SERIES
 

Fourier series – Odd and even functions – Half range Fourier sine and cosine series – Complex form of Fourier series – Harmonic Analysis.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
FOURIER TRANSFORM
 

Complex Fourier transform – Sine and Cosine transforms – Properties – Transforms of simple functions – Convolution theorem – Parseval’s identity. Solution of equations using Fourier transform.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Z - TRANSFORM AND DIFFERENCE EQUATIONS
 

Z-transform - Elementary properties – Inverse Z – transform – Convolution theorem -Formation of difference equations – Solution of difference equations using Z - transform.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.  Dr. B. Grewal, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, 43rd Edition, Khanna Publishers, July 2014.

T2.  H. K. Das & Rajnish Verma, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, 20th Edition, S. Chand & Company Ltd.,  2014.

T3. Kandasamy, P., Thilagavathy, K., and Gunavathy, K., “Engineering Mathematics Volume III”, S. Chand & Company ltd., New Delhi, 2003.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. B.V. Ramana, 6th Reprint, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, Tata-Macgraw Hill, 2008

R2. Churchill, R.V. and Brown, J.W., “Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems”, Fourth Edition, McGraw-Hill Book Co., Singapore, 1987.

R3. T. Veera Rajan, “Engineering Mathematics [For Semester III]. Third Edition. Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company. New Delhi, 2007.

R4. S. L. Loney, “Plane Trigonometry”, Cambridge: University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

End Semester Examination(ESE): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

 

Components of the CIA

CIA I  :  Subject Assignments / Online Tests                  : 10 marks

CIA II :   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                : 25 marks                   

CIAIII:Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications: 10 marks

Attendance                                                                           : 05 marks

            Total                                                                              : 50 marks

 

Mid Semester Examination (MSE) : 

The MSE is conducted for 50 marks of 2 hours duration.

Question paper pattern; Five out of Six questions have to be answered. Each  question carries 10 marks

 

End Semester Examination (ESE):

The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration.

The syllabus for the theory papers are divided into FIVE units and each unit carries equal Weightage in terms of marks distribution.

Question paper pattern is as follows:

Two full questions with either or choice will be drawn from each unit. Each question carries 20 marks. There could be a maximum of

three sub divisions in a question. The emphasis on the questions is to test the objectiveness, analytical skill and application skill of the

concept, from a question bank which reviewed and updated every year

The criteria for drawing the questions from the Question Bank are as follows

50 % - Medium Level questions

25 % - Simple level questions

25 % - Complex level questions

MIA351 - FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:04

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The studio intends to contextualize the student towards aesthetical approach and sensitize them towards local and heterogeneous culture of ours. Today, the biggest challenge is lying in the areas of aesthetical thinking and process-based techniques, where we try to enhance aesthetic sense, creativity, responsive and reflective ecology in which they live and connect. They connect their creativity and aesthetical sensibility to local knowledge and culture of their own environment. Also, there are things to learn and adapt from the diversity of craftsmanship and knowledge system. 

  1. Introduction to different media and rendering techniques.
  2. Introduction to principles of composition, developing keen sensitivity to space, scale, proportion, light, wind, sound, texture.
  3. To understand basic principles of freehand drawing and color.
  4. Introduction to the representation of the human body and anthropometrics /ergonomics.
  5. To translate abstract principles of design into architectural processes, forms, and solutions.
  6. To introduce the Architectural Design Language – technical drafting and presentation and to impart the appropriate manual skills for visualization and technical representation.

Learning Outcome

CO1:  To have a comprehensive understanding of architectural drawing techniques and pictorial presentation.

Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to sensitively observe and record various aspects of the immediate environment including human relationships, visual language, aesthetic characteristics and space, elements of nature, etc. 

Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to achieve skills of visualization and communication, through different mediums and processes.

Level: Basic 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Familiarizing surrounding
 

Observing, experiencing, analyzing the manmade environment and organic environment.

To create awareness of human abilities like perception, intuition, Identification, and observation, enjoying our senses through a nature walk, (by seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, and tasting)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Principles of art & drawing
 

To understand basic principles of art and drawing as an extension of seeing and a tool to create awareness of different visualization techniques.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Elements of Design & theory of visual perception
 
  1. Elements of design, Developing skills of analysis, synthesis, interpretation, and communication through elements and composition.
  2. Introduction to the theory of visual perception through color, form, space, light and shadow, texture, and tones.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:30
Pictorial Projections, Sciography & Rendering
 
  1. Developing pictorial representations -Isometric Projection, Axonometric projection, and Perspective projections 
  2. Introduction to Sciography and principles of shades and shadows.
  3. Rendering the pictorial projections.
Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.  Cari LaraSvensan and William Ezara Street, Engineering Graphics.

T2. Bhatt, N. D., Engineering Drawing, Charotar Publishing House Pvt. Ltd

T3. Venugopal, K., Engineering Drawing and Graphics, New Age International Publishers. 

T4. S. Rajaraman, Practical Solid Geometry.

 
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Francis D. K. Ching, ‘Drawing, Space, Form, Expression’.

R2. Alexander W. White, ‘The Elements of Graphic Design, Allworth Press

R3. Alexander W. White, ‘The Elements of Graphic Design, Allworth Press; 1 edition (Nov 1, 2002)

Evaluation Pattern

 The Evaluation pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE).

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE, VIVA-VOCE): 50 Marks

TOTAL:100 Marks

Note: For this course, a minimum of 50% marks in CIA is required to be eligible for VIVA-VOCE which is conducted as ESE.

MICS331P - INTRODUCTION TO DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To learn the systematic way of solving problems.
  • To understand the different methods of organizing large amounts of data.
  • To efficiently implement the different data structures.
  • To efficiently implement solutions for specific problems.

Learning Outcome

Sl NO

DESCRIPTION

REVISED BLOOM’S TAXONOMY (RBT)LEVEL

1.

Explain the basic concepts of data structures and solve the time complexity of the algorithm

L3

2.

Experiment with various operations on Linear Data structures

L3

3.

Examine the Structures and Operations of Trees and Heaps Data Structures

L4

4

Compare various given sorting techniques with respect to time complexity

L4

5

 Choose various shortest path algorithms to determine the minimum spanning path for the given graphs

L5

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
INTRODUCTION
 

Definition- Classification of data structures: primitive and non-primitive- Operations on data structures- Algorithm Analysis.

LAB Programs:

1a. Sample C Programs 1b. To determine the time complexity of a given logic. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:17
LISTS, STACKS AND QUEUES
 

Abstract Data Type (ADT) – The List ADT – The Stack ADT: Definition,Array representation of stack, Operations on stack: Infix, prefix and postfix notations Conversion of an arithmetic Expression from Infix to postfix. Applications of stacks. 

The Queue ADT: Definition, Array representation of queue, Types of queue: Simple queue, circular queue, double ended queue (de-queue) priority queue, operations on all types of Queues 

LAB Programs:

2. Implement the applications Stack ADT.

3. Implement the applications for Queue ADT.

4.Operations on stack[e.g.: infix to postfix, evaluation of postfix]

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
TREES
 

Preliminaries – Binary Trees – The Search Tree ADT – Binary Search Trees – AVL Trees – Tree Traversals – Hashing – General Idea – Hash Function – Separate Chaining – Open Addressing –Linear Probing – Priority Queues (Heaps) – Model – Simple implementations – Binary Heap.

LAB PROGRAMS:

5. Search Tree ADT - Binary Search Tree

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
SORTING
 

Preliminaries – Insertion Sort – Shell sort – Heap sort – Merge sort – Quicksort – External Sorting.

LAB PROGRAMS

6. Heap Sort.

7. Quick Sort.

8.Applications of Probability and Queuing Theory Problems to be implemented using data structures. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
GRAPHS
 

Definitions – Topological Sort – Shortest-Path Algorithms – Unweighted Shortest Paths – Dijkstra‘s Algorithm – Minimum Spanning Tree – Prim‘s Algorithm – Applications of Depth- First Search – Undirected Graphs – Bi-connectivity – Introduction to NP-Completeness-case study

LAB PROGRAMS

9. Implementing a Hash function/Hashing Mechanism.

10. Implementing any of the shortest path algorithms. 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

TEXT BOOK

1.Mark Allen Weiss , “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C”, 2nd  Edition, Addison-Wesley, 1997

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Michael T. Goodrich, Roberto Tamassia and Michael H. Goldwasser , ―Data Structures and Algorithms in Python  ‖, First  Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2013.ISBN1118476735, 9781118476734

Evaluation Pattern

Components of the CIA

CIA I : Assignment/MCQ  and Continuous Assessment : 10 marks

CIA II : Mid Semester Examination (Theory) : 10 marks

CIA III : Closed Book Test/Mini Project and Continuous Assessment: 10 marks

Lab marks :35 marks

Attendance : 05 marks

End Semester Examination(ESE) : 30% (30 marks out of 100 marks)

Total: 100 marks

MIMBA331 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This is offered as a core course in first trimester. This course will provide a general introduction to management principles and theories, and a brief outline on history and development of management thought.

Course Objectives: This course describes the steps necessary to understand an organisation that are aligned with business objectives and provides an insight to address a range of challenges that every manager encounters. It aims to prepare students for an exciting challenging and rewarding managerial career through case studies on ‘Global Perspective’.

Learning Outcome

 Course Learning Outcomes: On having completed this course students should be able to:

 CLO1   Understand different management approaches

 CLO2   Demonstrate planning techniques

 CLO3   Able to work in dynamic teams within organizations

CLO4   Analyze different processes in staffing and controlling

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Nature, Purpose and Evolution of Management Thought
 

Meaning; Scope; Managerial levels and skills; Managerial Roles; Management: Science, Art or Profession; Universality of Management.

Ancient roots of management theory; Classical schools of management thought; Behavioral School, Quantitative School; Systems Approach, Contingency Approach; Contemporary Management thinkers & their contribution. Ancient Indian Management systems & practices. Comparative study of global management systems & practices. Social responsibility of managers, Managerial Ethics.

Evolution of Management: Teaching management through Indian Mythology (Videos of Devdutt Pattanaik, Self-learning mode)

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Planning
 

Types of Plans; Steps in Planning Process; Strategies, level of Strategies, Policies and Planning; Decision making, Process of Decision Making, Techniques in Decision Making, Forecasting & Management by Objectives (MBO).

Planning: Emerald Case and Projects of Events

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Organizing
 

Organizational structure and design; types of organizational structures; Span of control, authority, delegation, decentralization and reengineering. Social responsibility of managers, Managerial Ethics.

Organizing: Holacracy form of organization structure

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Staffing
 

Human resource planning, Recruitment, selection, training & development, performance appraisal, managing change, compensation and employee welfare.

Motivation: Concept, Forms of employee motivation, Need for motivation, Theories of motivation, Stress Management

Staffing: Stress Management & Career path, Emerald Case

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Leading and Controlling
 

Leadership concept, leadership Styles, leadership theories, leadership communication.

Nature of organizational control; control process; Methods and techniques of control; Designing control systems, Quality Management

Leading: Article on Styles of leadership by Daniel Goleman

Controlling: Projects of Events

           

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Koontz, H. & Heinz, W. (2013). Management (13th Edition). Tata McGraw Hill Publications.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Reading

1.     Daft, R. L. (2013). The new era of management (10th Edition). Cengage Publications.

2.     Prasad, L.M., Principles and practices of management. New Delhi: Sultan Chand & Sons.     

3.     Stoner, J.F., Freeman, E. R., & Gilbert, D.R. (2013). Management (6th Edition). Pearson Publications.

4.      Joseph L Massie, Essentials of Management. Prentice-Hall India, New York.

Evaluation Pattern

Test & Exam

 Exam conducted for

Marks conversion

Weightage

Total

CIA-I

20

10

20%

10

CIA-II

50

25

25%

25

CIA-III

20

10

10%

10

Attendance

 

5

5%

5

CIA – I, II, and III

50

50%

50

End-term

100

50

50%

50

Total

100

MIME331 - SENSORS AND DATA ACQUISITION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:45
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:  

  • To know about the types of transducers available.
  • To understand the function of signal generators and analyzers.
  • To gain information about data acquisition, data logging, and application of sensors incondition-based monitoring.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes:

CO1. Summarize the working and construction of sensors measuring various physical
parameters.

CO2. Design suitable signal conditioning and filter circuits for sensors.

CO3. Outline operations of various data acquisition and transmission systems.

CO4. Distinguish smart sensors from normal sensors by their operation and construction.

C05. Classify various sensing methods used in condition monitoring

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
SENSORS AND TRANSDUCERS
 

Sensors and classifications – Characteristics environmental parameters – Selectionand specification of sensors – Introduction to Acoustics and acoustic sensors- Ultrasonicsensor- Types and working of Microphones and Hydrophones – Sound level meter, Humidity
sensor, and Nuclear radiation sensor – Stress- Strain measurements Strain gauges (resistiveand Optical) types Uniaxial and Multiaxial strain gauges with signal conditioning circuits(half, quarter, and full bridges)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
SMART SENSORS
 

Introduction - primary sensors, characteristic, Information coding / processing, Datacommunication - Recent trends in sensors and Technology - Film sensor, MEMS and NanoSensors.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
SIGNAL CONDITIONING
 

Amplification, Filtering – Level conversion – Linearization - Buffering – Sample andHold circuit – Quantization – Multiplexer / Demultiplexer – Analog to Digital converter –Digital to Analog converter- I/P and P/I converter - Instrumentation Amplifier-V/F and F/V converter.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
DATA ACQUISITION
 

Data Acquisition conversion-General configuration-single channel and multichanneldata acquisition – Digital filtering – Data Logging – Data conversion – Introduction to DigitalTransmission system.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
SENSORS FOR CONDITION MONITORING
 

Introduction to condition monitoring - Non destructive testing (vs) condition
monitoring- Intelligent fault detection- Accelerometers- Acoustic Emission sensors- Thermalimaging cameras- Vibration Signature based monitoring techniques - Acoustic emissionholography - oil Analysis- Ultrasound based Non Destructive Evaluation techniques.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Patranabis. D, “Sensors and Transducers”, PHI, New Delhi, 2ndEdition, 2003.

T2. Ernest O. Doebelin, “Measurement Systems – Applications and Design”, TataMcGraw-Hill, 2009.

T3. David G. Alciatore and Michael B. Histand, “Introduction to Mechatronics andMeasurement systems”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2nd Edition, 2008.

T4. John Turner and Martyn Hill, Instrumentation for Engineers and Scientists, OxfordScience Publications, 1999.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Cornelius Scheffer and PareshGirdhar “Practical Machinery Vibration Analysis andPredictive Maintenance” Elsevier, 2004.

R2. A.K. Sawney and PuneetSawney, “A Course in Mechanical Measurements andInstrumentation and Control”, 12th edition, DhanpatRai& Co, New Delhi, 2001.

R3.Mohamed Gad-el-Hak, “The MEMS handbook”, Interpharm/CRC. 2001

R4. Dr.Ing.B.V.A. RAO, “Monograph on Acoustics & Noise control”, NDRF, TheInstitution of Engineers (India), 2013.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Marks: 50

ESE Marks: 50

 

MIPSY331 - UNDERSTANDING HUMAN BEHAVIOR (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course focuses on the fundamentals of psychology. It is an introductory paper that gives an overall understanding about the human behavior. It will provide students with an introduction to the key concepts, perspectives, theories, and sub-fields on various basic processes underlying human behavior.

  1. To understand the fundamental processes underlying human behavior
  2. To become aware of one’s idiosyncrasies and predispositions
  3. To apply the understanding of concepts in day-to-day activities

Learning Outcome

After the completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. Explain human behaviors using theoretical underpinnings
  2. Understand oneself and others, respecting the differences
  3. Demonstrate their understanding of psychological processes in daily activities

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Sensation
 

Definition, Characteristics of Sensory modalities: Absolute and difference threshold; Signal detection theory; sensory coding; Vision, Audition, Other Senses. Assessment of Perception and Sensation

Practicum: Aesthesiometer

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Perception
 

Definition, Understanding perception, Gestalt laws of organization, Illusions and Perceptual constancy; Various sensory modalities; Extrasensory perception.

Practicum:  Muller-Lyer Illusion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Learning and Memory
 

Learning:Definition, Classical conditioning, Instrumental conditioning, learning and cognition; Memory:  Types of Memory; Sensory memory, working memory, Long term memory, implicit memory, Constructive memory, improving memory; Assessment of memory.

Practicum: Memory drum

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Individual Differences
 

Concepts and nature of Individual differences; Nature vs. nurture; Gender difference in cognitive processes and social behavior; Intelligence: Definition, Contemporary theories of intelligence; Tests of intelligence; Emotional, Social and Spiritual intelligence.

Practicum: Bhatia’s Battery of Performance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Personality
 

Definition, Type and trait theories of personality, Type A, B & C. Psychoanalytic -  Freudian perspective; Types of personality assessment.

Practicum: NEO-FFI 3

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baron, R. A. (2001). Psychology. New Delhi: Pearson Education India.

Rathus, S. A. (2017). Introductory Psychology, 5thEd. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Nolen-Hoeksema, S., Fredrickson, B.L. & Loftus, G.R. (2014). Atkinson & Hilgard'sIntroduction to Psychology.16th Ed. United Kingdom: Cengage Learning.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Feldman, R. S. (2011). Understanding Psychology. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

Morgan, C. T., King, R. A., & Schopler, J. (2004). Introduction to Psychology. New Delhi: Tata     McGraw Hill.

Kalat, J. W. (2016). Understanding Psychology. New York: Cengage Learning

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Evaluation pattern

Group Assignment

Individual Assignment

Mid semester

20

20

25

 

Mid Semester Examination

Section A

(Definition)

Section B

(Short note)

Section C

(Essay)

Section D

(Case Question)

Total

5×2=10

4×5=20

1×10=10

1×10=10

50

 

End Semester Examination

Section A

(Definition)

Section B

(Short note)

Section C

(Essay)

Section D

(Case Question)

Total

5×2=10

4×5=20

1×10=10

1×10=10

50

 

 

BS451 - ENGINEERING BIOLOGY LABORATORY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Understanding and application of MATLAB and TINKERCAD for biological analysis which would results in better healthcare and any engineer, irrespective of the parent discipline (mechanical, electrical, civil, computer, electronics, etc.,) can use the disciplinary skills toward designing/improving biological systems. This course is designed to convey the essentials of human physiology.

 

The course will introduce to the students the various fundamental concepts in MATLAB and TINKERCAD for numerical analysis and circuit design using arduino.

 

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1Perform basic mathematical operation and analysis on biological parameters as BMI, ECG using MATLAB.L4

CO2Perform basic image processing on RGB images pertaining to medical data using MATLABL4

CO3Perform analysis on biological parameters using TinkerCad and design mini projects applicable for healthcare and biosensing.L4

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
 

1.      To familiarize with Matlab Online and getting used to basic functionalities used in Matlab (arrays, matrices, tables, functions)

2.      To calculate the Body Mass Index (BMI) of a person and determine under what category the person falls under – underweight, normal, overweight

3.      To determine the R peaks in given ECG and to find HRV using Matlab.

4.      To determine the R peaks in given ECG and to find HRV using Matlab.

5.      To determine the R peaks in given ECG and to find HRV using Matlab.

6.      Introduction to Tinkercad and using the various tools available for running a simple program of lighting a LED bulb using Arduino (digital).

7.      To design a driver motor in Tinkercad using Arduino and driver motor

8.      To design a temperature sensor in Tinkercad using Arduino and TMP36

9.      To design and simulate gas sensors using potentiometers, Arduino and servo motors

10.  To design and simulate measuring pulse sensors using photodiodes, IR LED and Arduino

11.  Preparation of biopolymers (polylactic acid) at home using home-based ingredients.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

 

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

As per university norms

EE431P - ELECTRICAL MACHINES-II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·           To understand Construction and performance of salient and non – salient type synchronous generators.

·           To understand Principle of operation and performance of synchronous motor.

·           To understand Construction, principle of operation and performance of induction machines.

·           To analyze the performance and speed control of three-phase induction motors.

·           To understand the  construction, principle of operation and performance of single phase induction motors and special machines.

 ·     To perform standard tests on synchronous machine and induction machine and analyse the results

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the operating principles of synchronous generators and determine the regulation of athe generator under lagging, leading and upf loads

CO2: Analyze the effect of changing load and excitation on the performance of a synchronous motor

CO3: Understand the operational principle and analyse the performance characteristic of a three phase induction machine.

CO4: Examine the speed control and starting methods of three phase induction motors

CO5: Determine the performance characteristics of a single phase induction motor on load

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
SYNCHRONOUS GENERATOR
 

Constructional details – Types of rotors – emf equation – Synchronous reactance – Armature reaction – Voltage regulation – e.m.f, m.m.f, z.p.f and A.S.A methods – Synchronizing and parallel operation – Synchronizing torque - Change of excitation and mechanical input – Two reaction theory – Determination of direct and quadrature axis synchronous reactance using slip test – Operating characteristics - Capability curves. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
SYNCHRONOUS MOTOR
 

 Principle of operation – Torque equation – Operation on infinite bus bars - V-curves – Power input and power developed equations – Starting methods – Current loci for constant power input, constant excitation and constant power developed.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
THREE PHASE INDUCTION MOTOR
 

Constructional details – Types of rotors – Principle of operation – Slip – Equivalent circuit – Slip-torque characteristics - Condition for maximum torque – Losses and efficiency – Load test - No load and blocked rotor tests - Circle diagram – Separation of no load losses – Double cage rotors – Induction generator – Synchronous induction motor.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
STARTING AND SPEED CONTROL OF THREE PHASE INDUCTION MOTOR
 

Need for starting – Types of starters – Stator resistance and reactance, rotor resistance, autotransformer and star-delta starters – Speed control – Change of voltage, torque, number of poles and slip – Cascaded connection – Slip power recovery scheme.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
SINGLE PHASE INDUCTION MOTORS AND GENERALISED MACHINE THEORY
 

Constructional details of single phase induction motor – Double revolving field theory and operation – Equivalent circuit – No load and blocked rotor test – Performance analysis – Starting methods of single-phase induction motors -

 

Generalised machine theory -machine as a circuit -model parameters -conventions -models for dc machines, synchronous machines, induction machines and transformers -introduction to digital simulation of systems comprising of machines.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:30
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
 

1.     Regulation of three phase alternator by emf and mmf methods

2.     Regulation of three phase alternator by ZPF and ASA methods

3.     Regulation of three phase salient pole alternator by slip test

4.     Measurements of negative sequence and zero sequence impedance of alternators.

5.     V and Inverted V curves of Three Phase Synchronous Motor.

6.     Load test on three-phase induction motor.

7.     No load and blocked rotor test on three-phase induction motor.

8.     Separation of No-load losses of three-phase induction motor.

9.     Load test on single-phase induction motor

 

10.No load and blocked rotor test on single-phase induction motor.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. D.P. Kothari and I.J. Nagrath, ‘Electric Machines’, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company Ltd, 2002.

 

2. P.S. Bhimbhra, ‘Electrical Machinery’, Khanna Publishers, 2003.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. A.E. Fitzgerald, Charles Kingsley, Stephen.D.Umans, ‘Electric Machinery’, Tata McGraw Hill publishing Company Ltd, 2003.

2. J.B. Gupta, ‘Theory and Performance of Electrical Machines’, S.K.Kataria and Sons, 2002.

 3. Sheila.C.Haran, ‘Synchronous, Induction and Special Machines’, Scitech Publications, 2001.

Evaluation Pattern

ASSESSMENT OF THEORY COURSE WITH PRACTICAL COMPONENT (for 2016 Batch only)

·         Theory                                                            : 70 marks

·         Laboratory                                          : 30 marks

           TOTAL                                                            :100 marks

LABORATORY EVALUATION (30 marks)

 

·         CIA                                                                                         : 15 Marks and

·         End Semester Exam (ESE)                                                     : 15 Marks

 

Components of the CIA

·         Conduct of experiments                                                         : 10 marks

·         Observations/Lab Record                                                      : 05 marks

      TOTAL                                                                                         : 15 marks

Eligibility for ESE: minimum of 40 % in CIA

 

End Semester Exam (ESE)

The ESE is conducted for 3 hours duration.

·         Write up & Viva – voce                                                         : 05 marks

·         Execution                                                                                : 10 marks

                 TOTAL                                                                                                                  : 15 marks

THEORY EXAMINATION (for 70 marks)

 

Eligibility: Cleared practical exam with the minimum of 40 % marks

·         35 Marks CIA and 35 Marks End Semester Exam (ESE)

             

Components of the CIA

CIA I :   Assignments/tests/quiz                                                    :05marks        

CIA II:  Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                                 :20 marks

CIA III: Quizzes/Seminar/Case Studies/Project Work/

 Online Course (optional) /projects/publications/innovativeness          :05 marks

Attendance                                                                                       :05 marks

Total                                                                                                             : 35 marks

End Semester Examination (ESE):

 

·         The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration, scaled to 70 % and pattern remain same as for  the course without practical

EE432P - CONTROL SYSTEMS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

·           To write the different methods of representation of systems and getting their transfer function models.

·           To illustrate time response of systems and its analysis.

·           To explain the open loop and closed–loop frequency responses of systems.

·           To describe the concept of stability of control system and methods of stability analysis.

·           To design compensation for a control system.

·           To explain of state space analysis.

·           To model and test the performance of controllers and system on MATLAB

·           To analyze the performance a few given systems by finding the transfer functions.

Learning Outcome

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of the course, students will be able to

·         Define basic principles and techniques in designing linear control systems.

·         Apply knowledge of control theory for practical implementations in engineering and network analysis

·         Explain the basic concepts of state space modeling and analysis.

·         Model and test the performance of controllers and system on MATLAB

·         Analyze the performance a few given systems by finding the transfer functions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
INTRODUCTION TO CONTROL SYSTEM
 

Controlled Situations and Type of Control systems, Basic elements in control systems – Open and closed loop systems, Linear and Nonlinear systems, Continuous and discrete control systems – Introduction, properties and application of Laplace Transform - Matrix definitions and operations, Scalar and Vector space - Characteristics equation – Practical Control Systems - Definition of Stability, Controllability and Obervability - Sensors, transducers, actuators – Data acquisition

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
MODELING OF A SYSTEM
 

Mathematical Model of Systems (Differential equations, Transfer function, Impulse response, State equations) - Schematic Representation of system (block diagram, signal-flow graphs) - Electrical analogy of mechanical and thermal systems – Block diagram reduction techniques - Synchros – AC and DC servomotors

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
TIME AND FREQUENCY DOMAIN ANALYSIS
 

Stability analysis using Root loci technique - Bode plot - Routh-Hurwitz criterion - Nyquist stability criterion - Polar plot

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
DESIGN OF CONTROL SYSTEM
 

Time and frequency domain specifications - Time response of first order and second order systems - Steady State Error - Design of P-I-D Controllers - Design of Lag, Lead, Lag-Lead Compensator – Process Control.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
STATE SPACE ANALYSIS.
 

State space representation – Advantages of State space analysis over transfer function method – Canonical forms - Solution of state equation - Stability, Controllability and Obervability of a system.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:30
Lab Experiments.
 

PROGRAMMING EXPERIMENTS

1.    1. Design and implementation of compensators.

2.     2.Design of P, PI and PID controllers.

3.     3. Stability analysis of linear systems.

     4.  State space modeling of electronic circuit and comparison of stability analysis of state space modeling and transfer function modeling.

2.     5. Digital simulation of linear systems.

 

HARDWARE EXPERIMENTS

 

3.   6.Determination of transfer function parameters of a DC servo motor.

4.  7.    Determination of transfer function parameters of AC servo motor.

5.   8.Study of synchros.

6.  9.    Analog simulation of type-0 and type-1 system.

7.   10.    Real-time hybrid data acquisition and control.

 

SIMULINK EXPERIMENTS

 

8.    11.  Analysis and Design of Aircraft Pitch Controller

9.    12.  Analysis of Vehicle Suspension System

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.    J.C. Doyle, B.A. Francis and A.R. Tannenbaum, Feedback Control Theory, Maxwell Macmilan International edition. 1992.

2.    C.L. Phillips and R.D. Harbour, Feedback Control Systems, Prentice Hall, 1985

3.      B.C. Kuo, ‘Automatic Control Systems’, Prentice Hall of India Ltd., New Delhi, 1995.

4.    M. Gopal, ‘Control Systems, Principles & Design’, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2002.

5.    Norman S. Nise, Control Systems Engineering, 4th edition, New York, John Wiley, 2003. (Indian edition)

6.    M.N. Bandyopadhyay, ‘Control Engineering Theory and Practice’, Prentice Hall of India, 2003.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. K. Ogata, ‘Modern Control Engineering’, 4th edition, Pearson Education, New Delhi, 2003 / PHI.

2. I.J. Nagrath & M. Gopal, ‘Control Systems Engineering’, New Age International Publishers, 2003.

Evaluation Pattern

ASSESSMENT PATTERN  :

·         Theory                                                            : 70 marks

·         Laboratory                                                      : 30 marks

           TOTAL                                                            :100 marks

LABORATORY EVALUATION (30 marks)

 

·         CIA                                                                                         : 15 Marks and

·         End Semester Exam (ESE)                                                     : 15 Marks

 

Components of the CIA

·         Conduct of experiments                                                         : 10 marks

·         Observations/Lab Record                                                      : 05 marks

      TOTAL                                                                                         : 15 marks

Eligibility for ESE: minimum of 40 % in CIA

 

End Semester Exam (ESE)

The ESE is conducted for 3 hours duration.

·         Write up & Viva – voce                                                         : 05 marks

·         Execution                                                                                : 10 marks

                 TOTAL                                                                                         : 15 marks

THEORY EXAMINATION (for 70 marks)

 

Eligibility: Cleared practical exam with the minimum of 40 % marks

·         35 Marks CIA and 35 Marks End Semester Exam (ESE)

             

Components of the CIA

CIA I:   Assignments/tests/quiz                                                    :05marks        

CIA II:  Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                                 :20 marks

CIA III: Quizzes/Seminar/Case Studies/Project Work/

 Online Course (optional) /projects/publications/innovativeness  :05 marks

Attendance                                                                                           :05 marks

Total                                                                                                      : 35 marks

End Semester Examination (ESE):

The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration, scaled to 70 %.

 

EE433 - SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·         To understand the properties and representation of continuous and discrete time signals.

·         To understand the sampling process and analysis of discrete systems using z-transforms.

 

·         To understand the analysis and synthesis of discrete time systems.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course, students will be able to

·      Characterize and analyze the properties of CT and DT signals and systems

·      Analyze CT and DT systems in Time domain using convolution

·      Represent CT and DT systems in the Frequency domain using Fourier Analysis tools like CTFS, CTFT, DTFS and DTFT.

·      Conceptualize the effects of sampling a CT signal

·      Analyze CT and DT systems using Laplace transforms and Z Transforms

 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
REPRESENTATION OF SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS
 

Continuous and discrete time signals: Classification of Signals – Periodic & Aperiodic, Even& Odd, and Energy& Power signals, Deterministic & Random signals, Transformation in independent variable of signals: time scaling, time shifting, time reversal. Complex exponential and Sinusoidal signals, Periodicity of continuous and discrete signals, Basic/Elementary functions: unit impulse, unit step functions, Basic system properties.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
LINEAR TIME-INVARIANT CONTINUOUS TIME SYSTEMS
 

Introduction, Convolution Integral, Properties of Linear Time Invariant Systems. Differential Equations representation of Systems, Solving Differential Equations, Natural and Forced Response of the system, Block Diagram Representation.     

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
FOURIER ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS AND DISCRETE TIME SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS
 

Introduction, Frequency response of LTI systems, Fourier representation of Four Classes of signals, Fourier series, Fourier Transform, Discrete Time Fourier Series, Discrete Time Fourier Transform, Properties of Fourier Representations,  Continuous time Fourier Transform and Laplace Transform analysis with examples,  convolution in time and frequency domains.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
SAMPLING THEOREM AND z-TRANSFORMS
 

Representation of continuous time signals by its sample - Sampling theorem – Reconstruction of a Signal from its samples, aliasing – discrete time processing of continuous time signals, sampling of band pass signals. Basic principles of z-transform - z-transform definition – region of convergence – properties of ROC – Properties of z-transform – Poles and Zeros – inverse z-transform

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
LINEAR TIME-INVARIANT DISCRETE TIME SYSTEMS
 

Introduction, Convolution sum, Properties of Linear Time Invariant Systems. Difference Equations representation of Systems, Solving Difference Equations, Natural and Forced Response of the system, Block Diagram Representation.     

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Alan V.Oppenheim, Alan S.Willsky with S.Hamid Nawab, Signals & Systems, 2nd edn., Pearson Education, 1997.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.               Simon Haykin and Barry Van Veen, Signals and Systems, John Wiley, 1999

2.               John G.Proakis and Dimitris G.Manolakis, Digital Signal Processing, Principles, Algorithms and Applications, 3rd edn., PHI,  2000.

3.               M.J.Roberts, Signals and Systems Analysis using Transform method and MATLAB, TMH 2003.

4.               K.Lindner, “Signals and Systems”, McGraw Hill International, 1999

 

5.               Moman .H. Hays,” Digital Signal Processing “, Schaum’s outlines, Tata McGraw-Hill Co Ltd., 2004.

Evaluation Pattern

·         Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) for Theory papers: 50% (50 marks out  of 100 marks)

·         End Semester Examination(ESE) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

 

Components of the CIA

CIA I : Assignments :                                                                         10 marks 

CIA II : Mid Semester Examination (Theory) :                          25 marks

CIA III : Quizzes/Seminar/Case Studies/Project Work :           10 marks

Attendance :                                                                            05 marks

 

Total :                                                                                                 50 marks 

EE434 - GENERATION AND TRANSMISSION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

To introduce conventional and non-conventional energy generation  principles, economics of generation, transmission system parameters and characteristics.