Department of MEDIA STUDIES

Syllabus for
Master of Arts (Media and Communication Studies)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MCN111 WRITING FOR MEDIA - 4 4 100
MCN121 THEATRE - 2 2 50
MCN131 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION - 4 4 100
MCN132 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY - 4 4 100
MCN133 DESIGNING PRINCIPLES AND VISUAL CULTURE - 4 4 100
MCN134 CONTEMPORARY INDIA - 4 4 100
MCN151 PHOTOGRAPHY AND PHOTO DOCUMENTARIES - 2 2 50
MCN152 SOUND DESIGN AND PRODUCTION - 2 2 100
MCN153 PRACTICAL ENGAGEMENT - 2 2 50
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MCN231 COMMUNICATION AND DEMOCRACY IN INDIA - 4 4 100
MCN232 DEVELOPMENT COMMUNICATION - 4 4 100
MCN241A QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN MEDIA RESEARCH - 2 2 50
MCN241B QUALITATIVE METHODS IN MEDIA RESEARCH - 2 2 100
MCN242A DIGITAL HUMANITIES AND CYBER CULTURE - 2 2 100
MCN242B READING CINEMA - 2 2 50
MCN243A REPORTING AND PUBLIC SPEAKING - 4 4 100
MCN243B TECHNICAL WRITING - 4 4 100
MCN251 DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION - 2 2 50
MCN281 INTERNSHIP - I - 0 2 50
MCN282 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP - 2 2 50
MCN291 ECOLOGY AND MEDIA DISCOURSES - 4 4 100
MSA291 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - 4 4 100
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MCN321 MEDIA MANAGEMENT - 2 2 50
MCN325 ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE AND BEHAVIOUR - 2 2 100
MCN331 JOURNALISM - HISTORY, ISSUES AND DEBATES - 4 4 100
MCN332 MULTIMEDIA REPORTING AND EDITING - 4 4 100
MCN333 CYBER CULTURE - 4 4 100
MCN334 DATA JOURNALISM - 4 4 100
MCN335 IMAGINEERING - 4 4 100
MCN336 INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION - 4 4 100
MCN337 ADVERTISING PLATFORMS - 4 4 100
MCN338 COPYWRITING - 4 4 100
MCN351 DIGITAL STORYTELLING - 2 2 100
MCN352 MOBILE JOURNALISM - 2 2 50
MCN355 DIGITAL ADVERTISING - 2 2 50
MCN356 EVENT MANAGEMENT - 2 2 50
MCN381 DISSERTATION - 2 4 100
MCN382 INTERNSHIP-II - 36 2 50
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MCN421 DEVELOPMENT JOURNALISM - 4 4 100
MCN422 ENTREPRENEURSHIP - 2 2 50
MCN423 BUSINESS JOURNALISM - 2 2 50
MCN425 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - 2 2 50
MCN426 CLIENT SERVICING - 2 2 50
MCN431 PHOTO AND DOCUMENTARY JOURNALISM - 4 4 100
MCN432 INTERPRETATIVE JOURNALISM - POLITICS, SCIENCE, HEALTH, BUSINESS, SPORTS, ECOLOGY AND ENTERTAINMENT, LIFESTYLE - 4 4 100
MCN433 LAW, ETHICS AND JOURNALISM - 4 4 100
MCN435 MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100
MCN436 CORPORATE AND MEDIA LAW - 4 4 100
MCN437 CORPORATE COMMUNICATION AND PUBLIC RELATIONS - 4 4 100
MCN481 VALUE METHODOLOGY - 2 2 50
MCN482 INTERNSHIP-III - 30 2 50
        

Department Overview:

The Department of Media Studies at Christ university is one of the most vibrant and academically rigorous centres of media higher education in India with the passion of honing students’ skills, knowledge and attitude for effective leadership in local, national and global media platforms. Since its inception in 1991, the department always strives to optimize the theoretical rigour and practical exposure of its students, through a constantly evolving curriculum, a plethora of activities and workshops, and exposure to key developments in the various fields of communication. The department offers two undergraduate programmes (CEP, JPE), one PG programme (MAMCS) and a PhD in Media Studies. While the undergraduate programmes lay a strong foundation, the PG programme enables the students to acquire an advanced disciplinary knowledge, sharpen media skills, and career-ready orientation. The PhD programme ensures that the students empowers students with plentiful opportunities and support to tackle real-life communication issues, deploy communication skills, gain socio-cultural sensitivity and build a strong base in the domain.

Mission Statement:

Vision: To excel in communication and media education by creating an open and collaborative environment that embraces innovation and integrity by providing both classroom and experiential learning.

Mission: The Department of Media Studies combines communication and journalism to create a theoretical, professional, and applied approach to communication studies within a structured yet free environment to enhance students? personal and professional lives.

Introduction to Program:

The MA in Media and Communication Studies programme has two specialisations - a. Multimedia Journalism and b. Advertising and Corporate Communications. The programme ensures that the student gains key media skill sets, advanced disciplinary knowledge, and the attitudinal orientation for media practice and media studies. Internships, live projects, field visits, workshops, etc. are there to widen the student's learning.

Program Objective:

Programme Outcome 

PO1. Disciplinary Knowledge 

  

Assesment Pattern

Both formative and summative assessments will be carried out to test and further the learning outcomes of each course, as acquired by the student. Rubrics for each course's evaluation will be shared with the student.

Examination And Assesments

The programme adopts a variety of evaluation mechanisms that include regular exams, live domonstrations, portfolio submissions, viva voce, etc.

MCN111 - WRITING FOR MEDIA (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:4
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized to help students focus on their writing skills by exposing them to different forms of writing in keeping with the varied platforms-- print, broadcast and online media. They will be introduced to different writing styles and understand the mechanics of writing for diferent mass media platforms encompassing different genres, thereby providing students a foundation to build on for advanced courses in future. The ability to analyze complex situations and translate them into clear, concise written segments will benefit them in their media career.

Learning Outcome

On completion of the course, students will demonstrate their ability to:

 

  • Follow the rules of good grammar
  • Incorporate in their writing, Associated Press style.
  • Distinguish between news and public relations style writing
  • Evaluate a news event 
  • Use effective interviewing techniques
  • Effectively use quotes, attribution and transitions 
  • Consider the audience while writing a news story
  • Cover an actual news event 
  • Understand the basic professional uses of social media in the field of mass communication.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Writing for Print
 
  1. Is Writing Important? The Significance of Writing for the Media
  2. Understanding News, News Values and Journalistic Writing
  3. Lead Writing, Creating Headlines, Cutlines and Photo Captions
  4. Writing Hard News Stories & Feature Stories 
  5. Writing Editorials 
  6. Drafting Press Releases 
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Writing for Broadcast Media
 
  1. Writing to Be Heard -Techniques and Conventions
  2. Radio Scripting - News Piece, Commercials
  3. Writing to Visuals
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Writing for the Web
 
  1. How is Writing for the web different from other forms?
  2. The Art of Blogging
  3. Web Newswriting
  4. 4.Writing for microblogging sites - Twitter and Instagram: Understanding trends, using second-person pronouns, evoking emotional response, brevity, using hashtags and multimedia content
Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Langan, J. (1979). Sentence skills: a workbook for writers.   
  •  Pickering, I. (2018). Writing for news media: The storyteller's craft. Routledge.
  • Ramage, J. D., Bean, J. C., & Johnson, J. (1999). Writing arguments. Allyn and Bacon.
  • Sissons, H. (2006). Writing for broadcast. . SAGE Publications Ltd. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781446216828.n5
  • Pickering, I. (2018). Writing for news media: The storyteller's craft. Routledge.
  • Wheeler, S. (2009). Feature writing for journalists. Routledge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Baehr, C. M., & Schaller, B. (2010). Writing for the Internet: A guide to real communication in virtual space. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Greenwood Press.
  • Brooks, B. S., & Pinson, J. L. (2015). The art of editing in the age of convergence. CRC Press.
  • Kipphan, H. (Ed.). (2001). Handbook of print media: technologies and production methods. Springer Science & Business Media.
  • Lucas, F. L. (2012). Style: The art of writing well. Harriman House Limited

 

Evaluation Pattern

The course shall not have a regular CIA- MSE -ESE model. Instead, the student will be given a series of assignments spread across the semester, leading to a final portfolio/article/content collective on submission model. The teaching facilitator will consider the level of intelligibility in the class and the learning needs of the students and decide what assignment to be given on a regular basis.

Sample Assignment:

  • Feature Writing

  • Blog Post

  • Live Tweet 

  • In-depth Interview

  • Radio Drama Script

*Rubrics for each activity will be provided by the concerned faculty offering the course.

 

** Keep duplicate copies of all work submitted in this course. Save all returned, graded work until the semester is over.

MCN121 - THEATRE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper is a continuation of adult learning process  for theatre - where individuals discover the various aspects involved in putting up a proscenium play based on personal initative. Students get involved in a participatory teaching-learning process related to the identified topic. 

Learning Outcome

Individual confidence level goes up and group dynamics helps the students to work together

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
PERSONAL ORIENTATION
 

Personal orientation, the theatre experience, understanding, likes, dislikes and and area of specialization to be explored. Watching a play, identification of prepared/new script towards “play specific learning”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
GROUP WORK
 

Stage positions and group compostions.  Scheduling and  identification of roles and responsibilites for the chosen play. Question and Answer sessions and decisions on identified departments of the theatre – direction, stage management, lights, sound, sets and props, costumes, marketing, auditorium.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
THE INVISIBLE THEATRE
 

View-point of script/script-writer/director/team. Summary and graph of the chosen play. Understanding the need and importance of each scene and maintaining of tempo  through all departments.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
THE VISIBLE THEATRE
 

Actors , Lights, Sound, Stage positions, Sets and Props, Entries and Exits

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Practicals
 

Production related areas of exploration

  1. Direction
  2. Acting
  3. Stage Management
  4. Lights
  5. Sound
  6. Props
  7. Sets
  8. Costumes
  9. Marketing
  10. Work-in-progress performance
Text Books And Reference Books:

A Phaidon Theatre Manual (Series) – Phaidon Press Ltd, Londo

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

A Phaidon Theatre Manual (Series) – Phaidon Press Ltd, Londo

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Assessment: Individual Performance of Character Sketches

ESE Evaluation: Proscenium Theatre performance in teams

MCN131 - INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Introduction to Media and Communication course enables the student to appreciate the various media for communication and the theories that have evolved over the last century in the domain in order to explain the various phenomena in the communication and media field. The main objective of the course is to provide a theoretical grounding for research in the field of communication and media studies.

To introduce the process, types and forms of communication

To provide an understanding of the models of communication

To give a comprehensive insight into communication and media theories

 

To enable the application of a theoretical framework for research work

 

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

 

  • Comprehend the concept and complexities of communication.

  • Analyse and appreciate the process of communication.

  • Understand theories in the domain of communication and media.

  •  Apply the theories in the research proposal at the end of the course.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Communication
 

 

  1. Communication and its process

  2. Components of communication

  3. Barriers to communication

  4. Communication patterns- one way and two way, one-to-one, one to many, many to many

  5. Types of communication- verbal and oral, written and non-verbal 

  6. Mass Media- Characteristics, Features and Impact of Print, Cinema, Radio, Television and SocialMedia

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Communication Models
 

 

  1. Linear models-Aristotle, Laswell, Shannon-Weaver, Berlo, DeFleur, Gerbner

  2. Interactive models- Westley-McLean, Osgood-Schramm, Newcomb

  3. Transactional models-Barnlund

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Behaviourist Theories
 

 

  1. Social-Psychological approach

  2. Propaganda- powerful Effects theory

  3.  Limited Effects theory-two-step flow

  4. Audience-centred approach-Cultivation theory, Agenda Setting theory, Media Dependency theory, Uses and Gratification theory

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Critical and Cultural Theories
 

 

  1. Marxist approach

  2. Gramsci- Hegemony

  3. Habermas- Public sphere

  4. Barthes- Myths/Semiotics

  5. Derrida- Media Temporalities

  6. Foucault- Power/Knowledge

  7. Hall- Representation

  8. Williams- Culture

  9. Consumer Society of Baudrillard

  10. Chomsky- Media manufactured consent

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Other Approaches & Theories
 

 

  1. Normative Press theories

  2. McLuhan- Medium is the message

  3. Network Society of Castells

  4. Van Dijk’s Social aspects of new media 

  5. Christian Fuchs Critical Social Media Theory

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baran,Stanley S and Dennis K Davis. Mass Communication Theory: Foundations, Ferment and Future. Singapore: Thomson Wadsworth, 2007.

Wood. Julia. T. Communication theories in action: An introduction. London: Wadsworth Publishing Company. 1997.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Barthes, Roland. Mythologies. New York: Hill & Long, 2012.

  • Adorno, Theodore W. The Culture Industries. London: Routledge, 2010.

  •  McLuhan, Marshall and Quentin Fiore. Medium is the message. New York: Penguin Books, 2001.

  • McQuail, Denis: Mass Communication theory (III ed.). New Delhi: Sage Publication,2004

Evaluation Pattern

Department Level Submission

CIA1: Analysis of Daily communication process

CIA2: Analysis of media through communication models

CIA3: Group presentation of Critical media models

 

CIA4: Research Proposal

MCN132 - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course 'Research Methodology' is to enable the media students to:

Understand some basic concepts of research and its methodologies  

Identify appropriate research topics

Select and define appropriate research problem and parameters

Prepare a project proposal (to undertake a project)

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Apply a range of quantitative and / or qualitative research techniques to contemporary problems / issues.
  • Understand and apply research approaches, techniques and strategies in the appropriate manner. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of data analysis and interpretation in relation to the research process.
  • Conceptualise the research process. Develop necessary critical thinking skills in order to evaluate different research approaches utilised in the service industries

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Inquiry
 
  • Human inquiry and scientific inquiry.
  • The foundations of social science.
  • Social science paradigms - Logic systems.
  • The link between theory and research.
  • The ethics and politics of social research.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Communication Research
 
  • History of communication research.
  • Phases and stages of communication research.
  • Basic building blocks in conducting communication research (Identifying research problems, variables, formulating hypotheses, review of literature, writing an abstract).
  • Research design.
  • Writing a research proposal
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Quantitative Research
 
  • Conceptualisation and operationalisation.
  • The logic of sampling.
  •  Survey research.
  • Experiments.
  • Quantitative text analysis.
  • The basics of quantitative data analysis.
  • Inferential statistics in quantitative data analysis
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Qualitative Research
 
  • Participant observation.
  • Qualitative interviewing.
  • Social text analysis.
  • Qualitative data analysis.
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Technology for Research Work
 
  • Software used for writing Bibliography.
  • Quantitative and Qualitative Data Analysis.
  • How to write reports with our grammatical errors with the help of software.
Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Writing and Presenting Research Work
 
  • Synopsis, Dissertation, Research paper.
  • Oral presentation, Poster presentation.
Text Books And Reference Books:

Bryman, A. (2008). Social research methods. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Potter, S. (2006). Doing postgraduate research. Milton Keynes, U.K.: Open University in association with SAGE Publications.

VanderStoep, S. W., & Johnson, D. D. (2009). Research Methods for Everyday Life: Blending Qualitative and Quantitative A. John Wiley & Sons.

Waller, V., Farquharson, K., & Dempsey, D. (2016). Qualitative social research: Contemporary methods for the digital age. Los Angeles: SAGE.

Wimmer, R. D., & Dominick, J. R. (2000). Mass media research: An introduction. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Pub.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Research Methodology - Concepts and Cases, Dr. Deepak Chawla & Dr. Neena Sondhi, 2nd edition, 2016.

Research Methodology A Handbook Revised and Enlarged Edition, R.P. Misra,2016.

Research Methodology : Methods and Techniques,  C.R. Kothari & Gaurav Garg, 3rd edition.

Evaluation Pattern

Department Level Submission

CIA1: Situating a Research Problem

CIA2: Quantitative Research Plan

CIA3: Qualitative Research Plan

CIA4: Research Proposal

MCN133 - DESIGNING PRINCIPLES AND VISUAL CULTURE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

  • Design Principles and Elements is focused on providing you with a design language through familiarity with the essential concepts and principles underlying all good design.
  • The course encourages you to experiment with different forms and different elements. The course is an essential introduction to later studies in design and aims to help you develop creative methods of thinking and a critical approach to your own work.
  • The practice of design combines both independent and collaborative work and this course requires you to use both methods of design development.
  • The subject is introduced to learn the principles of graphic design and understand the process of conceptualization and visualization of idea in graphic form

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

 

  • Conceptual idea about design in media

  • Theoretical and practical understanding of Indian and Western aesthetics

  • Application of Design principles in Media productions

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Art, Design and Aesthetic
 
  1. Important Concepts and Definitions 
  2. Human understanding art 
  3. Introduction to Graphic Design
  4. Art and Production 
  5. Comparison of Arts 
  6. Visual Images 
  7. Typography and its applications
  8. Indian and Western Understanding of Aesthetics
  9. Idea of Beauty in West and East
  10. Concept of Rasa (Navarasa)
  11. Aesthetic Experience - Aesthetic Attitude - Aesthetic Judgment - 
  12. Significance of Aesthetics in day today life Aesthetics in Day today life - 
  13. Aesthetics in Media
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Elements and Principles of Design
 

 

  1. Elements of Design: Points | Lines | Space | Perspective | Atmospheric perspective | movement | Texture | Colour
  2. Principles of Design:  Figure/Ground | Balance | Gestalt | Emphasis | Proportion | Rhythm | Unity
  3. Designing fundamentals in publications: Layout designs | Design Analysis in Newspaper, Advertisement, Photography and Film -Package Designing
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Infographics
 

 

  1. What Are Infographics: 

  2. The Science of visualization - Why 

  3. Infographics Work for business.

  4. Visualizing how things work and are connected : Process | Hierarchy | Relationships

  5. Visualizing Who, when, And where : Personality | Chronology | Geography

  6. Creating infographics: 

    1. Infographic prep work - purpose - the Art of observation - 

    2. Processing your ideas - recording your thoughts 

    3. Info Synthesis

    4. Designing your infographics

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Visual Culture
 

 

  1. Concept of Visual and Culture
  2. Importance of Visual Culture in Media studies
  3. Theories in Cultural Studies
  4. Visual culture and media - Fine Art – Photography – Film – Television - New Media
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Image Analysis
 

 

  1. Introduction to Visual Analysis
  2. Modes of Analysis: Form and Content - Content Analysis - Iconography & Iconology - Mythologies - Genre and Type Analysis - Form and Style Analysis - Semiotic Analysis - Semiotics - Structuralism - Deconstructions - Physical Context - Intertextuality - Hermeneutics
  3. Visual Analysis and Research
  4. Steps in Visual Analysis (Practice): Intuitive response - Cultural Context - Function and purpose - Media - Formal Elements
Text Books And Reference Books:

Arthur, Asa Berger. Media Analysis Techniques. New Delhi: Sage Publications, 1976.
Berger John. Ways of Seeing. London: BBC,1972
Berger, Arthur Asa. Media Analysis Techniques. San Francisco: Sage Publication, 2005.
Chaplin, S., Walker, J. A. (1997). Visual Culture: An Introduction. United Kingdom: Manchester University Press.
Gillian, Rose. Visual Methodologies. New Delhi: Sage Publications, 2001
Helmers, M. H. (2006). The Elements of Visual Analysis. United Kingdom: Pearson Longman.
Howells, Richard. Visual Culture. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2005.
Machin, D., Ledin, P. (2018). Doing Visual Analysis: From Theory to Practice. United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
Mirzoeff, N. (1999). An Introduction to Visual Culture. United Kingdom: Routledge.
Mirzoeff, F. An Introduction to Visual Culture, London: Routledge.
Peter Bridgewater. An Introduction to Graphic Design.New Jersey: Chartwell Books. 1987.
Russell, N Baird. The Graphic Communication. London: Holt Rinehart and Winston. 1987
Tony Thwaites and Lloyd Davis. Introducing Cultural and Media Studies. London: Paalgrave, 2002.
Wendell, C, Crow. Communication Graphics. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. 1986

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Howells, Richard. Visual Culture. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2005.

  2. Mirzoeff, F. An Introduction to Visual Culture, London: Routledge.

  3. Peter Bridgewater. An Introduction to Graphic Design.New Jersey: Chartwell Books. 1987.

  4. Russell, N Baird. The Graphic Communication. London: Holt Rinehart and Winston. 1987

  5. Tony Thwaites and Lloyd Davis. Introducing Cultural and Meida Studies. London: Paalgrave, 2002.

  6. Walker, John. Visual Culture. New York: Manchester University Press. 1997

  7. Wendell, C, Crow. Communication Graphics. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. 1986
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1, CIA 2 and CIA 3 totally adding up to 45 marks. (Attendance will carry the rest- 5 marks)

The ESE will be conducted by the Department and will be evaluated out of 50 marks.

CIA I: Consists of multiple assignments (Written Assignments and Practical) – 10 marks

Assessment 1: Interview an artist (30 marks)

Assessment 2: Group Discussion and Presentation on Indian and Western Aesthetics (15 marks)

Assessment 3: Presentation on Art Movements based on any online journal (20 marks)

CIA II- Mid-semester exam – 25 marks

CIA III CIA 3- Projects, and Presentations,  - 10 marks

Assessment 1: Newspaper/Magazine/Advertisement analysis (20)

Assessment 2: Shadow Play/… based on a theme -  (25 marks)

Assessment 3: Product Design (25 marks)

 

MCN134 - CONTEMPORARY INDIA (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This is a foundational course for the students of Mass Communication to understand the geographical, cultural and temporal contexts they would be functioning in. It is an introduction to the complex discourses that exist about the idea of India. 

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

 

  • Demonstrate the complexity in understanding the idea of India

  • Identify the historical roots of contemporary socio-political and cultural practices

  • Exercise Indian citizenship with awareness

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
India: Nation, Nationalism and the Nation-State
 

 

  1.  Introduction: Historical Sociology and the Study of Nation and Nationalism in India by G Aloysius (from Nationalism without a Nation in India)

  2. What is Nationalism? by Aurobindo

  3. Have You Passed the Nationalism Test? By Shiv Visvanathan (Extract from OPEN, 25 March 2016)

  4. Why India Survives by Ramachandra Guha (Epilogue, from India After Gandhi

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Key Events
 

 

  1. Indian Independence, Partition, Emergency, Indo-Pak and Indo-china Wars, Anti-Sikh Riots, Mandal Commission, LPG, Entry of Cable Television, Babri Masjid Demolition, Gujarat Riots

  2. A History of Events by Ramachandra Guha (India After Gandhi)

  3. Timeline by Nivedita Menon (Power and Contestation)

  4. A Genealogy of the 1990s by Nivedita Menon (Power and Contestation)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Key Politicians and Political Thinkers
 

 

  1. Jyotirao Phule, Mahatma Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru, Jayaprakash Narayan, Bhima Rao Ambedkar, EVR Periyar, A K Ramanujan etc. 

  2. Debating Democracy: Jayaprakash Narayan versus Jawaharlal Nehru By Ramachandra Guha (Democrats and Dissenters)

  3. Final Encounter: The Politics of the Assassination of Gandhi by Ashis Nandy (Debating Gandhi)

  4. Excerpts from Bunch of Thoughts by Golwalkar

  5. Is there an Indian way of thinking? By A K Ramanujan

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Secularism, Class, Caste, Ethnicity, Gender, Development
 

 

  1. Reflections on the Category of Secularism in India: Gandhi, Ambedkar, and the Ethics of Communal Representation, c. 1931 / Shabnum Tejani 45 (The Crisis of Secularism in India)

  2. Will Class Politics Replace Caste Politics in India? By Rahul Verma and Ankita

  3. One Hundred years of Tamil Nationalism by A Mangai  (What the Nation Really Needs to Know)

  4. Women Feed the World by Vandana Shiva (Who Really Feeds the World)

  5. Culture, Voice and Development: A Primer for the Unsuspecting by Ashis Nandy (Bonfire of Creeds)

  6. Without Fear or Favour - Ashis Nandy in Conversation with Shuddhabrata Sengupta (SARAI Reader 08 - FEAR

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
India in the World
 

 

  1. Globalism and its Discontents by Joseph Stiglitz

  2. Looking Back into the Future: India, South Asia, and the World in 2100 by Ashish Kothari and K J Joy

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Essential references: 

  1. Aurobindo. (2010, May 17). What is nationalism? Savitri.In. https://savitri.in/blogs/light-of-supreme/what-is-nationalism-by-sri-aurobindo

  2. Aloysius, G. (2010). Nationalism without a nation in India. Delhi: Oxford University Press.

  3. Ashish, K. (2017). Looking Back into the Future: India, South Asia, and the World in 2100. In K. J. Joy (Ed.), Alternative Futures: India Unshackled (Vol. 1, pp. 627–645). AuthorsUpFront.

  4. Azad, R., Nair, J., Singh, M., & Roy, M. S. (2016). What the nation really needs to know: The JNU nationalism lectures. India: HarperCollins.

  5. Chatterjee, P. (2010). Empire and nation: Essential writings, 1985-2005. Ranikhet: Permanent Black.

  6. Guha, R. (2016). Democrats and dissenters. Gurgaon, Haryana: Allen Lane by Penguin Random House India.

  7. Guha, R. (2008). India after Gandhi: The history of the world's largest democracy. India: Picador.

  8. M. (2020, December 14). Will class politics replace caste politics in India? Mint. https://www.livemint.com/news/india/will-class-politics-replace-caste-politics-in-india-11607672972899.html

  9. Menon, N., & Nigam, A. (2008). Power and contestation: India since 1989. Himayatnagar, Hyderabad: Orient Longman Private.

  10. Narula, M. (2010). Fear. Delhi: Centre for the Study of Developing Societies.

  11. Needham, A. D., & Rajan, R. S. (2009). The crisis of secularism in India. New Delhi: Permanent Black.

  12. Raghuramaraju, A. (2010). Debating Gandhi:. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

  13. Shiva, V. (2016). Who Really Feeds the World? London: Zed Books.

  14. Stiglitz, J. (2018, October 25). Globalism and Its Discontents: Point/Counterpoint with Joseph Stiglitz ’64 | Amherst Videos | Amherst College. Www.Amherst.Edu. https://www.amherst.edu/amherst-story/today/amherst-videos/globalism-and-its-discontents-joseph-stiglitz-64

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Regular reading of news from newspapers, digital platforms, journals and news magazines is a must.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: Component I: Snap Quiz

Component II: Written Test

Mid Sem: Regular exam wherein 5 out of 7 questions need to be answered, with each carrying a maximum of 10 marks.

CIA III: reflective critical essay (Submission) on Unit III or IV

End Sem: Regular exam wherein 5 out of 7 questions need to be answered, with each carrying a maximum of 20 marks.

MCN151 - PHOTOGRAPHY AND PHOTO DOCUMENTARIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is a 30-hour mandatory ability enhancement course aimed at introducing photographic skills to novices and improving technical knowledge about digital cameras. It addresses the concerns of both amateur and advanced-amateurs.

 

Learning Outcome

By end of the course,

● Students will be able to produce good pictures suitable for media houses’ requirements

● Students will be able to handle any digital cameras

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Technicalities
 

1. Introduction to SLR cameras, Analog camera and Digital Camera.

2. Exposure triangle: Shutter speed, ISO and Aperture

3. Lenses-Types and usage 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Aesthetics of photography
 

1.Composition-Basic Rules, relationship between photography and other arts

2. Symmetry, Balance, Dynamic perspective, Leading line

3. Color aesthetics, Details of Photo film And difference between color and Black and white 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Lighting
 

1.Working with natural lights

2. One point, two-point, three point, multiple lights, reflected and incident light, High key and Low key lighting.

Text Books And Reference Books:

● History And Practice Of The Art Of Photography Or, The Production Of Pictures Through The Agency Of Light

● Ultimate Field Guide To Photography, National Geographic Photography Basics 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

● Photography : The Definitive Visual History, Tom Ang

● Photography : By Warren, Bruce

Evaluation Pattern

Based on continuous evaluation of a series of classroom and weekly assignments, mostly in the form of projects. Apart from these, a theme based Photo-exhibition within the campus and outside will also be considered for evaluation.

● Composition: Click all the 8 compositions, draw Rule of Third rule on the pictures.

● White balance exercise-click 12 pictures from 7-7

● News photos review

● Creative/concept photography/Issue based photo essay, Photo story-field study, 360 photography

● Group assignment-Develop a photo-story, theme based, at least 5 pictures

● Photo-essay

MCN152 - SOUND DESIGN AND PRODUCTION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
Entails usages of digital technologies to record, manipulate and produce audio for a
variety of media, such as film, television, video games, and radio.
Examining theory and practice of audio production techniques and their relationship to
other aspects of media production
Demonstrate how to use the industry-standard Digital Audio Workstation, Pro Tools,
to create professional recordings.
Understanding technical aspects of Audio production, and how sound is translated into
audio signals, recording techniques, and effects.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:
Evaluating the technical aspects of Audio productions terminology and concepts.
Be comfortable in a recording studio environment and demonstrate digital audio
recording and editing.
Employ field sound recording, foley, ADR, sound effects gathering, scoring, digital
audio editing, and mixing.
Produce programs for radio.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Sound. Hours: 05
 
1. Audio fundamentals: Definition, properties and characteristics of sound
2. Element of Sound
3. Representation of sound
4. Wave Theory - sound waves -- evolution of sound recording, understanding the
nuances of sound: decibel, range of human hearing, threshold, distortion, echo,
acoustic, reflection and refraction of sound, reverberation, ambient sound. Studio and
on-location recording of sound.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Scripting and Advantages of Digital Audio Editing.
 
1. Introduction of scripting for Audio, Understanding Radio scripts,Practical exposure
in studio Using Audio production applications
2. Recording, Mixing and mastering
3. Difference between Digital and Analog
4. Advantages of Digital audio editing
5. About stereo and mono ---
6. Properties of Sound
7. Capturing Sound wave
8. Audio formats for web
9. Pipeline of Audio Industry
10. About Equalizer, Consoles
11. Overview Of recording studio
12. About SFX
13. Foley
14. Background music.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Understanding Production Techniques and Equipments
 
1. Understanding Studio Protocols
2. Vocal booth,gobos,control rooms
3. Understanding Audio equipments and processors
4. Understanding Audio Cables and interconnections
5. Understanding grounding and pathway
6. Understanding Analog tape Recorders and its properties
7. Understanding microphone and miking techniques - Types of microphone ,polar
patterns,usages
8. Phantom power,Diaphragm
9. Tips for Audio Recording vocals.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Working with Audio applications
 
1. About Audacity/Audition interface
2. Main screen components
3. Recording with Audacity
4. checking recording levels | peak meters
5. Adjusting the input levels|
6. Usages of Sound card | setting up the recording environment
7. Effects | Trax mix window
8. Usages of multi track recording and single track recording--working with different
types of effects
9. Analog delay | Chorus/flanger | Com presser | reverb | dynamics | graphic eq
|Distortion | noise print
10. changing mono to stereo
11. live voice recording indoor and outdoor
12.Noise reduction.
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Music Theory and Production
 
1. Working with Pro Tools
2. Understanding tips and tricks of Studio Recording
3. Introduction to Music Theory, Tones semitones, sharps, flats, scales
4. Key signature major and minor scales and chords
5. Understanding musical notations
6. Beats and Rhythms, bars in music |
7. Understanding Different types of Instruments Sections
8. Understanding Music Laws and their characteristic
9. Royalty and copyrights in Music|
10. Introduction to MIDI Vsts
11. Needs for midi, Setting up midi|
12. Learning, Role of Radio Jockey, Radio Scheduling, and Automation,
13. Understating different types of production processes in the audio industry.
14.Understanding Mixing for Radio and TV Commercials, Mixing Music and music for
the film.
Text Books And Reference Books:
Audio Production Worktext Sixth Edition Concepts Techniques and Equipment.
The Recording Engineer's Handbook 3rd Edition by Bobby Owsinski.
The Mixing Engineer's Handbook 3rd Edition by Bobby Owsinski.
The Mastering Engineer's Handbook 3rd Edition by Bobby Owsinski.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NIL

Evaluation Pattern
Evaluation pattern: Submission-based Department level.
Record submission- 50 Marks.
Presentation, Viva Voce - 50 Marks.
 
 
Assignment Details :
1. Campus News for Radio Decibel (Weekly Based).
2. Sound for Video (group).
3. Podcast Series - 3 to 4 Episode.
4. Audio Documentary.
5. Product (or) Book Review
6. Song Production.
 
 
End Semester Submission and Viva Voce
Submitting the captured audio Waveform formats in online Google Drive folder with Hard
copy of Record Book offline submission (Includes all the assignments )

MCN153 - PRACTICAL ENGAGEMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
Students of mass communication need to be provided opportunities to practice their skills often so that they become adept. The students will be asked to handle and run either e-zine,
vlog or podcasts.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:
 
 
Demonstrate skill sets matching to the chosen platform
Produce content matching to the identified platform
Add meaningful content to one’s portfolio
Run online Radio station with different genre
Gather information, edit and publish through magazine, website..
Learn to collaborate with other people from different departments
Enhance the creative skill (Think and do creatively).

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Understanding Media Platforms Themes
 
1. Understanding the nature, features and potential of the identified media platform
2. Getting the themes identified and approved
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Production - 1
 
1. Identify one platform-specific expert
2. Meet the expert, present one’s action plan and get it approved.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Production - 2
 
1. Interviews with three people (faculty approvals to be taken)
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Production - 3
 
1. Issue-based content to be generated (at least three)
Text Books And Reference Books:
https://money.howstuffworks.com/how-to-start-online-magazine.htm
https://www.wow-womenonwriting.com/34-How2-StartEzine.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06ba9sgNtxw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIJpOcFf5h4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-osVNiP-ZX0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qmgl8vhrf4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TsMS7MW4H
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
Regular following of popular e-zines, podcasts and blogs is mandatory.
Evaluation Pattern
Students will be assessed at different stages based on the parameters shared in the course plan.

MCN231 - COMMUNICATION AND DEMOCRACY IN INDIA (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course provides an overview of the complex interrelation and interdependence between media and democracy. The normative objective of this course is to understand and critically

evaluate whether the existing forms and structures of media, enable, support and promote a democratic society. It also tries to explore whether new forms of media can empower the media's role within democratic societies. The course also provides a deep understanding of the complexities that arise in neoliberal democracies and contemporary media systems.

Learning Outcome

Understand the significance of the fourth estate in a constitutional democracy.

● Recognise the media's critical function of speaking truth to power.

● Identify the threats of increasing corporatisation, the concentration of ownership, and

evolving funding models in the digital economy.

● Critique the undemocratic overrepresentation of social elites in Indian newsrooms

● Discern the role of mass and social media in manufacturing public opinion and reality

● Critique various forms of censorship and curbs on press freedom in India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
THEORY, CONCEPT, & DEFINITIONS
 

1. Democratic theory; Democratic Press Theory

2. Media as the fourth estate. Democratic responsibilities of the media.

3. Fundamental rights and media’s role in protecting them.

4. Media as the voice of the voiceless. Media as the watchdog of democracy.

5. Media as the platform for deliberation (Media as Public Sphere).

6. Media worker as the democratic warrior.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
DEMOCRACY, CAPITALISM, & MEDIA
 

1. Contemporary structure of media within capitalism: Advertising funding and its

implications on media’s democratic functions.

2. Big business and government. Media as Big business.

3. Use of SLAPP on media houses and self-censorship.

4. Media concentration, conglomeration, commercialisation and its effect on democracy

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
DEMOCRATIC MEDIA.
 

1. Media reform and democratic media.

2. Media policy and democratic reform.

3. Alternatives to commercial media models: Case studies of BBC, NPR, Aljazeera,

PARI, NewsClick.

4. Critical analysis of Doordarshan and Rajya Sabha TV as PSM.

5. Emergence of digital news platforms and their role in democratic communication

[The Wire, Quint, NewsLaundry, The News Minute, Scroll].

6. Citizen Journalism

7. Representation of Caste and minorities in the media.

8. Media trials and the creation of the common enemy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
SOCIAL MEDIA, ALTERNATIVE MEDIA & DEMOCRACY
 

1. Social media as the new public sphere.

2. Social media and democratic elections in the current era ( Case studies of 2016 US

elections and 2019 Indian elections).

3. Alternative media spaces: Exploring community radio, Dalit Camera, Video

Volunteers and Alt News.

4. Critical examination of alternative models of media.

5. Public participation, civic engagement and Media

Text Books And Reference Books:

● Curran, J. (2011). Media and democracy. Routledge.

● Chattarji, S., & Ninan, S. (Eds.). (2013). The hoot reader: media practice in

twenty-first century India. New Delhi: Oxford.

● Ghosh, S., & Thakurta, P. G. (2016). Sue the Messenger: How Legal Harassment by

Corporates is Shackling Reportage and Undermining Democracy in India. Paranjoy

Guha Thakurta.

● Hardy, J. (2014). Critical political economy of the media: An introduction. Routledge.

● Herman, E. S., & Chomsky, N. (2010). Manufacturing consent: The political economy

of the mass media. Random House.

● McChesney, R. W. (2016). Rich media, poor democracy: Communication politics in

dubious times. New Press.

● Thomas, P. N. (2010). Political Economy of Communications in India: The Good, the

Bad and the Ugly (1st ed.).New Delhi, India: Sage Publication.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

● Biswal, S. K. (2019). Exploring the role of citizen journalism in rural India. Media

Watch, 10, 43-54.

● Curran, J. (1991). Rethinking the media as a public sphere. Communication and

citizenship, 27-57.

● Khan, U. (2015). Indian media: Crisis in the fourth estate. Kennedy School Review,

15, 70

● Rao, S. , Mudgal, V. (2015). Introduction: Democracy, Journalism and Civic Society

in India. Journalism Studies. 16(5), 615-623.

● Saeed, S. (2015). Phantom journalism governing India's proxy media owners.

Journalism

● Studies , 16(5), 663-679.

● Thussu, D. K. (2007). TheMurdochization'of news? The case of Star TV in India.

Media, Culture & Society, 29(4), 593-611.

● Varshney, A. (2000). Is India becoming more democratic?. The Journal of Asian

Studies, 59(1), 3-25.

● Udupa, S. (2012). Desire and democratic visibility: news media’s twin avatar in urban

India. Media, Culture & Society, 34(7), 880-897.

Evaluation Pattern

Department level submission

CIA1: Local community journalism

CIA2: Assignment in association with Online media

CIA3: Democracy seminar

CIA4: Analytical White paper

MCN232 - DEVELOPMENT COMMUNICATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

  • Development communication refers to the use of communication to facilitate social development. Development communication techniques include information dissemination and education, behaviour change, social marketing, social mobilization, media advocacy, communication for social change, and community participation. The course introduces students to the role of information, communication and the media in development and social change. To put development into context, the course looks at development theories and how these have influenced the different development communication approaches used at the various times. 

  • Through this course Students will explore: The concept of participatory communication; global debates about development; the digital divide; development policy frameworks at the global, regional and national levels. Communication of issues pertinent to sustainable development will be addressed including environment, population, gender, poverty and conflict management.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • To explain how different forms of media are used for development communication

  • To enable students get an appreciation of the role of information, communication and the media in development process

  • To facilitate students’ appreciation of the dimensions of development and introduce them to the development policy frameworks

  • To give students an understanding of key issues in sustainable development as a basis for engaging in effective development communication

  • To relate to NGO internship’s need which will be taken by students by end of the semester’s examination

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Concept of Development
 

 

  1. The meaning and definition of development

  2. Brief history: Colonization, Industrial revolution, First world, second world, and Third world

  3. Western and Indian models of development: Marshall plan, Rostow-Stages of Economic growth, McClelland-Human Motivation theory, Hagen-Theory of social change, Karl Deutsch-political theory of development, Gandhian economics, and socialistic approach of Nehru

  4. Psychological and social theories on human needs Maslow’s social hierarchy, Social conflict theory, Social exchange theory, and social constructionism

  5. The concept of sustainable development-UNDP’s Sustainable Development Goals and UN’s continuous efforts

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Development Communication - Introduction
 

 

  1. A brief  history of development communication, Daniel Learner’s Passing of traditional society 

  2. The value-added of development communication in programs and projects

  3. National development goals and key issues about (development) communication in the Indian context

  4. Understanding the scope and uses of development communication - Diffusion /Extension approach, mass media approaches Development support communication approach, Integrated approach, localized approach 

  5. Indian media in Dev. comm-Efforts of AIR, DD, and other media platforms. Kheda, SITE program

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Practice, Methodological framework, and application
 

 

  1. Participatory communication approaches-Case study of micro-financing and self-help groups

  2. The trickle down effect, citizen empowerment frameworks-RTI

  3. Technology aided communication models-e-governance

  4. Alternative approaches 

  5. Principles and methodology fundamentals of the four-phase framework - Communication-based assessment 

  6. Communication strategy design - Implementing the communication program - Communication for monitoring and evaluation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Different media for social change and case studies
 

 

  1. Community media

  2. Folk media, Street theatre, Print, Radio, TV, Outdoor media, and New media

  3. Social Entrepreneurship

    1. Case Studies

  4. PARI, Deccan Development Society, Raagi Kana

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Mathur, Kanwar B. (1994): Communication for Development and Social Change  New Delhi, Allied Publications

  2. Melkote, Srinivas R, Steeves, H. Leslie. (2015): Communication for Development : theory and practice for empowerment and social justice, New Delhi:Sage,
  3.  Narula, Uma.(1994): Development Communication: Theory and Practice New Delhi, Har-Anand

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Gauba O.P (2014): An Introduction to Political Theory (7th Edition), India,     Macmillam Publishers

  2. Paolo Mefalopulos.(2008): Development Communication Sourcebook - Broadening the Boundaries of Communication, Washington DC, The World Bank

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 – Submission - 20 Marks

CIA 2 – Mid - Semester Exam – 50 marks

CIA 3 – Presentation – 20 Marks

ESE – 100 Marks

 

 

 

MCN241A - QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN MEDIA RESEARCH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aimed at developing descriptive and statistical skills necessary for quantitative research approaches. It includes fundamental concepts and tests essential for quantitative research methods.

Learning Outcome

The students who have completed this course,

● Will be able to approach through quantitative methods towards their research works

● Will be able to decide the necessary statistical test and apply them

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Methods in media Research
 

1. Methods-Survey, Descriptive, Analytical, Cross-sectional, Longitudinal, Experimental, Content analysis, Sentimental analysis.

2. Sampling techniques - Probability and Non-probability, Sampling error;

3. Construction of tool, validity and reliability, Usage of existing inventories.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Statistics
 

1. Measures of central tendency (mean, mode, and median), measures of dispersion

(standard deviation), Level of Measurements, Nominal, Ordinal, Ratio, and Interval.

2. Parametric and Non-parametric tests - correlation tests and chi-square, Reliability, and

Validity.

3. Data processing, Analysis, Presentation, and interpretation of data,

4. Use of graphics in data presentation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Analyzing media messages: using quantitative content analysis in research by Riffe, Daniel; Lacy, Stephen; Fico, Frederick, Routledge communication series, 2014, Third edition

Riazi, A. M. (2016). The Routledge Encyclopedia of research methods in applied linguistics: Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research. London:

Routledge.

Mass Media Research-An Introduction, Roger D. Wimmer and Joseph R. Dominick, 2015, Thomson and Wordsworth

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Communication Research, Usha Rani N, 2016, University of Mysore.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous internal assessment conducted at the department level

MCN241B - QUALITATIVE METHODS IN MEDIA RESEARCH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is a continuation of Research Methodology, focusing on introducing to students a

variety of Qualitative research methods. The Course focuses both on gathering and analyzing

qualitative empirical material. The focus will be on methods commonly used in media and

communication research: Interviewing, Focus groups, and Text & discourse analysis. It will

further involve brief discussions about ethnographic methods and mixed methods.

Learning Outcome

● Recognize qualitative methods based on research questions.

● Evaluate benefits and limitations of Qualitative research methods.

● Understand the process of implementing a qualitative research project.

● Conduct in-depth interviews and focus groups.

● Analyze media texts & discourses, and empirical material collected through in depth

interviews/focus groups

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
How to think about Qualitative Research Projects
 

1. Developing & Designing qualitative research projects

2. Science & Qualitative research.

3. Case Selection & Gathering empirical material.

4. Ethics in Qualitative research

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Qualitative Interviews
 

1. Introduction to qualitative interviews.

2. Creating an Interview guide & Interview Schedule

3. Setting up interviews: Sample & Space

4. Analyzing interview data

5. Ethics of Interviewing

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Focus Groups
 

1. Introduction to Focus groups

2. Creating a Focus Group Schedule & plan

3. How to form groups? Samples & Space

4. Moderating and Observing

5. Analysis of Focus groups

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Textual & Discourse Analysis
 

1. Difference between textual & discourse analysis

2. Text as data

3. Doing Textual analysis

4. Conducting discourse analysis

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Other forms/techniques Qualitative research
 

1. Ethnography

2. A case for Grounded Theory

3. Tech for Qualitative research: NVivo

4. Mixed Methods

Text Books And Reference Books:

● Weiss, R. S. (1995). Learning from strangers: The art and method of qualitative

interview studies. Simon and Schuster.

● Brennen, B. S. (2017). Qualitative research methods for media studies. Taylor &

Francis

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

● Charmaz, K. (2014). Constructing grounded theory. Sage.

● Emerson, R. M., Fretz, R. I., & Shaw, L. L. (2011). Writing ethnographic fieldnotes.

University of Chicago Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Department level Submissions

CIA1: Interview Schedule & Interview Transcript

CIA2: Conducting Focus Group.

CIA3: Text Analysis

CIA4: Qualitative Research proposal.

MCN242A - DIGITAL HUMANITIES AND CYBER CULTURE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course gives an introduction to the field of digital humanities and cyber culture. Learners of this course are to explore the use of digital resources and their application in the domain of humanities and the ways in which digital technologies have transformed the way we experience our social lives and have shaped the ways in which we connect (and disconnect) with each other and wider society.

Course Objectives: This course explores a range of contemporary scholarship oriented to the study of digital humanities and cyber culture:

  • To make the students to understand the ways in which our social spaces, relationships and activities are mediated by and through digital technologies. 
  • To enable students to develop an understanding of digital humanities and cyber culture and their implications. 
  • To develop analytical and methodological skills to the study of different cases in the areas of digital humanities and cyber culture.
  • To instil research interest among students in the domains of digital humanities and cyber culture.

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • Understand and explain various terms and concepts related to the fields of digital humanities and cyberculture.
  • Demonstrate how technologies both constrain and enable knowledge acquisition and cultural convergence through a digital lense.
  • Engage in contemporary debates that evaluate the implications of cyber culture and digital humanities.
  • Research and analyse the cultural, political, philosophical, social and psychological implications of the networked interactions of human beings.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Digital Humanities & Cyberculture
 
  • Concept, nature and scope of Digital Humanities (DH)
  • Concepts- digitization, text mining, data analysis & visualization, digital media, digital ethnography
  • Concepts- cyberspace, online community, online identity, internet society, cyber culture, Internet of things
  • Use of digital platforms for creative work, scholarly publication, and pedagogy
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit II: Social Networking Sites
 

  • Social Network Sites: Definition, History, Scholarship and language
  • Social media platforms: Facebook, Twitter and Instagram
  • Participatory culture (UGC): YouTube, Wikipedia and Crowdsourcing
  • Net neutrality and corporatisation of social media platforms
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit III: Digital Consequences
 

  • Memes, Trolls, Hacking and Activism (FB/Twitter revolutions)
  • Cyber bullying,  piracy and online laws
  • Digital money: Paytm, BHIMA, BitCoin, Cryptocurrency
  • Internet surveillance: Julian Assange, Edward Snowden and Cambridge Analytics
Text Books And Reference Books:

Bortoli, S., Bouquet, P., & Palpanas, T. (2009). Social networking: Power to the people. In Papers presented in W3C Workshop on the Future of Social Networking Position, January, Barcelona.

Briggs, A., & Burke, P. (2009). A social history of the media: From Gutenberg to the Internet. Polity.

Ricardo, F. J. (Ed.). (2009). Cyberculture and new media (Vol. 56). Rodopi.

Documentaries:

The Great Hack

Edward Snoden

How Facebook changed the world? The Arab Spring

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Beckett, C. (2011). SuperMedia: Saving journalism so it can save the world. John Wiley & Sons.

Castells, M. (2009). Communication power: Oxford University Press. Inc. NewYork, USA ISBN, 199567042, 9780199567041.

Elea, I., & Mikos, L. (2017). Young & creative: Digital technologies empowering children in everyday life. Nordicom, University of Gothenburg.

Jenkins, H. (2008). Convergence Culture: where old and new media collide.

Karapanagiotis, N. (2013). Cyber Forms," Worshipable Forms": Hindu Devotional Viewpoints on the Ontology of Cyber-Gods and-Goddesses. International Journal of Hindu Studies, 17(1), 57-82.

Mayo, S. (2008). The prelude to the millennium: the backstory of digital aesthetics. The Journal of Aesthetic Education, 42(1), 100-113.

Papacharissi, Z. (2010). A private sphere: Democracy in a digital age. Polity.

Jajodia Nirmalendu,Krishnaswamy Arvind (2017). A Cashless Society, Cyber Security and the Aam Aadmi. EPW

Thorat Shiva (2016). Morality, Illegality and Crime in Download Culture  Sarai Reader

Evaluation Pattern

Department Level Submissions

The course shall not have a regular CIA- MSE -ESE model. Instead, the student will be given a series of assignments spread across the semester, leading to a final portfolio/article/content collective on submission model. The teaching facilitator will consider the level of intelligibility in the class and the learning needs of the students and decide what assignment to be given on a regular basis. 

Sample Assignments

Analyze a case study and present a report-500 words. 15 marks

Social Media Campaign idea & plan for a social cause-500 words. 15 marks

Portfolio submission based on classroom assignments on critical reflections on digital humanities. 50 marks

Understand, analyze and disseminate digital literacy through stories. Cyber story (Easy)/ expert interview (Medium) and booklet submission (Complex) 

*Rubrics for each activity will be provided by the concerned faculty offering the course.

** Keep duplicate copies of all work submitted in this course. Save all returned, graded work until the semester is over.

MCN242B - READING CINEMA (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to introduce the students to some of the formal elements of analysing cinema. The course aims to increase the “visual” literacy and ensure a more well-developed technical and critical vocabulary with which one could talk and write about films and other visual media. We will watch and analyze scenes, some shots, and three feature-length films drawn from both Indian and world cinemas. The main focus will be on the formal elements of film and their relationship with film content. We will also spend time touching on major trends, issues, figures, and works in film history. Overall, this course will help students to think, talk and write more effectively about viewing and make them more confident and knowledgeable about the moving image in all its forms and media.

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, students will be able to

explain how films have changed over the years as a form of entertainment, an industry, and as a form of social reflection 

● analyze the relationship between films, psychoanalysis and feminism

engage with cinema-based research articles with reference to Indian Cinema

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Reading Cinema History
 

1. Rajadhyaksha, A. (2007). The ‘Bollywoodization’ of the Indian cinema. The Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Reader, 449-466. 

2. Booth, G. D. (2011). Preliminary thoughts on Hindi popular music and film production: India's ‘culture industry (ies)’, 1970–2000. South Asian Popular Culture,9(02), 215-221. 

3. Jain, P., & Sarkar, B. (2010). Mourning the Nation: Indian Cinema in the Wake ofPartition. The Journal of Asian Studies, 69(2), 641. 

4. Chatterjee, P. (2013, December 27). Cinema pulse. Retrieved from Frontline

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Films, Feminism and Psychoanalysis
 

Rizzo, T. (2012). Deleuze and film : A feminist introduction.ProQuest Ebook Central https://search.proquest.com 

S.J. (1990). Introduction: Psychoanalysis and Cinema. Film Criticism, 14(3), 1-2.

Devaleena Das (2020) Body, Boundaries and Sindoor Feminism in India, South Asia:Journal of South Asian Studies, DOI: 10.1080/00856401.2020.1816018

Ashvin Devasundaram (2021) Tracing Bergman in Contemporary Indian Cinema:Philosophical Cross-Connections in Through a Glass Darkly, Ship of Theseus andDear Molly, Popular Communication, DOI: 10.1080/15405702.2020.1868046

Shazia Rahman (2011) Land, Water, and Food: Eco-cosmopolitan Feminist Praxis inSabiha Sumar's Khamosh Pani, Environmental Communication, 5:2, 187-201, DOI:10.1080/17524032.2011.562521 

HELEN TAYLOR ROBINSON MSc (2007) The Ego, the Eye, and the CameraLens—A Psychoanalytic Reading of Traumatic Loss and Mourning in KrzysztofKieslowski's Three Colours Blue (1993), Psychoanalytic Inquiry, 27:4, 510-524, DOI:10.1080/07351690701484683 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Rajadhyaksha, A. (2016). Indian Cinema: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press. 

Virdi, J. (2003). The cinematic imagiNation [sic]: Indian popular films as social history. Rutgers University Press. 

Sarkar, B. (2009). Mourning the nation: Indian cinema in the wake of Partition. Duke University Press. 

Chatterjee, P. (2013, December 27). Cinema pulse. Retrieved from Frontline: https://frontline.thehindu.com/books/cinema-pulse/article5443958.ece

Rizzo, T. (2012). Deleuze and film : A feminist introduction. ProQuest Ebook Central https://search.proquest.com - 

https://search.proquest.com/legacydocview/EBC/1751443/bookReader?accountid=38 885&ppg=10 

Mulvey, L. (1981). AFTERTHOUGHTS ON 'VISUAL PLEASURE AND NARRATIVE CINEMA' INSPIRED BY 'DUEL IN THE SUN' (KING VIDOR, 1946). Framework: The Journal of Cinema and Media, (15/17), 12-15. Retrieved February 20, 2021, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/44111815 

S.J. (1990). Introduction: Psychoanalysis and Cinema. Film Criticism, 14(3), 1-2. Retrieved February 20, 2021, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/44075856

https://frontline.thehindu.com/books/cinema-pulse/article5443958.ece

Ashvin Devasundaram (2021) Tracing Bergman in Contemporary Indian Cinema: Philosophical Cross-Connections in Through a Glass Darkly, Ship of Theseus and Dear Molly, Popular Communication, DOI: 10.1080/15405702.2020.1868046

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

A century of cinema literature: The film history survey. (1998). Film History, 10(4), 429-447. Retrieved from 

https://lavasalibrary.remotexs.in/scholarly-journals/century-cinema-literature-film-hist ory-survey/docview/219791189/se-2?accountid=38885 

Fell, J. (1983). Christian metz and the reality of film. Film Quarterly (ARCHIVE), 37(1), 52-52,1. Retrieved from 

https://lavasalibrary.remotexs.in/scholarly-journals/christian-metz-reality-film/docvie w/845266320/se-2?accountid=38885 

A century of cinema literature: The film history survey. (1998). Film History, 10(4), 429-447. Retrieved from 

https://lavasalibrary.remotexs.in/scholarly-journals/century-cinema-literature-film-hist ory-survey/docview/219791189/se-2?accountid=38885 

Page | 43 / 116

Chakravarty, S. (2007). Teaching indian cinema. Cinema Journal, 47(1), 105-108,115. Retrieved from 

https://lavasalibrary.remotexs.in/scholarly-journals/teaching-indian-cinema/docview/2 22247797/se-2?accountid=38885 

Chidananda, D. G. (1980). New directions in indian cinema. Film Quarterly (ARCHIVE), 34(1), 32-42. Retrieved from 

https://lavasalibrary.remotexs.in/scholarly-journals/new-directions-indian-cinema/doc view/223107548/se-2?accountid=38885 

Chute, D. (2006). The kapoors: The first family of indian cinema. Film Comment, 42(6), 79. Retrieved from 

https://lavasalibrary.remotexs.in/scholarly-journals/kapoors-first-family-indian-cinem a/docview/210254593/se-2?accountid=38885 

Fell, J. (1983). Christian metz and the reality of film. Film Quarterly (ARCHIVE), 37(1), 52-52,1. Retrieved from 

https://lavasalibrary.remotexs.in/scholarly-journals/christian-metz-reality-film/docvie w/845266320/se-2?accountid=38885 

Gust, S. J. (2000). Encyclopedia of indian cinema. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 39(3), 297. Retrieved from 

https://lavasalibrary.remotexs.in/scholarly-journals/encyclopedia-indian-cinema/docvi ew/217939959/se-2?accountid=38885 

Herman, v. O. (2002). Making meaning of indian cinema. The Journal of Asian Studies, 61(2), 766-767. Retrieved from 

https://lavasalibrary.remotexs.in/scholarly-journals/making-meaning-indian-cinema/d ocview/230425364/se-2?accountid=38885 

Iadevito, P. (2014). Theories of gender and cinema. A contribution to the representation studies. Universitas Humanística, 78(78) Retrieved from https://lavasalibrary.remotexs.in/scholarly-journals/theories-gender-cinema-contributi on/docview/1771619066/se-2?accountid=38885 

Waugh, T. (1999). CINEMAS, NATIONS, MASCULINITIES: The martin walsh memorial lecture (1998)1. Canadian Journal of Film Studies (ARCHIVE), 8(1), 8-44. Retrieved from 

 

https://lavasalibrary.remotexs.in/scholarly-journals/cinemas-nations-masculinities-mar tin-walsh/docview/222698229/se-2?accountid=38885 

Evaluation Pattern

The course shall not have a regular CIA- MSE -ESE model. Instead, the student will be given a series of assignments spread across the semester, leading to a final portfolio/article/content collective on submission model. The teaching facilitator will consider the level of intelligibility in the class and the learning needs of the students and decide what assignment to be given on a regular basis. 

Sample Assignment: 

Poster Presentation on history of film 

Film Review 

Film Analysis 

 

*Rubrics for each activity will be provided by the concerned faculty offering the course.

MCN243A - REPORTING AND PUBLIC SPEAKING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course introduces the student to the essential communication and leadership skill of public speaking.  The course includes techniques to lessen speaker anxiety, use of visual aids, listening skills and effective body language to enhance presentations. Practical speaking assignments will be provided to train the students to influence, impact, entertain and persuade people with  regular individual and peer feedback to improve their technique and style in speech communication. 

Learning Outcome

After completing this course, students should be able to:

 

  • Plan, prepare and deliver speeches that inform, persuade, entertain or fulfill the needs of any occasion;

  • Design and use presentation aids to enhance their speeches and communicate effectively;

  • Outline their speeches in a logical and thorough fashion;

  • Conduct meaningful research on a variety of topics 

  • Analyze audiences and develop speeches accordingly;

  • Evaluate speeches based on a variety of verbal and non-verbal criteria;

  • Listen more effectively in order to ideate and speak better

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
The Foundations of Public Speaking
 

 

  1. Why Public Speaking Matters Today

  2. Managing Speech Anxiety - Fighting stage fright

  3. Speaking with Confidence

  4. The importance of listening

  5. Understanding Oneself

  6. Differentiating between Speeches

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Preparation and Planning
 

 

  1. Understanding and Owning the Speaking Environment

  2. Audience Analysis

  3. Finding a Purpose and Selecting a Topic

  4. Preparing, Outlining and Researching your speech

  5. Adding supporting ideas and building arguments

  6. The body , introduction and conclusion.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Delivering the Public Speech
 

 

  1. Connecting with the audience

  2. The importance of language

  3. Methods in Delivering the Speech - Tone, Voice, pitch, modulation, body language and gestures

  4. Developing and Selecting Style

  5. Designing and Using Presentation aids

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Applying and Developing Public Speaking Skills
 

 

  1. Speaking to inform and entertain

  2. Persuasive speaking.

  3. Ethical Public Speaking

  4. Connecting Public Speaking with Storytelling

  5. Group Discussion Techniques

  6. Managing time and adapting to situations

  7. Seeking Feedback

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  • Grice, G. L., Skinner, J. F., & Mansson, D. H. (2016). Mastering public speaking (Ninth edition.). New York: Pearson.

  • Beebe, S. A., & Beebe, S. (2007). Public Speaking: Handbook (2nd ed.). New York: Allyn And Bacon.

  • Gallo, C. (2014). Talk like TED: The 9 public speaking secrets of the world's top minds (First edition : March 2014.). New Delhi: Macmillan.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Call, Dennis Boyd (2019). Stand Up! Speak Up! Shut Up!: Ten Thoughts on Giving An Amazing Talk (Kindle edition).Retrieved from amazon.com

  • Forsyth, Patrick (1997). 30 Minutes before a Presentation ( 1st edition). London: Kogan Page

  • Anderson, C. (2016). TED TALKS: The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking. London: Headline Publishing Group.

Evaluation Pattern

 

  • CIA1: Introductory Speech

  • CIA2: Informative Speech in Pecha Kucha Style

  • CIA3: Persuasive Speech 

  • CIA 4: Group Discussion

MCN243B - TECHNICAL WRITING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is a practical paper offered as an elective. 

Technical writing involves translating technical information into readable and accessible writing, usable by a wide audience.

  • This course enables students to communicate information about a product or concept for a specific audience and a specific purpose. 
  • The objective is to train students to convey the information clearly and concisely and in a language that is understandable by the audience.

Learning Outcome

On completion of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Identify and understand the facets and functions of the different genres of technical writing
  • Write documents that are reader-centered
  • Integrate tables, figures, and other images into documents

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Technical Writing
 
  1. What is Technical Writing? Definition and explanation
  2. Relevance & importance of Technical Writing
  3. Role of a Technical writer
  4. Principles of Technical Writing; Technical Writing structure & style
  5. Whom to write-Knowing your audience-approaches to word choice, tone, and formatting
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Content Development
 
  1. Communication for internal & external reasons-professional correspondence such as emails, memos & letters
  2. Resumes, reports, proposals, technical descriptions, technical definitions
  3. Technical manuals, and proposals.
  4. Instructional content-what goes into a video, podcast, printed pamphlets/brochures
  5. Technical writing methods-Agile & Waterfall
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The Technical Writing Process
 
  1. Description & explanation of product/concept
  2. Including visuals/photographs, infographics, audio/visual content/videos
  3. Editing to suit the platform-hard-copy, multimedia, wiki, blogs, on-line, electronic documents (pdf)
  4. Editing for clarity & simplicity- English Grammar, Punctuation and Mechanics
  5. MS Style Guides & Proofreading
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Technical Writing Software Tools
 
  1. Microsoft Word, PowerPoint
  2. Adobe Photoshop
  3. Adobe Illustrator
  4. Powtoon
  5. Prezi
  6. Notepad++
  7. WordPress
  8. Windows Snipping Tool
  9. Windows Movie Maker
  10. Google Docs
Text Books And Reference Books:
  • James, G. (2012). How to Get Started as a Technical Writer. USA:CreateSpace Independent Publishing
  • VanLaan, K.  (2012). The Insider's Guide to Technical Writing. USA:XML Press
  • Olsen, L. and Huckin, T. (1990). Technical Writing and Professional Communication. USA: McGraw-Hill Education.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Blake, G. (2000).  The elements of technical writing. USA: Pearson Pub.
  • Gerson, J. S. and Gerson, S.M (2013). Technical Communication: Process and Product. USA: Pearson Longman.
  • Markel, M.  (2012). Technical Communication. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
Evaluation Pattern

The course shall not have a regular CIA- MSE -ESE model. Instead, the student will be given a series of assignments spread across the semester, leading to a final portfolio/article/content collective on submission model. The teaching facilitator will consider the level of intelligibility in the class and the learning needs of the students and decide what assignment to be given on a regular basis. 

Sample Assignments

  1. Introductory Emails, 200 words. Using a standard email format and an effective professional style, send a message to each of these- Professional working within your field, Organization’s HR personnel, Tech support engineer. (25 marks)
  2. Technical Description, 700 words. Write a professional memo that provides a clear description using specific technical terms for a process or device. (25 marks)
  3. Instructional Podcast, 1000 words per student. Working in groups of three, students will create an instructional guide designed to provide advice or instructions for either the general student body or a specific group of students. (25 marks)
  4. Application Packet, 700 words. Produce an application packet with a job description analysis, cover letter, and a resume. (25 marks)

*Rubrics for each activity will be provided by the concerned faculty offering the course.

MCN251 - DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
The goal of the course is for the student to develop the ability to capture great video images and audio, and to be able to edit those two elements together to tell a story.

Learning Outcome

  • The Course would provide students hands-on skills in planning, scripting, and producing studio program mes for the television medium. 
  •  Students can produce Commercials, Short Films, and documentaries, and PSAs.
  •  Practical knowledge in Video editing and Audio editing techniques – To create their own video Commercials and Documentaries.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to video production
 
1. General introduction to production practices in broadcast media, television, and camera Operations, types of the camera;; principles of lighting, basic lighting, studio and portable lighting instruments, lighting accessories.
2. Concept to Editing Desk
3. One line story, dialogue story, camera script, and sound script
4. Television programs: production planning, writing TV scripts, shooting scripts, producing news, news writing and reporting designing newscast and anchoring.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Sound
 

 

1. The basics of sound, elements of sound, frequency, amplitude, microphones, patterns of microphones, types of microphones – hand-held, studio, mounted, headset, shotgun.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Multi-Camera Production: The Video Studio
 
1. Multi-camera production, video production studio, studio control room, master control;; set design: make-up: technical requirements, clothing and texture, colour and materials. Scenery and Props
2. Television Scenery, Properties and set dressings and elements of Scene design, floor plan, set backgrounds and platforms
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
The Craft of Video Editing:
 
1. Linear and non-linear editing, linear editing systems, non-linear editing systems,off-line editing procedures, on-line editing procedures, continuity editing and complexity editing.Outdoor shooting, Multi-camera production. Post-production tasks.
2. Different types of editing techniques. Montages: Introduction to Non Linear Editing (NLE)- Adobe Premiere Pro, Final Cut Pro
3. Introduction: Introduction to Adobe Premiere Pro : Basic concept, Various windows, Importing video clip, Organizing clips using bins, creating a rough cut , Timeline window tools, Trimming clips.
4. Starting a project: Starting a project, removing unused clips from project, naming ,finding and deleting items, working with palettes
5. Capturing the video: Getting source material for a project, connecting video source,preparing for analog and DV capture, recording or replacing timecode (DV only) ,capturing clips with & without device control, batch capturing video.
6. Editing Video, Transition: Monitor window and timeline window , editing In and Out points, using markers, editing clips, creating counting leader. Introduction, Transition palette, Creating Transitions, Replacing transitions, Changing transition settings.
7. Audio and Audio Filters: Audio processing, adjusting fade and Crossfade, Fades intimeline, Audio mixer window, Non-linear fades, Muting and swapping channels in a stereo clip, viewing audio clips.
8. Titling in Premiere: Creating a new title, setting up the title window, rolling and crawling text, graphic object, adding shadow, color, transparency, and gradients, using title presets and final exporting the project. Visual Effects and How to use them: Digital video effects, motion, multi-image,
image size, light, colour
10. Optical effects, television gobos, reflections star filters, diffusion filters, defocus.
11. Mechanical effects, rain, snow fog, wind, smoke, fire and lightning
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
360 Videography
 
1. Introduction to 360 Videography
2. Storytelling through 360
3. Basic editing in Unity
Text Books And Reference Books:
Better Location Shooting - Techniques for Video Production by Paul Martingell,Focal Press, 2008.
The 360° Video Handbook: A step-by-step guide to creating video, Michael Wohl,2017.
Documentary Filmmakers Handbook by Ned Eckhardt, McFarland&company, IncPublishers, 2012.
Film Directing Fundamentals, Second Edition,Nicholas T. Proferes, Focal Press,2005.
Film Production Technique by Bruce Mamer, Wadsworth Publication, 2009.
Television Production, Fourteenth Edition by Gerald Millerson, Focal Press, 2009.
Writing and Producing Television News by Eric K. Gormly, 2 nd Edition, Surjeet
Publication.
Video Basics by Herbert Zettl (Wadsworth Publishing Company)
Video Field Production and Editing by Campesi and Sherriffs.
Lighting For Action: Professional Techniques for Shooting Video and Film by JohnHart (Amphoto)
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Nil

Evaluation Pattern
Assessment Outline(All CIA s and ESE project is submission based only):
1) CIA 1 - Video Resume for 2 minutes
2) CIA 2 - C News and C Interview
3) CIA 3 - Voxpop and PSA
4) ESE Viva Voce - Portfolio

MCN281 - INTERNSHIP - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:0
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The internship is a mandatory requirement for the completion of the MA in Media and Communication Studies progamme. At the end of the first semester, students are required to undertake a writing-specific internship for a month in any media platform. Students will be given a letter from the University so that they can approach media organizations for their internships. At the end of the internship the students should submit an internship completion report/certificate authorised by the media organisation. 

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to: 

Apply the writing-specific learnings acquired in the classroom 

Understand the organisational structure and culture 

Connect with industry professionals 

Test one’s skills and knowledge in the industry context

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:160
Writing-specific internship
 

Students need to pursue a writing-specific internship.

Text Books And Reference Books:

not applicable

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

not applicable

Evaluation Pattern

Students have to submit the following reports, baed on which they will be assessed.

Joining day report 

First Weekly journal 

Part A: Prepare a report based on various tasks assigned to you, its analyses and retrospection (Minimum 800 words) 

Part B: Report Format: 

Details of organisational structure. (Owner, MD, Heads,.....) 

Page | 58 / 116

Details of your responsibility in the organistion/department 

Details of your Works and summary of daily programme 

Time schedule 

Projects that you have completed/ongoing in this week 

New learnings from the organisation 

How do you compare the classroom learning with industry exposure New and innovative ideas 

Relationship with your immediate boss in the organisation 

Difficulties/Challenges that you have faced in organisation 

.....to interact with the boss, management, team workers... 

.....to understand the industry working situation, 

.....to keep time travel and food 

Team work 

Challenges 

Plans for the next week 

Second to the last week journal entry 

Task assigned 

Analysis and Retrospection

MCN282 - RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The ability to formulate a question, find the data relevant to your question, analyze those data, and present your findings are skills that you benefit your professional and personal life.

Learning Outcome

  • assess critically the following methods: literature study, case study, structured surveys, interviews, focus groups, participatory approaches, narrative analysis, cost-benefit analysis, scenario methodology and technology foresight.

  • critically assess research methods pertinent to technology innovation research.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to research project
 

introduction about the research project. Delegation of work. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Data collection and Analysis
 

Data collection and analysis

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Analysis
 

Analysis of collected data.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Conclusion & presentation
 

Conclusion and presentation.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Patten, Mildred L. 2004. Understanding research methods: An overview of the essentials. 4th ed.

Glendale, CA: Pyrczak Publishing. 170p. ISBN 1884585523 (pbk.) 5th ed.: 183p. ISBN 1884585647

Simon, Julian Lincoln. 2003. Basic research methods in social science: The art of empirical

investigation. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. [Reprint of previous 2nd edition, 1978,

entitled Basic research methods in social sciences: The art of empirical investigation.] 558p. ISBN:

0765805308.

 

Yates, Simeon J. 2004. Doing social science research. London, UK: Sage Publications: Open

University. 293p. ISBN 0761967974 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Patten, Mildred L. 2004. Understanding research methods: An overview of the essentials. 4th ed.

Glendale, CA: Pyrczak Publishing. 170p. ISBN 1884585523 (pbk.) 5th ed.: 183p. ISBN 1884585647

 

Simon, Julian Lincoln. 2003. Basic research methods in social science: The art of empirical

investigation. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. [Reprint of previous 2nd edition, 1978,

entitled Basic research methods in social sciences: The art of empirical investigation.] 558p. ISBN:

0765805308.

 

Yates, Simeon J. 2004. Doing social science research. London, UK: Sage Publications: Open

University. 293p. ISBN 0761967974 

Evaluation Pattern

Department level submission

Evaluation based on the type of research activity selected.

 

 

 

MCN291 - ECOLOGY AND MEDIA DISCOURSES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Rampant exploitation of natural resources, increasing levels of pollution, intensifying human-animal conflicts, climate emergency, etc. have made ecology one of the prime subjects of discussion in recent decades. While engagements with ecology are most often taken up from a life sciences perspective, there is a felt need to approach ecology from a humanities and social sciences perspective. This course addresses that need. After laying the terms and concepts in the field as the foundation, the course progresses to engage with some of the key issues in the domain and ends with some of the media texts on ecology.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to: 

  • Engage with ecological concerns from a Humanities and Social Sciences perspective

  • Demonstrate interdisciplinary knowledge of ecology

  • Analyse diverse contexts and concerns of ecology

  • Sense the potential of media in spreading ecological awareness

  • Exercise ecological consciousness

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Ecology
 
  1. Glossary: Ecology, Environment, Ecosystem, Biosphere, Biome, Habitat, Niche, Vegetarianism, Anthropocentrism, Speciesism, Conservation, Biocentrism, Gia Theory, Deep Ecology, Bioregionalism, Ecopsychology, Virtual Water

  2. The Ecology of Affluence and the Southern Challenge (Excerpts from Environmentalism: A Global History)

 

This unit is a platform that enables the entrant to pick up key vocabulary, and attain conceptual clarity regarding the discourse of ecology.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Idea of Nature
 
  1. Four Frames of Relating to Nature: Nature for Itself, Nature despite People, Nature for People, People and Nature 

  2. William Cronon's The Trouble with Wilderness; or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature

  3. Changing Natures: A Democratic and Dynamic Approach to Biodiversity Conservation by Kartik Shankar, Meera Anna Oommen and Nitin Rai

  4. Excerpts from Nature in the City by Harini Nagendra

 

This unit presents some of the key discourses on nature that circulate both in the popular and in the theoretical domains.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecology: Contexts, Concerns
 
  1. The Food Crises: Hunger via Corporate-Controlled Trade chapter from Making Peace with the Earth by Vandana Shiva

  2. Pollution: Addressing Pollution in Urban Rivers: Lessons from the Vrishabhavathy River in Bengaluru by Priyanka Jamwal and Sharachchandra Lele (excerpts from Transcending Boundaries: Reflecting on Twenty years of Action and research at ATREE)

  3. Excerpts from the Madhav Gadgil and Kasturirangan Reports

 

This unit presents some of the prime ecological concerns that haunt our lives and a few contexts that are detrimental in deciding the course of our earth’s ecological well-being.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Limits to Growth
 
  1. The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable - History (Chapter II)

  2. How Much should a Person Consume? (excerpts from How much should a person consume?: Thinking through the environment. )

 

This unit highlights how our finite world is plundered by indiscriminate looting and infinite demands.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Field Visits
 
  1. A one-day trip to a forest (Excerpts from My Husband and Other Animals to be discussed on the occasion)

  2. Visit to ATREE/ Bhoomi College/ Environment specific-NGO/ Ecologically-stressed area in Bangalore 

 

Field visits are to enable the student to gain an experiential sense of biodiversity, forest life, eco initiatives and ecological stress.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Ecology and Media Discourses
 

 

  1. Conservation Conversations E3: Science and Conservation

  2. Human-Animal Conflict: Gaur in My Garden by Rita Banerjee 

  3. The Hunt - BBC Series

  4. Mongabay Explores Sumatra: Omens and optimism for orangutans - Podcast

This Unit exhibits how the media could play a proactive role in promoting ecological awareness. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Banerji, Rita. (2013) Gaur in my garden. Film.

  2. Callenbach, E. (2008). Ecology: A pocket guide. Berkeley: University of California Press.

  3. Conservation Conversations E3: Science & Conservation. (n.d.). Retrieved April 06, 2017, from http://www.conservationindia.org/videos/conservation-conversations-e3-science-conservation

  4. Ghosh, A. (2016). Great derangement. Place of publication not identified: John Murray  Lt.

  5. Guha, R. (2014). Environmentalism: A global history. London: Penguin Books.

  6. Guha, R. (2006). How much should a person consume?: Thinking through the environment. Delhi: Permanent Black.

  7. Home. (n.d.). Retrieved April 06, 2017, from http://conservationindia.org/

  8. Lenin, J. (2012). My husband and other animals. Chennai: Westland.

  9. Nagendra, H. (2016). Nature in the city: Bengaluru in the past, present, and future. New Delhi, India: Oxford University Press.

  10. Podcast: Omens and optimism for Sumatran orangutans. (2021, February 02). Retrieved from https://news.mongabay.com/2021/02/podcast-omens-and-optimism-for-sumatran-orangutans/

  11. Rangarajan, M. (2015). Nature and nation: Essays on environmental history. Ranikhet: Permanent Black in association with Ashoka University.

  12. Shiva, V. (2013). Making peace with the earth: Beyond resource, land and food wars. Auckland Park, South Africa: Jacana Media.

  13. U.N. report lays out blueprint to end 'suicidal war on nature'. (2021, February 19). Retrieved from https://news.mongabay.com/2021/02/u-n-report-lays-out-blueprint-to-end-suicidal-war-on-nature/

  14. Vincent, P. (n.d.). Carrying Capacity. Encyclopedia of Human Geography. doi:10.4135/9781412952422.n21

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. ALTERNATIVE FUTURES: India Unshackled. AUTHORSUPFRONT Publishing, 2018.

  2. Students should start following news that is environment-centric. One should also follow websites like conservationindia.org, mongabay.org, etc.
Evaluation Pattern

Students need to take four-levels of evaluation.

 

  • I CIA: Students need to identify a local ecological crisis, document it and identify means of addressing it. (10 marks)

  • II CIA- Mid Sem: Centralised exam (25 marks)

  • III CIA - Students need to identify a problem in the domain of ecology and make a research proposal. (10 marks)

  • End Sem: Centralised exam (50 marks)

MSA291 - CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the idea of CSR from a conceptual, historical and theoretical perspective and also addresses the ongoing debates. Detailed analysis of the policies and frameworks related to CSR implementation in India is made considering the employability of CSR professionals. While discussing the scope of CSR for sustainable development, references will be made to SDG goals.

 

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the student should be able to:

        Demonstrate an understanding of  the conceptual framework of CSR.

        Explain the history and evolution of the concept of CSR and the debates around it both at the global and national levels.

        Explain the theories related to CSR.

        Explain the legal framework of CSR.

        Demonstrate the  skills to critically examine the CSR strategies and initiatives of various organizations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to CSR
 

1.      CSR: Definition, Concepts, Elements of Social Responsibility

2.      History and Evolution of CSR (International)

3.      History and Evolution of CSR (India)

4.      CSR in Global Context - International Legal Instrument and Guidelines

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Theoretical Foundations of CSR
 

1.      Normative Theories: Corporate Social Performance Theory, Fiduciary Capitalism Theory, Stakeholder Theory, Corporate Citizenship Theory.

2.      Instrumental Theories and Approaches: Maximisation of shareholder value, strategies for competitive advantage and cause-related marketing.

3.      CSR - critique

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Issues and Challenges in CSR
 

1.      CSR and Issues in Economy and Social Development

2.      CSR and Environmental Issues

3.      CSR and  Labour Related Issues

4.      Ethical and Governance Issues related to CSR

5.      Corporate Citizenship and Brand building

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Implementation and Governance of CSR in India
 

1.      Evolution of Indian CSR Framework -Pre Companies Bill 2012

2.      Companies Act 2013

3.      CSR implementation – Agencies, Models & Best practices

4.      Case Studies (Field Exposure /workshop)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Agarwal, S. (2008).Corporate Responsibility in India.New Delhi: Sage.

Crane, A. (ed.). (2008). The Oxford handbook of Corporate Social Responsibility.Oxford Handbooks Online.

Crowther, D., &Guler A. (2008).Corporate Social Responsibility.Ventus Publishing House.

GoI (2011).National Voluntary Guidelines. New Delhi: Ministry of Corporate Affairs.

GoI (2013).Companies Act. New Delhi: Ministry of Corporate Affairs.

Maira, A.(2013). India’s 2% CSR Law.Economic and Political Weekly, 48 (38)

Mele, D., &Garriga, E. (2004).Corporate Responsibility Theories: Mapping the Territory. In Journal of Business Ethics. 51-71. Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Baxi, C.V &Rupamanjri S R. (2012).Corporate Social Responsibility. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.

Bob &Hartsuikar. (2007). Theory of CSR:  Its Evolutionary Path and Road Ahead.Oxford :Blackwell.

Brammer, S., Jackson &Matton. (2012). Corporate Social Responsibility And Institutional Theory: New Perspectives On Private Governance. Socio-Economic Review.3-28.

Burchell, J. (2008). The Corporate Social Responsibility Reader. New York: Routledge.

Mullerat, R. (2010).  International Corporate Social Responsibility: the role of corporations in the economic order of the 21st century. Austin: Aspen Publishers

Prasad, K. (2009).  Corporate Governance. New York: Prentice Hall India.

Rodrigues &Branco. (2007). Positioning Stakeholder Theory within the Debate on Corporate Social Responsibility. Electronic Journal of Business Ethics and OrganisationalStudies.12(1).

Steiner, J. F & Steiner, G. A. (2009).Business, Government and Society (12thed.). New York: McGraw Hill.

Sundar, P. (2013). Business and community: The Story of Corporate Responsibility in India. New York: Sage

Evaluation Pattern

The evaluation pattern is as follows:

·  Continuous Internal Assessment or CIA constitutes a total of 50 percent. The distribution is as follows

oCIA I is a 20 marks assignment that contributes to 10% of the final grade

oCIA II is the 2 hour long 50 mark Mid semester Examination conducted during August/January for 25 % of the final grade 

The pattern for the exam is as follows:

Section A: This section has 1 compulsory question that carries 10 marks

Section B: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 20 marks 

oCIA III also carries 20 marks and is based on an assignment that is set for the course. This contributes to 10% of the final grade

oAttendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 

·  End Semester Examination (ESE) is conducted at the end of the semester. This is a 3 hour long 100 mark exam that contributes 50% of the final grade for the course. The pattern for the exam is given below:

Section A: Attempt any 5 questions out of the 8 options given. Each question carries 20 marks

MCN321 - MEDIA MANAGEMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course media management helps students explore the domain of management. It throws light on the necessity to apply the principles of management in the context of media organizations. The course also discusses the need to be concerned with visison, ethics, cultural diversity and the changing workplace.  

 

 

Learning Outcome

  • Explain the nature and purpose of management
  • Describe the application of the functions of management in the context of media organizations
  • Analyze decisison making as a rational process 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Media Organizations- Print, Broadcast- Radio and Television, film and New Media
 

Historical evolution of media
Functions of media
Not-for-profit organisation
Management functions
Organizational structure- types
Print organisation, broadcast organisation, film production
organisation and new media organisation
Moving towards convergence

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Management Approaches- Case study of a few media houses
 

The dilemma of profit versus ethics
The Times of India/ The Telegraph
Viacom18
Radio City
Dharma Productions
Newsminute/The Wire

Text Books And Reference Books:

Management by Stoner, Freeman and Gilbert

Media Management- A casebook approach by Jan leBlanc Wicks
 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Inside the BBC and CNN: Managing Media Organisations by Lucy Kung-Shankleman
Media and Communication Management by C.S. Rayudu

Evaluation Pattern

Multiple Assessments : 50 marks

Total : 50 marks

MCN325 - ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE AND BEHAVIOUR (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course organisational structure and behavior discusses individual and group processes in organisational settings. It throws light on organisational design, organisational culture and change management among other related concepts. A media professional is expected to know the context in which he/she works so that the goal of the organization is same as that of the professional.

Learning Outcome

  • To help students develop cognizance of the importance of human behavior
  • To help students describe the formal and informal elements of an organisation
  • To enable students explain the dimensions of cultural differences in societies that affect work related attitudes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Organisational Structure
 

 

  • Purpose of organisation Types of organisation(tall, flat, Virtual, Boundaryless)

  • Formal Divisions, Grouping and Coordination

  • Work specialization, Departmentalization, Centralised and decentralised control

·

 

        

 

  • Purpose of organisation Types of organisation(tall, flat, Virtual, Boundaryless)

  • Formal Divisions, Grouping and Coordination

  • Work specialization, Departmentalization, Centralised and decentralised control

 

 

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Changing pattern of media management and its impact on behaviour
 
  • Team structure, Virtual organisation, interpersonal communication

  • Media organisations (Print and Broadcast), Case study of selected organisation eg: Times of India, Ford

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Quick, Nelson and Khandelwal.(2013). organizational Behavior: A South Asian Perspective. Delhi, India: Cengage Learning

Dessler and Varkkey.(2011). Human Resource Management. Delhi, India: Pearson

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1)      The Frankenstein Syndrome: The Creation of Mega-Media Conglomerates and Ethical Modeling in Journalism

Author(s): Robert A. Miller

Media Organisations in Society by James Curran

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

Regular Internal Assessments: 50

 

TOTAL: 50

MCN331 - JOURNALISM - HISTORY, ISSUES AND DEBATES (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course tries to paint an overview of the field of journalism in India by looking at the historical evolution and the many challenges that confront the field to the present debates on controversial issues out of the practice of journalism.

To give a deep understanding of where we have come from (historical perspective), what are the important issues (challenges) and the raging debates (controversie) in the field of journalism

Learning Outcome

1. They will be able to know the history of journalism, with special emphasis on the Indian context

2. They will be able to know about the issues in the field of journalism, how they have emerged and the impact they have on the  profession

3. They will be able acknowledge the critical debates that are raging on issues that impact the practice of journalism

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Historical perspective
 

Beginning of the press in Europe

Status of Fourth Estate

Penny Press in America

British press versus Indian press before independence

Post-Independence- role of the press in India

Post-liberalisation press

Social media as new journalism

Kannada journalism- history and achievements

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Evolution of varied platforms for Journalism
 

Brief historical development of Print

Brief historical development of Radio

Brief historical development of Television

Brief historical development of New Media

Varied platforms for journalism

Journalism today- how these platforms are functioning parallely 

Future of journalism- mobile journalism

Processing and filtering high volume of data efficiently

Writing across multiple platforms

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Issues in Journalism
 

Ethical issues- sensationalism

Inshorts versus long form journalism

English Elitism

Lack of freedom

Corporate ownership of media

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:16
Debates in the field of Journalism
 

Fake news

Paid news

Business of news- pressure of advertisers

TRP as the sole criterion for success

Corporate media

Self censorship and regulation

Social media ethics

Opinion and Exit polls (elections)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Journalism- a critical history by Martin Conboy

History of Indian Journalism by J. Natrajan

Media Ethics: Truth, Fairness and Objectivity and Breaking News- Paranjoy Guha Thakurta

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Current challengess to media freedom in India- pdf

Understanding Fake news- Constitutional Rights Foundation- Pdf

Corporate control of media- pdf

Importance of self-regulation of media…-Andrew Puddephatt (UNESCO)

Regulating opinion polling: a deliberative democratic perspective- ANU college of Law (Pdf)

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1- 20 marks

CIA2- 50 marks

CIA3- 20 marks

Attendance- 10 marks

End Semester Exam- 100 marks

MCN332 - MULTIMEDIA REPORTING AND EDITING (2020 Batch)