CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

School of Social Sciences

Syllabus for
Master of Science (Psychology-Clinical )
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPS111 ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
MPS131 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS132 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS133 QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS134 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY - I Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS135 BIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOUR - I Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS136 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS181 COMMUNITY SERVICE - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2 2 50
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPS211 RESEARCH PROPOSAL Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
MPS231 LAW AND ETHICS IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS232 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY- I Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS233 PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT AND STATISTICS Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS234 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY - II Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS235 BIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOR - II Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS236 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS251 PSYCHO DIAGNOSTIC LAB - I Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
MPS281 COMMUNITY SERVICE - II Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 1 2 50
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPS331 PSYCHOTHERAPY-I Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS332 PSYCHOTHERAPY-II Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS333 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY- II Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS342A PSYCHOSOCIAL REHABILITATION Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MPS342C ADOLESCENT COUNSELLING Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MPS342D CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MPS342E COGNITIVE ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MPS351 MULTICULTURAL AND THERAPEUTIC SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 4 4 100
MPS382 RESEARCH LAB Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPS431 ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MPS441B EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MPS441C FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MPS441D SEXUAL DYSFUCNTIONS AND SEX THERAPY Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MPS441E DISABILITY AND CHALLENGE Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MPS442A CRISIS AND TRAUMA COUNSELLING Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MPS442B CBT FOR COMMON PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MPS442E ASIAN HEALING PRACTICES AND PSYCHOTHERAPY Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
MPS451 PSYCHODIAGNOSTIC LAB - II Skill Enhancement Course 4 4 100
MPS471 SEMINAR AND PUBLICATION Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 0 2 50
MPS481 SUPERVISED CLINICAL PRACTICUM Skill Enhancement Course 0 8 200
MPS482 SUPERVISED DISSERTATION Skill Enhancement Course 2 6 100
MPS483 CLINICAL INTERNSHIP Skill Enhancement Course 0 2 50
      

    

Department Overview:

The Department of Psychology offers a range of programmes that include Open Electives, Undergraduate programmes, Post Graduate programmes with seven specializations and Research degrees in psychology (PhD). Through these programmes, we encourage students to consider careers and life missions that integrate psychological understanding into life. Our programmes integrate scholarship with professional practice and we offer courses that are cutting edge in the field of psychology. Students who complete programmes in Psychology from the University demonstrate high degrees of self-awareness are service-oriented and are encouraged to embrace humane values in their vocation. The Department realizes its vision to promote high academic standards through a continuous and dynamic curriculum review process based on feedback from regional, national and international peers, practitioners, potential employers, alumni and students. A variety of student-centered teaching and training pedagogies are practised by the faculty members. Prominent among them is the use of seminars, experiential methods, laboratory training, conferences, workshops, field-based studies, film-based discussions, journal clubs, and professional development activities. All postgraduate students of he department prepare a publication ready research manuscript by the end of the third semester. Through its several MOUs with International Universities, the department organizes joint conferences, webinars, faculty and stude

Mission Statement:

The department adopts the vision of the University "Excellence and Service" and its Mission as "a nurturing ground for an individual's holistic development to make an effective contribution to the society in a dynamic environment". In doing so it strives to is to promote high academic standards and scholarship in psychology, by creating an optimal and enriching learning environment, foster ongoing professional and personal development, and contribute effectively to societal needs.

Introduction to Program:

The Department of Psychology offers a two-year full-time M Sc program in Psychology with specialization in Clinical Psychology. Keeping pace with the disciplinary advances the program would address knowledge about psychological functioning at individual and social levels in an all-encompassing manner. With the goal of acquiring specialized knowledge, the program would allow students to nurture their academic interest in clinical psychology, along with personal growth and awareness. The spirit of interdisciplinary growth is kept in view while conceptualizing a three-tier system- A) CORE COURSES in the first three PG semesters (courses, which can be considered to be fundamental in giving PG students a larger perspective of Psychology as a social science discipline, irrespective of specialization); B) SPECIALIZATION COURSES (specific theory courses within the subject of Clinical Psychology); and C) ELECTIVE COURSES ( a wide variety, across all disciplinary specializations, primarily conceptualized by individual faculties (based on their own interest/expertise), offered from time to time and chosen by students according to their preference. The program would strive to prepare competent professional psychologists who would excel in knowledge, orientation, and practice in psychology, with high ethical standards and social relevance.

Program Objective:

Program objectives

After completion of this program students will be able to

1. Employ skills and competencies required for practicing as a clinical psychologist.

2. Conduct research in the area of clinical psychology relevant to practise needs

3. Have an adequate grasp of the ethical standards of the profession and apply them in their practice.

By the end of the programme students should be able to:

PO1. Disciplinary Knowledge: Exhibit competence in the discipline Analyze seminal pieces of work in the area Apply disciplinary principles to conduct academic inquiry Evaluate aspects of social reality using the principles of the discipline

PO2.Critical Thinking: Recognize and examine the social structures underlying our society and how they shape our existence Reflect upon lived experiences with reflexivity Analyze and engage with their social surroundings, problematize and raise questions based on academic inquiry

PO3: Research Skills Exhibit problem solving skills, reflective thinking Apply analytical and scientific thinking Demonstrate technical skills in terms of handling data, working with various research related software Conceptualize, design, and execute research project/s

PO4. Communication and social Interaction: Communicate effectively across media in varied contexts Collaborate as members or leaders in teams in multidisciplinary settings Work in multicultural spaces

PO5. Effective Citizenship: Act with an informed awareness of issues Engage with the community effectively using expertise drawn from the discipline Undertake initiatives that encourage equity and growth for all

PO6. Ethics: Recognize and respect different value systems including one?s own, Take cognizance of the moral implications of our decisions Use ethical values aligned with the values of the University in academic initiatives

PO7. Environment and Sustainability: Demonstrate awareness of local, regional, national, and global needs Engage with socio-cultural contexts Focus on the concerns of the environment and sustainability

PO8. Self-directed and Life-long Learning: Engage in lifelong learning Work on strategies for career enhancement Adapt to changing professional and societal needs

 

 

Programme Specific Outcomes (Core Competencies)

Programme Specific Component Outcomes) Essential Components

Behavioural Indicators

Develop a Scientist-Practitioner Approach to the discipline

 

 

 

 

 

To internalise Scientific Mindedness as a clinical psychologist

 

 

 

 

Demonstrates respect for scientifically derived knowledge

Is able to distinguish scientifically derived theories and interventions from pseudo-scientific concepts

Is able to understand the scientific nature of the discipline

Demonstrates ability to critically evaluate existing theories, models and practices

Demonstrates scientific knowledge of etiology, assessment, conceptualization and interventions for disorders

Develop Role Knowledge as a clinical psychologist.

 

 

Understand the expectations and limitations of one's role.

 

 

Is able to function well within one's professional boundaries and respect other related disciplines

Is able to be assertive when one's role boundaries are infringed upon

Demonstrates knowledge about the laws related to necessary qualifications for practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Develop Functional Competencies as a clinical psychologist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Addressing the referral question.

 

 

 

Demonstrates knowledge of and ability to select appropriate assessments to answer referral questions

Is able to provide regular feedback to the sources of referral about the progress of assessment and therapy in an ethical manner

Develop Competent Formal Assessments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Demonstrates basic knowledge of the scientific and theoretical basis of test construction and interviewing.

Demonstrates knowledge of the models and techniques of clinical interviewing and the mental status exam and is able to write a comprehensive report

Demonstrates proficiency in independently administering structured assessments, awareness of the strengths and limitations of administration, scoring and interpretation of traditional assessment measures as well as related technological advances

Is aware of the constructs being assessed and responsive to and respectful of individuals with diverse backgrounds

Is able to write a comprehensive report based on the assessment findings and communicate the same to the referring sources and the client

Is able to integrate data collected from the clinical interview and structured assessments and provide necessary recommendations for interventions

Demonstrate Competent Diagnosis and Conceptualization Skills.

 

 

 

 

Is familiar with the diagnostic criteria outlined in the DSM-5 and ICD-10 for various disorders

Is able to systematically gather data to inform clinical decision-making regarding diagnosis

Is able to conceptualize a psychodiagnostics formulation

Demonstrates knowledge of various theoretical models and concepts to construct a psychotherapy formulation

Plan and Deploy Appropriate Psychological Interventions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Demonstrates knowledge of the basic scientific, theoretical and contextual bases of interventions and the value of evidence-based practice.

Demonstrates skills of empathetic listening, non-judgementality, effective rapport formation, and use of good judgment about unexpected issues including crises and the effective use of supervision.

Is able to select the most appropriate intervention for a client based in the nature of the symptoms and research evidence for the same

Is able to evaluate treatment progress and outcome and to modify treatment planning and interventions accordingly

Is able to to terminate intervention successfully, and to collaborate effectively with other care providers

Is able to document the progress of interventions in a systematic manner

Demonstrate Evidence Based Research Competencies.

 

 

 

 

Demonstrates development of skills and habits in seeking, applying, and evaluating theoretical and research knowledge to the practice of clinical Psychology

Is able to design and critique approaches to scientific inquiry

Demonstrates proficiency in reviewing exiting literature, creating a research argument, qualitative and quantitative methods of data analysis

 

Imbibes a Spirit of Advocacy to promote the Profession.

 

 

 

Is able to identify valid scientific journals and prepare a manuscript according to the journal guidelines

Demonstrates a commitment to the development of the profession and safeguarding the rights of clients and practitioners through various advocacy programmes

 

Display Disposition to Reflective Practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Displays adequate Self-assessment while practise.

 

 

 

 

 

Practices within the boundaries of competencies

Demonstrates commitment to lifelong learning

General self-awareness, self-assessment and self-monitoring skills

Reflective regarding professional practice

Aware of own attitudes, values, and beliefs toward diverse others

Willingness to acknowledge and correct errors

Accepts and uses feedback effectively

Demonstrates commitment to Self-Care.

 

 

 

 

 

Understands importance of self-care to effective practice.

 

 

 

Displays Professionalism in Work and Practise

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Being organized and on time, demonstrates appropriate personal hygiene and dress, membership in professional organizations, demonstrates the need to practice within one’s competence and understands what the core competencies entail

Continuing education to keep up with advances in the profession, contributing to professional organizations, and awareness of the impact one’s behavior, has on the public and their perception of professional psychologists

Committed to Upholding Ethical Practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Displays knowledge of own moral principles/ethical values

Knows and applies an ethical decision- making model and is able to apply relevant elements of ethical decision making to a dilemma

Able to articulate knowledge of own moral principles and ethical values in discussions with supervisors and peers about ethical issues

 

Maintains appropriate Interpersonal and Inter-disciplinary relationships

 

 

 

Able to participate in and initiate interdisciplinary collaboration/
 consultation directed toward shared goals

 

Able to develop and maintain, where appropriate, collaborative
 relationships and respect for other professionals

 

Assesment Pattern

Assessment Pattern

The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Examinations (ESE).

Break up of continuous internal assessment for 4 credit courses is as follows

CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks

 

Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For two credit courses the breakup of CIA is as follows

CIA1:20 marks
CIA 2:20 Marks
Class participation and Attendance: 10 marks

Minimum pass marks for the CIA of a course is 50 % and a pass in each of the CIA is mandatory to be eligible to write the End semester examinations. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA before moving to the next CIA. The students who fail a CIA will have to apply for repeat CIA immediately after publishing the results of each of the CIA components. In such a case an application should be made, to the Office of Examinations and obtain necessary approvals forwarded through the HoD and Dean. The number of chances for repeating each CIA is one. Students who fail the CIA in a semester have to apply for CIA repeat of the whole course in the subsequent semester

The end semester examinations shall be conducted for 2 hours and evaluated out of 50 marks which are then converted to out of 30 marks. Minimum of 40 % marks is required to pass in the ESE of each course and an overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course(CIA+ESE) . Student failing a course due to less than minimum in ESE shall repeat the ESE while his/her internal scores shall remain valid.

Permission for admission to the ESE is granted only if
• A student has passed in CIAs for that course.
• A student has at least 85% of the attendance in aggregate at the end of the semester.
• The Vice Chancellor is satisfied with the character and conduct of the student.

 

Grading Pattern

Percentage 

Grade 

Grade point

(10 point scale) 

Grade point

 (4 Point scale) 

Interpretation 

80-100 

O

10

4

Outstanding

70-79

A+

9

3.6

Excellent 

60-69

A

8

3.2

Very Good

55-59

B+

7

2.8

Good

50-54

B

6

2.4

Above Average

Examination And Assesments

 

Formative and Summative assessments are conducted by the department to ascertain the readiness for learning and the attainment of learning outcomes. Assessments are examinations are based on competency frame work and principles of outcome-based education. Attainment of learning outcomes/ expected competencies is evaluated using either holistic or analytic rubrics, grading schemes or attainment criteria specified to the students at the beginning of the semester. Learning outcomes (Course outcomes) of each course are mapped to programme outcomes and programme specific outcomes. Assessments and examinations follow the principle of constructive alignment and outcomes are mapped to higher order thinking skills. Most common frameworks used in this programme include Revised Blooms Taxonomy, and Structure of Observed Learning outcomes (SOLO) and ICAP framework.

Assessment is based on the performance of the student throughout the semester.

Credit Structure
Normally 15 hours of classroom teaching in a semester is considered as one credit for theory courses.

• Courses with 30 hours per semester will earn the candidate 2 credits.
• Courses with 45-50 hours per semester will earn the candidate 3 credits.
• Courses with 51 hours and above per semester including practical will earn the candidate 4 credits.
• Dissertations/Practical equivalent to one course will earn the candidates 4-6 credits.

MPS111 - ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH SKILLS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This Course will introduce students to the domain of academic writing and its intricacies. Every student, regardless of his or her area of interest, will be called upon to use an academic style of writing at different levels and at various points in time. This Course will therefore seek to impart such knowledge about the styles of writing used in the current academic scenario. It will provide students with opportunities in the classroom setting to practice such styles, both individually and in collaboration with others.

Course Objectives:

  • To identify and practice the elements, style and language of academic writing.

  • To practice and engage in various forms of academic writing.

  • To develop an ability to write in scientific style.

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to: 

  • Scientifically acknowledge  different sources of information in their writings
  • Write a document in APA format
  • Avoid plagiarism

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I:
 

Introduction to Academic Writing: An overview of the current status of academic writing and its importance; different approaches and processes; key issues: plagiarism, biases and frequent errors. Guidelines and rules in Academic Writing: Introduction to style and formatting guidelines from the American Psychological Association (APA); specific guidelines pertaining to in-text citations, references, and structures of academic courses

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II:
 

Forms of Academic Writing: Abstract writing; summarisation; review of literature; scientific poster presentations; reflective, analytic and descriptive reports; book review; film review; tables and graphs in academic courses; Experiential Learning as Assessment Strategies: Individual/Group presentations on forms and issues in Academic Writing; classroom assignments in generating abstracts, posters, reviews, etc.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Bailey, S. (2011). Academic writing : A handbook for international students.3rdEdition. NewYork : Routledge.
  2. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6 th ed.). (2009). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Hartley, J (2008). Academic Writing and Publishing, Routedlege,  New York

  2. Leki, L (2010). Academic Writing 2/E South Asian Edition, Cambridge University Press

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 (15 marks)

CIA-2 (15 marks)

Class participation & Attendance (5 marks)

Summative Assessment (15 marks)

All CIAs are must pass assessments, A grade of 50% is required to pass. If a student fails to meet the grade, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all CIAs to be eligible to write the summative assessment.

MPS131 - HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course has been conceptualized to provide a background in the history of clinical psychology globally as well as in India. The philosophical perspectives of the mind are discussed. The course also introduces assessments and interventions pertinent to the field of clinical psychology.

Course objectives: This course helps the learner

  • Understand the philosophical roots and historical events that have shaped the field of clinical psychology.
  • Understand the evolution of clinical psychology globally and within India.
  • Critically evaluate different perspectives of the philosophy of the mind
  • Introduce psychological assessments and interventions in the field of clinical psychology

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Trace the historical contributions to clinical psychology in India and across the world

  • Critically evaluate different philosophical perspectives of the mind

  • Provide a basic description of different assessments and interventions in clinical psychology


Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Historical and Philosophical Roots of Psychology
 

Understanding Science, History, and Philosophy; Psychology and Science; Persistent questions in Psychology and approaches/methods for answering the questions: Mind-Body, nativism-empiricism, mechanism-vitalism, reason? non-reason, objectivity-subjectivity, origin of human knowledge, problem of the Self.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II Perspectives on the mind and psyche
 

Social and intellectual contexts of questions of ?psyche?/?mind?: Greek, Pagan, Christian, Medieval, Islam; Shift from mentalism to behaviorism; The rise of cognitivism; Psychology and ‘Minorities’; the rise of Applied Psychology; The ‘Psychologized’ society; The value and role of contemporary Psychology

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III:Psychology in India
 

History of Psychology in India; Contemporary Psychology; Impact of Globalization; Post Modernism and Multicultural movements. Towards a Clinical Identity: education & training, professional activities and employment settings, differences/similarities with other mental health professions   

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit IV: Introduction to Clinical Assessment and Interventions
 

Assessment Processes: planning, data-collecting, interpreting, and communicating findings; Clinical Interview: components and basic skills; Diagnosis and Classification: basic issues and skills; Other assessment components and skills (Intellectual, Neuropsychological, Personality and Behavioral assessment).

General issues in interventions: Nature of specific therapeutic variables (client, therapist, relationship). Course of intervention; Various perspectives (briefly): Psychodynamic, Humanistic-Existential, Behavioral-Cognitive, Group & Family

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Hergenhahn, B. R., & Henley, T. (2013). An introduction to the history of psychology. Cengage Learning.

  2. Gentile, B. F., & Miller, B. O. (2009). Foundations of psychological thought: A history of psychology. Sage Publications, Inc.

  3. Hecker, J., & Thorpe, G. (2015). Introduction to clinical psychology. Psychology Press.


Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Watrin, J. P. (2017). The “new history of psychology” and the uses and abuses of dichotomies. Theory & Psychology, 0959354316685450.

  2. Shaffer, Michael J. "The Experimental Turn and the Methods of Philosophy." (2017).

  3. Singla, D. R., Kohrt, B. A., Murray, L. K., Anand, A., Chorpita, B. F., & Patel, V. (2017). Psychological treatments for the world: Lessons from low-and middle-income countries. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 13, 149-181.Nath, R. (2017). Healing Room: The Need for Psychotherapy. Harper Collins.

  4. Minas, H., & Lewis, M. (Eds.). (2017). Mental Health in Asia and the Pacific: Historical and Cultural Perspectives. Springer.

  5. The Mental Healthcare Act, 2017. Retrieved from http://egazette.nic.in/WriteReadData/2017/175248.pdf Kumar, M. (2006). Rethinking Psychology in India: Debating Pasts and Future. Annual Review of   Critical Psychology, 5, pp. 236-256, www.disCourseunit.com/arcp/5.

  6. Dhar, A.K. 2008: Science(s) of the mind: Fort-da between the windscreen and the rearview mirror (Working Course).

  7. Gentile, B.F. & Miller, B.O. (2009). Foundations of psychological thought: A history of  psychology. Sage: New Delhi.

  8. Giles, B. (2002). (Ed.). History of Psychology. Delhi: Pearson

  9. Gross, R. 1995: Themes, issues and debates in psychology. London: Hodder and Stoughton.

  10. Harris, B. 1997: Repoliticizing the history of psychology. In Critical psychology: an introduction.  D. Fox and I. Prilleltensky (eds), London: Sage Publication.

  11. Jones, D. & Elcock, J. (2001). History and theories of psychology: A critical perspective. Arnold: London.

  12. Kuhn, T.S. 1962: The structure of scientific revolutions. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 

  13. Kumar, M. (2006). Rethinking Psychology in India: Debating Pasts and Future. Annual Review of       Critical Psychology, 5, pp. 236-256, www.discourseunit.com/arcp/5.

  14. Lawson, R.B., Graham, J.E., & Baker, K.M. (2007). A history of psychology: Globalization, ideas, and applications. Prentice Hall: New Delhi.

  15. McGhee, P. 2001: Thinking Psychologically. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

  16. Nandy, A. 2004: The savage Freud: The first non-western psychoanalyst and the politics of  secret selves in colonial India, (in ‘Bonfire of creeds: The essential Ashish Nandy) pp 339-393; Delhi: Oxford University Press.

  17. Nandy, A 2004: Towards an alternative politics of psychology, (in ‘Bonfire of creeds: The essential Ashish Nandy) pp 324-338; Delhi: Oxford University Press.

  18. Robinson, D.N. (1995). An intellectual history of psychology. (3rd ed.). Arnold: London.http://www.julianjaynes.org/pdf/jaynes_history.pdf

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. TThe student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS132 - THEORIES OF PERSONALITY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 This course has been conceptualized in order to introduce students to the prominent theories of personality within the field of psychology. Students will review various theoretical models, the historical context in which they were developed, and related empirical research related to the theories. Application of personality theories wherever applicable in professional field of clinical psychology will be discussed. Assessment of personality and personality dysfunction will be introduced as a clinical skill. This course will be associated with demonstration labs where students are introduced to personality assessment techniques. Students are not expected to conduct these assessments in this course.

 

Course objectives:

 

  • This course will help the learner to gain a familiarity with the theoretical aspects of how ones personality develops and how personality disorders emerge.

Course Outcome

Course outcomes:

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

 

  • Apply the theoretical understanding to practical clinical case conceptualization

  • Compare various theoretical approaches

  • Understand the need for personality assessments in clinical practice

  • Critically evaluate the various theories of personality.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT I: Psychodynamic Theories
 

Classical psychoanalysis: Freud; Neo-Freudian: Jung, Adler; Object relations: Winnicot. (8 hrs)

Demonstration Labs                                                                                           (7 Hrs)

Projective tests: Thematic Apperception Test, Sentence Completion Test, Rosharch Ink blot; Type Indicators; Case studies related to psychodynamic theories.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT II: Behavioral Theories
 

Radical Behaviorism: Skinner; Social Learning: Dollard and Miller; Social Cognitive Theorist: Bandura. (8 Hrs)

 Demonstration Labs                  (7 Hrs)

 

Behavioural observation, schedules of reinforcement, cognitive behavioral assessment; Case studies

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT III: Humanistic and Existential Theories
 

Maslow, Rogers, Kelly and Rollo May. (8 Hrs)

Demonstration Labs (7 Hrs)

Rating scales (e.g change in client, therapist attitude scale); Case studies related to humanistic and Existential theories; Assessment of personality using simulated method (Leaderless group discussion, role play, etc)

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT IV: Trait Theories
 

 

Allport, Cattell, Eysenck

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

1.                 1.Schultz, D. P., & Schultz, S. E. (2016). Theories of personality. Cengage Learning.

  1. Hall, C.S., Lindzey, G. & Camobell, J.B. (2007). Theory of personality, 4th edition. John Wiley and Sons.
  2. Ewen,R.B. (2010). An Introduction to theories of personality. Academic Press, Inc. (London) Ltd.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Carpara, G.V &Cereone, D. (2000). Determinants, dynamics and potentials. Cambridge University Press.

  1. Friedman, H.S. & Schustack, M.W. (2004). Personality, 2ND edition. Pearson Education Pvt.Ltd. India.

  1. Hergenhann, B.R & Olson, M.H (1999). An Introduction to Theories of Personality, 5th Edition, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New jersey

  2. Ryckman M. R (2004) 8th Edition. Wadsworth, Thompson learning. USA.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS133 - QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is offered to students in the first semester to introduce them to the tradition of quantitative research in psychology. It begins by discussing the philosophical foundations of quantitative research followed by the scientific basis of research. Students are expected to see the links between scientific process of research and development of clinical psychology. Students will be introduced to research designs and process of research in quantitative methods. The course also provides opportunities to practice skills of research in laboratory setting.

Course Outcome

At the end of this course students will be able to: 

  • Demonstrate knowledge of research designs in quantitative research and the scientific process of research
  • Design an experiment with manipulation can control of the variables.
  • Differentiate various data collection and sampling methods employed in  quantitative research
  • Write a quantitative research proposal in the domain of Psychology.

UNIT 1
Teaching Hours:15
Foundations of Quantitative Research Methods in Psychology
 

Philosophical roots of quantitative research; History of scientific research in psychology; Definition of research; Purpose and need of psychological research. Experimental, Exploratory, Correlational and descriptive research in psychology; Ethical issues in psychological research

UNIT 2
Teaching Hours:15
Process of Quantitative Research
 

Conceptualization, operationalization and measurement; Causality and experimentation; Definition and nature of variables; ;operationally defining variables; Independent variables; Dependent variables; formulation of research problems and hypothesis ; Different types of hypothesis ; Experimental manipulation and control of variables; steps in quantitative research (5 hours of lab work dedicated to developing problem statement and a hypotheses is suggested)

UNIT 3
Teaching Hours:15
Sampling Techniques and Data Collection
 

Population and sample: Basic assumptions; Sampling distribution; Sampling techniques: probability and non-probability sampling; Methods of data collection: observational methods, surveys, questionnaires, interviewing methods, case study methods, and psychometric tests.

UNIT 4
Teaching Hours:15
Experimental Designs in Psychology
 

Adequate vs Inadequate (faulty) research design;Types of experimental design based on subjects and factors; Within-subjects, between subjects, single-subject, single factor, and factorial design; Sources of error variance and its management in the various types of experimental designs; Mixed design (8 hrs )

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Gravetter,F. J., & Forzana, L. A. (2015). Research methods for behavioral sciences (5 ed.). Stamford, CT:Wordsworth cengage learning .
  2. Bordens, K. S., & Abbott, B.B. (2006). Research and design methods: A process approach(6 ed.). New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill Company Limited
  3. Goodwin, C. J. (2002). Research in psychology: Methods and design (3rd ed.). New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  4. Coolican, H.(2004). Research methods and Statistics in Psychology. London: Hoddes Arnold
  5. Kerlinger, N. (1996). Foundations of behavioural research. India: Prentice Hall
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  1. Breakwell, G. M., Hammond,  S., Fife-Shaw, C., & Smith, J. A. (Ed.). (2006). Research methods in  psychology (3 ed.). New Delhi: Sage.
  2. Cohen, R. J., & Swerdlik, M. E. (2005). Psychological testing and assessment: An introduction to tests and measurement (6 ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  3. Heiman, G.W. (2001). Understanding research methods and statistics: An integrated introduction for psychology (2ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
  4. Rosnow, R. L., & Rosenthal, R. (2002). Beginning behavioral research: A conceptual primer (4ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
  5. Singh, A. K. (1997). Test, measurements and research methods in behavioural sciences.  Patna: Bharathi Bhavan Publishers and Distributors.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS134 - COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is part of the first years master's program in Clinical Psychology and comprises a core methodology that underlies the understanding of both normal and abnormal human behaviour. This course contributes to the Clinical Psychology program objectives of (a) developing domain knowledge (b) enhancing observation skills and critical analysis (c) inculcating evidence-based inference and finally (d) enhances self awareness and self regulation. At the same time the course also exemplifies the University expectation of excellence and service and contributes to the following graduate attributes of academic excellence, professional excellence and personal enhancement.

 This course will provide students with an understanding of normal mental processes and their relationship to brain, mind and behavior. This course will give an overview antecedents and influences on Cognitive Psychology and the basic concepts from an information-processing and computational perspective. Domain wise understanding of cognition will be highlighted in the understanding of attention and perception. The course will require the use of labs and experiments to demonstrate concepts in the course. Application to the practice of evaluating behaviour in the context of clinical psychology will be highlighted in this course.

 

 Course Objectives:

  • Recognize, understand and define the basic concepts of Cognition

  • Understand and Analyze the use of models and experiments to study cognition

  • Apply that knowledge to critically evaluate functional cognitive processes

  • Develop scientific mindedness, self awareness and self regulation

Course Outcome

 By the end of the course learners will be able 

  • To develop an understanding of normal mental processes and demonstrate the domains of cognition using experiments.

  • To draw connections between brain, mind and behaviour and demonstrate the relationships through observations and reasoning.

  • To evaluate cognitive processes using the model of information processing and make predictions.

  • To apply available tools and be able to describe their use in creating new knowledge in cognitive psychology, in written and oral form.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
 

History of cognitive psychology and Emergence of Cognitive Science; Core Concepts: Mental Representations, Stages of processing, Memory stores; Serial vs. Parallel Processing, Hierarchical systems, Information processing, Connectionism, Consciousness and Awareness; Embodied Cognition. The Brain and Cognition: Basic Neuroanatomical principles, new techniques for exploring cognition (EEG, fMRI, PET) designing cognitive experiments.

 

Demonstration Lab: Designing a cognitive experiment

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Psychophysiology
 

Introduction to Psychophysics: History and development. Classical psychophysics: Weber’s law, Fechner’s law. Psychophysical methods: Method of limits, Method of constant stimuli, Method of average error. Contemporary psychophysics: Steven’s power law, signal detection theory (modular with demonstration and practicum on psychophysical methods and response criterion and decision).

 

Demonstration Lab: Psychophysics experiments using Method of limits, Method of average error and Method of Constant Stimuli.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Perception
 

Modularity of Perception: Visual perception (Form and pattern perception); Space perception and cognition, Auditory Perception, Multimodal Perception; Synesthesia; Perception and Action; Theories of Perception: Gestalt approach, Top–Down vs. Bottom- up Processing, Information Processing; Pattern Recognition: Feature detection analysis, Template matching, Prototype matching; Brain and Perception: Dorsal and Ventral pathways; Disruptions of Perceptions: Illusions and Agnosia

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit IV: Attention
 

 

Basic Concepts: Divided attention, Selective Attention, Visual attention and Auditory attention. Theories and current developments: Bottleneck and Capacity theories; Automatic and Controlled processing, switching attention. Brain and attention

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Matlin M W (2013) Cognitive Psychology. 8th Edition. John Wiley & Sons.

  • Galotti, K.M. (2017). Cognitive Psychology In and Out of the Laboratory. 6th Edition. SAGE Publications, Inc.

  • Kellogg, R.T. (2012) Fundamentals of Cognitive Psychology. 2nd Edition, Sage South Asia.

  • Smith, E. E. & Kosslyn, S (2013). Cognitive Psychology: Pearson New International Edition: Mind and Brain, Pearson.

  • Goldstein B E (2010). Sensation and Perception (8th Edition) Wadsworth.

  • Solso, R, L. (2014) Cognitive Psychology. 8th Edition. Pearson Education.

  • Eysenck M.W. and Keane M.T. (2015) Cognitive Psychology: A Student's Handbook. 7th Edition. Psychology Press.

  • Reed, S.K. (2007). Cognitive theories and applications. International Edition. 8th edition. Wadsworth.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Lamberts K & Goldstone R L (2005) (Eds). Handbook of Cognition, Sage, London.

  • Millar S (2008) Space and Sense. Essays in Cognitive Psychology. Psychology Press, England.  

  • Stevens S, S. (1966) ( Ed) Hand book of Experimental Psychology, Wiley.

  • Woodworth R S & Schlosberg H (1954). Experimental Psychology.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS135 - BIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOUR - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This Course intends to familiarize students with an introductory knowledge of the topics and methods of biological psychology to create an understanding of the underlying biological foundations of human behavior.

 Course objectives: The course is intended to help the learner

  • gain a familiarity with general biological foundations of behavior
  • develop knowledge required to understand the biological underpinnings of major mental disorder

  • Identify basic brain structures and related functions

  • Describe contemporary research methods for studying brain and behavior

  • Interpret how drugs and hormones influence behavior  

  • Apply biological elements to common psychological disorders

Course Outcome

At the end of the course students will be able to

  • Understand the links between behavior, mental processes and biological processes

  • Understand the basic structure of the nervous system and its various functions

  • Demonstrate the application of biological foundations in clinical practice


Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT I: Introduction
 

The origins of biopsychology, Nature of biological psychology, basic cytology and biochemistry, Mind Brain relationship,  Methods of study of research in biopsychology-anatomical methods, degeneration techniques, lesion techniques, chemical methods, stereotaxic surgery, micro-electrode studies, oscilloscope, polygraph, scanning methods & Ethical issues in research.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT II: Neurons and Neuronal Conduction
 

Structure of neurons, types, functions, neural conduction, communication between neurons, Synaptic conduction, Neurotransmitters

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT III: The Structure and Functioning of the Nervous System
 

Basic features of nervous system, Meninges, Ventricular system, Cerebrospinal fluid, Blood brain barrier, Peripheral nervous system: Cranial Nerves, Spinal Nerves, Autonomous nervous system; Major structures and functions, spinal cord, Brain: Fore brain, Mid brain, Hind brain, Cerebral cortex, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes; prefrontal cortex


Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT IV: Biopsychology of emotion, stress and health
 

Emotions as response patterns: fear, anger and aggression; Hormonal control of aggressive behavior; Neural basis of the communication of emotion: Recognition and expression; Stress and health: The stress response, stress and gastric ulcers, Psychoneuroimmunology, stress and the hippocampus; Fear conditioning: amygdale, contextual fear conditioning and the hippocampus

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Carlson, N.R. (2004). Physiology of behaviour (8th.ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

  2. Schneider M Alles (1990). An introduction to Physiological Psychology (3rd Edition) USA: Random House.


Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Blackmore, S. (2003). Consciousness: An introduction. London: Hodder&Stoughton.

  2. Carlson, N.R. (1999). Foundations of physiological psychology (4th. Ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

  3. Kalat, J.W. (2004). Biological psychology (8th.ed.). Belmont: Wadsworth/Thomson learning.

  4. Kandel, E.R. Schwartz, J.H. & Jessel, T.M. (2000). Principles of neural science (4th .ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

  5. Leukel, F. (1985). Introduction to physiological psychology (3rd .ed.). New Delhi: CPSPublishers.

  6. Pinel, J.P.J. (2000). Biopsychology (4th .ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

  7. Rosenweig, M.R., Leiman, A.L. & Breedlove, S.M. (1999). Biological psychology: An introduction to behavioral, cognitive, clinical neuroscience. (2nd Ed.). USA: Sinauer Associates, Inc.

  8. Wallace, B. & Fisher, L.E. (1991). Consciousness and Behavior (3rd Ed.). USA: Allyn & Bacon.


Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS136 - QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course will introduce students to the tradition of qualitative research in social sciences with an emphasis of is applicability in psychology. Different methods of collecting qualitative data are discussed. Methods of Qualitative data analysis are also touched upon .Along with courses on research in the first and second semester, this course intends to provide students with the theoretical background to develop their research proposal.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner will be able to: 

  • Understand the philosophical  foundations on which qualitative research methods are based

  • Gain familiarity with the conceptual foundations of qualitative research methods in Psychology

  • Understand various traditions of qualitative research methodologies in psychology.

  • Learn different methods of data collection.

  • Understand different methods of data analysis in qualitative research methods.

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to: 

  • Demonstrate skills on designing qualitative research

  • Collect qualitative data using various methods

  • Appreciate the importance of interdisciplinary research  

  • Demonstrate skills on different traditions of qualitative data analysis

  • Conduct Computer assisted qualitative data analysis

  • Demonstrate skills on proposal writing and reporting qualitative research.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Foundations of Qualitative Research
 

Defining qualitative research; Historical development of qualitative research; Key philosophical and methodological issues in qualitative research; Different traditions of qualitative research; Grounded theory, Narrative approach, Ethnography ,Action research and Discourse analysis (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs) 

  1. Review of different article related to the different traditions of qualitative research

  2. Skill training seminars

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Qualitative Research Design
 

Conceptualizing research questions, issues of paradigm, .Designing samples, Theoretical sampling, Contrasting qualitative with quantitative approach in research process  Issues of Credibility and trustworthiness (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs) 

  1. Qualitative research proposal  lab

  2. Simulated techniques on designing qualitative research

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Methods of Collecting Qualitative Data
 

What is qualitative data? Various methods of collecting qualitative data: participant observation, interviewing, focus groups, life history and oral history, documents, diaries, photographs, films and videos, conversation, texts and case studies (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs) 

  1. Simulated techniques on different data collection methods

  2. Skill training seminars

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit IV: Analyzing Qualitative Data
 

Different traditions of qualitative data analysis; thematic analysis, Narrative analysis, Discourse analysis, Content analysis (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs) 

  1. Qualitative  data analysis software NVivo

  2. Reporting qualitative research data

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Creswell, J. W., & Poth, C. N. (2017). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches. Los Angeles, CA: Sage. 

  2. Ritchie, J., Lewis, J., McNaughton Nicholls, C., & Ormston, R. (2014). Qualitative    research Pactice A  guide    for social science students and researchers (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Sage Publication Limited.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Bryman,A (Ed.)(2007) Sage Benchmarks in social science research  methods Vol.I,Vol.II ,Vol,III,and Vol.  IV.New Delhi : Sage Publications

  2. Kvale,S.(Ed.) (1997).Psychology & Post-modernism. New Delhi:Sage Publications

  3. McGhee, P. (2001). Thinking critically about qualitative research in psychology. In P. McGhee, Thinking psychologically (pp.98-111). New York: Palgrave

  4. Smith,J.A.(ed.)(2003).Qualitative psychology: A practical guide to research methods.New Delhi: Sage.

  5. Smith,J.A., Harre,R., & Langenhove,L.V.(eds.).(1995).Rethinking methods in psychology.  NewDelhi:Sage.

  6. Willig,C.(2001).Introducing qualitative research in psychology: Adventures in theory and method. Buckingham:Open University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS181 - COMMUNITY SERVICE - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

In this course, students will spend four hours a week or a total of 30 hours during the semester involved in supervised community service. Students are encouraged to work alongside NGO’s or other professional bodies. Students will engage in activities such as children, adolescents and youth teaching/tutoring, community organization, psychological assessment and mental health awareness. Reflections on their interactions are an integral part of this course. Student engagement will be assessed by the supervisor.

Course objectives

This course will help the learner 

  • To choose a community-based organization that they are interested in working with. 
  • To support organizations to help the community.

 

Course Outcome

After the completion of this course the students will be able to:

  • Identify community-based issues.
  • Provide assistance in community intervention programmes.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction
 

Community service: The concept, Objectives and Scope; Need for community and Academia (University) interface. The role of a psychologist in community service: Social Psychologist, Community Psychologist & Counselor. Outcomes of community service: Personal outcome; Social outcome, Learning outcome and Career outcome.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Field work
 

Students in groups will partner with various NGO’s and organizations working in the areas of education, development, interventions and mental health. As part of the course requires the students will be involved in the community-oriented activities of the organizations they affiliate with. The NGO’s or Organizations along with the faculty coordinator will be responsible for the process delivery. These placements will offer students hands-on experiences in working with various issues in the community and facilitate meaningful learning. 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Reflection
 

Reflection is a core component of Community service. It is a period of critical thinking performed by the student and is based on a specific or overall experience of the student.   It guides students towards greater personal development by coming to a better understanding of their own values, opinions, and assumptions. The types of reflection which can be used are, class discussion, brainstorming, sharing of critical personal and group incidents, directed writings, experiential research paper, student portfolios and so on. The students are expected to discuss in groups at the end of this course using the following guidelines.

Reason for choosing the organization

•The planning phase of service-learning initiatives

•Logistics for the initiative of the action

•Stakeholders/beneficiaries 

•Execution of the action initiative

•Specific learning outcome

•Evaluation 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Pawar, M. (2014). Social and Community Development Practice (1st ed.). Los Angeles: SAGE India.
  2. America’s Promise—The Alliance for Youth (2004). Connecting Communities with Colleges & Universities.  909 North Washington Street, Suite 400, Alexandria,VA 22314-1556.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Bringle, R. G. & Hatcher, J. A. (1996). Implementing Service-Learning in Higher Education.   The Journal of Higher Education, 67(2), 221-239.
  2. Swaminathan, M., & Baksi, S. (2018). How Do Small Farmers Fare? – Evidence from Village Studies in India. New Delhi: Tulika Books.
  3. Sarkar,S. (2015). Social Problems in India (1st  ed). Kalpaz Publications.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)


CIA 1: 20 marks


CIA 2: 25 Marks


Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks



All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPS211 - RESEARCH PROPOSAL (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: In this course the students are required to identify and select a topic of their interest to conduct research on.

Course Objectives:

This course intends to help the learner

  • identify a research problem
  • develop a research proposal to study the problem

 

Course Outcome

At the end of the course students will

  • Be able to develop a research proposal for presentation to the departmental council
  • Understand the ethical issues involved in their research proposal
  • Use peer and instructor feedback effectively to critique  research proposals

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Review of Literature and Problem Identification
 

Identifying a problem; Presentation of research idea; Presentation of research idea; Training on review of literature; Research proposal (Quantitative ); Research proposal (Qualitative )

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Developing the Proposal
 

Issues in Methodological frame work; Presentation of methodology; Presentation of methodology; Submission and Presentation of first draft; Submission and Presentation of first draft; Final presentation; Final submission of proposal

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Hart, C (2006). Doing your Masters Dissertation ,Sage, New Delhi

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Best, J, W & Khan,J,V .(2016).  Research in Education,10th edition.Pearson Education
Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

MPS231 - LAW AND ETHICS IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course has been conceptualized in order to inculcate awareness about legal and ethical aspects of practicing Clinical Psychology in India. It highlights the commonly encountered ethical dilemmas in clinical practice and facilitates ethical decision making in a multicultural context. The courses also addresses licensure and certification issues in clinical psychology practice in India.

Course Objectives:

  • This course will help the learner to gain a familiarity with foundations of ethics, historical violations of ethical principles in research and practice, commonly encountered ethical dilemmas in research and clinical practice.

  • It will help the learner gain awareness about different codes of ethics and develop a personal ethical decision- making model to resolve ethical dilemmas.


Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Understand the foundational principles of ethics in clinical psychology.

  • Analyze and resolve common ethical dilemmas in research and practice

  • Examine ethical issues specific to special population

  • Develop a personal ethical decision model

  • Understand legal aspects of licensure and practice of Clinical Psychology in India


Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History and Principles of ethics in psychology
 

History of ethical principles in Psychology; General Ethical Principles: Beneficence and Nonmaleficence, Fidelity and Responsibility, Integrity, Justice, Respect for People’s Rights and Dignity; Ethical standards: Resolving Ethical Issues, Competence, Human Relations, Privacy and Confidentiality, Advertising and Other Public Statements, Record Keeping and Fees, Education and Training, Research and Publication, Assessment, Therapy, Ethics in Indian context

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Practice issues
 

Ethics and the personal context: Morals, Virtues, Emotions; Developing a personal model for ethical decision making; Multiple relationships and Boundary issues, Close Encounters, Attraction, & Sexual Misconduct; Psychotherapy contract: Informed consent, confidentiality and guidelines for contacting; Ethics and confidentiality in digital age, Ethics in online therapy

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Issues in working with special population
 

Ethics in child psychotherapy; Couples and families,  Survivors of sexual violence; Therapy with LGBT; Ethical Issues in the Consultation-Liaison Context; Assessment and Management of Suicide Risk; Ethics in Multicultural and Interpersonal context


Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Issues in working with special population
 

Mental healthcare act 2017; Rights of Persons with Disabilities Act, 2016; RCI Regulations and Act 2000; Process of getting certified as licensed clinical psychologists; Representing clients in court of law

RTI Act, Consumer Protection Act

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. American Psychological Association. (2010). Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. http://www.apa.org/ethics/code/principles.pdf
  2. Bhola,P.& Raguram ,A.(Eds.) (2016). Ethical Issues in Counselling and Psychotherapy Practice Walking the line .New Delhi: Springer
  3. Rehabilitation Council of India(2000).RCI Amendment Act 2000.Retrived from http://www.rehabcouncil.nic.in/writereaddata/RCI_Amendments_ACT.pdf
  4. The Mental Health Care Act (2017). Available from: http://www.prsindia.org/uploads/media/Mental%20Health/Mental%20Healthcare%20Act,%202017.pdf.


Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Pope, K, S., and Vasquez, M. J. T. (2016). Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling, a Practical Guide, 5th edition. New Jersey: Wiley.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA.The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS232 - PSYCHOPATHOLOGY- I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course introduces students to mental health issues in clinical psychology by introducing clinical psychopathology. The use of diagnostic assessments using both DSM V and ICD 10 will be explored in this course. Students will also be encouraged to integrate the bio-psycho-social model of health and illness with clinical interventions.

Course objectives: 

  • To understand the etiology and current classificatory systems of mental disorders

  • To learn about the different symptoms, course and prognosis of mental disorders

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to: 

  • Contrast and compare the models of etiology of mental disorders

  • Demonstrate understanding of the various manifestations of psychopathology

  • Demonstrate the ability to use DSM V and ICD 10 classificatory systems

  • Demonstrate understanding of skills required to diagnose various disorders.

  • Demonstrate mastery of skills required for psychopathological formulation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Classification and Theoretical Models
 

Systems of classification, basic features; DSM-5, ICD-10, similarities, differences and critical evaluation; new disorders in DSM-5; Major theoretical models of psychopathology; Critical evaluation.

Demonstration lab

 Use of DSM V and ICD- diagnostic interviews through video tape, Teacher lead simulation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Psychopathology of Neurocognitive and sleep disorders
 

Dementia, delirium, head injury, epilepsy, other amnesic syndromes; Clinical characteristics and etiology and treatment

Sleep disorder; Clinical characteristics, etiology and treatment.

Demonstration Lab

Neuropsychological assessments.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Psychopathology of substance related and addictive disorders and feeding and eating disorders
 

Clinical characteristics, etiology, models of addiction, assessment in addiction. Motivational intervention and behavioral assessment.

Feeding and Eating disorders- Anorexia and Bulimia, Binge eating disorder.

Demonstration lab 

Assessment in addictions, Motivational Interviewing.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT IV: Psychopathology of Adult Personality Disorders, sexual dysfunctions and gender dysphoria.
 

Clinical characteristics, etiology and theories of cluster A, B and C personality disorders. Differences in ICD and DSM V. Clinical characteristics, etiology of sexual dysfunctions, gender dysphoria and paraphilias.

Demonstration Lab 

Use of IPD, Clinical rating scales for personality disorders

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1.  Ahuja N (2002). A short textbook of Psychiatry (5th edition). New Delhi. Jaypee Brothers.
  2. Sadock, B.J. & Sadock, V.A. (2003). Kaplan & Sadock’s Synopsis of psychiatry: Behavioral sciences/clinical psychiatry (9th. Ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Hecker, S.E. & Thorpe, G.L. (2005). Introduction to clinical psychology: Science, practice & ethics. Delhi: Pearson Education, Inc.

  2. Adams, H.E., Sutker, P.B. (2001). Comprehensive handbook of psychopathology (3rd Ed.). New York: Kluwer Academic publishers.

  3. Millon, T., Blaney, P., & Davis, R.D. (1998). The oxford textbook of psychopathology. London: Oxford University Press.

  4. Smith, N.W. (2001). Current systems in psychology: History, theory, research & applications. USA: Wadsworth/Thomson learning.

  5. American Psychological Association. (1998). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th .ed.): text revision (DSM-1V-TR). New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical  Publishers (pvt) Ltd

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minumum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS233 - PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT AND STATISTICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course extends the learning in Quantitative research methods in Psychology by introducing students to the measurement and statistical techniques in research. Students will be given opportunity in this course to practice in labs the techniques of tool construction and statistical analysis. Students will be trained in software packages such as SPSS and Excel. 

  • The central objective of the course is to provide an introduction to the construction and validation of psychological measurements and an exposure to quantitative analysis techniques. The course also aims to enhance the skills of the students in data analysis manually as well as with the aid of software including EXCEL and SPSS.
  • The classes will focus on the fundamental principles of psychological measurements and statistics, theory behind test construction, psychometric test development, and data entry, data editing and analysis, exclusively quantitative.
  • The students will learn to construct and validate scales, inventories, and questionnaires, and to establish the psychometric properties.
  • The students will also be exposed to a broad range of statistical tools and packages that can be used for data analysis in clinical research and experiments.

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to: 

  • Define measurement, design psychological tests, explain and apply the steps in test construction and standardization

  • Estimate the validity and reliability of the scales, inventories and questionnaires, and generate test norms

  • Define psychological statistics, determine the relevant statistical tool during data analysis, identify and distinguish the analysis techniques that can be used in quantitative and qualitative research

  • Analyze the quantitative data using descriptive and inferential statistics manually, and using EXCEL and SPSS, and interpret the findings

  • Distinguish between the dependent and independent variables and identify the specific quantitative method to meet the given objectives in a quantitative research

  • Differentiate and integrate the output of the statistical analysis, parametric and non-parametric, and use APA format to present them in figures and tables

  • Assess and critique the quantitative methods used in a published journal article

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Foundations of Psychological Measurement and Testing
 

 Definition of measurement; scales of   measurement; Development of psychological test - steps; Item analysis: purpose of item analysis ;Item response theory, item difficulty, item discrimination; Test construction lab.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Test Construction and Standardization
 

Various methods of estimating reliability and Validity; Test norms: types of norms, development of norms; Test construction lab.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Descriptive Statistics
 

Definition and purpose of psychological statistics; Measures of central tendency and variability; Correlation: product-moment, point-biserial, phi, biserial, tetrachoric, spearman’s correlation coefficients; EXCEL & SPSS- Data entry and Descriptive statistical analysis, Reporting Statistics

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Inferential Statistics
 

 Probability distribution and normal curve; Levels of significance, type – I and type – II errors, one-and two-tailed tests ;Parametric and non-parametric tests of significance; Statistical analysis of single - sample study: testing a sample mean by t-test; Statistical analysis of two-sample experiments: the independent samples t-test, the dependent-sample t-test; Statistical analysis of complex experiments: analysis of variance – F test (computing and interpreting one-way, two-way ANOVA and their logic);MANOVA and  Post-hoc tests; SPSS- inferential statistical analysis, APA style of report writing

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Gravetter, F.J., & Wallnau, L.B. (2002). Essentials of statistics for the behavioral sciences (4th ed.). Pacific Grove, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning
  2. Coolican, H.(2004).Research methods and Statistics in Psychology. London: Hoddes Arnold
  3. Anastasi, A.& Urbina,S(1997).Psychological testing .New Delhi: Pearson Education Asia
  4. Gregory, R.J (2004).Psychological testing. History, principles and applications. New Delhi: Pearson Education Asia
  5. Garrett,H.E (2005).Satistics in psychology and Education. New Delhi: Paragon international Publishers.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.Aron, A. & Aron, E.N. (1994). Statistics for psychology. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

2.Cohen, R.J., & Swerdlik, M.E. (2005). Psychological testing and assessment: An introduction to tests and measurement (6th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

3.Heiman, G.W. (2001). Understanding research methods and statistics: An integrated introduction for psychology (2nd ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.

4.Kaplan, R.N.,& Saccuzzo, D (2001). Psychological Testing, Principles, Applications and issues. New York Kerlinger, N. (1996). Foundations of behavioural research.  India: Prentice Hall

5.King, B.M., & Minium, E.M. (2003). Statistical reasoning in psychology and education  (4th ed.). New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

6.Leong, F.T., & Austin, (1996). The psychology research handbook: A guide for graduate students and research assistants. Delhi: Sage Publications

7.Levin, J., & Fox, J.A. (2006). Elementary statistics in social research (10th ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education.

8.McCall, R.B. (2001). Fundamental statistics for behavioral sciences (8th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.

9.Miles, J. (2001). Research methods and statistics. Exeter: Crucial

10.Murphy, K.R., & Davidshofer, C.O. (2001). Psychological testing: Principles and applications (5th ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.  

11.Schweigert, W.A. (1997). Research methods psychology: A handbook. Delhi: Sage Publications

12.Singh, A.K. (1997). Test, measurements and research methods in behavioural sciences. Patna: Bharathi  Bhavan Publishers and Distributors

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. TThe student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS234 - COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course is part of the second semester of the master's program in Clinical Psychology and aims to discuss complex cognitive processes that underlie both normal and abnormal human behaviour. This course contributes to the following Clinical Psychology program objectives (a) developing domain knowledge (b) enhancing observation skills and critical analysis (c) inculcating evidence-based inference and finally (d) enhances self awareness and self regulation. At the same time the course also exemplifies the University expectation of excellence and service; and contributes to the graduate attributes of academic excellence, professional excellence and personal development.This course continues from Cognitive Psychology-1 and furthers learning on higher cognitive functions. This course will continue to highlight information-processing and computational perspectives while examining Memory, Language, Problem Solving, Reasoning and Decision Making. The topics will also include an understanding of the neuroscience of Cognition. This course will require the use of lab and experiments to demonstrate concepts in the course. Applications related to evaluating cognitive processes and their relevance to the practice of clinical psychology would be highlighted.

Course objectives: The course will help the learner 

  • Recognize, understand and define the concepts of high cognition (Memory, Language, Reasoning, Thinking, Problem Solving, Decision Making)

  • Understand and Analyze models and experiments to study topics in Cognition

  • Apply that knowledge via experiments to critically evaluate functional cognitive processes

  • Develop scientific mindedness, self awareness and self regulation

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to: 

  • Define and describe normal mental processes and contrast it to disordered states.

  • Describe and Compare the theories in written and oral form.

  • Infer connections between brain, mind and behaviour and demonstrate such relationships through observations and experiments.

  • Analyze and critically evaluate models of cognitive processes and make predictions.

  • Use available experimental tools and describe their importance and utility

  • Create hypotheses based on the theories and evaluate cognitive processes using experiments.

  • Present the arguments and conclusions based on evidenced gathered through literature or data.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Memory
 

Architecture of Memory, Working Memory and Levels of processing;  Remembering: Autobiographical and eyewitness memories; traumatic and false memories, Confabulation; Forgetting: Reproduction and reconstruction in memory, Theories of forgetting; Models of Knowledge Representation: Semantic Memory, Episodic Memory, Procedural (Implicit and Explicit); Models of memory for new information: General approach, Simple association models and SAM model; Prospective Memory – Event based, Time based, Current model; Mnemonics and TOT; Metacognition


Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Language Comprehension and Production
 

Defining Language: Origins of language, meaning structure and use, Chomsky’s Universal grammar, Psycholinguistics; Theoretical Perspectives of Language: Modularity Hypothesis, Whorfian Hypothesis and Neuropsychological perspectives, Lateralization; Language production: Speaking: Producing a word, sentence, speech errors, discourse, the social contexts of speech. Writing: Cognitive model, planning the writing assignment, sentence generation, revision; Language comprehension: Comprehension, Reading and Discourse: Theories of Parsing; Factors affecting Comprehension, Reading processes and Discourse processes; Bilingualism


Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Thinking, Problem Solving and Creativity
 

Concepts and Categorization: Function of concepts, Structure of Natural Object Categories, Association and Hypothesis Testing, Use of categories in reasoning;Problem Solving:  Types of problem, Understanding the problem, Strategies of Problem Solving (Sub goals, analogues); Problem-Solving Approaches: Gestalt, Newell and Simon’s theory, Factors that influence Problem Solving; Creativity and problem solving

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Reasoning and Decision Making
 

Reasoning: Types of Reasoning: Deductive, Inductive and everyday reasoning, Syllogistic Reasoning (Conditional Reasoning) Wason’s Card Task; Approaches to the study of reasoning: Componential, Rules/heuristics, mental models approach.; Patterns of Reasoning Performance; Basic concepts: Estimating probabilities, combining probabilities and values, risk dimensions; Models in Decision Making: Utility models (Expected utility, Multiattribute utility, dual processing); Cognitive Illusions in Decision Making: Availability, representativeness, framing effects, illusory correlations, hindsight effects, overconfidence; Decision Making Models – Compensatory and Non-compensatory; Types of decisions:  Decisions –Influence of risk, uncertainty, Emotions and Decision Making

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Matlin M W (2013) Cognitive Psychology. 8th Edition. John Wiley & Sons.

  2. Galotti, K.M. (2017). Cognitive Psychology In and Out of the Laboratory. 6th Edition.SAGE Publications, Inc. 

  1. Eysenck M.W. and Keane M.T. (2015) Cognitive Psychology : A Student's Handbook. 7th Edition. Psychology Press.

  2. Kellogg, R.T. (2012) Fundamentals of Cognitive Psychology. 2nd Edition, Sage South Asia.a

  3. Smith, E. E. & Kosslyn, S (2013). Cognitive Psychology: Pearson New International Edition: Mind and Brain, Pearson.

  4. Reed, S.K. (2007). Cognitive theories and applications. International Edition. 8th edition. Wadsworth.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Purves et al. (2008) Principles of Cognitive Neuroscience: 1st (first) Edition Sinauer Associates.

  2. Benjafield J. C. (2007) .Cognition, Third Edition. Oxford University Press.

  3. Howes M B (2007) Human Memory.  Structures and images. Sage

  4. Neath I & Surprenant A M (2003). Human Memory, Second Edition, Wadsworth.

  5. Sternberg R J & Pretz J E (2005) (Eds) Cognition and Intelligence Cambridge University Press.


Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS235 - BIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOR - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This Course intends to familiarize students with an introductory knowledge of the topics and methods of biological psychology to create an understanding of the underlying biological foundations of human behavior

Course Objectives: At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify basic brain structures and related functions
  • Describe contemporary research methods for studying brain and behavior
  • Interpret how drugs and hormones influence behavior
  • Identify the process by which memories are formed
  • Analyze the neurological pathways related to hunger, emotions, and sleep
  • Recognize the ways various emotions are expressed
  • Describe biological and social origins of sexual behavior / motivation
  • Differentiate lateralization of brain function and language development
  • Apply biological elements to common psychological disorders

Course Outcome

At the end of the course students will be able to

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the biopsychology of cognitive functions
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the biopsychology of arousal
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the biopsychology of motivation and emotion
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the biopsychology of select psychiatric conditions

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Biopsychology of Cognitive Functions
 

Learning: Neurophysiology of learning, Synaptic plasticity; Memory: Neurological basis of memory, Brain damage and dysfunction of memory

Language: Lateralization, Evolution and neurophysiology of speech. Disorders of reading writing: apasia, alexia & dyslexia.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Biopsychology of Arousal
 

Physiological correlations of Arousal: consciousness and sleep, Factors affecting consciousness. Sleep: Rhythms of sleeping and waking, neural basis of biological clocks, Stages of sleep,brain mechanisms of REM sleep and dreaming, physiological mechanisms of sleep and waking, disorder of sleep

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Biopsychology of Motivation
 

Hunger –theories, neural signals; Thirst-neural mechanisms; Human obesity. Anorexia nervosa Sex- hormones and sexual development, neural mechanism of sexual behavior, sexual orientations, hormones and the brain.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Biopsychology of Psychiatric Disorders
 

Schizophrenia, Substance abuse disorders, Major affective disorders, and Anxiety disorders.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Carlson, N.R. (2004). Physiological of behaviour (8 th .ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

2. Kalat, J.W. (2004). Biological psychology (8 th .ed.). Belmont: Wadsworth/Thomson learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Blackmore, S. (2003). Consciousness: An introduction. London: Hodder &Stoughton.

2. Garrett, B. (2003). Brain and Behavior. Wadsworth, Thomson Learning Inc, USA.

3. Freberg, L A. Discovering Biological Psychology (2 nd ed.)(2006), Wardsworth, Belmont: USA

4. Wagner, H., & Silber, K. (2004),Physiological Psychlogy, Garland Science, Abingdon:UK.

5. Rosenweig, M.R., Leiman, A.L. & Breedlove, S.M. (1999). Biological psychology: An introduction to behavioral, cognitive, clinical neuroscience. (2 nd ed.). USA:Sinauer Associates, Inc.

6. Wallace, B. & Fisher, L.E. (1991). Consciousness and Behavior (3 rd ed.). USA: Allyn& Bacon.

7. Pinel, J.P.J. (2000). Biopsychology (4 th .ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon

8. Kandel, E.R. Schwartz, J.H. & Jessel, T.M. (2000). Principles of neural science (4 th.ed.). Newyork: McGraw-Hill.

9. Leukel, F(1985). Introduction to physiological psychology (3 rd . ed.). New Delhi: CPS Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS236 - DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Developmental Psychology course for Clinical Psychology builds upon principles of human development acquired at the undergraduate level. This course examines research in developmental psychology as it applies to real-world situations. The goal is to acquire a greater understanding of factors influencing development, such as biological, hereditary, environmental, or cultural effects that describe, explain and predict developmental changes in humans over the lifespan. The focus will almost exclusively be on typical development. As such, the course will not focus on therapeutic approaches, interventions, or clinical populations.  We will examine how knowledge of developmental perspectives can inform parenting decisions, education, public policy, interventions and clinical practice. As this course is only a semester-long, it would be impossible to cover in-depth the entire field of applied developmental psychology. Instead, we will focus on selected topics related to child and adolescents in cognitive development and socio-emotional development, and have separate discussion adulthood and aging theories and its impact on adult development.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to understand

  • Understand development theories with specific applications to clinical practice 
  • Lifecycle theories and appreciate their position in developmental psychology.  
  • Understand the importance of scientifically studying issues pertaining to human development     
  • To recognize the diversity of life experiences that shape individual development

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  1. Understand the normative outcomes within each of the developmental phases.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the major cognitive and socio-emotional theoretical perspectives on human development and will be able to understand the diversity of experiences that shape development 
  3. Explain the cognitive, cultural, environmental and social factors that influence development throughout the lifespan.
  4. Compare and contrast the foundational theories of developmental psychology
  5. Apply the developmental theories and specific evidence-based research findings to understand current practice, policies and social issues

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Cognitive Development
 

Jean Piaget : A constructivist approach ; Objects and Space: Object Permanence, metacognitive thinking, personal fableness and adolescent risk behaviour; Vygotsky:  A social contextual approach; Criticisms and application, Neo-Piagetian work Robbie Case, Changes in adult cognitive development-Schaie and William Perry,; Play and play patterns

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Development of Self and Others
 

Social cognition: Intentionality; Theory of mind, Favell’s perspective taking, false belief task, self-control; Moral development, reasoning and Prosocial behavior- Paiget, Kohlberg, & Gilligan; teaching moral values; Intentionality, Self and social understanding- self-concept, self-perception, peer relationship and identity- Erickson, Marcia’s Identity status; health adolescent identity development- positive youth development model; Gender development-Bell; Sex differences and gender role socialization, sexuality, gender fluidity

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Socio-emotional Development
 

Emotional development- still face experiment, emotional regulation and dysregulation, temperament, cycle of aggression, goodness of fit, attachment theories and styles- Bowlby, Ainsworth, and Winnicot; factors that affect attachment-quality time and opportunity for attachment, infant characteristics,  parents internal working model, family environment; Caregiving and Parenting-Diana Baumrind, impact of parenting, issues- co-sleeping, disciplining, abuse, resilience; the role of culture; Bronfenbernner’s Ecosystems model and importance of having a developmental lens

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Adulthood and Ageing
 

Development during Adulthood, Emerging Adults-Arnett, Bio-psycho-social model of development and developmental tasks- Robert Havighurst, Career and vocation changes-Super Donald, Life stages-Levinson, Erickson; Mid Life Crisis, adult attachment patterns and relationships; Sexuality and Menopause; Coping with death and dying- Kubler Ross; Aging- positive and successful aging; gains and losses in later adult life

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Berk, L. E. (2016). Exploring lifespan development. Pearson.
  2. Broderick, P.C., & Blewitt, P. (2010). The life span: Human development for helping professionals. (3rd Ed.). Pearson.
  3. Santrock, J.W. (2011). A topical Approach to life-Span Development. Tata McGraw-Hill Edition.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Boyd, D. & Bee, H. (2015). Lifespan Development (Seventh. Edition), Pearson.
  2. Dixon, W. E. (2003). Twenty studies that revolutionized child psychology. Prentice Hall.
  3. Feldman, R. S. (2015). Discovering the life span. (Third Edition). Pearson Global Education.
  4. Kail R V (2001) Children and their development. Prentice Hall Inc.
  5. Newman & Newman (2003). Development through life: A Psychosocial Approach. Thomson Wadsworth.          
Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS251 - PSYCHO DIAGNOSTIC LAB - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course will cover issues in the assessment of personality using self report measures and cognitive functions such as intelligence and memory. This course is meant to provide students with skills of administering, scoring ,interpreting and conveying report in clinical settings using simulated labs and field exposure. A part of this course will be linked to community service course where students will conduct free assessment camps in community settings such as schools catering to poor students; NGO’s working with children etc

The basic objective of this course is

  • To introduce central concepts of psychological measurement – personality and cognitive functions.
  • To critically examine psychometric considerations, methodologies, data acquisition, data analyses, and communications related to real world applications of using psychometrics within social science and educational environments.

 

Course Outcome

At the end of this lab course students will be able to

  • Understand the psychometric structure of psychological tests
  • Administer psychological assessments relevant to client needs
  • Interpret the scores obtained on the assessments
  • Develop a report and covey the findings to clients

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Assessment of Personality
 

Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF), Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), Eysenck’s Personality Questionnaire- Revised (EPQ-R), Minnesota Multiphasic Persoanlity Inventory (MMPI), Neo Five Factor Inventory (Neo FFI)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Assessment of Intelligence and Memory
 

Raven’s Progressive matrices: Colored progressive matrices (CPM); Standard progressive matrices (SPM); Advanced progressive matrices (APM)

Wechsler’s Adult Performance Intelligence Scale (WAPIS); Binet-Kamat test of Intelligence (BKT) Other tests of Intelligence (Bhatia’s performance battery; WAIS, Seguin Form Board,Vineland social maturity scale, Draw a man test, PGI memory scale, Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS), NIMHANS Neuropsychological Battery

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Groth – Marnat, G (2003). Handbook of Psychological Assessment.John Wiley & Sons Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Kaplan, R.M & Saccuzzo, D. P (2009). Psychological testing: Principles, Applications and Issues. 7 th Edition, Wadsworth, Belmont, USA

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

MPS281 - COMMUNITY SERVICE - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course aims at consolidation of the service learning initiative begun in the first semester.

Course Objectives: The course helps the learner

  • engage with the community
  • conduct psychodiagnostic testing in the community
  • screen for mental health issues

 

Course Outcome

At the end of the course students will be able to

  • apply learning from psychodiagnostic labs to screen for mental health needs in community settings
  • demonstrate social responsibility

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Community service
 

In this course students will spend two hours a week or a total of 25 hours during the semester involved in supervised community service. Students will engage in activities such as children and youth tutoring, community organization, psychological assessment and mental health awareness. Student engagement will be assessed by supervisory team.

Text Books And Reference Books:

N.A.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

N.A.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

MPS331 - PSYCHOTHERAPY-I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Psychotherapy-1 is a post graduate course offered in the third semester to students of Clinical Psychology (MPCL). The course aims to integrate the theoretical knowledge imparted through prior courses such as History  and Philosophy of Clinical Psychology (MPS 131), Theories of Personality (MPS 132), Biological foundations of Behaviour (MPS 135, MPS 235), Law and Ethics in Clinical Psychology (MPS 231), Psychopathology-1 (MPS 232) and Psycho Diagnostic Lab (MPS 251) with therapeutic skills than can be applied in clinical settings, thereby fostering  graduate attributes of academic excellence while upholding the vision of the department by nurturing professional development. Furthermore, it builds upon essential elements of functional competencies, ethical and reflective practise within the scientist-practioner model. This course has been conceptualized with an intention to orient students to the theoretical foundations, processes, skills and techniques underlying different psychotherapeutic approaches for the treatment and care of persons with mental illness.  A review of evidence-based practices for psychological interventions, ethical dilemmas in decision making, legal mandates for therapeutic professions and reflective practices in psychotherapy will explored. Designed as an introductory course in psychotherapy, it allows students to walk the bridge that connects theory with practise and in turn helps them comprehend and reflect on the psychotherapeutic assessments and interventions during their clinical internship

This course will help the learner understand 

·     The elements of psychotherapeutic process

·     Theoretical foundations underlying different psychotherapeutic approaches

·     Therapeutic skills and techniques unique to each psychotherapeutic approach

·     Evidence based practices for psychological interventions and their specific areas of application

·     The ethical guidelines that govern decision making during the therapeutic process

·     The need and significance of reflective practices in psychotherapy

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

●      Describe the psychotherapeutic process, discuss psychotherapy research, identify training needs and supervision requirements.

●      Describe the theoretical foundations underlying various psychotherapeutic approaches, the skills and techniques associated with them.

●      Identify evidence-based practices specific to particular mental health conditions.

●      Develop psychotherapeutic case formulations using different therapeutic approaches 

●      Critique the strengths, limitations and the unique features associated with each form of psychotherapy.

 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Research and Training
 

Introduction; Psychotherapy research: Methods, outcomes, process issues; Training & Supervision of individual psychotherapists: Selection issues, personal motivating factors, theoretical learning, supervised clinical practicum, personal therapy, continuous professional/personal development; Other critical issues in psychotherapy

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Psychodynamic therapies
 

Psychoanalytic, Brief Analytic, Object-Relations, and Interpersonal Approaches

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Humanistic Therapies
 

Client-Centered, Existential and Gestalt therapies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Behavioral & Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies
 

Behavioral therapy, Cognitive therapy (Beck), Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (Ellis). 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential references:

1. Corey, G. (2017). Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy (10th ed.).Boston, USA: Cengage Learning.

2. Barlow, D. (2014). Clinical Handbook of Psychological Disorders: A Step-by-Step Treatment Manual (5th ed.). New York: The Guilford Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended references:

1. Herlihy, B., & Corey, G. (2014). ACA Ethical Standards Casebook (7th ed.). USA:Wiley.

2. Herlihy, B., & Corey, G. (2014). Boundary Issues in Counseling: Multiple Roles and Responsibilities, (3rd ed.). USA: Wiley.

3. Corey, G. (2012). Case Approach to Counseling and Psychotherapy (8th ed.). USA:Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning.

4. Corey, G., Haynes, R., Moulten, P., & Mouratori, M. (2010). Clinical Supervision in the Helping Professions: A Practical Guide (2nd ed.). USA: Wiley.

5. Corey, G., & Schneider Corey, M. (2008). I Never Knew I Had A Choice: Explorations in Personal Growth (9th ed.). USA: Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning.

6. Yalom, I. (2012). Love’s Executioner & Other Tales of Psychotherapy (2nd ed.). New York: Basic Books.

7. Corey, G., Schneider Corey, M., & Callanan, P. (2010). Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions (8th ed.). USA: Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning.

8. Yalom, I. (2009). The Gift of Therapy: An Open Letter to a New Generation of Therapists and Their Patients (1st ed.). USA: Harper Collins ebooks.

9. Feltman, C. (2017). The Sage Handbook of Counselling and Psychotherapy (4th ed.).USA: Sage.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, they will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

 

MPS332 - PSYCHOTHERAPY-II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized in order to critically address theory informing group and family therapy and facilitate the development of mastery n developing treatment plans based on empirical research. This Course is meant to provide students of clinical psychology an opportunity to examine the theoretical underpinnings of group and family therapies. Students will be encouraged to view the historical and cultural contexts within which group psychotherapy and family and marital therapy (including couples counseling) has emerged.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to

  • gain a familiarity with historical aspects of family and group therapies
  • assess and conceptualize dynamics that contribute toor maintain pathology
  • plan appropriate interventions to address the same

Course Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Understand the historical aspects of family and group therapy
  • Assess family and group dynamics in a structured manner
  • Critically analyze the nature of theory informing couples, marriage and family therapy
  • Develop treatment plans for couples and families.
  • Examine the relevance of group therapy as a preferred treatment plan for clientele with psychological dysfunctions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Historical and cultural contexts for the development of Couples, Family and Group therapy. Developmental frameworks in Couples, Family and Group therapy.

Assessment

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Couples Therapy
 

Couples Therapy: Theoretical frameworks, Issues and therapeutic approaches for working with couples. Evidence based practice in couples therapy, Treatment planning, Emotion FOcused Therapy, Gottman's approach to family therapy

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Family Therapy
 

Family Therapy: Major Dominant theories of Family Therapy - classical, post modern and social contructivistic approaches. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Group Therapy
 

Group Therapy: Theories of group therapy, emergence of group interventions as de facto forms of treatment and brief forms of group therapy; Treatment planning using Group interventions – choice of treatment and modality. Review of evidence based models in Group therapy

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Nichols, P.M & Schwartz C.R (2006). Family Therapy –concepts and methods, 7 th edition, Allyn and Bacon, Boston, Pearson education, Inc.

2. Corey, G (2008) Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy, 8 TH edition, Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Agazarian, Y. M. (1997), System-Centered Therapy for Groups, Guilford Press

2. Alonso, A., & Swiller, H.I. (1992) Group Therapy in Clinical Practice, American Psychiatric Press, Inc.

3. Bernard, H. S. & MacKenzie, K.R. (eds.) (1999), Basics of Group Psychotherapy, Guilford Press.

4. Bieling, P.J., MacCabe, R.E., & Antony, M.M. (2006).  Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Groups NY: Guilford Pub.

5. Bion, W.R. (1959) Experiences in Groups and other Courses. N.Y.: Basic Books.

6. Corey, M. & Corey,G. (1997) Groups: Process & Practice (5th ed.) Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

7. Dies, R.R. & MacKenzie, K.R. (1983) Advances in Group Psychotherapy: Integrating Research and Practice. N.Y.: International University Press.

8. Fehr, S.S. (1999) Introduction to Group Therapy: A Practical Guide. N.Y.:Haworth Press.

9. Foulkes, S.H. & Anthony, E.J. (1965) Group Psychotherapy: The Psychoanalytic Approach.London: Penguin Books.

10. Gazda, G.M. (1989) Group Counseling: A Developmental Approach (4th ed.) Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

11. Kaplan, H. & Sadock, B. (eds.) (1993) Comprehensive Group Psychotherapy ,3rd ed. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins.

12. Carter, B. & McGoldrick, M. (1999). The changing family life cycle. 3rd. Ed.Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

13. McGoldrick, M. & Gerson, R. (1999). Genograms in family assessment. 2nd.Ed. New York: Norton.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS333 - PSYCHOPATHOLOGY- II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course introduces students to mental health issues in clinical psychology by introducing clinical psychopathology. The use of diagnostic assessments using both DSM V and ICD 10 will be explored in this course. Students will also be encouraged to integrate the bio-psycho-social model of health and illness with clinical interventions.

Course objectives: 

  • To understand the etiology and current classificatory systems of mental disorders

  • To learn about the different symptoms, course and prognosis of mental disorders

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to: 

  • Contrast and compare the models of etiology of mental disorders

  • Demonstrate understanding of the various manifestations of psychopathology

  • Demonstrate the ability to use DSM V and ICD 10 classificatory systems

  • Demonstrate understanding of skills required to diagnose various disorders.

  • Demonstrate mastery of skills required for psychopathological formulation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Classification and Theoretical Models
 

Systems of classification, basic features; DSM-5, ICD-10, similarities, differences and critical evaluation; new disorders in DSM-5; Major theoretical models of psychopathology; Critical evaluation.

Demonstration lab

 Use of DSM V and ICD- diagnostic interviews through video tape, Teacher lead simulation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Psychopathology of Neurocognitive and sleep disorders
 

Dementia, delirium, head injury, epilepsy, other amnesic syndromes; Clinical characteristics and etiology and treatment

Demonstration Lab

Neuropsychological assessments.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Psychopathology of substance related and addictive disorders and feeding and eating disorders
 

Clinical characteristics, etiology, models of addiction, assessment in addiction. Motivational intervention and behavioral assessment.

Demonstration lab 

Assessment in addictions, Motivational Interviewing.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT IV: Psychopathology of Adult Personality Disorders, sexual dysfunctions and gender dysphoria.
 

Clinical characteristics, etiology and theories of cluster A, B and C personality disorders. Differences in ICD and DSM V. Clinical characteristics, etiology of sexual dysfunctions, gender dysphoria and paraphilias.

Demonstration Lab 

Use of IPD, Clinical rating scales for personality disorders

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1.  Ahuja N (2002). A short textbook of Psychiatry (5th edition). New Delhi. Jaypee Brothers.
  2. Sadock, B.J. & Sadock, V.A. (2003). Kaplan & Sadock’s Synopsis of psychiatry: Behavioral sciences/clinical psychiatry (9th. Ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Hecker, S.E. & Thorpe, G.L. (2005). Introduction to clinical psychology: Science, practice & ethics. Delhi: Pearson Education, Inc.

  2. Adams, H.E., Sutker, P.B. (2001). Comprehensive handbook of psychopathology (3rd Ed.). New York: Kluwer Academic publishers.

  3. Millon, T., Blaney, P., & Davis, R.D. (1998). The oxford textbook of psychopathology. London: Oxford University Press.

  4. Smith, N.W. (2001). Current systems in psychology: History, theory, research & applications. USA: Wadsworth/Thomson learning.

  5. American Psychological Association. (1998). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th .ed.): text revision (DSM-1V-TR). New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical  Publishers (pvt) Ltd

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. TThe student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS342A - PSYCHOSOCIAL REHABILITATION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized in order to offer the opportunity for interested students to specialize in counseling individuals with problems such as chronic pain, brain injury,dementia, epilepsy, cancer, and psychiatric disorders. It provides training in psychological assessment related to rehabilitation counseling. This course is designed to help the student to learn the relevant theory and basic skills important to the profession of rehabilitation counseling psychology.

Course objectives:

  • To provide the students an opportunity to learn the concept of Psychosocial rehabilitation - skills training, case management, vocational training & family education
  • To make the students understand different rehabilitation settings
  • To educate the students on disability assessments and legislations related to mental health

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Understand the principles of rehabilitation science and apply it to the practise of clinical psychology
  • Evaluate the disability using Assessment strategies useful in the area of rehabilitation
  • Create a model of intervention using community based approaches in rehabilitation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

History of rehabilitation ;Principles of psychiatric Psychosocial Rehabilitation;Psychosocial aspects of disability; Case management and rehabilitation planning

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Assessment and training
 

Disability assessment ;Various Skills training;Vocational evaluation and training;Job development and placement;Career counseling; community based Rehabilitation services;Family education ;Awareness programs ;Technological adaptation

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Liberman R.P., editor, Effective Psychiatric Rehabilitation.New Directions for Mental Health Services.53.San Francisco CA., Jossey-Bass,1992

2. Liberman R.P., Editor,Psychiatric Rehabilitation of Chronic Mental Patients.Washington DC:Americal Psychiatric Press, 1988

3. Bellack S.A and Hersen M., Handbook of BT in the Psychiatric Setting,Plenum Press, New york, 1993

4. Aiken, L.R., & Groth- Marnat, G.(2006). Psychological Testing and Assessment – twelfth edition. Boston, MA: Pearson.

5. Anastasi, A. &; Urbina, S. (1997). Psychological testing. N.D.: Pearson Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Wing J.K., Morris B., (ed) Handbook of Psychiatric Rehabilitation Practice. Oxford university press,1981

2. Kaplan, R.M. & Saccuzzo, D.P. (2007). Psychological Testing: Principles,Applications, and Issues.    Australia: Thomson Wadsworth.

3. Cormier,S.&; Cormier,W.H. Interviewing Strategies For Helpers: Fundamental SkillsAnd Cognitive- Behavioural Interventions (Counseling Series). Wadsworth Publishing Co.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, they will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPS342C - ADOLESCENT COUNSELLING (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to understand the nature of adolescents and their counseling needs within school, family, and community contexts. This course aids the student in understanding the problems and issues among adolescents and need for intervention, creating awareness and helping students identify the tremendous opportunities in the area of adolescent counselling psychology. This course will help the learner

  • understand the problems, issues and counselling needs of adolescents within school, family, and community contexts.
  • develop an understanding of counselling related problems/issues confronting adolescents including developmental crises, diexceptional behavior, addictive behavior, abuse, violence, and situational and environmental factors that may impede academic, personal/social, or career success and overall development.
  • design intervention models based on various issues identified.

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Demonstrate skills and techniques to deal with various issues related to adolescents.
  • Identify community and institutional opportunities that enhance, as well as barriers that impede the academic, career, and personal/social success and overall development of adolescents.
  • Develop modules/ intervention models to address various adolescent issues related to school, family and community.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Course overview-Discussion of assignments, The World of Adolescents/Factors effecting growth and behavior, Characteristics of adolescents, high and low risk adolescents/youth, School, Family and community related issues, exceptional behaviour, addiction, abuse, Pregnancy, Risky Sexual Behavior & Delinquency, Suicide/Depression.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Situational and environmental factors that may impede academic, personal/social, or career success and overall development,Prevention and Early Intervention models, socio-economic and cultural contexts, Guidance, Peer Coaching Model, mental health awareness programmes, Emerging Technology, Group Discussion Skills, Critical Incidents: Counsellor Role and Function

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. American Psychological Association, (2002). Developing Adolescents – A reference for professionals. APA: Washington Dc.
  2. Akos, P., Levitt, D.H. (2002). Promoting healthy body image in middle school. Professional School Counseling, 6(2), 138-144. 
  3. Carlson, L.A. (2003). Existential theory: Helping school counselors attend to youth at  risk for violence. Professional School Counseling, 6(5), 310-315. 
  4. Casey-Cannon, S., Hayward, C., & Gowen, K. (2001). Middle-school girls’ reports of peer victimization: Concerns, consequences, and implications. Professional School Counseling, 5(2), 138-147. 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Evans, T. (2015). Counselling skills for Becoming A wiser Practitioner-Tools, techniques and reflections For building practice wisdom. Philadelphia:Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
  2. Jones, R. N. (2005). Practical counseling and helping skills - text and activities for the lifeskills counselling model.(5th ed).London: Sage publications.
  3. Evans, J.R., Van Velsor, P., & Schumacher, J.E. (2002). Addressing adolescent depression: A role for school counselors. Professional School Counseling, 5(3), 211-219.
  4. Feller, R.W. (2003). Aligning school counseling, the changing workplace, and career development assumptions. Professional School Counseling, 6(4), 262-271.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, they will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPS342D - CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course description: Clinical neuropsychology addresses the link between brain and behaviour. Neuropsychological assessments provide a scientific way of quantifying and describing the cognitive, behavioural and emotional sequelae of changes in brain function caused by damage or disease. This module introduces you to neuroanatomy, neuropsychological assessment, and neuropsychological rehabilitation.

Course objectives: Students will acquire:

  • An understanding of the broad work field of clinical neuropsychologists and the ability to apply this understanding. The focus lies on knowledge of various neurological, psychiatric and neuropsychological disorders, their underlying pathology, as well as the methods and techniques used to diagnose and treat them
  • Knowledge of the functional neuroanatomy, neuropathology, neurophysiology and neuropathophysiology
  • Oral and written skills that allow them to present a current (clinical) neuropsychological theme/topic

 

 

Course Outcome

Course outcomes: Having successfully completed this module students will be able to:

  • describe key brain structures and their functions
  • define and describe clinical signs of common neurological conditions
  • define which neuropsychological tests to use for different conditions and demonstrate competence in the use of neuropsychological tests
  • interpret the results of psychological assessment and use these to recommend appropriate intervention
  • demonstrate knowledge of professional and ethical issues relevant to the neuropsychologists role.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Unit I
 

History, basic anatomy, elements of neurology, Methods of study of research in neuropsychology-anatomical methods, degeneration techniques, lesion techniques, chemical methods, stereotaxic surgery, micro-electrode studies, oscilloscope, polygraph, scanning methods & Ethical issues in research.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Unit II
 

Major structures and functions, spinal cord, Brain: Fore brain, Mid brain, Hind brain, Cerebral cortex, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes; prefrontal cortex

Lobe syndromes- frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Unit III
 

Spiritual dimensions of neurology, Neurology and emotions, neurological changes during cousnelling interventions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV
 

Neuropsychology of psychiatric conditions: Schizophrenia, Substance abuse disorders, Major affective disorders and Anxiety disorders.

Neuropsychological assessments

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Blackmore, S. (2003). Consciousness: An introduction. London: Hodder&Stoughton.
  2. Kandel, E.R. Schwartz, J.H. & Jessel, T.M. (2000). Principles of neural science (4th .ed.)New York: McGraw-Hill.
  3. Wallace, B. & Fisher, L.E. (1991). Consciousness and Behavior (3rd Ed.). USA: Allyn &   Bacon.
  4. Walsh K. (2008). Neuropsychology. New Delhi: B.I. Churchill Livingstone Pvt. Ltd
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Anderson, V., Northam, E., Hendy, J. & Wrennall, J. (2005). Developmental Neuropsychology: A Clinical Approach (Brain Damage, Behavior and Cognition Series). NY, NY: Psychology Press, Taylor and Francis Group.
  2. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (2013). Arlington, VA.: American Psychiatric Press.
  3. Grant, I. & Adams, K. (2009). Neuropsychological Assessment of Neuropsychiatric and Neuromedical Disorders, Third Edition. New York, New York: Oxford University Press.
  4. Heilman, K.M. & Valenstein, E. (2003). Clinical Neuropsychology. NY, NY: Oxford University Presss.
  5. Lezak, M. D., Howieson, D. B, & Loring, D.W. (2012). Neuropsychological Assessment, 5th ed. NY, NY: Oxford University Press.
  6. Morgan, J.E. & Ricker, J.E. (2008). Textbook of Clinical Neuropsychology. NY, NY: Taylor and Francis Publishers, Inc.
  7. Reynolds, C.R.(Editor) & Fletcher-Janzen, E. (Editor) (2008). Handbook of Clinical Child Neuropsychology, Third Edition. NY, NY: Springer Publishers.
  8. Strauss, E., Sherman, E.M.S. & Spreen, Otfried (2006). A Compendium of Neuropsychological Tests:, Third Edition Administration, Norms and Commentary. NY, NY: Oxford University Press.
  9. Yeates, K.O., Ris, M.D., Taylor, H.G. & Pennington, B.F. (2010). Pediatric Neuropsychology: Research, Theory, and Practice, 2nd Edition. NY, NY: Guildford Press.
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPS342E - COGNITIVE ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Couse Description:

Electroencephalography is the recording of the scalp electrical activity generated by brain structures. This course provides an exposure to basic and applied aspects of Electroencephalography in the study of brain and cognition. The study of various processes underlying cognition requires the use of well-structured cognitive tasks. Changes in brain potentials or EEG patterns can also be elicited as a response to external stimuli provided through these tasks, generating an event related potential (ERP). Hence, this course aims to also provide an exposure to EPrime in constructing the cognitive tasks. The students will also be trained in electrophysiological data collection, data cleaning and editing and basic ERP data analysis. In addition, the seminar segment of the course improves the reading and analysis of published ERP studies.

Course objectives: 

·       Understand and describe theoretical underpinnings of electrophysiological correlates of cognition in written and oral form.
·       Learn about the methods of acquiring EEG data and be able to explain the procedures and principles of various parts of the EEG system.
·       Design and translate cognitive ERP tasks using EPrime platform.
·       Understand the ERP acquisition from these cognitive tasks.
·       Describe and analyze ERP waveforms, identify key components and interpret the waveform.
·       Critically evaluate published studies in Event related Potentials.

 

 

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to

  • demonstrate knowledge of a key methodology used to study cognitive functions
  • apply that knowledge to evaluate design and results of ERP studies
  • develop scientific mindedness

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Theory
 

Introduction to Electroencephalography (EEG) History, EEG rhythms and applications. Neurophysiological basis of the EEG signal – Neuron as an electrical unit and basic neuroanatomy of cortex.


Event-related potentials (ERP) – History and Basic methodology
; ERP waveform and its components: Definition, nomenclature, quantification and interpretation. Exploring cognitive processes with ERPs.

 ERP experiment design: Conceptualizing experiment design, representing a design and translating the design into a functioning experiment using EPrime. Integrating Eprime with EEG system.

 Quantification of ERPs in the time domain, Averaging and grand-averaging, Advanced EEG/ERP analyses (short overview) and topographical maps.

 

Review and analysis of electrophysiological data – Representing results and Interpreting EEG/ERP data

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 2
 

Technical basis of EEG/ERP From the physical signal to the digital time-series, types of sensors, amplifiers, amplification, analog-to-digital conversion, collecting EEG data, Electrode positioning systems, montages, reference; Software and systems for recording and processing EEG/ERP data.

 ERP signal processing - Digital filters, Baseline correction, and Event/response coding. Removal/correction of artifacts, Interpolation

 Topography and Fundamentals of source localization

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Unit 3
 

Seminar Module –

(a)  Journal Desk - Key & relevant journal articles will be critically reviewed and presented as a summary in a discussion board and presented for 15mins in class.

(b)  10-15 articles with ERP methods for specific clinical conditions will be curated by the student. This will be done in consultation with the course coordinators. This material will be compiled into a wiki activity titled “ERP correlates of Psychiatric Diagnoses”

Text Books And Reference Books:

Rowan's Primer of EEG E-Book (2015) Marcuse, L. V., Fields, M. C., and Yoo, J. J. Elsevier Health Sciences.

 Practical Approach to Electroencephalography (2009) Mark H. Libenson MD, Saunders Elsevier.

 An Introduction to the Event-Related Potential Technique (2005) Stephen J Luck, MIT Press.

The Oxford Handbook of Event-Related Potential Components. (2012) Eds. Kappenman, Emily S., and Steven J. Luck. : Oxford University Press, Oxford Handbooks Online.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Niedermeyer's Electroencephalography: Basic Principles, Clinical Applications, and Related Fields. (2017) Schomer, D., & Lopes da Silva, F. (Eds.), Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Key Journals for regular review:

Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology

https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/electroencephalography-and-clinical-neurophysiology

Nature Neuroscience

https://www.nature.com/neuro/

PNAS

https://www.pnas.org/

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPS351 - MULTICULTURAL AND THERAPEUTIC SKILLS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at providing students with the skills of clinical interviewing, assessment and formulations in order to help them prepare for clinical work in their practicum.

Course Objectives:

This course will help the learner

1. Understand and develop skills of assessment and case history taking

2. Develop psychodiagnostic formulations

Course Outcome

At the end of the course students will be able to

  1. Conduct a clinical interview and create a structured assessment report including case history and MSE.
  2. Formulate diagnoses and differential diagnoses
  3. Develop a psychodiagnostic formulation
  4. Demonstrate  active listening skills
  5. Develop treatment plans
  6. Initiate therapeutic goals with clients using a CBT Approach

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Basic clinical interview skills
 

Intentional clinical interviewing , Basic Listening skills , Reflection of feeling,  reflection of meaning, influencing  skills,  structuring the sessions, integration of skills. Clinical history taking; Mental Status Examination; Psycho diagnostic formulation.

Clinical interviewing skills

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Formulations and Treatment planning
 

Multi axial diagnosis, Mental status examinations, Clinical case history, and formulations including CBT (compulsory) . Skills of treatment planning, Developing goals in therapy , Establishing therapeutic alliance, ethical consideration, dealing with breaches and transference

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. American Psychiatric Association (2012) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Diseases – 4 TR, APA, Jaypee, New Delhi
  2. Ivey, A., Ivey, M., & Zalaquett, C (2009). Intentional Interviewing and counseling :Facilitating client development in a multicultural society. Cengage
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Green.,Ben.(1996).Problem - based Psychiatry.B.I.Churchill Livingstone Pvt Ltd, New Delhi.
Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester Viva Voce - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, they will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Viva
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+End Semester Viva)

MPS382 - RESEARCH LAB (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is the second of two labs that facilitate the evolving research dissertation of the students. Following the research proposal presented in the second semester, students will undertake the data collection and analysis of the data in this semester. Through peer feedback and instructor support students will critically examine the issues of reliability and validity of their work and engage in learning tools of data analysis using SPSS and NVivo software.

This course will help the learner to:

  • gain familiarity with different methods of data analysis
  • understand the issues of reliability, validity and trustworthiness in data.
  • gain familiarity with the presentation of qualitative and qualitative data in a scientific format

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Demonstrate skills of quantitative data analysis using SPSS
  • Demonstrate the skills of qualitative data analysis using NVivo
  • Develop skills on presenting qualitative data in a scientific format
  • Identify issues of reliability, validity and trustworthiness of their data and data collection procedures

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 1
 

Statistical Data Analysis using SPSS

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT II
 

Qualitative Data Analysis using NVivo

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT III
 

Reliability , Validity and Trustworthiness of data

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Miles, M.B, Huberman, A.M & Saldana, J (2013).Qualitative Data Analysis: A Methods Sourcebook, 3 rd Edition. Sage, New Delhi

2. Field A, 2(2013). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS statistics, 4thEdition, Sage, New Delhi

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Bryman,A (Ed.)(2007) Sage Benchmarks in social science research methods Vol.I,Vol.II ,Vol,III,and Vol. IV.New Delhi : Sage Publications

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

MPS431 - ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course has been conceptualized in order to provide knowledge in social psychology to conceptualize the subject matter of the social individual in its deepest sense.  Building from the preliminary knowledge of social psychology at the undergraduate level, this course offers learners a more hands-on experience in social behaviour dynamics. 

This course is structured to provide students a culturally informed and contextualized view of the discipline.  Students are encouraged to appreciate and analyze the changing cultural diversity in the present Indian society, therefore, equipping them to approach social issues with its implications. The course will be augmented with field work and labs to enhance learning.

Course Objectives:

This course will help the learner to gain familiarity with :

  • The historical development of social psychology as a discipline, its nature and critical issues and current debates within it.
  • The plurality and multiple research designs and methods that can be employed to undertake research in social psychology with an-depth understanding of the ethical issues associated with them.
  • The nature of how the self and identity develop in a social and cultural context and how individuals engage in the processes of social perception and social cognition.
  • An understanding of social interactions in the context of interpersonal relationships, group dynamics and aggression.
  • The diverse social issues that exist in society and the application of social psychological principles and theories to address these issues, with a special focus on mental health in India.

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Evaluate the historical and cultural context of social psychology as a discipline internationally and India.
  • Examine theoretical frameworks underlying social interaction and its relationship to social identity.
  • Relate knowledge of theory as well as current and past research in social psychology to situations in everyday life such as interpersonal and group relations.
  • Understand the nature, dynamics and dimensions of interpersonal behaviour.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Historical and Conceptual Issues in Social Psychology
 

The definition and nature social psychology; Growth of social psychology; Alternative conceptions of social psychology; Crisis of confidence in the discipline and its resolution;  Development of social psychology in India; Current status of the discipline; Indigenization of social psychology; Issues in experimental social psychology; Emerging alternative methods in social psychology;  Ethical issues in social psychological research.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Social  Interaction
 

Self and identity : Culture and development of self, social identity , diverse identities; Social cognition and impression management ; Attribution- theories, biases and errors; Organizing and Changing attitudes; persuasion and propaganda techniques ; Prejudice, Stereotypes and Discrimination : Theories of inter-group relations, reducing prejudice ; The development of social representations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Social Influences
 

Nature, dimensions and dynamics of interpersonal relationships; Interpersonal attraction ; Sexuality and intimacy; Diverse and complex relationships – alternate sexualities; Groups: Small groups and its functions , social influence processes in groups ; Aggression: Theories and individual differences in aggression; Violence- sexual harassment, genocide,terrorism.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Issues
 

Cross-cultural psychology: Diversity in socialization: Individualistic vs. collectivistic culture:Social psychological perspectives on health and illness ; Culture, personality and psychopathology ; Traditional healing methods: Cross- cultural aspects of coping ;Environmental stresses and social behaviour; Psychological effects of unemployment. Social and ethnic minorities and law; Poverty and deprivation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Baumeister,R.F. and Bushman, B.J. (2014). Social Psychology and human nature.

Third edition. New Delhi : Cengage publishers.

2. Fraser, C., and Burchell, B. (2001). Introducing Social Psychology. Cambridge: Polity

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Baumeister, R.F. and Finkel, E.J. (2010). Advanced social psychology :The state ofthe science. New York : Oxford university press.

2. Crisp, R.J. and Turner , R.N.(2014).Essential social psychology. New Delhi : Sage.

3. Dalal, A.K. and Misra, G. (2002). Social Psychology in India: Evolution and emerging trends.   In A.K. Dalal and G.Misra (Eds.), New directions in Indian Psychology (Vol1: Social Psychology). (pp.19-49). New Delhi: Sage.

4. Dovidio,J.F. (2010).The Sage handbook of prejudice, stereotyping and discrimination. London :Sage

5. Heinzen,T.E., and Wind, G. (2019). Case studies in social psychology : Critical thinking and application.First edition. California :Sage publications .

6. Hepburn,A (2003). An introduction to critical social psychology. London :Thousand Oaks, California : Sage

7. Klauer,K.C. Andreas , V., and Christoph,S. (2011). Cognitive methods in social psychology. New York : Guilford press.

8. Linda, S. (Ed) (2017). Applied social psychology : understanding and managing social problems. Cambridge ,UK: Cambridge university press

9. McGhee, P. (2001). Thinking about experimental social psychology. In P. McGhee,Thinking psychologically (pp. 119-139). New York: Palgrave.

10. Michener, H.A., Delamater, J.D., and Myers, D.J. (2004). Social Psychology (5 th ed.).

Belmont,CA: Wadsworth/ Thomson Learning.

11. Nelson,T.D. (2019). Classic and Contemporary studies in social psychology: A text

reader. California : Sage publications.

Recommended Journal references :

12. Baumeister,R.F and Vos,K.D. (2003). Social psychology articles from the 1980s and 1990s : Some new classics and overlooked gems. Psychological Inquiry,14 (3/4),

p193-195.

13. Fiske,S,T.(2015). Grolar bears, social class and policy relevance : Extraordinary agendas for the emerging 21 st century. European journal of social psychology, 45(5),

p551-559.

14. Greenberg.J. (2005). The revealing science of social psychology. Psychological Inquiry,16(4). p168-171.

15. Kapur, R.L. (1994). Violence in India: A Psychological Perspective. D.L.N. Rao Murthy Oration, Indian Journal of Psychiatry, 36(4), 163-169.

16. Kiran,R. (2006). Lessons learnt in mental health and psychosocial care in India after disasters. International review of psychiatry, 18(6). p547-552.

17. Leung,K. (2007). Asian social psychology : Achievements ,threats and opportunities. Asian journal of social psychology , 10(1), p8-15.

18. Moghaddam, F.M. (1987). Psychology in the three worlds: As reflected by the crisis in social psychology and the move toward indigenous third world psychology. American

Psychologist, 42, 912-920.

19. Verma,S.K. , Bharti,P., and Singh,. T. (2018). Does stigma always have negative consequences?. Journal of community and applied social psychology.28(6), p495-507.

20. Wilson, T.D.(2005). The message is the method : Celebrating and exporting the experimental approach. Psychological Inquiry

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 
Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, they will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPS441B - EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This elective is aimed at providing students an understanding of the inter-links between psychology and education. Application of psychological principles to educational settings will be imparted in this course. An understanding of Biological foundations of behaviour and developmental psychology is a pre-requisite for this course. Completion of this course would equip students to deliver clinical interventions in educational settings. 

This course will help the learner to

  • Understand the Educational Psychology field, Interventions and Research Models.
  • Gain knowledge of  Educational Psychology theories and conceptual frameworks.
  • Develop skills on various models and strategies of Educational Psychology assessment and intervention with students, parents, teachers, educators and other professionals. 
  • Develop a critical, creative and intended approach regarding psychological intervention in different educational settings.

Course Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

•Understand key issues and develop effective solutions
•Evaluate study methodology and scientific basis of findings
•Demonstrate various Childhood disorders and its implications in classroom teaching and learning
•Explore a case with learning disability
•Report a case study of a learner with learning disability 
 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Introduction to Educational Psychology; Educational Psychologists intervention & Research in Educational Psychology 

Applied Theoretical Frameworks of Learning, Teaching and Development; Motivation and Learning; Metacognition, Self-regulation and Learning 

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Vocational Counseling and Guidance; Indiscipline, Teacher-Student Relationship and Classroom management 

Learning disabilities, Special needs & Multicultural classrooms; Parenting Education Prevention Approaches in Educational settings

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.Woolfolk, A. (2004). Educational psychology (9th ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education.

2.Robinson, S. (2009). Foundation of Educational Psychology (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Ane Books.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Frederickson, N., Miller, A. & Cline, T. (2008). Educational Psychology. London: Hodder Education. 

2. Rubie-Davies, C. (Ed.) (2011). Educational Psychology Concepts, Research and Challenges. New York: Routledge. 

3. Brophy, J. (2010). Motivating Students to Learn (3rd edition). New York: Routledge. 

4. Smith, T., Polloway, E., Patton, J. & Dowdy, C. (2012). Teaching Students with Special Needs in Inclusive Settings (6th edition). New Delhi: PHI Learning.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPS441C - FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Forensic Psychology is the application of psycvhology in the aid of legal investoigation, which looks into the vast psychological perspective and applies them to legal investigations including issues such as public policies, new laws, competency and also the mental state of a defendant.

Course Outcome

Better understanding the legal aspects of the forensic psychology and learning the art of studying human mind and behaviour especialy criminals.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
UNIT 1
 

Forensic Science: Definition of Forensic Science,  Scope of Forensic Science, Need for forensic Science, Basic principles of Forensic Science, Tools and Techniques of Forensic Science, Branches of Forensic Science.

 

Crime: Definition, Types of Crimes, Modus Operandi and its role in crime investigation. Crime scene, types of crime scene, Crime Scene Management. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
UNIT 2
 

Forensic Psychology: Definition, Goals and scope of Forensic Psychology,Forensic psychiatry.Memory: Types - Sensory Memory -Iconic Memory; Echoic Memory; Working Memory, Long-Term Memory – determinants, autobiographical memory, mnemonics. Sleep – Stages of Sleep. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
UNIT 3
 

Impulse Control DisorderIntermittent Explosive Disorder, Kleptomania, Pyromania, Pathological Gambling, Trichotillomania- Features, specific culture, gender differences, age, prevalence, course. Mood Disorder & Suicide -Meaning, Definition, Prevalence, Age of onset, Depression throughout the lifetime. Crime and Psychopathology, Genetics and Crime. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
UNIT 4
 

Forensic Psychology and the Law, Ethical Issues in Forensic Psychology, Civil and criminal case assessment, Assessing mental competency, Mental disorders and Forensic Psychology Eye witness testimony, Memory recovery, Statement verification.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
UNIT 5
 

Criminal Profiling: Need for criminal profiling, Criminal profiling approaches, Criminal Profiling types, Forensic Scientific evidence, Forensic Socio Psychological profiling. Crime profiling, Serial murders Silent points in criminal profiling. 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
UNIT 6
 

Polygraph: The Art-Polygraph, Legal and Ethical aspects. Brain-Mapping- Historical aspects of Brain-Mapping, Principles of Brain mapping, Neuropsychological aspects, operational aspects, EEG-ER recording, analysis, methodology and interpretation skills. Hypnosis, Requirements of Hypnosis,  Applications of Hypnosis, Sense of Hypnosis Forensic Hypnosis, Artificial Hypnosis/Narco analysis, General Procedure, Interpretation.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1.  Bartol C. R., & Bartol A. M. (2011).  Criminal behavior: a psychological approach. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson.
  2.  Hickey E. W. (2010).  Serial murderers and their victims. Belmont, California: Wadsworth.
  3.   Silverman, Robert A., Kennedy, Leslie W. (1988). Women who kill their children: violence and victims, Vol 3(2).
  4.  Weisheit, Ralph A. (1986). When mothers kill their children: the social science journal. Volume 23, issue 4

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Resnick, Phillip J. (1969). Child murder by parents: a psychiatric review of filicide. Am J Psychiatry.
  2.    Wrightsman, Lawrence S. Forensic psychology. Belmont, California: Wadsworth/Thomason Learning.
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPS441D - SEXUAL DYSFUCNTIONS AND SEX THERAPY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course suitable for post graduate students of Counselling and Clinical Psychology intends to deepen their theoretical understanding of sexual dysfunctions and sex therapy, train them in empirically proven techniques of individual and couple sex therapy across behavioural, cognitive, emotion focussed and systemic frameworks. The students will be equipped to critically appraise the research literature in the area, conceptualize research on sex therapy as well as get comfortable in handling clients with sexual dysfunctions.

Course Objectives:

  • A thorough understanding of normal sexual functioning, deviations from normality, types of male and female sexual dysfunctions.
  • Familiarisation with the intricacies, therapist qualities, interviewing strategies, application of culturally appropriate intervention strategies in the context of sex therapy.
  • Acquiring an overview of current status of research in sexuality and sex therapy, and ability to conceptualize process and outcome research.

Course Outcome

  • Appreciate the interplay of biological, social and psychological factors in normal sexual behavior and in sexual dysfunction
  • Delineate and describe culturally appropriate individual and couple sex therapy techniques.
  • Critically evaluate the historical and current research in the area of sexuality and sex therapy.
  • Conceptualize research on sexual dysfunctions and sex therapy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to sexuality
 

Psychosexual development. Models of sexual functioning (Medical, Cognitive behavioural, Experiential). Distinguishing between normal and dysfunctional sexual behaviour. Classification of male and female dysfunctions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Assessment in Sex Therapy
 

Qualities of a sex therapist. Models of sex therapy. Clinical evaluation and Psychometric assessment in sex therapy. Techniques in sex therapy. Sex therapy with single individuals.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Couple Sexual Interactions
 

Normal and dysfunctional couple sexual interactions. Systemic approaches to couple sex therapy. Processes in integration of sex and couple therapy. Challenges in sex therapy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
History and Evolution, Critical Evaluation
 

History and evolution of sex therapy research. Critical evaluation. Current trends and future directions in the area of sex therapy. Conceptualising culturally sensitive process and outcome research in sex therapy.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Masters, W. H., & Masters, V. J. (1980). Human sexual inadequacy. Bantam Books.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Hawton, K. (1985). Sex therapy: A practical guide. Oxford University Press.

Hertlein, K. M., Weeks, G. R., & Gambescia, N. (Eds.). (2009). Systemic sex therapy. New York, NY: Routledge.

LoPiccolo, J., & LoPiccolo, L. (Eds.). (2012). Handbook of sex therapy. Springer Science & Business Media.

Weeks, G. R. (2013). Integrating sex and marital therapy: A clinical guide. Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPS441E - DISABILITY AND CHALLENGE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to acquaint the students with different psycho-social aspects of disabilities and plan interventions for the same. 

The course will help the learner

1. Understand different etiologies of diability

2. Analyze psycho-social and legal aspects of disability

3. Plan interventions for psycho-social issues faced by individuals with disabilities. 

 

Course Outcome

By the end of the course. the learner will be able to

  • Understand the challenges and issues that individuals with disabilities face
  • Debate policy and legal provisions for the individuals in disabilities in the Indian context
  • Understand different intervention strategies and explore the ideology behind inclusion, in principle and practice

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to disability and challenge