CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

School of Social Sciences

Syllabus for
Master of Science (Psychology-Counselling)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPC111 ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH SEMINAR Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
MPC121 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2 2 50
MPC131 FOUNDATIONS OF COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MPC132 LIFE-SPAN PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MPC133 QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS Core Courses 4 4 100
MPC134 COUNSELLING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES - I (INDIVIDUAL) Core Courses 4 4 100
MPC151 MULTICULTURAL COUNSELLING SKILLS - I Core Courses 4 4 100
MPC181 COMMUNITY SERVICE - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2 2 50
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPC211 APPLICATION OF STATISTICS IN BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES - 2 2 50
MPC221 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT-II - 2 2 50
MPC231 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100
MPC232 POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100
MPC233 SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS FOR COUNSELLING - 4 4 100
MPC234 MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS - 4 4 100
MPC235 COUNSELLING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES - II (GROUP) - 4 4 100
MPC251 MULTICULTURAL COUNSELLING SKILLS - II - 4 4 100
MPC271 RESEARCH PROPOSAL AND SUPERVISION - 2 2 50
3 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPC331 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT COUNSELLING Core Courses 4 4 100
MPC332 COUNSELLING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES - III (COUPLES AND FAMILIES) Core Courses 4 4 100
MPC351 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT Skill Enhancement Course 4 4 100
MPC381 SUPERVISED PRACTICUM Skill Enhancement Course 2 4 100
MPC382 RESEARCH MANUSCRIPT Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2 4 100
MPC383 COMMUNITY SERVICE-II(SUMMER PLACEMENT) Skill Enhancement Course 0 2 50
4 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPC431 COUNSELLING INTERVENTIONS FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS - 4 4 100
MPC432 TRAUMA INFORMED COUNSELLING - 4 4 100
MPC441A ACCEPTANCE AND COMMITMENT THERAPY - 2 2 50
MPC441B COGNITIVE ANALYTIC THERAPY - 2 2 50
MPC441C SEX THERAPY - 2 2 50
MPC441D DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOUR THERAPY - 2 2 50
MPC441E GRIEF THERAPY - 2 2 50
MPC471 COUNSELLING SUPERVISION SEMINAR - 2 2 50
MPC481 COUNSELLING INTERNSHIP - 0 8 200
MPC482 BLOCK INTERNSHIP - 0 2 50
MPC483 SEMINAR AND PUBLICATION - 0 2 50
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The Department of Psychology offers two year full-time M.Sc Course in Counselling Psychology. Masters course in Counselling Psychology is an advanced course aimed at competence building among the students from a holistic and an interdisciplinary perspective.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Demonstrate knowledge of the theoretical foundations of counselling psychology and its application in diverse contexts and populations.

PO2: Practice evidence-based and culturally-sensitive counselling based in a holistic model of mental health services for individuals, couples, families, and groups.

PO3: Exhibit an emerging professional identity and an openness to ongoing personal and professional development through engagement in relevant professional organisations, continued learning, and reflexive practices.

PO4: Design, implement, evaluate, interpret, and disseminate psychological research to solve real world problems.

PO5: Demonstrate a critical understanding of professional, ethical, and legal policies and procedures in mental health and counselling practice.

PO6: Demonstrate skills of leadership, creativity, and social sensitivity to recognise the needs of the community and become active agents of change.

Assesment Pattern

Assessment Pattern

The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Examinations (ESE).

Break up of continuous internal assessment for 4 credit courses is as follows

CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks

 

Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For two credit courses the breakup of CIA is as follows

CIA1:20 marks
CIA 2:25 Marks
Class participation and Attendance: 5 marks

Minimum pass marks for the CIA of a course is 50 % and a pass in each of the CIA is mandatory to be eligible to write the End semester examinations. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA before moving to the next CIA. The students who fail a CIA will have to apply for repeat CIA immediately after publishing the results of each of the CIA components. In such a case an application should be made, to the Office of Examinations and obtain necessary approvals forwarded through the HoD and Dean. The number of chances for repeating each CIA is one. Students who fail the CIA in a semester have to apply for CIA repeat of the whole course in the subsequent semester

The end semester examinations shall be conducted for 2 hours and evaluated out of 50 marks which are then converted to out of 30 marks. Minimum of 40 % marks is required to pass in the ESE of each course and an overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course(CIA+ESE) . Student failing a course due to less than minimum in ESE shall repeat the ESE while his/her internal scores shall remain valid.

Permission for admission to the ESE is granted only if
• A student has obtained a minimum of 33/65 (CIAs + Class participation marks)
• A student has at least 85% of the attendance in aggregate at the end of the semester.
• The Vice Chancellor is satisfied with the character and conduct of the student.

 

Grading Pattern

Percentage 

Grade 

Grade point

(10 point scale) 

Grade point

 (4 Point scale) 

Interpretation 

80-100 

O

10

4

Outstanding

70-79

A+

9

3.6

Excellent 

60-69

A

8

3.2

Very Good

55-59

B+

7

2.8

Good

50-54

B

6

2.4

Above Average

Examination And Assesments

Formative and Summative assessments are conducted by the department to ascertain the readiness for learning and the attainment of learning outcomes. Assessments are examinations are based on competency frame work and principles of outcome-based education. Attainment of learning outcomes/ expected competencies is evaluated using either holistic or analytic rubrics, grading schemes or attainment criteria specified to the students at the beginning of the semester. Learning outcomes (Course outcomes) of each course are mapped to programme outcomes and programme specific outcomes. Assessments and examinations follow the principle of constructive alignment and outcomes are mapped to higher order thinking skills. Most common frameworks used in this programme include Revised Blooms Taxonomy, and Structure of Observed Learning outcomes (SOLO) and ICAP framework.

Assessment is based on the performance of the student throughout the semester.

Credit Structure
Normally 15 hours of classroom teaching in a semester is considered as one credit for theory courses.

• Courses with 30 hours per semester will earn the candidate 2 credits.
• Courses with 45-50 hours per semester will earn the candidate 3 credits.
• Courses with 51 hours and above per semester including practical will earn the candidate 4 credits.
• Dissertations/Practical equivalent to one course will earn the candidates 4-6 credits.

MPC111 - ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH SEMINAR (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This Course will introduce students to the domain of academic writing and its intricacies. Every student, regardless of his or her area of interest, will be called upon to use an academic style of writing at different levels and at various points in time. This course will therefore seek to impart such knowledge about the styles of writing used in the current academic scenario. It will provide students with opportunities in the classroom setting to practice such styles, both individually and in collaboration with others. In doing so, it will allow students to delve deeper into scientific literature, while also preparing them for efforts in research. The insights gained from such a course can be used by students as a foundation in their specialized line of work.

Course objectives:

  • This course will help the learner to gain a familiarity with different academic writing styles used in contemporary scientific journals.

  • Students will gain better understanding about in-text and reference citations, APA formatting.

  • Students will also be introduced to the concept of plagiarism and its different types to avoid such academic forgery.

Course Outcome

CO1: Scientifically acknowledge different sources of information in their writings

CO2: Write a document in APA format

CO3: Avoid plagiarism

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Academic Writing
 

An overview of the current status of academic writing and its importance; different approaches and processes; key issues: plagiarism, biases and frequent errors

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Guidelines and rules in Academic Writing
 

Introduction to style and formatting guidelines from the American Psychological Association (APA); specific guidelines pertaining to in-text citations, references, and structures of academic papers

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Reporting
 

Abstract writing; summarization; review of literature; scientific poster presentations; reflective, analytic and descriptive reports; book review; film review; tables and graphs in academic papers.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Experiential Learning as Assessment Strategies
 

Individual/Group presentations on forms and issues in Academic Writing; classroom assignments in generating abstracts, posters, reviews, etc

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association: the official guide to APA style (Seventh edition. ed.). American Psychological Association.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Hartley, J. (2008). Academic writing and publishing: A practical guide. Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

MPC121 - PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized in order to shape students to ultimately serve clients of counselling services effectively. It is necessary to monitor the student’s academic progress in the domains that are both personal and professional. These qualities will enhance their counselling skills. The most important aspect of this process is for  the counsellor to grow as a person and then a professional. This course will help the students to understand their skills and developing new skills to become a professional counselor. Life skills and basic counselling skills will be the focus of this course. 

 Course objectives: This course will help the learner to

  • understand the basic skills needed for a counselor in professional life.
  • understand the Life Skills (personal, cognitive and social skills) model for professional development
  • develop modules for psycho-educational training.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify their values, Skills, and beliefs as a Professional counselor.

CO2: Be more reflective and self- aware

CO3: To utilize life skills in professional growth.

CO4: To design training modules on psycho-educational training programmes.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Self-awareness, Self-image, Self-development, Identity (oldvs. new), Empathy, problem solving and decision making, Creativity, critical thinking,/ Effective helpers; Building relationships.

Practicum: Designing and developing training modules on Psycho-Educational Prevention Programs for adolescents, teachers and parents.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Leadership – characteristics of a leader, leadership styles, stress management and techniques, Influences of Culture in counselling relationships, Review and feedback session.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Feltham, C. (2007). Professional skills for counselors – understanding the counseling relationships. Sage publication

Goud, N. & Arko, A. (2006). Psychology and personal growth. Pearson, MA.

Inskipp, F. (2004). Skills training for Counselling. Sage publications. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Evans, T. (2015). Counselling skills for Becoming A wiser Practitioner-Tools, techniques and reflections For building practice wisdom. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Jones, R. N. (2005). Practical counseling and helping skills - text and activities for the life skills counselling model. (5th ed). Sage publications.

Nair. A. Radhakrishnan, (2010). Life Skills Training for Positive Behaviour, Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development, Tamil Nadu

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC131 - FOUNDATIONS OF COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course will give students an insight into topics that provide a foundation for counselling psychology and lays down the ground concepts for their journey towards becoming a professional in this field. It is provided to the students in the first semester and will give them the basic competencies and understanding for future courses as well as internships. Topics covered include, understanding the meaning of counselling, its settings and aspects, the historical roots of this field, an Indian Perspective, ethical components, and current trends. This course is the steppingstone for students to gain a foundation towards understanding their roles and requirements to provide services to those in need of them.

 Course objectives: This course provides students with an understanding of:

  • The counsellor’s roles and responsibilities within evolving practice environments
  • Historical development and its current status of counselling psychology
  • Ethical issues and dilemmas in the field of counselling psychology

Course Outcome

CO 1: Distinguish between guidance, psychotherapy and counselling

CO 2: State the historical background and development of counselling psychology

CO 3: Critically analyze ethical issues and debates in counselling psychology

CO 4: Assess boundaries of the different types of counselling

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Struggle, Growth and Diversity of the Profession; Defining Features of Counselling; Difference between guidance and counselling; Counselling and psychotherapy; Training, Job Settings, and Activities; Counselling psychology and other specialties and fields: Distinctiveness and overlap

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Historic Perspectives
 

Five Unifying Themes of Counselling Psychology; Stages in the Development of the Profession - Western History and Indian History; The Scientist-Practitioner Model

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Counselling Relationship & Ethical and Legal Guidelines
 

Facilitative conditions for a counselling relationship; Importance of Ethics; Ethical Principles, with Case Studies; Ethical Dilemmas; Ethics and Online Client-Counsellor Interactions; Ethical and Legal concerns

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Current trends in counselling
 

Different formats of Counselling services; Technological Advances in Counselling; Global diversity issues in counselling; Trauma Counselling; Mental Health Advocacy and Social Justice; Process Oriented Research in Counselling

Text Books And Reference Books:

·     Chang, C. Y., Lambert, S., & Goodman-Scott, E. (2017). Advocacy and Social Justice . In S. J. Young, & C. S. Cashwell, Clinical Mental Health Counselling: Elements of Effective Practice (pp. 88 - 127). Sage .

Gelso, C. J., Williams, E. N., & Fretz, B. R. (2014). Counselling Psychology. American Psychological Association .

Gibson, R. L., & Mitchell, M. H. (2008). Introduction to Counselling and Guidance . Pearson .

Gladding, S. T. (2018). Counselling: A Comprehensive Profession . Pearson .

Gupta, K., Sinha, A., & Bhola, P. (2016). Intersections Between Ethics and technology: Online Client-Therapist Interactions. In P. Bhola, & A. Raguram, Ethical Issues in Counselling and Psychotherapy Practice: Walking the Line (pp. 169 - 186). Springer .

Mcleod, J. (2013). An Introduction to Counselling . McGraw Hill Publication .

Vinay, B., Lakshmi, J., & Math, S. B. (2016). Ethical and Legal Issues in Psychotherapy and Psychotherapy Practice: Walking the Line. In P. Bhola, & A. Raguram, Ethical Issues in Counselling (pp. 199 - 218). Springer.

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·     Neukrug, E. (2011). The world of the counselor: An introduction to the counseling profession. Nelson Education.

Bond, T. (1997). Standards and Ethics for counsellors in action. Sage

Charles, G.J., & Bruce, F.R. (1995). Counselling Psychology. Harcourt Brace Publishers

Felthman, C., & Horton, I. (2000). Handbook of Counselling and Psychotherapy. Sage

Robert, G. L., & Marianne, M.H. (2003). Introduction to Counselling and Guidance. Pearson education, Inc.

Sharma, R .N.,& Sharma,R. (2004). Guidance and Counselling in India.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC132 - LIFE-SPAN PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized in order to introduce trainee counsellors to human development across the lifespan with a focus on normal and atypical development, developmental transitions, the socio-economic context of development and wellness at each stage of development. This course looks at life span development through the lenses of social, cognitive and biological theories. The course aims at providing conceptual understanding of healthy development and practical understanding of how to help children, adolescents, and adults address the developmental challenges they face across the life span.  This course provides counselling students with a foundation to conceptualize and apply developmental theory and research.  

 

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to understand

  • Atypical growth and healthy development, and practical understanding of how to help children, adolescents, and adults 
  • Processes of human development and apply this knowledge to understand developmental needs of all diverse age groups
  • Theories of individual development across the lifespan
  • The systemic and environmental factors that affect human development, functioning, and behavior
  • Biopsychosocial and eco-systems model of development across the lifespan.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe Systemic and environmental factors that affect human development and functioning

CO2: Compare and contrast how different theories of development explain changes related to physical, cognitive, social, and emotional influences (such as socio-economic status, gender, special needs, culture, religion, schools, peers, and family) on physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development

CO3: Apply the developmental theories and specific evidence-based research findings to understand counselling practice and social issues

CO4: Apply developmental concepts and theories to everyday relationships and situations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Life-Span Development
 

Importance of studying Life-Span Development, Characteristics of life-span development, Nature of Development, Scope of Life span development; Social contexts of lifespan development-ecosystems model. Implications of Lifespan Development for Counselors, need for a developmental perspective 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Biological Processes in Human Development
 

Part 1: Biological Bases to explain Human Development (10 hours)- Heredity-Environment Correlations; Important physical changes; Challenges for psychological development. Bio-psychosocial model of health- Sleep, Eating, Obesity, health, illness and lifestyle issues across the life-span. 

Part 2: Endings of Life  (10 hours)-Biological and social theories of aging, Successful aging; Death, Causes for death across life span, Suicide in adolescence and adulthood; Facing one’s own death, coping with the death of someone else.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Cognitive Processes and Development
 

Piaget and Vygotsky’s theory of cognitive development; Age related challenges to cognitive development; Play and play patterns

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Socio-Emotional Processes and Development Across Life Span
 

Development of Emotion, Emotional regulation and Temperament, Attachment and Love: Bowlby, Ainsworth, Sternberg.  Development of Identity: Erickson’s theory; Marcia Identity status; Moral Development, Contexts of moral development: Kohlberg’s theory Parenting; Emerging adulthood and Adult life cycle theories, Fowlers Theory: Arnett, Levinson, quarter and midlife crisis

Text Books And Reference Books:

Berk, L. E. (2016). Exploring lifespan development. Pearson.

Santrock, J.W. (2011). A topical Approach to life-Span Development. Tata McGraw-Hill Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Broderick, P.C., & Blewitt, P. (2010). The life span: Human development for helping professionals. (3rd Ed.). Pearson.

Feldman, R. S. (2015). Discovering the life span. (3rd Eds). Pearson Global Education.

Newman & Newman (2003). Development through life: A Psychosocial Approach. Thomson Wadsworth.  

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC133 - QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is offered to students in the first semester to introduce them to the tradition of quantitative research in psychology. It begins by discussing the philosophical foundations of quantitative research followed by the scientific basis of research. Students are expected to see the links between scientific process of research and development of clinical psychology. Students will be introduced to research designs and process of research in quantitative methods. The course also provides opportunities to practice skills of research in laboratory setting.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge of research designs in quantitative research and the scientific process of research

CO2: Design an experiment with manipulation can control of the variables.

CO3: Differentiate various data collection and sampling methods employed in quantitative research

CO4: Write a quantitative research proposal in the domain of Psychology.

UNIT 1
Teaching Hours:15
Foundations of Quantitative Research Methods in Psychology
 

Philosophical roots of quantitative research; History of scientific research in psychology; Definition of research; Purpose and need of psychological research. Experimental, Exploratory, Correlational and descriptive research in psychology; Ethical issues in psychological research

UNIT 2
Teaching Hours:15
Process of Quantitative Research
 

Conceptualization, operationalization and measurement; Causality and experimentation; Definition and nature of variables; operationally defining variables; Independent variables; Dependent variables; formulation of research problems and hypothesis ; Different types of hypothesis ; Experimental manipulation and control of variables; steps in quantitative research (5 hours of lab work dedicated to developing problem statement and a hypotheses is suggested)

UNIT 3
Teaching Hours:15
Sampling Techniques and Data Collection
 

Population and sample: Basic assumptions; Sampling distribution; Sampling techniques: probability and non-probability sampling; Methods of data collection: observational methods, surveys, questionnaires, interviewing methods, case study methods, and psychometric tests.

UNIT 4
Teaching Hours:15
Experimental Designs in Psychology
 

Adequate vs Inadequate (faulty) research design;Types of experimental design based on subjects and factors; Within-subjects, between subjects, single-subject, single factor, and factorial design; Sources of error variance and its management in the various types of experimental designs; Mixed design

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Gravetter,F. J., & Forzana, L. A. (2015). Research methods for behavioral sciences (5 ed.). Stamford, CT:Wordsworth cengage learning .
  2. Bordens, K. S., & Abbott, B.B. (2006). Research and design methods: A process approach(6 ed.). New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill Company Limited
  3. Goodwin, C. J. (2002). Research in psychology: Methods and design (3rd ed.). New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  4. Coolican, H.(2004). Research methods and Statistics in Psychology. London: Hoddes Arnold
  5. Kerlinger, N. (1996). Foundations of behavioural research. India: Prentice Hall
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  1. Breakwell, G. M., Hammond,  S., Fife-Shaw, C., & Smith, J. A. (Ed.). (2006). Research methods in  psychology (3 ed.). New Delhi: Sage.
  2. Cohen, R. J., & Swerdlik, M. E. (2005). Psychological testing and assessment: An introduction to tests and measurement (6 ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  3. Heiman, G.W. (2001). Understanding research methods and statistics: An integrated introduction for psychology (2ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
  4. Rosnow, R. L., & Rosenthal, R. (2002). Beginning behavioral research: A conceptual primer (4ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
  5. Singh, A. K. (1997). Test, measurements and research methods in behavioural sciences.  Patna: Bharathi Bhavan Publishers and Distributors.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC134 - COUNSELLING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES - I (INDIVIDUAL) (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course introduces the students to the various theoretical orientations to counselling. The major approaches like Psychoanalytic, Humanistic, Adlerian, Gestalt, Experiential, Cognitive, Behavioural, Multimodal and Integrative approaches are covered in this course. Specific techniques and interventions for each of the approaches are also covered.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the various approaches to counselling

CO2: Implement at least three therapeutic techniques in each approach

CO3: Critique various approaches to counselling

UNIT 1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I
 

Psychoanalytic psychotherapy: Introduction to Freud and his personality theory, Therapeutic process, Techniques, Application of techniques and procedures, Therapy with diverse populations.

Adlerian psychotherapy: Introduction to Adler and his personality theory, Therapeutic process, Techniques, Application of techniques and procedures, Adlerian therapy with diverse populations

UNIT 2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Person Centred Psychotherapy: Introduction to Carl Rogers and Rogerian theory of personality; Therapeutic process ; Techniques ; Application of techniques and procedures ;Therapy with diverse populations.

Existential therapy: Introduction to Existentialism; Logotherapy - Therapeutic process;Techniques; Application of techniques and procedures; Therapy with diverse populations.

Gestalt Therapy: Introduction to Gestalt therapy; Therapeutic process ;Techniques ; Application of techniques and procedures; Therapy with diverse populations

UNIT 3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 3
 

Behavior Therapy: Introduction to behavioral theories ;Behavioral therapeutic process ; Techniques ; Application of behavioral techniques and procedures ;Therapy with diverse populations.

Lazarus Multimodal Approach to Psychotherapy: Introduction to Multimodal Psychotherapy theory ; Therapeutic process; Application of techniques and procedures ;Therapy with diverse populations.

Cognitive Behavior Modification: Donald Meichenbaum's approach to therapy

UNIT 4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 4
 

Cognitive Therapy: Introduction to Albert Ellis Rational Emotive Behavioral (REBT) theory; Therapeutic process ;Techniques; Application of techniques and procedures; REBT with diverse populations.

Aaron Beck's Cognitive Therapy: Introduction to Aaron Beck's cognitive theory (CT); therapeutic process; Techniques; Application of techniques and procedures ; CT with diverse populations.

Integrative Approach to Psychotherapy: Integration vs. Eclecticism ; An introduction to therapy, techniques and applications.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Corey, G. (2012). Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy (9th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Gilland, B.E., & James, R.K. (1998). Theories and Strategies in Counselling and Psychotherapy. Singapore: Allyn and Bacon. 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Corey,  G.  (2008). Student manual for Theory and Practice of Counselling and Psychotherapy (8th ed.). CA: Brooks/Cole.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)
 

MPC151 - MULTICULTURAL COUNSELLING SKILLS - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This practical course has been conceptualized in order to train students in counselling skills. The developmental model of training is followed. Through this course the students are trained in basic counseling skills, such as attending skills, basic listening sequence, observation skills, along with ethics in a multicultural context through dyad and triad work.

Course objectives : After the completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate Basic Counselling Skills.
  • Reflect more on themselves as developing counsellors.
  • Demonstrate a few counselling techniques.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognize Ethical issues in a multicultural context.

CO2: Understand what multicultural competence entails.

CO3: Demonstrate Attending Skills.

CO4: Demonstrate appropriate questioning skills in a counseling session

CO5: Demonstrate client observation skills.

CO6: Use encouragers and be skilled in paraphrasing and summarizing.

CO7: Demonstrate appropriate use of Reflection of feeling.

CO8: Conduct a brief counseling session integrating all skills learnt appropriately

CO9: Gain self-awareness through reflective writing and journaling.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Introduction to counselling skills; Micro skill approach to counselling; Ethics and multicultural issues in counselling.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Attending Behaviours; Questions; Client observational Skills; Encouraging, Paraphrasing and Summarizing.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 3
 

Reflection of Content, Reflection of Feeling

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 4
 

Integrating Listening Skills

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Ivey, A.E., & Ivey, M.B.(2007). Intentional Interviewing and Counselling. Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Evans, D.R., Hearn, M.T., Uhlemann, M.R., & Ivey, A.E. (2008). Essential Interviewing: A Programmed Approach to Effective Communication.  Thomson: Brooks/Cole.
Nelson-Jones, R. (2008). Basic Counselling Skills: A Helper’s Manual. Sage Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC181 - COMMUNITY SERVICE - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: In this course students will spend four hours a week or a total of 30 hours during the semester involved in supervised community service. Students are encouraged to work alongside NGO’s or other professional bodies. Students will engage in activities such as children, adolescents and youth teaching/tutoring, community organization, psychological assessment and mental health awareness. Reflections on their interactions are integral part of this course. Student engagement will be assessed by a supervisor.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner: 

  • build awareness about the requirements of the society.

  • identify the needs of underprivileged communities.

  • create mental health awareness among children, adolescents and youth.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the mental health related and other issues in our society

CO2: Identify the needs of underprivileged population.

CO3: Address the mental health issues among various communities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction
 

Community service: The concept, Objectives and Scope; Need for community and Academia (University) interface. The role of psychologist in community service: Social Psychologist, Community Psychologist & Counselor. Outcomes of community service: Personal outcome; Social outcome, Learning outcome and Career outcome.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Fieldwork
 

Students in groups will partner with various NGO’s and organizations working in the areas of education, development, interventions and mental health. As part of the course requirement the students will be involved in the community oriented activities of the organizations they affiliate with. The NGO’s or Organizations along with the faculty coordinator will be responsible for the process delivery. These placements will offer students hands-on experiences in working with various issues in community and facilitate meaningful learning.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Reflection
 

Reflection is a core component of Community service. It is a period of critical thinking performed by the student and is based on a specific or overall experience of the student.   It guides students towards greater personal development by coming to a better understanding of their own values, opinions, and assumptions. The types of reflection which can be used are, class discussion, brainstorming, sharing of critical personal and group incidents, directed writings, experiential research paper, student portfolios and so on. The students are expected to discuss in groups at the end of this course using the following guidelines.

Reason for choosing the organization

•The planning phase of service learning initiatives

•Logistics for the initiative of the action

•Stakeholders/beneficiaries

•Execution of the action initiative

•Specific learning outcome

•Evaluation

Text Books And Reference Books:

 America’s Promise—The Alliance for Youth (2004). Connecting Communities with Colleges & Universities.  909 North Washington Street, Suite 400, Alexandria,VA 22314-1556.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bringle, R. G. & Hatcher, J. A. (1996). Implementing Service Learning in Higher Education. The Journal of Higher Education, 67(2), 221-239.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

 

 

 

MPC211 - APPLICATION OF STATISTICS IN BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is offered in the second semester. An understanding in Quantitative Research methods is a pre-requisite for this course. The course covers introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics along with computation skills in descriptive statistics and skills of plotting relevant graphs. Furthermore the course would enable the learners to answer the question on what, when and why various inferential statistics that can be used for quantitative research analysis in Behavioural sciences. Hands on experience in the usage of statistical packages for quantitative analysis is a core component of this course. Completion of this course would equip students to prepare the research proposal and conduct quantitative research with confidence and efficacy.

 

Course objectives: The learner will be able to

  • Explain the various psychological measurements and statistical tools
  • Apply descriptive and inferential statistics in psychological research
  • Identify appropriate statistics based on the nature of hypothesis and variables
  • Use various parametric and non-parametric statistics in analysis of data
  • Develop skills on analyzing quantitative data using software
  • Test hypothesis with SPSS software
  • Interpret the results from quantitative analysis

Course Outcome

CO1: Tabulate data, compute measures of central tendencies and measures of variability

CO2: Formulate appropriate research questions

CO3: Generate hypothesis

CO4: Use appropriate accurate statistical tests to analyse data

CO5: Compile assessment data to generate reports

CO6: Evaluate the findings

CO7: Effectively use SPSS

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS
 

Definition and purpose of psychological statistics; application of statistics in Behavioral science; scale of measurement; Probability distribution and normal curve; Levels of significance, type -I and type -II errors, one-and two-tailed tests; Parametric and non-parametric tests of significance 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
INFERENTIAL STATISTICS
 

Statistical analysis of single - sample study: testing a sample mean by t-test,; Statistical analysis of two- sample experiments: the independent samples t-test, the dependent-sample t-test; Correlation: product- moment, point-biserial, phi, biserial, tetrachoric, spearman’s correlation coefficients; Statistical analysis of complex experiments: analysis of variance - F test (computing and interpreting one-way, two-way ANOVA and their logic); MANOVA and Post-hoc tests. 

 

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Aron, A., Coups, E. J., Aron, E., (2016). Statistics for psychology (6th ed.).  Pearson education.

Coolican ,H.(2004).Research methods and Statistics in Psychology . Hoddes

Arnold Field, P. A. (2013).Discovering Statistics Using IBM SPSS Statistics (4th ed.). SAGE Publications.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Garrett,H.E(2005).Statistics in psychology and Education . Paragon international publishers

Gravetter, F.J., & Wallnau, L.B. (2002). Essentials of statistics for the behavioral sciences (4th ed.).  Wadsworth/Thomson Learning

Bordens, K.S., & Abbott, B.B. (2006). Research and design methods: A process approach (6th ed.).  Tata McGraw- Hill Company Limited.

Cohen, R.J., & Swerdlik, M.E. (2005). Psychological testing and assessment: An introduction to tests and measurement (6th ed.).  McGraw-Hill.

Gravetter, F.J., & Wallnau, L.B. (2002). Essentials of statistics for the behavioral sciences (4th ed.).  Wadsworth/Thomson Learning6. Heiman, G.W. (2001). Understanding research methods and statistics: An integrated introduction for psychology (2nd ed.). Houghton Mifflin Company.

Kerlinger, N. (1996). Foundations of behavioural research. Prentice Hall
King, B.M., & Minium, E.M. (2003). Statistical reasoning in psychology and education (4th ed.). John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Leong, F.T., & Austin, (1996). The psychology research handbook: A guide for graduate students and research assistants. Sage Publications

Levin, J., & Fox, J.A. (2006). Elementary statistics in social research (10th ed.). Pearson Education. McCall, R.B. (2001).
Fundamental statistics for behavioral sciences (8th ed.). Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MPC221 - PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT-II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course is an extension of the professional development course offered in the first semester and encourages students to continue to examine their developing identities as counsellors in training.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to:

  • Explore parts of their self at a deeper level through guided autobiographical reading, having specific life review themes that are shared in a group.
  • Engage in active listening as well as sharing life stories in a group setting.
  • Generate new perspectives on different areas in their lives.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognize adaptive strategies and apply it to their current needs and problems

CO2: Demonstrate higher levels of self-awareness

CO3: Listen Empathetically.

CO4: Engage in reflective writing.

CO5: Demonstrate higher levels of trust.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Life Review Themes - 1

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Life Review Themes - 2                                                                                    

Text Books And Reference Books:

NA

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MPC231 - QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course provides a theoretical foundation on qualitative research methods. Different methods of collecting qualitative data are discussed. Methods of Qualitative data analysis are also touched upon. Along with courses on research in the first and second semester, this course intends to provide students with the theoretical background to develop their research proposal.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to:

  • Understand the philosophical foundations on which qualitative research methods are based
  • gain familiarity with the conceptual foundations of qualitative research methods in counselling Psychology
  • understand various traditions of qualitative research methodologies in counselling psychology.
  • learn different methods of data collection
  • understand different methods of data analysis in qualitative research methods

Course Outcome

CO1: demonstrate skills on designing qualitative research

CO2: collect qualitative data using various methods

CO3: appreciate the importance of interdisciplinary research

CO4: demonstrate skills on different traditions of qualitative data analysis

CO5: develop skills on Computer assisted qualitative data analysis

CO6: demonstrate skills on proposal writing and reporting qualitative research.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Foundations of Qualitative Research
 

Defining qualitative research; Historical development of qualitative research; Key philosophical and methodological issues in qualitative research; Different traditions of qualitative research; Grounded theory, Narrative approach, Ethnography, Action research, and Discourse analysis (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs)

1) Review of different article related to the different traditions of qualitative research

3) Skill taining seminars 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Qualitative Research Design
 

Conceptualizing research questions, issues of paradigm, .Designing samples, Theoretical sampling, Contrasting qualitative with quantitative approach in research process  Issues of Credibility and trustworthiness (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs)

1) Qualitative research proposal  lab

2) Simulated techniques on designing qualitative research

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Methods of Collecting Qualitative Data
 

What is qualitative data? Various methods of collecting qualitative data: participant observation, interviewing, focus groups, life history and oral history, documents, diaries, photographs, films and videos, conversation, texts and case studies (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs)

1) Simulated techniques on different data collection methods

2) Skill training seminars

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Analyzing Qualitative Data
 

Different traditions of qualitative data analysis; thematic analysis, Narrative analysis, Discourse analysis, Content analysis (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs)

1)  Qualitative  data analysis software NVivo

2) Reporting qualitative research data 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Mcleod, J. (2011). Qualitative Research in Counseling and Psychotherapy. Sage

Creswell, J. W., & Poth, C. N. (2017). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches. Sage. 

Ritchie, J., Lewis, J., McNaughton Nicholls, C., & Ormston, R. (2014). Qualitative research Practice A  guide for social science students and researchers (2nd ed.). Sage Publication Limited.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bryman,A (Ed.)(2007) Sage Benchmarks in social science research methods Vol.I,Vol.II ,Vol,III,and Vol. IV. Sage Publications

Kvale,S.(Ed.) (1997).Psychology & Post-modernism.Sage Publications 

McGhee, P. (2001). Thinking critically about qualitative research in psychology. In P. McGhee, Thinking psychologically (pp.98-111). Palgrave

Smith,J.A.(ed.)(2003).Qualitative psychology: A practical guide to research methods. Sage.

Smith,J.A., Harre,R., & Langenhove,L.V.(eds.).(1995).Rethinking methods in psychology. Sage.

Willig,C.(2001).Introducing qualitative research in psychology: Adventures in theory and method. Open University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC232 - POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course examines a paradigm shift from pathologies to positive subjective experience and positive individual traits to improve quality of life.  A framework for a science of positive psychology is built on the aim to promote positive relationships which has implications in various areas of psychology.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to:

  • Gain a familiarity with the context and subject matter of positive psychology
  • Understand the application of positive psychology principles in different facets of life.

Course Outcome

CO1: Acquire insights into their own strengths

CO2: Utilize the insights to increase their and others? wellbeing.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Positive Psychology
 

The context and subject matter of positive psychology; Western and Eastern perspectives on Positive Psychology; Theoretical background of positive psychology                                                                                                     

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Positive Emotional and Cognitive States
 

Principles of pleasure; Positive emotions, happiness, subjective wellbeing; emotional states and positive health; emotional intelligence; quality of life; optimism and hope; self efficacy; wisdom and courage; faith; flow and spirituality.

*Field study from an interdisciplinary way.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Promoting Positive Relationships
 

Self and consciousness; mindfulness; positive personal traits; positive coping strategies; positive relationships: Love; Compassion, Forgiveness, Altruism, Gratitude, Empathy.

*Case work, research article review.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Applications of Positive Psychology
 

Positive Psychology in the context of Ageing, Health, Work; Positive Education: Need for Positive Education, Positive Schooling - Definition and Component, Socio-Emotional Learning,  Strengths-Based Therapy Model; Communities- ME/WE balance.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Snyder, C.R. & Lopez, S.J. (2002). Handbook of positive psychology. (eds.). Oxford University Press.

Jones-Smith, E. (2013). Strengths-based therapy: Connecting theory, practice and skills. Sage Publications.

Seligman, M. (1994).  What You Can Change and What You Can’t.  Knopf.

Seligman, M. E., Ernstb, R. M., Gillhamc, J., Reivicha, K., & Linkinsd, M. (2009). Positive education: Positive psychology and classroom interventions. Oxford Review of Education, 35(3), 293-311, pp. 1-5

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Anderson, N.B. (2003).  Emotional Longevity.  Viking.

Andrews, F.M. and Withey, S.D. (1976).  Social Indicators of Wellbeing.  Plenum Press.

Baltes, P., & Staudinger, U.M. (2000). Wisdom: A metaheuristic (pragmatic) to orchestrate mind and virtue toward excellence. American Psychologist, 55, 122-136.

Bradburn, N. and Caplovitz, D. (1965).  Reports of Happiness.  Aldine.

Buss, D.M. (2000).  The Evolution of Happiness.  American Psychologist, 55, 15-23.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)

MPC233 - SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS FOR COUNSELLING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course familiarizes the students with some of the major theoretical perspectives in social and cultural psychology. Appreciating interpersonal and group level psychological processes in the cultural context, this course analyzes multimodal influences on human behaviour. Applications to counselling will be discussed.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to gain a familiarity with

  • The role of culture in understanding the development of the self and the multidimensional nature of social identities.
  • The processes of social perception and social cognition involved in the way we understand our social world, form attitudes, make attributions, categorize and engage in intergroup comparisons, with specific focus on how these may impact the practice of professional counselling.
  • Theoretical explanations of social behaviours such as prosocial behaviour, aggression and intimate relationships.
  • The social issues prevalent in our cultural context and an understanding of how social psychological theories can be applied to develop scientific and community- oriented solutions , programmes and interventions.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the social and cultural roots of individual behaviour

CO2: Demonstrate a range of interpersonal skills required in counselling psychology encounters.

CO3: Examine their own attitudes, behaviours, perceptions, and biases to develop culturally aware approaches to teaching, counselling, and/or administration

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Self, society and personality
 

Development of self; Self, narrative  and identity: Culture and social identities, diverse identities; Perception of Self and Others; Self-presentation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Social Relationships
 

Social cognition: a)Attribution, bias and errors in attribution; b) Prejudice, Stereotypes, Stigma Discrimination; c) Attitudes: attitude organization, methods of attitude change, persuasion and propaganda techniques. Social Relationships: a) Nature, dimensions and dynamics of interpersonal relationships: interpersonal attraction, sexual orientation and gender identity,  Overview of queer affirmative therapy;c)Aggression: nature and characteristics; individual differences in aggression; Violence: sexual harassment, interpersonal violence, Violence and trauma in South Asia. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Society, Culture and Mental Health
 

Culture and mental health: Issues in cross-cultural psychology/psychiatry- Cultural competency, cultural humility, Cultural formulation interview, cultural brokers.

Dealing with ethnic minorities – the cultural dimension of individual behaviour: acculturation, assimilation, refugees, migrant workers and other marginalised sections in South Asia. 

a) Diversity in Socialization; b) Poverty, Deprivation and Disadvantage; c) Mental health & psychopathology: Global mental health and medical pluralism in South Asia:  Indian systems of medicine and other indigenous healing systems d) Diverse childhoods: disability, gender and other social locations in India.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Globalisation, community and mental health
 

Complex worlds and social behaviour; Social psychology and contemporary issues – globalization and its impact on mental health; Social psychology in (community) mental health settings; Social psychology at work- job satisfaction, performance, diversity,  inclusion, recruitment, well-being at workplace.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baumeister,R.F. and Bushman, B.J. (2014). Social Psychology and human nature. Third edition. New Delhi : Cengage publishers.

Fraser, C., and Burchell, B. (2001). Introducing Social Psychology. Cambridge: Polity.

J. Bockmeier and D. Carbaugh (eds) Narrative and identity: Studies in autobiography, self, and culture.

Mohanty, A. K., & Misra, G. (Eds.). (2000). Psychology of poverty and disadvantage (Vol. 2). Concept Publishing Company.

Ranade, K. (2018). Growing Up Gay in Urban India: A Critical Psychosocial Perspective. Springer Nature: Singapore, ISBN 978-981-10-8365-5.

Ranade, K., & Chakravarty, S. (2016). ‘Coming Out’of the Comfort Zone: Challenging Heteronormativity Through Affirmative Counselling Practice with Lesbian and Gay Clients. In Ethical Issues in Counselling and Psychotherapy Practice (pp. 141-154). Springer Singapore

Curran, T., & Runswick-Cole, K. (2013). Disabled Children’s Childhood Studies. Critical Approaches in a Global context. Palgrave Macmilan.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Berry, J.W., Mishra, R.C. & Tripathi, R.C. (Eds). (2003). Psychology in human and social development: lessons from diverse cultures. New Delhi: Sage.

Blaine, B.E. (2013). Understanding the psychology of diversity. Second edition. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications

Crisp, R.J. and Turner, R.N.(2014).Essential social psychology. New Delhi: Sage.

Dalal, A.K. and Misra, G. (Eds.) (2002). New directions in Indian Psychology (Vol 1: Social Psychology). (pp.19-49). New Delhi: Sage.

Dasen, P.R. Berry, J.W. & Sartorius, N. (1988) (Eds.). Health and cross-cultural psychology: toward applications. New Delhi: Sage.

Gilbert, D.T., Fiske, S.T., and Lindzey. G. (Eds). (1998). The handbook of social psychology (4th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Kakar, S. (1982). Shamans, Mystics and Doctors. Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Kao, H.S.R., Sinha, D. (Eds.) (1997). Asian perspectives on psychology. New Delhi: Sage.

Linda, S. (Ed) (2017). Applied social psychology: understanding and managing social problems. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge university press

Lott, B.E. (2010).Multiculturalism and diversity: a social psychological perspective: Chichester: UK; Malden.MA: Wiley-Blackwell

Matsumoto, D. & Juang, L. (2004). Culture and psychology. Australia: Thomson Wardsworth.

Pandey, J. (Ed.) (2004). Psychology in India revisited (Vol-3). ND: Sage. 3

Saraswathi, T.S. (Ed). (1999). Culture, socialization and human development. New Delhi: Sage.

Smith, P.B., Bond, M.H. & Kagitcibasi,C. (2006). Understanding social psychology across cultures. London: Sage.

Tuffin, K. (2005). Understanding Critical Social Psychology. ND: Sage.

Vindhya, U. (Ed). (2003).Psychology in India: Intersecting crossroads. New Delhi: Concept publishing company.

Kapur, R.L. (1994). Violence in India: A Psychological Perspective. D.L.N. Rao Murthy Oration, Indian Journal of Psychiatry, 36(4), 163-169.

Nancy, A.R. (2013). Aversive racism and intergroup contact theories: Cultural competence in a segregated world. Journal of social work education, 49 (4), p 564-579.

Winnifred, R.L.(2009). Collective action and then what?. Journal of social issues, 65 (4); p727-748

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)

MPC234 - MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized in order to enable the students to understand the various mental health disorders affecting an individual from infancy to old age.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner

  • understand about international classificatory systems of mental health disorders, diagnostic criteria & clinical manifestations
  • gain an understanding about psycho social aetiology of mental health disorders. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand various types of mental disorders.

CO2: Make a provisional diagnosis of psychological conditions using the ICD 10.

CO3: Clearly differentiate the manifestation of various disorders in children and adults

CO4: provide the possible causal factors based on the psychosocial profile of the client.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Classification and Psychopathology of Neuro Psychological Conditions.
 

Systems of classification, basic features; DSM 5, ICD-10, similarities, differences and critical evaluation; Dementia, delirium, head injury, epilepsy, other amnesic syndromes

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Psychopathology of Addiction, Psychotic and Personality Disorders.
 

Models of addiction, schizophrenia, delusion, other psychotic disorders. Clinical characteristics, etiology. Clinical characteristics, etiology and theories of cluster A, B and C personality disorders

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Psychopathology of Mood and Anxiety Disorders
 

Depression, bipolar affective disorders; Phobia, GAD, panic, OCD, PSTD, adjustment disorder; Clinical characteristics, etiology.

Dissociative disorder, somatoform disorder, other neurotic disorder

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Disorders of Infancy, Childhood and Adolescence.
 

Specific developmental disorder of scholastic skills; Pervasive developmental disorders Behavioral and emotional disorders; Disorders of social functioning

Text Books And Reference Books:

Barlow, D.H., Durand, M.V. & Hofmann, S.G. (2018). Abnormal Psychology: An Integrative Approach. 8th Ed. Cengage.

Ahuja, N. (2011). A Short Textbook of Psychiatry. Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.

World Health Organization. (1992). ICD-10 Classifications of Mental and Behavioural Disorder: Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines. World Health Organization. 

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). American Psychiatric Association.

Sadock, B.J. & Sadock, V.A. (2003). Kaplan & Sadock’s Synopsis of psychiatry: Behavioral sciences/clinical psychiatry (9th. Ed.). Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Adams, H.E., Sutker, P.B. (2001). Comprehensive handbook of psychopathology (3rd Ed.). Kluwer Academic publishers.

Hecker, S.E. & Thorpe, G.L. (2005). Introduction to clinical psychology: Science, practice & ethics. Pearson Education, Inc.

Millon, T., Blaney, P., & Davis, R.D. (1998). The oxford textbook of psychopathology. Oxford University Press.

Smith, N.W. (2001). Current systems in psychology: History, theory, research & applications. Wadsworth/Thomson learning.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC235 - COUNSELLING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES - II (GROUP) (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This courseis an applied course with a focus on integration of theory and clinical group work, and discussion of clinical, professional, and ethical issues. This course is designed for students to gain group counselling skills and self-awareness about how one’s own qualities, needs, motivations, and values can either facilitate or interfere with one’s effectiveness as a group counsellor.

 Course objectives: This course will help the learner gain familiarity with

  • different types of groups that can be run for different populations
  • the group process, including opening and closing groups, and group dynamics
  • ethical, legal and training issues
  • the application of theoretical approaches in groups

Course Outcome

CO1: Plan a group session

CO2: Open and close a small group

CO3: Identify group dynamics as they occur within a group

CO4: Identify the roles they play in group

CO5: Demonstrate knowledge of group theory

CO6: Demonstrate competence in group counselling skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Goals, Functions and Definitions of Group guidance, Group Counselling & Group Therapy; Group vs. Individual Counselling; Types of groups.

Skills training Lab:  

Planning and Starting Groups; Exercises; Therapeutic Forces; Dealing with problem situations in groups.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Using Counselling Theories in Groups
 

REBT, Reality Therapy, Adlerian Therapy, TA, Gestalt Therapy, Solution-Focused Therapy, Trans theoretical Model; Psychodrama.

Skills training Lab:

Attending and Observation Skills; Focusing, pacing, leading and linking skills.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Issues in Group Counselling
 

Co leading, Ethical Considerations; Legal Issues; Training of Group Counsellors

Skills training Lab:

Leadership skills of basic listening sequence; Skills of structuring dimensions and stages of groups.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Application of Group Processes to Special Groups
 

Children, Adolescents, Couples, Older Clients, Addiction Groups, Divorce Groups

Skills training Lab:

Skills and strategies for interpersonal influence; Closing a session or a group.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Jacobs, Ed E., Masson, Robert L., Harvill, Riley L. (2009). Group Counselling: Strategies and skills. Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Corey, Gerald (2000). Theory and Practice of Group Counselling (5th Ed). Brooks/Cole.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Corey, M.S., Corey, Gerald (2006). Groups process and Practice (7th Ed). Thomson: Brooks/Cole.  

Capuzzi, Dave (2002). Approaches to Group Work: A Handbook for Practitioners. Prentice Hall.

Ivey, A.E., Pedersen, P.B. & Ivey, M.B. (2001). Intentional group counselling: A micro skill approach. Wadsworth.

Yalom, LD (1995). The theory and practice of group therapy (4th Ed). Basic books.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC251 - MULTICULTURAL COUNSELLING SKILLS - II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course is a continuation of the Multicultural Counselling Skills Course–I. Here the student is trained in the more advanced skills of influencing and bringing about client change.  The student is also taught different models of problem conceptualization, and treatment planning.

Course objectives : The aim of this course is to learn 

  • Advanced individual counselling skills.

  • To use counselling techniques in applied settings.

  • Conceptualization of client problems and effectively work towards client change and growth.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate Confrontation skills

CO2: Bring appropriate focus to a counseling session

CO3: Demonstrate ability to reflect, interpret and reframe meaning

CO4: Demonstrate influencing skills

CO5: Conduct a counseling session integrating both basic and advanced counseling skills

CO6: Determine their personal style

CO7: Conceptualize a case along with treatment plan

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
 

Review; Confrontation Skills; Focusing the interview; Reflection of Meaning; Influencing Skills – Six Strategies for change.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
 

Skill Integration; Integrating Micro skills with Theory; Determining Personal Style & Future Theoretical/ Practical Integration.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
 

Case conceptualization using different models

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Treatment Planning
 

Treatment Planning

Text Books And Reference Books:

Ivey, A.E., & Ivey, M.B.(2007). Intentional Interviewing and Counselling. Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Evans, D.R. , Hearn, M.T., Uhlemann, M.R., & Ivey, A.E. (2008). Essential Interviewing: A Programmed Approach to Effective Communication.  Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Nelson-Jones, R. (2008). Basic Counselling Skills: A Helper’s Manual. Sage Publications.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC271 - RESEARCH PROPOSAL AND SUPERVISION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is intended to help students develop skills of writing a research proposal and defending it. Students are supported as they progress through the different stages of their research work which include data collection, data analysis and writing up their dissertation.

 

Course objectives:

This course will help the learner to conceptualize a research problem and choose an appropriate research design to carry out the research. 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: identify a research problem

CO2: select appropriate research design to study the problem

CO3: write a research proposal and defend it

CO4: collect data in an ethical manner

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
UNIT 1
 

Developing a Research Proposal

Ethical Issues in Research

Supervision of Research Process

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Coolican, H. (2004). Research methods and Statistics in Psychology. Hoddes Arnold

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Garrett, H. E. (2005). Statistics in psychology and Education. Paragon international publishers

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

MPC331 - CHILD AND ADOLESCENT COUNSELLING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course will provide trainee counsellors with the knowledge and application of counselling techniques and skills to work with children and adolescents in a variety of settings: school/ educational, family and community. The course prepares trainee counsellors to address the specific needs of children and adolescents, with emphasis on developmental needs, specific therapeutic interventions, and common emotional issues. Courses including multicultural counselling skills, counselling theories and techniques (individual and groups), and Life span psychology are key foundational and prerequisite courses for this course. This course is taken along with supervised practicum in the third semester to provide students with the opportunity to practice and develop specific skill sets to work with children and adolescents. 

 Course objectives: This course will help the learner to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of issues that may affect the development and functioning of students
  • Understand the principles and skills needed for counselling children and adolescents
  • Gain knowledge and application of evidence-based research and practice in child and adolescent to assist students, families, and educators in using resources that promote informed academic, career, and personal/social choices
  • Understand ethical and legal considerations related specifically to the practice of child and adolescent counselling
  • Coordination, collaboration, referral, and team-building efforts with teachers, parents, support personnel, and community resources to develop promotive and preventive interventions

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify developmental factors that influence counselling children and adolescents.

CO2: Apply counselling skills and techniques to work with children and adolescents

CO3: Interpret ethical and legal considerations involved in counselling children and working with their families

CO4: Describe the various categories of children with special needs, the services and interventions that counsellors can use

CO5: Develop Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for children and adolescents with special needs

CO6: Develop study skills and academic advising programs for students

CO7: Compare and Contrast the theories in career development

CO8: Apply the knowledge of consultation and collaboration models to develop services for children, adolescents, school staff and families

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Counselling Process and Relationship
 

Counselling needs of children and adolescents, locations of needs (School, Family, Residential care, community, at-risk) and Nature of issues (Emotional, behavioural, conduct, developmental, learning). Characteristics of child and adolescent counsellor, therapeutic relation in child and adolescent counselling. Process of child therapy, Internal processes of children and therapeutic change, Child counselling skills, use of play and art with children, Child counselling skills: observation, active listening, dealing with resistance and transference, termination skills.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Counselling in Educational Context
 

Specific issues in the educational setting: Dealing with children with Special needs. Behavioural management: functional analysis and techniques of behaviour modification. Individualized educational programmes. Career guidance and counselling: Theories of Career Development, Influences on Career Development.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Learning and Teaching
 

Learning styles: VAK Model, Kolb’s Experiential Model, MBTI Pattern, Honey & Mumford Model, Hemispheric Dominance Model, Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence Model. Study skills and Academic advising: Reading, Writing, Note Making skills, Time Management. Cognitive issues: Factors influencing Attention and Concentration, Remembering, Forgetting; teacher-student relationship, school climate and dealing with issues in teaching and learning  

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
School-based Interventions and Policies
 

Counsellor as Educational Consultant: Consultation Models and Skills, School-based tired interventions- three-level prevention; School counselling models and polices- The ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs; Relevant policies of UNCRC, UNICEF, National level initiatives-NCPCR, NCERT and others that are applicable to school counselling

Text Books And Reference Books:

Santrock, J.W. (2003). Educational psychology. McGraw-Hill.

Geldard, K., Geldard, D., & Foo, R. Y. (2013). Counselling children: A practical introduction. Sage. 

Woolfolk, A. (2007). Educational psychology (10th ed.). Allyn & Bacon.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

American School Counselor Association (2012). The ASCA National Model: A framework for school counseling programs, Third Edition. Alexandria.

Asch, M. (2000). Principles of guidance and counselling (1st ed.). Sarup & Sons

Bowe, F. G. (2000). Birth to five – early childhood special education. Delmar Publishers Inc.

Cohen, L.G., & Spenciner, L.J. (2003). Assessment of children and youth with special needs. Allyn & Bacon.

Ferguson, S. (2002). What parents need to know about children. Dallas, TX: Ludic.

Henderson D.A., Thompson C.L. (2011). Counseling children. Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning.

McClure, F. & Teyber, E. (2003). Casebook in child and adolescent treatment: Cultural and familial contexts. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Naar-King, S., & Suarez, M.  (2011). Motivational interviewing with adolescents and young adults. Guilford. 

Pattison S., Robson M., & Beynon A. (2015). The handbook of counselling children and young people. Sage.

Schmidt, J. (2008). Counseling in schools: Comprehensive programs of responsive services for all students. Allyn and Bacon.

Sharry, J. (2004). Counselling children, adolescents and families: A strengths-based approach. Sage Publications Ltd.

Studer, J.R. (2015). The essential school counselor in a changing society. Sage.

Thompson, C. L., Rudolph, L. B., & Henderson, D. (2010). Counseling children. (8th ed.). Brooks & Cole.

Vernon, A. (2009). Counseling children and adolescents (4th ed.). Denver, CO: Love Publishing.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC332 - COUNSELLING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES - III (COUPLES AND FAMILIES) (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized in order to provide an overview of the different family therapy models. Students will be encouraged to view the historical and cultural contexts within which family and marital therapy (including couples therapy) have emerged.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to:  

  • Gain familiarity with historical aspects of family therapies
  • Assess and conceptualize dynamics that contribute to or maintain pathology in families
  • Plan appropriate interventions to address pathology in families

Course Outcome

CO1: Trace the historical development of family therapy

CO2: Assess family dynamics in a structured manner

CO3: Apply concepts from family system theories to understand family dynamics and thereby develop treatment plans for couples and families.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Historical evolution of the field of marriage and family therapy. Current and Future trends. Foundations of Family Therapy. Early models, Fundamental concepts (Cybernetics, Systems theory, Social constructivism, Attachment theory); Family therapy research

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Classical schools: Bowen, Structural, Experiential, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-Behavioural.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 3
 

Recent Developments- Post modernism, Feminist critique, Solution focused therapy, Narrative Therapy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 4
 

Contemporary approaches: the Gottman Method, Emotionally Focussed Couple Therapy, Integrative models

Text Books And Reference Books:

Nichols, M. P., & Davis, S. (2017). Family therapy: Concepts and methods (11th Ed). Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Carter, B. & McGoldrick, M. (1999). The changing family life cycle. 3rd. Ed. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

McGoldrick, M. & Gerson, R. (1999). Genograms in family assessment. 2nd. Ed. New York: Norton.

Gehart, D. R. (2013). Mastering competencies in family therapy: A practical approach to theory and clinical case documentation. Cengage Learning.

Satir.V.(2008) Satir Transformational Systemic Therapy. Publisher: Science & Behavior Books

Steve de Shazer. (1982) Patterns of Brief Family Therapy: An Ecosystemic Approach. Guilford Publications

Napier, A.Y & Whitaker, C. (1988). The Family Crucible: The Intense Experience of Family Therapy. New York: Harper and Row.

Gottman, J. M., & Gottman, J. S. (2015). Gottman couple therapy. In A. S. Gurman, J. L. Lebow, & D. K. Snyder (Eds.), Clinical handbook of couple therapy (pp. 129–157). The Guilford Press.

Johnson, S. M. (2015). Emotionally focussed couple therapy. In A. S. Gurman, J. L. Lebow, & D. K. Snyder (Eds.), Clinical handbook of couple therapy (pp. 97–128). The Guilford Press.

Evaluation Pattern
Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)
 

MPC351 - PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This is a practical course aimed at familiarizing students with different assessment methods including psychological tests. A range of Personality, Intelligence, Aptitude, and Achievement tests are covered.

Course objectives: The course is intended to help students: 

  • Demonstrate competence in administering, scoring, and interpreting a range of psychological tests.
  • Identify relevant tests to be used for specific counselling needs.

Course Outcome

CO1: Administer and interpret Intelligence tests

CO2: Administer and interpret Personality measures

CO3: Administer and interpret Aptitude and Career Interest scales

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 1
 

The purpose of assessment in counselling. Assessment principles. Overview of assessment areas: Initial assessment in counselling – Case history, MSE: Identifying a clients problem using a clinical interview

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Unit 2
 

Intelligence and general ability testing (BKT, Bhatia’s battery, Vineland Social Maturity Scale, Bharatraj Development Schedule). Measuring Achievement and aptitude (DBDA)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3
 

Assessment in career counselling (Comprehensive Interest Schedule), Developmental assessment in counselling and therapy (DCT). Spiritual assessment strategies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Unit 4
 

Appraisal of personality (16PF, MAPS, MBTI, EPQ-R, TAT, SCT, CAT, Rorschach- Demo only)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Test Manuals

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Aiken, L.R., & Groth- Marnat, G. (2006). Psychological Testing and Assessment – twelfth edition. Boston, MA: Pearson.

Anastasi, A. & Urbina, S. (1997). Psychological testing. N.D.: Pearson Education.

Cormier, S.& Cormier, W.H. Interviewing Strategies for Helpers: Fundamental Skills And Cognitive- Behavioural Interventions (Counselling Series). Wadsworth Publishing Co.

Kaplan, R.M. & Saccuzzo, D.P. (2007). Psychological Testing: Principles, Applications, and Issues. Australia: Thomson Wadsworth.

Whiston, S.C (1999). Principles and applications of assessment in counselling, Wadsworth, Belmont. Brooks- Cole

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)
 

MPC381 - SUPERVISED PRACTICUM (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: The students will be at practicum sites 2 days a week. They will engage in  providing counselling services which include, individual counselling, group counselling and psycho-education. Two hours a week they will receive supervision at college in batches of 8-10 students. The students discuss cases seen at their practicum sites and elicit feedback from their peers and supervisors. 

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to gain a familiarity with various counseling skills, including assessment, conceptualization and planning interventions. It will also provide students an insight into transference and countertransference issues they may experience with their clients.

Course Outcome

CO1: Elicit information from a client and prepare a structured case history and mental status examination report

CO2: Conceptualize cases using various theoretical perspectives

CO3: Plan interventions based on case conceptualizations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Unit 1
 

Case presentation and group supervision

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Borders, L.D. & Brown, L.L. (2005). New Handbook for Counselling Supervision. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Jongsma Jr, A.E., Peterson,L. M., & Bruce, T.J. (2006). The complete adult psychotherapy treatment planner, 4th Ed. Hoboken, NJ. Wiley.

Jongsma Jr, A.E., Peterson,L. M., Mc Innis, W.P., & Bruce, T.J. (2006). The adolescent psychotherapy treatment planner, 4th Ed.  Hoboken, NJ. Wiley

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30% 

Continuous Internal Assessment

1)  Pre-course self assessment - 10 marks

Write a two page paper assessing yourself as a developing counsellor. The paper should include the following: (a) your strengths as a counsellor in training, (b) learning goals for the semester, (c) counter-transference issues requiring additional examination and work, and (d) theoretical orientation(s) to which you subscribe.

 2) Mid Semester Viva - 20 marks

The viva is based on the students work at their internship site and general counselling knowledge including theories and its application.

3) Group supervision presentation - 15 marks

4) Participation (inputs given to peers during supervision) -10 marks

5) Progress notes and Logs - 10 marks

6) Attendance- 5 marks

End Semester Examination: 

ESE viva - 30 marks

The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 33/65 (Excluding attendance marks) to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

 

MPC382 - RESEARCH MANUSCRIPT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: The student engages in original research work and writes a manuscript based on a field study to publish in a nationally/internationally reputed journal. This course helps the students organize learnt concepts, conceptualize and work on short feasible projects by applying their knowledge of research methodology creatively.

Course objectives : 

  • This course will help the learner to gain familiarity with field research, analysis, and discussion writing.
  • It also helps the students to prepare a manuscript based on the field study.

Course Outcome

CO1: Carry out a field study, conduct the necessary data analysis and discuss the results.

CO2: Prepare a manuscript in scientific format for publication in a nationally/ internationally reputed journal.

CO3: Present and defend the study.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Research Process
 

Completing a field study, choosing a journal for publication, writing the manuscript as per journal requirements

Text Books And Reference Books:

APA. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Ed.).Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

American Psychological Association. (2012). APA guide to electronic references (6th Ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association

Hartley, J. (2008). Academic Writing and Publishing: A Practical Guide. Taylor and Francis. ISBN 0 203927982

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 
Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Supervisors Feedback: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including supervisor feedback marks to be eligible to write the ESE.  

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC383 - COMMUNITY SERVICE-II(SUMMER PLACEMENT) (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:0
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Students will do volunteer work with any community / mental health agency at the end of the second semester during the summer holidays for a minimum period of 30 days. The student can choose a volunteer opportunity that best suits their skills, availability, and expectations. 

Course Objectives: 

The main objectives of the Internship are that

  • students willingly accept to assist, support or help the agency in activities which may include the following 
    • Working & supporting the client population
    • assisting in administrative responsibilities
    • assisting in the agency helpline
    • any other activity as outlined by the agency
  • Students develop a sense of professionalism as they prepare to start their practicum in the third semester.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify a client population they might like to work with

CO2: Work in an organizational setting

CO3: Demonstrate professionalism in the work place

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
UNIT 1
 

Volunteer Work

Text Books And Reference Books:

NA

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation:

1) Students are expected to prepare a log book in the following format:

Name of the Agency

Date:                                                                                                       Day:

No. of Hrs:

Time

Brief description of work done

 

 

 

 

Total No. of Days

Total No. of Hrs

Signature & Name of the Authority

 

2) They are required to get a certificate letter from the Agency for volunteer work/ internship.

3) Submit a final Reflective report in the following format:

Name –

Course –

Name of External Supervisor -

Name of Organization –

Name of Internal Supervisor –

Outline

 

  • Profile of The Organisation
  • Policy of the Organization regarding volunteer work
  • Activities that you did
  • Experiential learning
  • Integration with Counselling concepts & theories
  • Summary and conclusion.

Marks

Logbook – 10 marks

Report – 40 marks

Students must obtain a minimum mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC431 - COUNSELLING INTERVENTIONS FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course provides an overview of counselling interventions for special populations. Various domains like Substance abuse counselling, health counselling, and queer affirmative practice are dealt with in this course. This course in the final semester aims to help students to integrate learning from the previous semester and apply it to provide counselling interventions for specific populations. 

Course objectives: This course will help the learner:

  • Understand addiction and deal more effectively with people addicted to various substances
  • Understanding behavioural factors, disease prevention and health promotion in the context of a holistic philosophy of health
  • Inculcate basic theoretical understandings of sexuality and gender from an intersectional perspective and engage with LGBTQIA+ people with enhanced sensitivity   

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and conceptualise substance use disorders and plan appropriate interventions

CO2: Describe social and psychological perspectives of health and develop psychosocial interventions for health promotion and health care

CO3: Demonstrate the skills to work with LGBTQIA+ people employing queer-affirmative principles

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Substance Abuse counselling
 

Understanding Use, Abuse and Dependence; Types of Drugs; Early Identification (risk factors); Nicotine Dependence; Assessment tools and application; Counselling for Motivation Enhancement; Brief Intervention Therapy; Denial; Counselling Individuals; Relapse Dynamic & triggers; Processes in Recovery (refusal skills)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Health Counselling
 

Core issues in health psychology; psychoeducation; managing stigma, illness management; families, communities, promotion of mental health; Asian healing practices

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Queer Affirmative Psychology Practice
 

Sexual orientation and gender identity; Sexuality, genders and mental health disciplines in India; Queering psychological practice: Role of language; CBT, Family and couples Therapy, Person-Centred Therapy, Trans-affirmative practice; Guidelines and Manuals from India and outside.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Capuzzi, D., & Stauffer, M. D. (2014). Foundations of addictions counseling. Pearson.

Shelley, E. Taylor. (1986). Health Psychology. MGH

Miller, G. (2014). Learning the language of addiction counseling. John Wiley & Sons.

Narrain, A., & Chandra, V. (2015). Nothing to fix: Medicalisation of sexual orientation and gender identity. SAGE Publications India.

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Alcoholic Anonymous World Services, Inc. (1980). The twelve steps and the twelve traditions. New York: AA World Services, Inc.

American Psychological Association (APA) Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming People. 2015

Ranade, K. (2018). Growing up gay in urban India. Critical Psychosocial perspectives. Springer Singapore.

Kumar, P. (2021). Sexuality, Abjection and Queer Existence in Contemporary India. Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

For 4 credit core papers (100 marks)

CIA-1 (30 marks)

CIA-2 (30 marks)

Class Participation (5 marks)

Attendance (5 marks)

ESE (30 marks)

All CIAs are must pass assessments, A grade of 50% is required to pass. If a student fails to meet the grade, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA.The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.  

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%. The students needs an overall grade of 50% to pass the course (ESE + CIA)

MPC432 - TRAUMA INFORMED COUNSELLING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims to introduce the learner to trauma-informed counselling. This course will help learners gain knowledge on techniques relevant to crisis and trauma management and enable them to understand the clinical outcome of exposure to trauma events and plan interventions accordingly.

Course Objectives: The course intends to provide learners:

  • An overview of trauma and traumatic stress
  • Knowledge and skills for working with adult clients with trauma
  • Appropriate knowledge and skills to respond to abuse and trauma in children and adolescents

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the multidimensional impact of trauma and devise appropriate strategies for assessment

CO2: Develop integrated trauma treatment plans

CO3: Develop prevention and intervention plans to address child abuse and neglect

CO4: Illustrate the process involved in reporting child abuse and neglect

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to trauma
 

Understanding stress, crisis & trauma; Effects of traumatic stress; Assessing trauma & post-traumatic outcomes; Principles of trauma treatment; Ethical & professional issues: secondary trauma and self-care; Integrated approaches in working with trauma

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Therapeutic Interventions for Trauma-I
 

Psychoeducation; Stability interventions; Crisis Intervention; Cognitive interventions 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Therapeutic Interventions for Trauma-II
 

Cognitive & emotional processing of trauma; Interventions for issues in relational functioning & self-organisation; Specific applications of trauma treatment

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Child Abuse & Trauma
 

Understanding child abuse, neglect, and trauma; short- and long-term consequences of childhood trauma; ethical issues in working with child abuse and trauma; legislations related to child abuse; prevention, intervention, and treatment of child abuse

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Myers, J.E.B. (2010). The ASPAC Handbook on Child Maltreatment, 3rd Edition. Sage Publications.

Cohen, J. A., & Mannarino, A. P. (2015). Trauma-focused cognitive behaviour therapy for traumatized children and families. Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics, 24(3), 557-570.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Levers, L. L. (2012). Trauma counseling: Theories and Interventions. New York: Springer Pub.

Gilliland, Burl E. & James, Richard K. (1998). Crisis Intervention Strategies. Brooks/Cole Publishing Company: USA.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components and get a minimum of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)

MPC441A - ACCEPTANCE AND COMMITMENT THERAPY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will provide an in-depth overview of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a third wave cognitive behavioural therapy, which integrates acceptance and mindfulness with principles of behaviour change. This course will explore foundational ACT concepts as they apply to assessment and interventions with clients.

Course Objectives: This course will help the learner to:

  • Gain an understanding of the principles and processes of ACT 
  • Acquire competence in conceptualising and working with client issues using ACT

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand basic theoretical concepts underlying acceptance and commitment therapy

CO2: Conceptualize how ACT processes play a role in psychopathology and therapeutic change

CO3: Articulate and demonstrate specific acceptance and commitment therapy techniques

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Introduction and history of ACT, Overview of the theoretical model, Acceptance-based processes: Present moment awareness, Self-acceptance, Cognitive defusion.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Self as context, Values clarification and committed Action. ACT for anxiety, depression, and trauma.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Luoma, J. B., Hayes, S. C., & Walser, R. D. (2017). Learning ACT: An acceptance and commitment therapy skills-training manual for therapists (Second Ed.). Oakland, CA: New Harbinger. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Hayes, S. C. (2004). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Relational Frame theory, and the third wave of behavioral and cognitive therapies. Behavior Therapy, 35, 637-638

Eifert, G. H., Forsyth, J. P., Arch, J., Espejo, E., Keller, M., & Langer, D. (2009). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for anxiety disorders: Three case studies exemplifying a unified treatment protocol. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 16(4), 368–385. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpra.2009.06.001

Feliu Soler, A., Montesinos, F., Gutiérrez-Martínez, O., Scott, W., McCracken, L., & Luciano, J. (2018). Current status of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for chronic pain: a narrative review. Journal of Pain Research, 11, 2145–2159. https://doi.org/10.2147/jpr.s144631

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) 

CIA 1: 20 marks 

CIA 2: 25 Marks 

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course

MPC441B - COGNITIVE ANALYTIC THERAPY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides an introduction to Cognitive Analytic therapy (CAT) and its core concepts. It gives an overview of the stages in CAT therapy with a focus on the therapeutic alliance. The course also aims to increase the level of self-awareness for the learner from a CAT lens. 

Course objectives: The course intends to:

  • Introduce learners to the CAT framework
  • Encourage learners to think/perceive relationally
  • Help learners use the model as a way of understanding oneself
  • Generate interest in the CAT model

Course Outcome

CO1: Think relationally when working with clients

CO2: Conceptualize cases using CAT

CO3: Use tools from the CAT model in their practice

CO4: Use the CAT framework to recognize one?s own procedures in relationships

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to CAT
 

Introduction to CAT- context of development, defining features; Development of the self and Reciprocal roles

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
CAT Procedures and Stages
 

Procedures in CAT; Stages in CAT- Reformulation, recognition, revision; Letters and Maps in CAT

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Therapeutic alliance and termination in CAT
 

The therapeutic alliance in CAT; Exits, change and endings in CAT

Text Books And Reference Books:

Ryle A and Kerr I. Introduction to Cognitive Analytic Therapy: Principles and Practice. 2nd ed. West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2020.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Mikael Leiman (2019) How assisting client self-observation has changed in CAT. International journal of cognitive analytic therapy and relational mental health. Vol 3.

Moran, C. (2019) ‘The sense of an ending’- death and endings in CAT. Reformulation, Summer, 23-25.

Potter,S. (2018) Reciprocal roles: the mother of all ideas. Summer, 9-11.

Rafi,A.T and Prabalkumari,S.S (2022) Cognitive Analytic Therapy: an innovative psychotherapy framework in the Indian context. Indian journal of psychological medicine. DOI: 10.1177/02537176221081778

Hamill, M., Reid, M. and Reynolds,S. (2008) Letters in cognitive analytic therapy: The patient’s experience. Psychotherapy research. 18 (5): 573-583.

Denman C.  Cognitive Analytic Therapy. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment. 2001; 7: 243-256. 

Steve Potter. Negotiator’s Mind. Reformulation. Summer. 2016: 29-32.

Rafi, A.T., & Kerr, I.B. (2019) The challenge of psychotherapy across cultures: issues arising in cognitive analytic therapy (CAT) for an older male presenting with depression and sexuality-related problems with a younger female therapist in a south Indian context. International Journal of Cognitive Analytic Therapy & Relational Mental Health. 3, 107-128.

Ryle, A. (1975) Self-to-self, self-to-other: The world’s shortest account of Object relations theory. New psychiatry April 12-13.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) 

CIA 1: 20 marks 

CIA 2: 25 Marks 

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, they will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC441C - SEX THERAPY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course, suitable for post graduate students of Counselling and Clinical Psychology, intends to deepen their theoretical understanding of sexual dysfunctions and sex therapy, train them in empirically proven techniques of individual and couple sex therapy across behavioural, cognitive, emotion focussed and systemic frameworks. The students will be equipped to critically appraise the research literature in the area, conceptualize research on sex therapy as well as get comfortable in handling clients with sexual dysfunctions.

Course Objectives:

  • A thorough understanding of normal sexual functioning, deviations from normality, types of male and female sexual dysfunctions.
  • Familiarisation with the intricacies, therapist qualities, interviewing strategies, application of culturally appropriate intervention strategies in the context of sex therapy.
  • Acquiring an overview of current status of research in sexuality and sex therapy, and ability to conceptualize process and outcome research.

Course Outcome

CO1: Appreciate the interplay of biological, social and psychological factors in normal sexual behavior and in sexual dysfunction

CO2: Delineate and describe culturally appropriate individual and couple sex therapy techniques

CO3: Critically evaluate the historical and current research in the area of sexuality and sex therapy

CO4: Conceptualize research on sexual dysfunctions and sex therapy

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to sexuality
 

Psychosexual development. Models of sexual functioning (Medical, Cognitive behavioural, Experiential). Distinguishing between normal and dysfunctional sexual behaviour. Classification of male and female dysfunctions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Assessment in Sex Therapy
 

Qualities of a sex therapist. Models of sex therapy. Clinical evaluation and Psychometric assessment in sex therapy. Techniques in sex therapy. Sex therapy with single individuals.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Couple Sexual Interactions
 

Normal and dysfunctional couple sexual interactions. Systemic approaches to couple sex therapy. Processes in integration of sex and couple therapy. Challenges in sex therapy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
History and Evolution, Critical Evaluation
 

History and evolution of sex therapy research. Critical evaluation. Current trends and future directions in the area of sex therapy. Conceptualising culturally sensitive process and outcome research in sex therapy.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Masters, W. H., & Masters, V. J. (1980). Human sexual inadequacy. Bantam Books.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Hawton, K. (1985). Sex therapy: A practical guide. Oxford University Press.

Hertlein, K. M., Weeks, G. R., & Gambescia, N. (Eds.). (2009). Systemic sex therapy. New York, NY: Routledge.

LoPiccolo, J., & LoPiccolo, L. (Eds.). (2012). Handbook of sex therapy. Springer Science & Business Media.

Weeks, G. R. (2013). Integrating sex and marital therapy: A clinical guide. Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC441D - DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOUR THERAPY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Course is an exploration of DBT theory and an introduction to the role of a DBT therapist. To begin with, the strategies of the DBT approach and DBT treatments will be explored, including interpersonal effectiveness and mindfulness practices. The course will next discuss how to use psychotherapy, and DBT counselling approaches for solving common psychological disorders. Finally, the benefits and limitations of the DBT approach will be discussed. Throughout this course, the focus will be on essential problem-solving and clinical skills required for career advancement as a DBT practitioner.

Course Objectives: The course is intended to:

  • Provide an in-depth understanding of DBT approaches to counseling.
  • Help students gain mastery in using these theories to conceptualize and treat client issues.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Assess client issues, conceptualize client problems and provide therapeutic interventions using the DBT framework.

CO2: Be able to evaluate and apply theoretical principles of DBT to practice.

CO3: Demonstrate practical skills relevant to the DBT approach.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to DBT
 

What is DBT? What is ‘dialectical’? History & Philosophy of DBT; Mindfulness’; DBT strategies and modules; Multistage approach of DBT; The Stages of Treatment in DBT; Prioritising Treatments Targets; How to set up a ‘learning environment’ for the client; How to conduct ‘Behavioural Analysis’

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
DBT for Psychological Disorders
 

DBT in the treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD); DBT in the treatment of Depression and other disorders; Effectiveness of DBT; Criticism and Limitations of DBT; Skills training, in Mindfulness, Interpersonal Effectiveness, Emotion Regulation, Distress Tolerance, and Walking the Middle Path. Ordering competing priorities, Life-threatening behaviours, therapy-threatening behaviours, and behaviours that interfere with quality of life

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Linehan, M.M. (2015). DBT® Skills Training Manual: Second Edition. New York: Guilford Press.

Linehan, M.M. (2015). DBT® Skills Training Handouts and Worksheets: Second Edition. New York: Guilford Press.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Linehan, M.M. (1993). Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Dimeff, L.A. & Koerner, K. (2007). Dialectical Behavior Therapy in Clinical Practice: Applications across Disorders and Settings. Guilford Press

Koerner, K. (2011). Doing Dialectical Behavior Therapy: A Practical Guide. Guilford Press

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC441E - GRIEF THERAPY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will provide the students with an opportunity to understand the foundations of grief in order to help persons experiencing grief and loss.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate understanding of contemproary models of grief

CO2: Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of death, dying, trauma, and grief

CO3: Learn the needs of the grieving and how to help others remember with more love than pain

CO4: Use tools to create and lead grief groups and mentor clients one on one

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Models of Grief
 

Contemporary models of grief. Types of Grief. Cultural foundations of grief.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Tools in grief education
 

Dealing with grief. Contemporary approaches.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Gobey, F. & Casdagli, P. (1995). Grief, bereavement, and change: A quick guide. Cambridge: Daniels Publishing

Kessler, D. (2019) Finding meaning:the sixth stage of grief. New Delhi. Scribner

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Dana, D. (2018). The polyvagal theory in therapy- Engaging the rhythm of regulation. New York. Norton

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC471 - COUNSELLING SUPERVISION SEMINAR (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course aims at providing group supervision to the counsellor trainees who are practicing in the field. It will follow a small group format where 6-8 students are supervised by one supervisor. Students will be asked to present cases they are seeing in the field.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner:

  • Understand the importance of supervision
  • View client issues with a multiple and wider perspective
  • Understand how their personal lives are influencing and being influenced by their clients and therapy
  • Receive supervision so that they provide an ethical service to their client

Course Outcome

CO1: Conceptualize cases using multiple theoretical approaches

CO2: Recognize issues of transference and countertransference as it occurs

CO3: Engage in reflective practice

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Supervision
 

Case presentation and Group supervision

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Borders, L.D. & Brown, L.L. (2005). New Handbook for Counselling Supervision. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Jongsma Jr, A.E., Peterson,L. M., & Bruce, T.J. (2006). The complete adult psychotherapy treatment planner, 4th Ed,  Hoboken, NJ. Wiley.
Jongsma Jr, A.E., Peterson,L. M., Mc Innis, W.P., & Bruce, T.J. (2006). The adolescent psychotherapy treatment planner, 4th Ed, Hoboken, NJ. Wiley

 

Evaluation Pattern

Students will be evaluated based on their level of engagement with their clients, their own personal and professional development over the course of the semester and their case presentations.

Total Marks -50

1) Supervisor Evaluation (15 Marks)

2) Site Supervisor Evaluation (15 Marks)

3) Post Course Assessment (15 Marks)

4) Attendance (5 Marks)

*Supervisor Evaluation & Site Supervisor Evaluation is done using a prescribed form.

The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC481 - COUNSELLING INTERNSHIP (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:450
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:200
Credits:8

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized in order to provide students with a hands-on experience of working with clients. Students will be attached to various agencies where they will be trained and supervised in acquiring counselling skill competencies. They will be mentored by a supervisor at the University also. Students must periodically meet their supervisors, maintain case files and submit four case records at the end of their practicum period.

 Course objectives: This course will help the learner:  

  • Gain exposure to dealing with a wide variety of clients

  • Gain experience of real-life issues in the workplace

  • Enhance their counselling skills

 The student must complete a minimum of 450 hours of supervised internship which includes 150 direct hours and 300 indirect hours.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate competence in counselling skills in applied settings.

CO2: Appreciate and respect the ethical guidelines of organizations with which they work

CO3: Demonstrate amicable relationships with their colleagues and co-workers

CO4: Coordinate effectively with their supervisors.

CO5: Effectively conceptualize the client?s concerns, demonstrate and apply counselling skills and write reports.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
Counselling Internship
 

Students will engage in supervised practicum.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Borders, L D & Brown, L .L (2005). New Handbook for Counselling Supervision, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Jongsma Jr, A.E., Peterson,L. M., & Bruce, T.J. (2006). The complete adult psychotherapy treatment planner, 4th Ed,  Hoboken, NJ. Wiley.

Jongsma Jr, A.E., Peterson,L. M., Mc Innis, W.P., & Bruce, T.J. (2006). The adolescent psychotherapy treatment planner, 4th Ed,  Hoboken, NJ. Wiley

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation would be done periodically by the supervisors

Evaluation Pattern: 
Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Total Marks- 200

End Semester Exam (ESE) - Comprehensive Counselling Viva based on 2 cases submitted and practicum (60 marks)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

Continuous Internal Assessment (140 marks)

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. 

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC482 - BLOCK INTERNSHIP (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:100
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This is a block placement for short field training. Students are required to search for, examine and carve their niche in the field related to their chosen specialization. The basic purpose is to create awareness for the students so that the career progression of the students and the growth of the discipline can both be realized.

Course Objectives: The course is intended to help students:

  • Gain exposure to a new population that they may work with
  • Integrate all they have learnt and apply it in practice
  • Gain confidence in practicing as a counselling psychologist

Course Outcome

CO1: Choose their career path

CO2: Demonstrate competence in providing counselling services to clients

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:100
Unit 1
 

Field Placement

Text Books And Reference Books:

NA

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

The students are expected to submit:

1) An interim report (minimum 15 days must be completed), summarising their learning and experiences at the internship site 

2) A certificate of completion as soon as the internship is over. 

Total Marks-50

MPC483 - SEMINAR AND PUBLICATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: The student engages in original research work and writes a manuscript based on a field study to publish in a nationally/internationally reputed journal. This course helps the students organize learnt concepts, conceptualize and work on short feasible projects by applying their knowledge of research methodology creatively.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to:

  • Prepare a manuscript based on the field study
  • Disseminate their study findings through a suitable conference presentation

Course Outcome

CO1: Prepare a manuscript in the scientific format for publication in a nationally/ internationally reputed journal

CO2: Present and defend the study

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Dissemination
 

Choosing a journal for publication, writing the manuscript as per journal requirements, sending the manuscript for publication, responding to review from the journal.

Text Books And Reference Books:

APA. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Ed.).Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

American Psychological Association. (2012). APA guide to electronic references (6th Ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association

Hartley, J. (2008). Academic Writing and Publishing: A Practical Guide. Taylor and Francis. ISBN 0 203927982

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) 

CIA 1: 20 marks 

CIA 2: 25 Marks 

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.