CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, POLITICAL SCIENCE AND HISTORY

School of Social Sciences

Syllabus for
Master of Arts (International Studies)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAIS131 POLITICAL THEORY Core Courses 4 04 100
MAIS132 PRINCIPLES OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS133 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS134 WORLD HISTORY Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS135 INDIAN FOREIGN POLICY Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS141A FRENCH Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS141B CHINESE Core Courses 4 4 100
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAIS231 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS232 US AND LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS233 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS234 SOUTH ASIA Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS241A FRENCH Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
MAIS241B CHINESE Discipline Specific Elective 4 2 100
MAIS291 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
MCN291 ECOLOGY AND MEDIA DISCOURSES Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
MSA291 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAIS331 PROBLEMS OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS332 INTERNATIONAL LAW Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS333 CENTRAL ASIA AND RUSSIAN STUDIES Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS334 COMPARATIVE POLITICS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS335 EAST AND SOUTH EAST ASIA Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS351 RESEARCH PAPER Core Courses 0 4 100
MAIS381 DISSERTATION - 0 2 100
MAIS382 SUMMER INTERNSHIP - 0 2 100
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAIS431 EUROPEAN STUDIES Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS432 CONFLICT RESOLUTION AND PEACE STUDIES Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS433 AFRICAN STUDIES Core Courses 3 2 100
MAIS434 WEST ASIA Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS435 CHINA AND THE WORLD Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS451 RESEARCH PAPER Core Courses 0 4 100
MAIS482 INTERNSHIP Core Courses 0 2 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

Master of Arts in International Studies (MAIS) is an inter-disciplinary programme; students integrate and apply knowledge across disciplines in order to analyze global issues and problems. It equips students with analytical and critical skills to understand contemporary international politics and prepare them for a range of professions that require knowledge of international affairs. The Programme is designed to provide graduates the expertise and skills appropriate for a range of public and private sector careers where an advanced knowledge and understanding of contemporary international societies is integral to their work.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Establish comprehension and have an in-depth and clear understanding of historical and contemporary global politics, its various actors and institutions.

PO2: Apply the knowledge in analyzing and bringing creative solutions to complex international issues through cooperation, conflict resolution, diplomacy and creative thinking.

PO3: Demonstrate critical, analytical, research, problem-solving, self-learning and communication skills required for a range of careers in public and private sectors and also for self-employment.

PO4: Demonstrate entrepreneurship, innovativeness, and continuous learning.

PO5: Exhibit dynamism, consultative decision-making, teambuilding and such other leadership qualities.

PO6: Develop civic sense, inclusiveness, empathy, humility, integrity and display appreciation of diversity, environmental sensitivity and global perspective of issues.

Assesment Pattern

20% of the marks for Factual writing

60% of the marks for Interpretation, Analysis

20% of the marks for Writing style that arguments, cohesion, paragraphs and overall writing.  grammar,

 

Examination And Assesments

Continuous Internal Assessment   100 marks

CIA 1   Written assignments                                                 20 marks

CIA 2   Mid Semester  Examinations                                     50 marks

CIA 3    Written assignments and presentations                     20 marks

Attendance                                                                         10 marks.

End Semester Examinations                                                 100 Marks

MAIS131 - POLITICAL THEORY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:04

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims to help students

  • To understand the concepts, meaning and theories of political science. It is designed to give an in depth knowledge about the political concepts that students will be exposed to in their study of international studies.       
  • To develop an inquisitive attitude towards the current political issues and be able to connect the current issues to the prominent theories of political science.

  • To be open to critically analyze and respect diverse viewpoints.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge of major competing interpretations of key concepts and their relationship to different ideological approaches.

CO2: Display critical and analytical skills with appropriate knowledge and use of the political vocabulary in their research.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Nature, scope &significance of Politics
 
  • Nature, meaning and functions of political theory
  • Major approaches and methods in political theory
  • Sovereignty

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Rights, Liberty, Equality & Justice
 
  •  liberty
  • Equality
  • Justice
  • Rights
  • Power
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Political ideologies
 
  • Liberalism
  • Conservatism
  • Socialism
  • Nationalism : Anarchism, Fascism
  • Gandhism
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Political Theories
 
  • Social Contract  
  • Marxist Theory
  • Behavioralism & Post Behavioralism,
  • Systems theory
  • Communication theory
  • Post-Modernism
  • Feminism 
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Political Interaction
 
  • The economy and society
  • Political culture, identity and legitimacy
  • Mass media and political communication
  • Groups, interests and movements
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Heywood, A. (2007). Politics. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  2. Heywood, A. (2007). Political Ideologies. New Delhi: Palgrave Macmillan.
  3. Gaus, Gerald F.,  Kukathas, C, (2011) Handbook of Political Theory, Sage, London
  4. Harrison, Lisa, Little, A, Lock E (Eds) (2015) Politics: The Key Concepts, Routledge, New York
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Vinod, M.J. and Deshpande, M. (2013). Contemporary Political Theory. New Delhi: PHI Learning.
  2. Johari, J.C. (2012). Contemporary Political Theory. New Delhi: Sterling.
  3. Gokhale, B.K. (2006). Political Science: Theory and Governmental Machinery. Mumbai: Himalaya Publishing House.
  4. Marsh, D. and Stoker, G. (Eds.). (2002). Theory and Methods in Political Science. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  5. Hay, C. et al. (Eds.). (2006). The State: Theories and Issues. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  6. Cohen, M. and Fermon, N. (Eds.). (1996). Princeton Readings in Political Thought: Essential Texts Since Plato. New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
  7. Sabine, G.H. and Thorson, T.L. (1973). A History of Political Theory. New Delhi: OUP and IBH.
  8. Laski, H.J. (2007). Grammar of Politics. New Delhi: Surjeet.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 20 Marks 

CIA-2  50 Marks 

CIA -3 20 Marks 

Final Marks  100

MAIS132 - PRINCIPLES OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description:

 This is a principles-level course in International Economics for non-majors. International economics is the area of economics concerning transactions and interactions between agents (consumers, firms and governments) of different countries. The main goal is to introduce students to general principles of both international microeconomics and international macroeconomics.

First part of the course deals with basic microeconomics concepts and tools like demand and supply, cost and revenue, market structure and its types (1stand 2nd unit) after learning tools of economics 3rd unit focuses on international trade and gains from trade. Initially, we will see the main theories explaining international trade: who benefits from trade, why certain trade patterns appear, how international trade is related to income distribution, etc. Then in unit 4, we will focus on international trade policy: what are the instruments to encourage or discourage trade, why trade is not as prevalent as the theory would imply, and what are the main arguments for and against free trade. Unit 5 and 6 deals with balance of payment and exchange rate system, it’s important to understand these concepts in order to frame a correct policy for the economic growth and development in the era of globalization and liberalization. The last part of the course will focus on international macroeconomics, or open economy macroeconomics. It will go over exchange rate determination, the interaction between exchange rates, interest rates, inflation, and aggregate output; and discuss international monetary systems.

 Course Objectives

 

•        Introduce students to principles in international economics.

•        Provide a basic understanding of the workings of international trade, foreign exchange determination etc.

•        Develop economic reasoning and approach towards international relations

Course Outcome

CO: Identify and distinguish different types of market structure and its influence on the economy and the society. Analyze the role of free trade, in achieving economic growth and development. Give solutions pertaining to the problems of free trade Identify the inefficiencies created due to presence of trade policies and regional trade agreement in the market. Design the solutions for the economy to connect internationally and improve trade relations with the rest of the world.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Principles of International Economics
 

Introduction to economics, Production Possibility Frontier, Basics: Supply and Demand, Market Equilibrium,. Opportunity cost, Isoquants, Indifference Curve Analysis., Types of Market structure

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Market Structure: Price and Output Determination
 

Cost and Revenue Analysis, types of cost, types of revenue, Price and output determination under different types of market structure.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Gains from Trade
 

Theories of International Trade:  Absolute & Comparative Advantage Theory, Heckscher-Ohlin Theory,  Terms of Trade, Factors affecting ToT, Economic Growth and Development, Factor Endowment growth , Prebisch-Singer Thesis, Immiserising Growth-Jadgish Bhagwati

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Trade Policy Instruments
 

  1. Tariffs and its Effects
  2. Non Tariff Trade Barriers-import quotas, voluntary export agreements, subsidies, buy national policies, product and safety standards, and content requirements.
  3. Other Instruments of Trade Policy

Free Trade Vs Protection

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Balance of payment
 

  1. Balance of Trade Vs BOP
  2. Accounts in BOP
  3. Disequilibrium in BOP and its effects
  4. Measures to Correct BOP
Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Exchange Rates and Open-economy Macroeconomics
 

 

  1. Foreign Exchange Markets and Systems
  2. Theories of Exchange Rate Determination- Mint Theory,
  3. Purchasing power parity Theory
  4. BOP theory
Unit-7
Teaching Hours:10
Macro-Economic Issues and Policies
 

National Income,

Aggregate demand and supply,

Inflation,

Unemployment,

Fiscal policy and monetary policy,

Exim Policy.

Text Books And Reference Books:

—  International Economics – Cherunilam

—  International Economics – Dominick Salvatore

—  International Economics – H.G Mannur

—  International Economics – Raj Kumar

—  International Economics- Bo Sodersten

—  International Economics- Robert J. Carbaugh

—  International Economics: Theory and Policy - Paul R. Krugman and Maurice Obstfeld

—  Textbook of Economics – William Boyes & Michael Melvin

 Deviga Vengedasalam, Karunagaran Madhavan: Principles of Economics. 3 rd Edition

Krugman, Obstfeld, Melitz. International Economics: Theory and Policy, 10th Edition, 2012. Pearson.

Rajkumar: International economics, latest edition. Excel book

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

International Economics – Cherunilam

—  International Economics – Dominick Salvatore

—  International Economics – H.G Mannur

—  International Economics – Raj Kumar

—  International Economics- Bo Sodersten

—  International Economics- Robert J. Carbaugh

—  International Economics: Theory and Policy - Paul R. Krugman and Maurice Obstfeld

—  Textbook of Economics – William Boyes & Michael Melvin

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

  • CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%
  • CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                – 25%

  • CIA III – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation             – 10%

  • Attendance                                                                    – 05%

  • End Semester Examination                                              – 50%

 

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

 

 

 

MAIS133 - INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The study of international relations takes a wide range of theoretical approaches. Some emerge from within the discipline itself; others have been imported, in whole or in part, from disciplines such as economics or sociology. This course introduces students to some of the most important theory and practice for studying international relations. It provides a fairly comprehensive overview of the major political developments and events starting from the twentieth century. Students are expected to learn about the key milestones in world history and equip them with the tools to understand and analyze the same from different perspectives. The aim of the course is to understand International relations and its multidisciplinary nature where the student will be accommodated with contemporary trend of multidisciplinary discourse.

 

 

Course Outcome

CO 1: Demonstrate analytical aptitude to studying various concepts and theories of International Relations

CO 2: Identify and describe the main similarities and differences among the major IR theories

CO 3: Understand the historical evolution of IR theory over the course of time

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
PERSPECTIVES IN IR
 

International Relations: Meaning, nature, scope and importance; Meaning, elements, evaluation of national power, Approaches to International Peace: Balance of Power; Collective Security; Disarmament and arms control and War

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THOUGHT
 

Emmanuel Kant on perpetual peace, Hugo Grotius on International Relation, Karl Smith, Thucydides, Confucius, Arthashastra Thomas Hobbes, Aquinas.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES
 

Idealism, Realism, Liberalism, Neo-Realism and Neo-Liberalism, System theory  World Systems, Functionalism and Neo-functionalism, New-world order, Dependency theory, Game theory and Marxist approaches

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
CONTEMPORARY IR THEORY
 

Historical sociology, Normative theory, Social Constructivism, Postmodernism, post- colonialism, critical theory and Neo- Marxist Approaches in IR

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Alternative approaches to IR theory
 

Non-traditional Security threats in International Relations, Green Politics in International Relations, Globalization and new orders of non-State actors, and Feminist Theories, Language and Symbols in International Relations

Text Books And Reference Books:

Nicholson, M. International Relations: A Concise Introduction. New York: Palgrave, 2002. 1-4. Print.

Smith, M. and R. Little. “Introduction.” Perspectives on World Politics. New York: Routledge, 2000. 1-17. Print.  

Baylis, John and Steve Smith. The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. 4thedn. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. 1-6. Print. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Nicholson, M. International Relations: A Concise Introduction. New York: Palgrave, 2002. 1-4. Print.

Cox, M. “From the Cold War to the War on Terror.” The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Eds. John Baylis and Steve Smith. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 141-155. Print.

Bull, H. “The Balance of Power and International Order”. Perspectives on World Politics. New York: Routledge, 2000. 1-17. Print.

Dunne, T. “Liberalism.”The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Eds. John Baylis and Steve Smith. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. 185-203. Print.

Keohane, R.O. and Joseph S. Nye. “Trans-governmental Relations and the International Organisation.” Perspectives on World Politics. Eds. M. Smith and R. Little. New York: Routledge, 2000. 229-241. Print.

Moravcsik, Andrew. “Taking Preferences Seriously: A Liberal Theory of International Politics.” International Organisation51.4 (1997): 513-553. Print.

Keohane, Robert O. and Joseph S. Nye, Jr. Power and Interdependence. 3rd edn., Addison-Wesley, 2000. 3-52. Print.

Snyder, Jack. Myths of Empire: Domestic Politics and International Ambition. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1991. Print.

Tickner, Ann J. “You Just Don’t Understand: Troubles Engagements Between Feminists and IR Theorists.” International Studies Quarterly 41.4 (1997, December): 611-632. Print.

Peterson, Spike. Gendered States: Feminist (Re)Visions of International Relations Theory. Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 1992. Print.

Enloe, Cynthia. Bananas, Beaches and Bases: Making Feminist Sense of International Politics. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989. Print.

Cohn, Carol and Cynthia Weber. “Missions, Men and Masculinities.” International Feminist Journal of Politics 1.4: 435-451. Print. 

 Moravcsik, Andrew. “Taking Preferences Seriously: A Liberal Theory of International Politics.” International Organisation51.4 (1997): 513-553. Print. 

Keohane, Robert O. and Joseph S. Nye, Jr. Power and Interdependence. 3rdedn., Addison-Wesley, 2000. 3-52. Print. 

Halliday, F. Rethinking International Relations. London: Macmillan, 1994. 147-166. Print. 

Nicholson, M. International Relations: A Concise Introduction. New York: Palgrave, 2002.120-122. Print. 

Galtung, J. “A Structural Theory of Imperialism.”Perspectives on World Politics. Eds. M. Smith and R. Little. New York: Routledge, 2000. 292-304. Print.

Wallerstein, I. “The Rise and Future Demise of World Capitalist System: Concepts for Comparative Analysis.” Perspectives on World Politics. Eds. M. Smith and R. Little. New York: Routledge, 2000. 292-304. Print. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10% 

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

CIA III – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10% 

 Attendance – 05%

 End Semester Examination – 50%

 TOTAL 100%

MAIS134 - WORLD HISTORY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

It is essential to understand how the contemporary world, its priorities and articulations are rooted in the modern period. Broadly identified as beginning from 1800’s and lasting till 1950’s, Modernism was a conceptual movement that influenced the progress of History and Culture of the entire world. It was this pre war world that engineered the historical, political, social, economic and cultural sensibilities of Contemporary period.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse international events of the world in the context of its historical origins.

CO2: Critically understand how cultural identities are intrinsic to the way international relations get structured.

CO3: Explain the contemporary world affairs with a deep insight

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:18
Europe in 19th C .
 

a)Liberalism and Nationalism in the early 19th century

b) Social Darwinism

c) Nationalism and nation States: Unification of Italy and Germany.

d) The Romantic era: Concerns and Features- Romanticism  and Musical Nationalism of Richard Wagner – Romanticism in Art and Literature of Goya and Wolfgang von Gothe -Intellectual background of Romanticism: Kant, Hegel and Marx

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Africa and Colonialism
 

a)Colonialism in Africa

b) Pre colonial and colonial Africa : European presence 

c)Scramble for Africa

d) Consolidation of colonial rule: Raw materials and markets, peasant producers, economic impact, early expressions of nationalism.

 e)The People and Cultures of Africa: Religion and Society in early Africa,  African literature and literary movements, impact of African culture on the West.           

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Asia between 18th and early 20th centuries.
 
  • Ruptures in Ottomanization,and the issue of eastern question
  • Arab nationalism – Arabia during the world wars.
  • Western interventions and regional friction in China: Anglo Chinese confrontations, revolution and the republic-   Japan: Period of assertion 1860 to 1920.           
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
The Americas
 
  • USA: Formation of national identity – Struggle for nationhood: westward expansion and  the civil war – Idea of USA: i)The age of Jazz ii) Literature: Emerson and David Thoreau iii) Architecture: Frank Lyod Wright
  • Early colonial empires in Latin America: Portugal, Spain and France, the age of conquistadores, Portuguese empire in the Atlantic, Plantation economy, Slave trade and its impact on Europe.
  • Colonial culture and liberation movements.      
Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Sneh Mahajan, Issues in Twentieth Century World History, Macmillan,2010   2010                            

2. Kevin Shillington, History of Africa, Palgrave Macmillan 2012

3. Edited, US History, Rice University, 2017

4.Meenaxi Phukan, Rise of the Modern West, Trinity Press 1998

                                                                            

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 1.Hobsbawm, Eric. Age of Extreme: The Short Twentieth Century 1914-1991. London:  Abacus, 1995.

 2.      Carr, E.H. International Relations between the Two World Wars: 1919 – 1939.NewYork: Palgrave, 2004.

 3.     Taylor, A.J.P. The Origins of the Second World War. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1961.

 4.     Carrthuthers, S.L. “International History, 1900- 1945.”The Globalisation of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Eds. John Baylis and Steve Smith.  Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005

 5.     Calvocoressi, P. World Politics: 1945 – 2000. Essex: Pearson, 2005.

 6.     Beat Kumin (ed), The European World 1500 – 1800 An Introduction to Early Modern History,Routledge, 2009.

 7.     Benjamin Keen, A History of Latin America, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2009 

 8.     Christopher Lascelles. A Short History of the World. Bloomsbury, London, 2011

 9.     Arjun Dev and Indira Arjun Dev. History of the World, From the late Nineteenth to the Early Twenty First Century, Orient Blackswan, New Delhi, 2009.

 10.  Garthine Walker(ed). Writing Early Modern History, Bloomsbury, London, 2005.

 11.  David .S. Mason, A Concise History of Modern Europe- Liberty, Equality, Solidarity, Orient Blackswan, 2012. 

12.  Jeremy Black, The World in the Twentieth Century, Routledge, 2002 

13.  John C Corbally, The Twentieth Century World- 1914 to the Present, Bloomsbury, 2019 

14.  Daniel R. Brower, The World Since 1945 – A Brief History ( Second Edition ) Pearson Education, 2005 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation                     10%

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                      25%

CIA III – Research Topic                                                      10%

Attendance                                                                              05%

End Semester Examination                                                     50%                                        

TOTAL                                                                        100%

 

   Scheme of Evaluation: For all Sections     

50% of the marks for Factual writin

 40% of the marks for Interpretation, Analysis                                                             

 10% of the marks for Writing style that include  grammar, vocabulary, spelling ,presentation

MAIS135 - INDIAN FOREIGN POLICY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Indian foreign policy reflects the perceptions and priorities of our political, economic and military leaderships from time to time in relation to the neighbourhood, middle and big powers. This is evidenced from the continuity and change in Indian national security and foreign policy.

 

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the mechanics of foreign policy making and the issues that influence the policy in order for them to develop a perspective on the emerging trends in Indian foreign policy

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the basic features and determinants of Indian foreign policy;

CO2: Comprehend the foreign policy making mechanisms and appreciate the complexities involved

CO3: Appreciate the role of various Prime Ministers on the foreign policy making;

CO4: Analyse the India?s neighbourhood policy;

CO5: Know the history and current India?s policy with regards to global and regional powers.

CO6: Examine India?s foreign economic and nuclear policies.

CO7: Appraise the continuity and change in India?s foreign policies

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Foundations of Indian Foreign Policy
 

Doctrinal Aspects; Determinants: domestic and international; Evolution of Indian foreign policy, pre-Independence, post-Independence, Non Aligned Movement, Cold War and Security Politics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Making of India's Foreign Policy
 

Institutions, Structure, and Processes:Structure of Indian Government, Political System, Ministry of External Affairs, Prime Minister’s Office, Research & Analysis Wing, Role of Think Tanks, Media,  Role of the Prime ministers

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
India's Relations with its Neighbours
 

Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Afghanistan and South-East Asia

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
India's Relations with World Powers
 

US, Russian Federation, PRC, Japan, and European Union

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
India's Relations with Regional Powers
 

Israel, East and West Asia, African Countries, Australia and South America.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
India's Foreign Economic Policy
 

Interaction with Global and Regional Institutionsand Grouping (UN, IMF & WB, WTO, ASEAN-ARF, APEC, EU, IBSA, SAARC

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
India's Nuclear and Defense Policy
 

Genesis, Doctrines, Evolutionary Trajectory, Emerging Dimensions.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:6
Continuity and Change in 21st Century
 

Non-Alignment,Terrorism, Energy Security, Indian Diaspora

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bajpai, Kanti, Basit, Saira, Krishnappa, V. eds., India’s grand Stategy: History, theory, cases (2014)

Bandyopadhyaya, J,  The Making of India's Foreign Policy: Determinants, Institutions, Processes, And Personalities, Bombay: Allied Publishers, 1970.

C. Raja Mohan, Crossing the Rubicon: The Shaping of India's New Foreign Policy, New Delhi: Penguin Books, 2005.

J. N. Dixit, Indian Foreign Policy and its Neighbours, New Delhi: Gyan Publishing, 2001.

Ganguly, Sumit, ed., India’s foreign Policy (2010)

Ghosh, Anjali, Chakrobroti,Tridib,  Anindyo Jyoti Majumdar and Shibashis Chatterjee, eds.,India’s Foreign Policy, New Delhi: Pearson, 2009.

Jetly, Nancy and Rajendra Prasad, India's Foreign Policy: Challenges And Prospects, New Delhi: Vikas Pub. House, 1999.

Kapoor A and A. J. Wison, The Foreign Policy of India and her Neighbours. 1995.

Malone, David, Rajamohan C, (Eds) Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, Oxford university Press 2015

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bajpai, Kanti, Basit, Saira, Krishnappa, V. eds., India’s grand Stategy: History, theory, cases (2014)

 

Nehru,J awaharlal,  India's Foreign Policy: Selected Speeches, September 1946-April 1961, New Delhi: Publications Division, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Govt. of India, 1961.

Nancy Jetly and Rajendra Prasad, India's Foreign Policy: Challenges And Prospects, New Delhi: Vikas Pub. House, 1999.

Muni, S.D., India’s foreign Policy, The Democracy Dimension (2009)

Tharoor, Shashi Reasons of State: Political development and India’s foreign policy under Indira Gandhi (1982)

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation  – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation  10%

·         Attendance                                                     – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                               – 50%

 

                                                                     TOTAL 100%

MAIS141A - FRENCH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description -Comment vont les affaires? the proposed method for the I MA in International Studies programme has been conceived for real beginners or people desirous of enriching their linguistic knowledge for professional use. The immediate practice of the acquired linguistic competencies kindles in the learner the curiosity and the interest to observe, question and finally the competence to use them.

 

Course Objectives

·         To develop linguistic competencies and sharpen written and oral communicative skills

·         To greet, introduce oneself / others

·         To present objects and ask questions

·         To engage in telephonic conversations, answering queries, making reservations etc.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Enhancement of linguistic competencies and written and oral communicative skills

CO2: ability to greet and introduce oneself, speak about something, ask questions and engage in phone conversations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Glad to meet you
 

-          Professional life – Organisation of work, job profiles, identity, Europe, European

countries and different nationalities, how to introduce oneself in a French firm

-          Communication -Greeting, introducing oneself/others, speaking about

one’s profession/ nationality

-          Grammar – Presentative, definite articles, gender and number, the simple

affirmative sentence, verb ‘to be’, first group verbs, pronominal verbs ‘to call oneself’

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
You would like?
 

-          Professional life -Trade and products, distribution channels, types of trade,

toiletries, forms of trade, French behaviour (purchases)

-          Communication – Greeting, you – informal and formal, showing objects, asking

Questions, counting 0 to 20

-          Grammar – The presentative -This is/these are, indefinite articles, numbers 1-20,

demonstratives, gender and number, interrogative forms with intonation and

‘is it that?’, verb ‘to have’, first group verbs (cont)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Moving about
 

-          Professional life – Professional travel, seminars and conferences, travel and

means of transport, stations, airports French stations, airports of Paris

-          Communication – Say if it’s alright or not, speaking on the phone, answering,

wrong number, if the line is not clear, situating in space (towns and countries)

-          Grammar – contracted articles, prepositions of place, tonique pronouns, interrogative,

negative, positive and negative responses, verbs ‘to go’ and ‘to do’. immediate future

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
The right addresses
 

-          Professional life – Telephonic information, memo, addresses and telephone

numbers, urban transport (metro, bus, RER)

-          Communication- Speaking on the phone: asking for information, spelling, making

a reservation, looking for and giving directions, thanking

-          Grammar – Numbers (20-60), localising, interrogation with where, how and how much, verbs ‘to wish’ and ‘to be able’

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Appointment/ Meeting
 

-          Professional life – Work timings and weekends, lunch break, invitations and

appointments, meals, French wines and cheese

-          Communication – Speaking on the phone, automatic response, likes and dislikes,

excusing oneself, expressing certainty or uncertainty

-          Grammar – Pronoun ‘on’, indefinite pronouns, interrogatives, adverbs, qualifying

adjectives, time, ‘to be hungry/thirsty’ second group verbs, simple past tense

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Placing an order
 

-          Professional life – Office supplies, company orders, shopping and orders, lunch

For employees and managers, different ways of shopping

-          Communication – expressing quantity/need, refusing, expressing surprise or irritation

-          Grammar – Partitives, numbers (beyond 60), adverbs of quantity, measurements,

Negation, third group verbs

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Course Text : Gruneberg, Anne ; Béatrice Tauzin. Comment vont les affaires ? Cours de français professionnel pour débutants. Paris : Hachette, 2000.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      French websites like Bonjour de France, FluentU French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Quiz /Assignment / Role play

10%

 

CIA 2 – Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Research topic  / Viva

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

MAIS141B - CHINESE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce students to the Chinese language and culture and help them develop basic speaking, listening, reading and writing skillsand prepare them for HSK (level1), an international standardized exam conducted by Confucius Institute Headquarters(Hanban, a public institution) in affiliationwith the Government of China.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand, speak and write very simple Chinese words and phrases, meet basic needs of communication and possess the ability to further their Chinese language skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Phonetic notes (Initial Tables, Final Tables, Table of Speech Sounds, Tones)
 
  • Introducing oneself(Lesson 3: What is your name?)
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Numbers and the number system
 
  • Giving and getting personal details (Lesson 4: Do you study French?)
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction to the language, country and the Text Book
 

 

-Common Chinese greetings at different moments and in different situations (Lesson 1: Hello)

 -Getting to know each other (Lesson 2: Which country are you from?)

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Basic strokes
 
  • Teaching Basic Strokes, Basic character writing, Measuring words
  • Family: Talking about one’s family (Lesson 5: How many people are there in your family?)

    -Interacting with shopkeepers and making purchases (Lesson 6: How much is half a kilogram of bananas?)

  • Days and Date

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Weights
 

-         Asking and telling directions and location(Lesson 7: Where is the Bank of China?)

-          Discussing days, dates and events(Lesson 8: What’s the date today?)

-          Lesson 9:Discovering Chinese Culture through Autumn Festival

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Directions
 

oral

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Shopping
 

culture

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Currency and Money
 

General Information

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Preparation for HSK ( Level 1) exam
 

·        HSK is an international standardized exam conducted all over the world by Confucius Institute Headquarter in affiliation with the Chinese Education ministry to test and rate Chinese language proficiency. It assesses non-native Chinese speakers’ abilities in using the Chinese language in their daily, academic and professional lives. HSK consists of six levels, namely the HSK (level I), HSK (level II), HSK (level III), HSK (level IV), HSK (level V), and HSK (level VI) just like DELF/DALF exams for European languages.

·         This international certificationserves as a reference for educational institutions and multinational companies requiring the knowledge of Chinese language

Text Books And Reference Books:
  •   Developing Chinese (Elementary Comprehensive Course 1), 2nd EditionBeijing Language and Culture University press
  • HSK vocabulary and mock tests
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  •   Developing Chinese (Elementary Comprehensive Course 1), 2nd EditionBeijing Language and Culture University press
  • HSK vocabulary and mock tests
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 20

CIA II 50 

CIA III 20

End Sem 100

MAIS231 - INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to International Political Economy (IPE), an interdisciplinary field that focuses on the interplay between politics and economics .The world economic system is now highly integrated, as reflected in the increased cross- border flows of goods and capital and in the sustained activity of institutions like the World Trade Organization, European Union and SAARC. International Political Economy can act as either the make or break factor in the prosperity of nation-states. Invariably nation-states operate in a global context with an economic dimension which explains the importance of this paper. The dynamics of  interdependence which characterizes the web of economic activities like political decisions to join a monetary union or commit to economic policies that dilute political authority and power has the tendency to impact national economies with unforeseen ramifications. For instance, the flow of long-term capital into a state and access to foreign trade markets can help poorer countries to develop economically and strengthen a state's authority .To that extent, the four key areas that comprise IPE are: trade, monetary and fiscal policies, foreign direct investment and development.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Conceptualise and briefly explain the theoretical frames of international political economy.

CO 2: To trace the evolution of the international political economy up to the period of neoliberalism.

CO 3: Use the basic tools of economics and political science to analyse the nature of international economic competition and interdependence.

CO 4: To explain and analyse the dynamics of financial liberalisation, sovereign debt crisis and the politics of economic distribution.

CO 5: Define economic regionalism and analyse the Euro-zone crisis

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Perspectives on IPE: Concepts and theories
 

Introduction to IPE, Types of Economic System, Theories of IPE: Economic Liberalism, Economic Nationalism, and Economic
Structuralism, The role of markets and states in the global economy, Developing economies and its features/characteristics, The Mahalanobis Model in India, Political and Economic indicators/variables of an economy.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The International Trade Regime
 

The post-WWII GATT trade regime; the creation and record of the WTO; The domestic politics of International Trade, Trade theories: absolute and comparative in short, International trade relations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
The International Monetary Regime
 

Gold Standard Era, The Bretton Woods monetary regime; The collapse of Bretton Woods in the 1970s;East Asian crisis 1998, The road to the financial crisis of 2008, IMF, World Bank

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Regional Integration
 

What is Regional Integrations? , Different forms of regional integration;The costs and benefits of regional integration; The evolution and record of; G-7, G-77, ASEAN, SAARC, EU, NAFTA etc.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
The International Economy
 

Business/trade cycle theories,Strategies of Development;Sustainable Development, Globalization: concepts of globalization, Waves of Globalization, The future of Globalization; Globalization & Poverty.Prospects of Global Governance, Multi-National Corporations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
The Rise of China the Challenge to US Economic Hegemony
 

China’s development strategy since the 1970s; Chinese economic accomplishments and challenges; Implications of China’s economic development for the US

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
The International Politics of Energy
 

The evolution of international oil politics and oil prices since WWII;The role of OPEC; Asia’s growing thirst for energy; The debate over peak oil.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Mankiw,G–Principles of Economics-2ndEdition (2004)- South-Western  Publishers.

2. Beard, Jennifer. The political economy of desire: international law, development and the nation state. New York: Routledge-Cavendish, 2006. Print.

3. Watson, Alison M S. Introduction to International Political Economy.2004. Print.

4. Goddard C Roe. International Political Economy: State Market Relations in a changing global order. New Delhi: Viva Books, 2005, Print.

5. Goddard Roe.C. International Political Economy. New Delhi: Viva Books Private Limited. 2005. Print.

6. Carbaugh, Robert J. International Economics, Thomson, South- Western Publishers

7. Sridharan, E. International Relations Theory and South Asia: Security, Political

Economy, Domestic Politics, Identities, and Images. Oxford: Oxford University, 2011.

Print.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Mankiw,G–Principles of Economics-2ndEdition (2004)- South-Western  Publishers.

2. Beard, Jennifer. The political economy of desire: international law, development and the nation state. New York: Routledge-Cavendish, 2006. Print.

3. Watson, Alison M S. Introduction to International Political Economy.2004. Print.

4. Goddard C Roe. International Political Economy: State Market Relations in a changing global order. New Delhi: Viva Books, 2005, Print.

5. Goddard Roe.C. International Political Economy. New Delhi: Viva Books Private Limited. 2005. Print.

6. Carbaugh, Robert J. International Economics, Thomson, South- Western Publishers

7. Sridharan, E. International Relations Theory and South Asia: Security, Political Economy, Domestic Politics, Identities, and Images. Oxford: Oxford University, 2011. Print.

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

1.     CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%

2.     CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

3.     CIA III – Research Topic – 10%

4.     Attendance – 05%

 

5.     End Semester Examination – 50% 

MAIS232 - US AND LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The course provides a firm foundation to comprehend the overarching role of US and Latin America in the world affairs.

 

Knowledge

Students will be able to acquire deep knowledge on nature and historical evolution of the foreign policy of US and contemporary relevance of Latin America. They would understand the rationale behind the foreign policy decision making process every country adopts. The learn important foreign policy choices these countries have taken at different stages to promote their national interest.

Skill

Students will be able to critically analyse foreign policy problems in a dynamic manner. They would be able to interpret theoretically of foreign policy decisions being implemented by these countries. Students would acquire the ability to write essays and policy briefs on major developments in foreign policy of the three countries.  

Aptitude

Possess discipline-relevant professional skills, knowledge and competencies. They articulate complex ideas with respect to the needs and abilities of diverse audiences. They engage with the society through writings in popular media and scholarly journals.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demostrate an understanding of the trajectory of American foreign relations

CO2: Examine the causes of America's rise to power and and it?s foreign policy making vis-à-vis global issues and challenges.

CO3: Identify and examine the issues faced by major regional powers in the Latin American region.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
US Foreign Policy
 

Evolution of US Foreign Policy- Munroe Doctrine, Neutrality, Exceptionalism, World War I & II

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Cold War and its Impact
 

 

US and the Cold War:  Marshall Plan, Truman Doctrine, Korean War, Vietnam War, Cuban Missile Crisis, Nuclear competition, Arms race and Détente.

US Foreign Policy during 1980s. End of the cold war and US’ unipolarity

New Frontiers of American Foreign Policy in the post cold war era-  Global War on Terror, Clinton, Bush, Obama and Trump administrations

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Foreign Policy of Brazil and Argentina
 

Foundations of Brazil’s Foreign Policy, Brazil’s role in Latin American politics, Brazil US relations

 

Foundations of Argentina’s Foreign Policy, Argentina’s  role in Latin American politics, Argentina-US relations

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bruce Jentleson, American Foreign Policy: The Dynamics of Choice in the 21st Century.

Walter Russell Mead, Special Providence: American Foreign Policy and How It Changed the World. London: Routledge, 2002.

Stewart Patrick and Shepherd Foreman, Multilateralism and U.S. Foreign Policy: Ambivalent Engagement, Colorado: Lynne Rienner, 2002.

Robert J. Pauly Jr., U.S. Foreign Policy and the Persian Gulf: Safeguarding American Interest through Selective Multilateralism, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing House, 2005.

Joyce P. Kaufman, A Concise History of U.S. Foreign Policy, Oxford: Rowman and Littlefield,2006. Robert J. Art. and Seyom Brown, U.S. Foreign Policy: The Search for a New Role, Michigan:University of Michigan Press, 2008.

Marian Doris Irish and Elke Frank, U.S. Foreign Policy: Context, Conduct, Content, Michigan:University of Michigan Press, 2006.

Fausto Boris, A Concise History of Brazil. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

Chacel, Julian M., Pamela S. Falk and David V. Fleisacher, eds., Brazil’s Economic and Political Future. Boulder: Westview Press, 1988.

Child, Jack, Geopolitics and Conflict in South America: Quarrels Among Neighbors. New York:Praeger, 1985.

Child, Jack, Antarctica and South American Geopolitics: Frozen Lebensraum. New York:Praeger, 1988.

Carranza, Mario Esteban, South American Free Trade Area Or Free Trade Area of the Americas? Open Regionalism and the Future of Regional Economic Integration in SouthAmerica. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000.

Leslie Bethall, ed., Brazil: Empire to Republic, 1822-1930. Cambridge: Cambridge UniversityPress, 1989.

Becker, Bertha K. and Claudio A.G. Elgar, Brazil: A New Regional Power in the WorldEconomy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

Roett, Riordan, Brazil: Politics of a Patrimonial Society. New York: Praeger Special Studies.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bruce Jentleson, American Foreign Policy: The Dynamics of Choice in the 21st Century.

John Ikenberry, American Foreign Policy: Theoretical Essays. 5th Edition.

James McCormick, American Foreign Policy and Process. Peacock Publishers, 1998.

Walter Russell Mead, Special Providence: American Foreign Policy and How It Changed the World. London: Routledge, 2002.

Stewart Patrick and Shepherd Foreman, Multilateralism and U.S. Foreign Policy: AmbivalentEngagement, Colorado: Lynne Rienner, 2002.

Robert J. Pauly Jr., U.S. Foreign Policy and the Persian Gulf: Safeguarding American Interestthrough Selective Multilateralism, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing House, 2005.

Joyce P. Kaufman, A Concise History of U.S. Foreign Policy, Oxford: Rowman and Littlefield,2006. Robert J. Art. and Seyom Brown, U.S. Foreign Policy: The Search for a New Role, Michigan:University of Michigan Press, 2008.

Marian Doris Irish and Elke Frank, U.S. Foreign Policy: Context, Conduct, Content, Michigan:University of Michigan Press, 2006.

H. Jon Rosenbaum,  ‘Brazil among the Nations’,  International Journal, Vol. 24, No. 3 (Summer, 1969), pp. 529-544

Jose Honorio Rodrigues,  ‘The Foundations of Brazil's Foreign Policy Author(s): Source:  International Affairs ,Vol. 38, No. 3 (Jul. , 1962), pp. 324-33

Jânio Quadros,  ‘Brazil's New Foreign Policy’, Foreign Affairs, Vol. 40, No. 1 (Oct., 1961), pp. 19-27

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

1.     CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%

2.     CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

3.     CIA III – Research Topic – 10%

4.     Attendance – 05%

 

5.     End Semester Examination – 50% 

MAIS233 - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

  • To familiarize students with the basic concepts and approaches to the study of research methodology.
  • To acquaint students with the basics of research methods, techniques, and approaches and to assist in the accomplishment of exploratory as well as result oriented research studies.
  • To help students to identify the research problem and start asking the right questions with a goal of improving their ability to make a logical argument. 
  • To assist students to learn various research techniques (qualitative and quantitative).
  • To train students in the process of writing various academic and popular writings.
  • To sensitise students of research ethics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: To Illustrate familiarity with the basic concepts and approaches to the study of research methodology. To Infer the basics of research methods, techniques, and approaches that can assist in carrying out research.

CO2: Identify research problems and start asking the right questions with the goal of improving their ability to make a logical argument. Identify and review the relevant literature. Display various research techniques (qualitative and quantitative) based on the topic. Display skills in the process of writing various academic and popular writings.

CO3: Identify and adopt integrity and ethics while carrying out research. Inculcate inquisitive and innovative nature that can result in fruitful research and learning.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Foundations of Research
 

  •  Human Inquiry and Science
  • Paradigms, Theory, and Social Research
  • The Ethics and Politics of Social Research
  •  Characteristics of scientific method

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Problem Identification & Formulation
 

  • Explanation and Causation
  • Research Question 
  • Literature Review
  • Hypothesis:  Importance, logic, and testing

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Research Techniques
 

  • Qualitative and quantitative research
  • Policy oriented, problem specific research in IR.
  • Experimental and Formal Research Methods
  • Case studies and comparative research
  •  Content analysis and historical analysis
  •  Direct observation, field studies and archival research
  •  Questionnaire, interviewing and Survey
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Research Design and Report
 

  • Analyzing primary and secondary documents
  • Data presentation and preliminary analysis, interpretation of data
  • Research Design and writing the report
  • Organizing and Mapping Arguments
  • Presenting the Material: citation, references, notes

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Approaches and Theories
 
  • Institutional and Organizational Theories
  • Introduction to  study of Karl Popper, Paul Feyerband and Imre Lakotas
  • The English School, Critical Theory:
  • Frankfurt School and Marxist Approach
  •  Normative and Postmodernist Approaches
Text Books And Reference Books:

Ahuja, Ram. Research Method, Rawat Publication, New Delhi, 2001

Art, Robert J. and Jervis, Robert International Politics: Enduring Concepts and Contemporary Issues, Longman, 2010

Dhiman, AK and  SC Sinha. Research Methodology, Ess Ess Publication, New Delhi, 2002

Fowler, Flyod J. (Jr). Survey Research Methods, Sage, Beverley Hills, 1984.

Gerring, John 2004. “What is a Case Study and What is it Good for?”American Political Science Review 98, pp. 341-354

 

Lantis, Jeffrey S, Lynn M. Kuzma and John Boeher, eds. The New International Studies Classroom: Active Teaching, Active Learning, Lynne Rienner,Publishers, Boulder,2000.

Misra, Rabi  N and Sharma, R. P. Research Methodology and Analysis, Discovery Publishing, New Delhi, 2006

Morgan, David L. Integrating Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: A Pragmatic Approach, Sage, New Delhi, 2014

Paul, K. Hatt and William J. Goode. Methods in Social Research, McGrawHill-Koga-Kausha, Tokyo, 1982

Phophalia, AK.  Modern Research Methodology: New Trends and Techniques, Paradise Publishing, 2010

Silverman, David (Ed). Qualitative Research: Theory, Method and Practice, Sage, New Delhi, 2004

 

Sprinz, Detlef F. and Wolinsky, Yael, Cases, Numbers, Models: International Relations Research Methods

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ahuja, Ram. Research Method, Rawat Publication, New Delhi, 2001

Art, Robert J. and Jervis, Robert International Politics: Enduring Concepts and Contemporary Issues, Longman, 2010

Dhiman, AK and  SC Sinha. Research Methodology, Ess Ess Publication, New Delhi, 2002

Fowler, Flyod J. (Jr). Survey Research Methods, Sage, Beverley Hills, 1984.

Gerring, John 2004. “What is a Case Study and What is it Good for?”American Political Science Review 98, pp. 341-354

 

Lantis, Jeffrey S, Lynn M. Kuzma and John Boeher, eds. The New International Studies Classroom: Active Teaching, Active Learning, Lynne Rienner,Publishers, Boulder,2000.

Misra, Rabi  N and Sharma, R. P. Research Methodology and Analysis, Discovery Publishing, New Delhi, 2006

Morgan, David L. Integrating Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: A Pragmatic Approach, Sage, New Delhi, 2014

Paul, K. Hatt and William J. Goode. Methods in Social Research, McGrawHill-Koga-Kausha, Tokyo, 1982

Phophalia, AK.  Modern Research Methodology: New Trends and Techniques, Paradise Publishing, 2010

Silverman, David (Ed). Qualitative Research: Theory, Method and Practice, Sage, New Delhi, 2004

 

Sprinz, Detlef F. and Wolinsky, Yael, Cases, Numbers, Models: International Relations Research Methods

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

CIA III – Research Topic – 10%

 Attendance – 05%

End Semester Examination – 50%

TOTAL 100%

MAIS234 - SOUTH ASIA (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

South Asia is home to the world’s most populous nation states, characterized by religious diversity and one of the fastest-growing regional economies. The vast peninsula is situated at the crossroads of West Asia and East Asia, and dominates the shipping lanes of the Indian Ocean. As international attention shifts to Asia, the states of South Asia are expected to play a more prominent role in shaping the affairs of this huge continent.

 

This paper provides a foundation to understand the dynamics of this crucial region and offers students the opportunity to concentrate on a part of the world whose importance in international affairs is increasingly recognized by the policy and corporate communities. It includes studying land use systems, political ecology, utilization of and access to natural resources, health issues, food security, ethnic conflicts, wars and migration studies. To achieve a comprehensive understanding of human-environment interactions at the interface between local and global processes, it gives an insight into the central dilemmas of modern politics, economic development and social change present in the region.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Develop a thorough understanding of culture, history, polity and economy of South Asia

CO 2: acquire a balanced, multi-disciplinary understanding of the contemporary issues in the region of South Asia

CO 3: Demonstrate the skills to analyze the significance of South Asian region in world affairs

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Physical and Human Geography of South Asia
 

Geology, Landforms, Climate,Settlement, Population, Historical Geography

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
South Asian Regional Identity: Composition, aspiration and Constraints
 
  • South Asian civilization
  • Evolution of power, authority and institutions,
  • Ethnicity and Identity.
  • Culture and Identity in Modern South Asia 1800-2000
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Government and politics of South Asia
 

Governance: State Formation, Political Elite, Insurgency and Terrorism, Civil War, Militarization: Civil-Military Relations, Introduction of Nuclear Weapons, Territorial Disputes: Role of Super Powers:  Political, Economic, Military, Social Dimensions   

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Foreign Policy of South Asian countries - Inter-regional conflicts and subsequent relations
 

a. Kashmir

b. Rann of Kutch

c. Farakka

d. Ethnic conflicts

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Regionalism
 

South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation, creation and evolution, trade flows and treaties, barriers to intra-regional trade, challenges and opportunities

Text Books And Reference Books:

1)      South Asia’s Geography of Conflict (August 2010), Robert D. Kaplan

2)      South Asia:  Political and Economic Region, DrNitasha Malhotra, Kamala Nehru College, University of  Delhi

3)       South Asia in a Globalising World: A Reconstructed Regional Geography, 2002, Prentice- Hall, Bradnock, RW & Williams, G

4)      The Changing Map of Asia: A Political Geography, 2007, East, W Gordon

5)      Countries in Transition :A Brief Review of the Emerging Political Economy of Bangladesh, Bhutan, the Maldives, and Nepal, South Asia Occasional Paper Series 3, Asian Development Bank, Manila    

6)      Foreign Assistance and its Impact on Civil-Military Relations: A Case Study of Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal (Thesis) by Bobby Chand, March 2014 , Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, US

7)      Government and Politics in South Asia, Boulder, Col.: Baxter, C., Kennedy, C., Malik, Y., &Oberst, R. (2002)  Westview Press.

8) Mutual Suspicions, Murthy, Padmaja,   (2000) Knowledge World, NewDelhi

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Basham, Arthur L. 1954. The Wonder That Was India; a Survey of the Culture of the Indian SubContinent Before the Coming of the Muslims. London: Sidgwick and Jackson.

 

Chandra, Bipan. 1989. India's Struggle for Independence. New York: Penguin Books.

 

 Keay, John. 2000. India: A History. London: Harper Collins.

 

Sarkar, Sumit. 1989. Modern India, 1885-1947. New York: Macmillan Press.

 

 Wolpert, Stanley A. 2004. A New History of India. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

 

 

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

MAIS241A - FRENCH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Description – Comment vont les affaires? is a method meant for adult beginners. Conceived purely for the Business world, it exposes the student who will be working in the industry to all the situations he is likely to come across. From receiving a client at the airport to checking into a hotel, serving as a guide at places of touristic interest and giving information etc. it covers all the aspects so essential to the industry requirements. 

Course Objectives

·         To enhance linguistic competencies and sharpen written and oral communicative skills

·         To ask and quote prices, describe and categorize

·         To express opinion, to negotiate

·         To indicate time

·         To draft commercial letters

·         To give orders and instructions

Course Outcome

CO1: Enhancement of linguistic competencies and written and oral communicative skills.

CO2: The ability to engage in official conversations, indicate time, draft commercial letters and give directives

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
How much does it cost?
 

-          Professional life – Computer equipment, corporate purchases, clothes shopping,

car rentals, breakdowns, repairs and technical problems, department stores and

gas stations, invoices, taxes

-          Communication – Asking and quoting prices, describing and categorising,

-          giving appreciation, making objections, advising, proposing

-          Grammar – Adverbs, adjectives -place, feminine and plural, interrogation with

subject inversion, negation, colours, verbs in ‘dre’ ‘to be able+ infinitive

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Enjoy your meal
 

-          Professional life – Market, competition, at the restaurant (business meals and

outings with friends), gastronomy

-          Communication – Expressing obligation, ordering drinks, expressing opinion,

arguing, convincing, negotiating

-          Grammar – Possessives, comparison, frequency, negation with ‘never’, imperative

must + infinitive

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Travelling
 

-          Professional life – Professional travels, reserving a flight ticket, SNCF, travel

Agencies and tourist information bureaus, weekend tourism, regions of France,

Touristic and cultural attractions, air traffic 

-          Communication – Asking and seeking to know, proposing, indicating date, time

and the moment

-          Grammar – Revision of ‘It is’ and ‘there is’, time, day, evening, interrogation, construction with infinitive, ‘to come’, immediate future and recent past

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Lodging
 

-          Professional life – Professional travel, reserving a hotel room, house-rooms and

Furniture, hotels and location, habitats in different regions of France, hotels

-          Communication – Expressing finality, opposing, being indignant

-          Grammar – Comparatives, superlatives, aim, opposition and cause, verb ‘to know’

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Outing
 

-          Professional life - Professional travel: subscription settling bills, money and checks

City taxis, outings and shows

-          Communication – Requesting to do and not to do, making assumptions, exclaiming,

drafting commercial letters

-          Grammar – Restriction, negation, imperative negative, simple future, conditional

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
What mail is there?
 

-          Professional life – Handling mails, letters and fax, errors and excuses, post cards

Greeting cards, festivals and celebrations, holidays in France

-          Communication – Giving orders and instructions, excusing oneself, formal letters

-          Grammar – the use of ‘each’, indefinite pronouns, imperative, simple past tense

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Course Text : Gruneberg, Anne ; Béatrice Tauzin. Comment vont les affaires ? Cours de français professionnel pour débutants. Paris : Hachette, 2000.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      French websites like Bonjour de France, FluentU French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Quiz /Assignment / Role play

10%

 

CIA 2 – Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Research topic  / Viva

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

MAIS241B - CHINESE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Semester 2 Chinese course will be a continuation of the previous course to help students consolidate the basics and further develop their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills and prepare for HSK (level 2), an international standardized exam conducted by Confucius Institute Headquarters(Hanban, a public institution) in affiliation with the Government of China.

Course Outcome

CO1: The learners will have a good grasp of basic Chinese and will be able to communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct and simple exchange of information on familiar and routine matters.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
What?s your plan for today?
 

Time and daily activities

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Are you busy this Sunday?
 

discussing activities and planning outings

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
I eat at the school canteen
 

(discussing different meals

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
What would you like, tea or coffee?
 

discussing preferences and hobbies

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Can college students have part time jobs
 

communicating the need, ability, capacity, possibility and impossibility

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
I bought a sweater
 

 discussing the  intensity/ degree of something, communicating the continuity and sequence of actions

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Revision
 

Revision exercises for all the concepts learnt

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
I have moved to a new place
 

 communicating the completion or the change of a situation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
HSK2 vocabulary
 

introduction of the HSK2 vocabulary and syntax

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
HSK2 practice
 

practice tests to prepare for HSK2

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
HSK2
 

-introduction to the examination procedure and pattern

Text Books And Reference Books:

FaZhan Hanyu (Developing Chinese Vol.1)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

the additional sheets

- the HSK vocabulary and grammmar

- mock tests

 

Evaluation Pattern

-CIA1(20 marks)

- Midterm exam (50 marks)

- CIA3 (20 marks)

- Endsemester exam (100 marks)

MAIS291 - INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The goal of this course is to help the students develop a theoretical understanding of international organizations (IOs) and the global problems they attempt to address. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to articulate the leading explanations within political science for why IOs exist, controversies surrounding IOs in the context of international relations theory, why they are thought to help solve global problems, and the major challenges IOs face in meeting their objectives.

Course Outcome

CO1: To give an introduction to the conceptual and theoretical aspects of International Organization.

CO2: To discusse the historical evolution of international organizations

CO3: To familiarize students with the structure of United Nations and global financial institution.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Definition, Characteristics and Classification of international organizations, Theories of International Organizations

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
HISTORICAL PROGRESSION OF IO'S
 

Origins of International Institutions; Treaty of Westphalia, Congress of Vienna, League of Nations, Evolution of Bretton wood Institutions.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
UNITED NATIONS INSTITUTIONS and WORLD
 

United Nations, Principle structures of United Nations, Reform of United Nation.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Regional Organizations: Beyond the Nation-State
 

EU, BRICS, SCO, GCC, SAARC ASEAN, BIMSTEC.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Foreign Aid and Development