CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

School of Sciences

Syllabus for
Master of Science (Chemistry)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MCH111 MATHEMATICS FOR CHEMISTS Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
MCH112 GENERAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
MCH131 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY - I Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH132 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY - I Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH133 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY - I Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH134 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH151 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I Core Courses 6 3 100
MCH152 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I Core Courses 6 3 100
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAC252 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS Core Courses 6 3 100
MCH211 COMPUTERS FOR CHEMISTS Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
MCH212 SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATIONS: WRITING AND PRESENTATIONS Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 25
MCH231 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY - II Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH232 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY - II Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH233 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY - II Core Courses 4 04 100
MCH234 SPECTROSCOPY - I Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH251 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II Core Courses 6 3 100
MCH252 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I Core Courses 6 3 100
MOC252 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II Core Courses 6 3 100
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAC332 ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAC333 ADVANCED ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES Core Courses 4 4 100
MAC334 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAC351 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I Core Courses 6 3 100
MAC352 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICAL - II Core Courses 6 3 100
MCH311 CHALLENGES IN INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
MCH331 SPECTROSCOPY - II Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH332 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY-III Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH333 SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH334 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY-II Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH351 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS-I Core Courses 6 3 100
MCH352 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II Core Courses 6 3 100
MOC332 ORGANIC SYNTHESIS - I Core Courses 4 4 100
MOC333 CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS AND HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS Core Courses 4 4 100
MOC334 ORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS Core Courses 4 4 100
MOC351 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I Core Courses 6 3 100
MOC352 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II Core Courses 6 3 100
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAC432 INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAC433 CHEMISTRY OF MATERIALS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAC434 SPECTROSCOPY - III Core Courses 4 4 100
MAC451 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - III Core Courses 3 3 100
MAC481 COMPREHENSIVE VIVA VOCE Core Courses 4 4 100
MAC482 PROJECT Core Courses 6 4 100
MCH431 INORGANIC REACTION MECHANISM AND ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMISTRY Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH432 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY-IV Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH433 FRONTIERS IN APPLIED CHEMISTRY Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH434 BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF CHEMISTRY Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH451 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS-II Core Courses 6 3 100
MCH481 COMPREHENSIVE VIVA VOCE Core Courses 4 4 100
MCH482 PROJECT Core Courses 6 4 100
MOC432 STEREOCHEMISTRY AND RETROSYNTHETIC ANALYSIS Core Courses 4 4 100
MOC433 ORGANIC SYNTHESIS - II Core Courses 4 4 100
MOC434 MEDICINAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Core Courses 4 4 100
MOC451 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS-III Core Courses 3 3 100
MOC481 COMPREHENSIVE VIVA VOCE Core Courses 4 4 100
MOC482 PROJECT Core Courses 6 4 100
    

    

Department Overview:

The Department of Chemistry of CHRIST (Deemed to be University) aims at developing young talent for the chemical industry and academia. The curriculum is developed in such a way that the students are able to venture into allied fields too. The aim of the department through the programmes it offers is to provide “a cut above the rest” man-power to the ever growing demands of the industry and to prepare students for higher studies and research. The interactive method of teaching at CHRIST (Deemed to be University) is to bring about attitudinal changes to future professionals of the industry.

Equal importance is given to practical and theoretical aspects apart from experiential and digital modes of learning. Industrial projects form an integral part of the curriculum. Along with the syllabus, the U

Mission Statement:

Vision

  

Introduction to Program:

The two-year (four semesters) Masters Programme in Chemistry (specialization in Organic Chemistry) aims at providing a comprehensive study of various branches of chemistry to develop a critical and analytical approach to all major areas of the subject. The various courses in the first two semesters are presented in such a way as to give the students a harmonious view of the subject followed by the specialization courses of organic chemistry along with an industrial/institutional project in the third semester. Equal importance is given to both theory and practicals. The teaching methodology includes lectures, demonstration, seminars, projects and presentations.

 

Program Objective:

Students opting for post graduate studies in chemistry will acquire academic excellence in chemistry. This brings about a transformation in their thinking and instills confidence in facing the challenges of the modern times, scientifically.

 Programme Outcome (PO) for Master of Science

On successful completion of the MSc Programme students will be able to.

PO1. Engage in continuous reflective learning in the context of technology and scientific advancement.

PO2. Identify need and scope of interdisciplinary research.

PO3. Enhance research culture and uphold the scientific integrity and objectivity.

PO4. Understand professional, ethical and social responsibility.

PO5. Understand the importance and judicious use of technology for the sustainable growth of mankind in synergy with nature.

Programme Specific Outcome (PSO) for Master of Science in Organic Chemistry

On successful completion of the MSc Organic Chemistry program students will be able to

 

PSO1. Appreciate and relate the concepts and knowledge of organic chemistry applicable to the understanding of nature and life.

 

PSO2. Interpret and explain the behaviors of organic compounds based on the understanding of their chemistry.

 

PSO3. Apply the knowledge of organic chemistry to solve problems in academia, industry and environmental protection.

PSO4. Discover intricate details, driving forces, and mechanical pathways of organic processes.

 

PSO5. Perceive, deduce, and justify the chemical properties of organic molecules from their chemical structure and reactivity.

 

PSO6. Design, synthesize, and characterize organic compounds needed for industrial, health care, environmental, and academic requirements.

 

 

 

 

Assesment Pattern

Assessment Pattern for Theory

 

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

 

 

Examination And Assesments

Continuous internal assessment (CIA) forms 50% and the end semester examination forms the other 50% of the marks in both theory and practical. CIA marks are awarded based on their performance in assignments (written material to be submitted and valued), mid-semester test (MST), and class assignments (Quiz, presentations, problem solving etc.) The mid-semester examination and the end semester examination for each theory course will be for two and three hours duration respectively. The CIA for practical sessions is done on a day to day basis depending on their performance in the pre-lab, the conduct of the experiment, and presentation of lab reports. Only those students who qualify with minimum required attendance and CIA will be allowed to appear for the end semester examination.

 

MCH111 - MATHEMATICS FOR CHEMISTS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This introductory course on mathematics intends to provide the students the required mathematical support to understand the various topics in chemistry.

Course Outcome

On completion of this course the students will be able to demonstrate

CO1-A thorough understanding about the basic concepts of calculus, vector algebra, series and sequences and probability and being able to solve problems based on them.

CO2-Ability to recall and explain the mathematical concepts such as calculus, vector algebra, series and sequences and probability.

CO3-Ability to apply the concepts of mathematics in physical chemistry and spectroscopy.

CO4-Ability to choose the appropriate knowledge while carrying out independent research in physical sciences.

(Addresses GA- 2, GA-3, GA-4, GA-5, GA-6 )

 

Level of knowledge: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Vectors and Matrix Algebra
 

Vectors: Vectors, dot, cross and triple products etc. The gradient, divergence and curl. Vector calculus, gauss theorem, divergence theorem etc.

Matrix Algebra: Addition and multiplication: inverse, adjoint and transpose of matrices, special matrices (symmetric, skew symmetric, hermitian, skew hermitian, unit, diagonal, unitary etc) and their properties. Matrix equations: Homogenous, non homogenous*, linear equations and conditions for the solution, linear dependence and independence.

Introduction to vector spaces, matrix eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, determinants (examples from Huckel theory).

Introduction to tensors: polarizability and magnetic susceptibility as examples.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Differential Calculus
 

Functions, continuity and differentiability, rules for differentiation, applications of differential calculus including maxima and minima ( examples related to maximally populated rotational energy levels, Bohr’s radius and most probable velocity from maxwell’s distribution etc), exact and inexact differentials with their applications to thermodynamic properties.

Integral calculus, basic rules for integration*, integration by parts, partial fraction and substitution. Reduction formulae, applications of integral calculus.

Functions of several variables, partial differentiation, coordinate transformations (eg Cartesian to spherical polar), curve sketching.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Elementary differential equations
 

Variables- separable and exact first order differential equations, homogenous, exact and linear equations. Applications to chemical kinetics, secular equilibria, quantum chemistry etc. Solutions of differential equations by the power series method, fourier series, solutions of harmonic oscillator and legendre equation etc, spherical harmonics, second order differential equations and their solutions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Sequences and Series
 

Different types of series, Fourier series, theory behind Fourier transform: Legendre polynomials, Lagranche undetermined multipliers, Stirling approximation.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Theory of probability
 

Permutations and combinations, probability and probability theorems, probability curves, average, root mean square and most probable errors, examples from the kinetic theory of gases etc, curve fitting (including least squares fit etc) with a general polynomial fit.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]    Erich Steiner, The chemistry maths book, 2nd Edition, Oxford university press, 2008.

[2]    Doggett and Sutcliffe, Mathematics for chemistry, Longman group Ltd, 1995.

[3]    Farrington Daniels, Mathematical preparation for physical Chemistry, Mc Graw Hill,  2003.

[4]    D.M.Hirst, Chemical mathematics, Longman.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]    J. R. Barrante, Applied mathematics for physical chemistry, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2008.

[2]    Peter Tebbutt, Basic mathematics for chemists, 2nd Edition, John Wiley and Sons, 1998.

Evaluation Pattern

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test (Internal)

[MST]

1 Hrs (25 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Internal

2 Hrs (50 marks)

50

Total

                                  Final score is calculated out of 50

100

 

MCH112 - GENERAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course on general research methodology intends to make the students get an idea about research, its methods and its significance.

 

Course Outcome

On completion of this course the students will be able to demonstrate

 

CO1-Ability to recall and explain the terminologies in research methodology

CO2-Ability to apply the concepts of research methodology in writing literature review, manuscripts and  research proposal 

CO3-A comprehensive understanding about different statistical tools employed in research.

CO4-Ability to choose the appropriate research methods and carrying out independent research

(Addresses GA- 2, GA-3, GA-4, GA-5, GA-6 and GA-7)

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Research Methodology
 

Introduction - meaning of research - objectives of research - motivation in research– research :a way of examining your practice-types of research - research approaches - significance of research -research methods versus methodology - research and scientific method- importance of knowing how research is done - research processes - criteria of good research -defining research problem - selecting the problem - necessity of defining the problem- techniques involved in defining a problem - research design - meaning of research design - need for research design - features of good design - different research designs - basic principles of experimental design.

Originality in Research: Resources for research - research skills - time management - role of supervisor and scholar - interaction with subject experts.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Review of Literature
 

Source for literature: books -journals – proceedings - thesis and dissertations. On-line Searching: Database – SciFinder – Scopus - Science Direct - Searching research articles.

i) Computer Searches of Literature: ASAP Alerts, CA Alerts, ChemPort, Patent search 
     including STN International; Google Scholar

ii)Steps to publishing scientific articles in journals: types of publications-
    communications, articles, reviews; where to publish, specific format required for
    submission, organization of the material, letters to editor and emails.

iii) Writing a review article- Significance of review of literature, steps of searching the literature, Identification of topic, organization of the content, Conclusion and future pespectives, Language focus

Relationship of review of literature to theory, research, education and practice.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Writing a research proposal
 

Contents of a research proposal, introduction, The problem - relevance to the society, objectives, study design, methods, analysis, structure of the report, limitations, ethical issues.

 

Course enrichment activities

Assignment on literature review

Assignment on project proposal writing

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] C. R. Kothari, Research Methodology Methods and Techniques, 2nd. ed. New Delhi: New
Age International Publishers, 2009.

[2]  R. Panneerselvam, Research Methodology, New Delhi: PHI, 2005.

[3]  P. Oliver, Writing Your Thesis, New Delhi:Vistaar Publications, 2004.

[4]        J. W. Creswell, Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods
Approaches
, 3nd. ed. Sage Publications, 2008.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Kumar, Research Methodology: A Step by Step Guide for Beginners, 2nd. ed. Indian: PE,
2005.

[2] B. C. Nakra and K. K. Chaudhry, Instrumentation, Measurement and Analysis, 2nd. ed.
New Delhi: TMH publishing Co. Ltd., 2005.

[3] Gregory, Ethics in Research, Continuum, 2005.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test (Internal)

[MST]

1 Hrs (25 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Internal

2 Hrs (50 marks)

50

Total

                                  Final score is calculated out of 50

100

 

MCH131 - INORGANIC CHEMISTRY - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This introductory course on inorganic chemistry intends to make the students understand the basic concepts like chemical bonding, chemistry of elements and nuclear chemistry.

Course Outcome

On completion of this course the students will be able to demonstrate

 

CO1-Ability to recall and explain the concepts of chemical bonding.

CO2-Ability to apply the theories of chemical bonding in predicting the structures of compounds having classical and non-classical bonds and correlating with their properties

CO3-A comprehensive understanding about chemistry of acid- base systems, bioinorganic compounds and nuclear chemistry.

CO4-Ability to evaluate the role of metal ions in biological systems.

(Addresses GA- 1, GA-2, GA-3 and GA-7)

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Chemical Bonding
 

Prelearning: Periodic properties of elements, Types of bonds: ionic, covalent, and coordinate bonds

Slater’s rules and effective nuclear charge, Octet rule, VSEPR model, shapes of molecules; concepts of resonance and hybridization, Electronegativity, Scales of electronegativity (Pauling’s scale, Alred and Rochow’s approach, Mulliken’s approach), Fajans’ rules, coordinate bond, multicentre bond, quadruple bond, synergic bond, Agostic interaction with examples, Hydrogen bond – types and detection; Intermolecular force, metallic bond, Semiconductors and superconductors. 

MO Theory: σ, π and δ molecular orbitals, MOs of diatomic molecules- NO, CO, triatomic molecules- H2O, NO2, BeH2; Walsh diagram, Molecular term symbols of H2 to O2.

Ionic bond, Lattice energy, Born-Lande equation (derivation), radius–ratio rules, structures of simple solids-NaCl, CsCl, ZnS, CaF2, TiO2, unit cell and number of ions in sphalerite, Spinels and Perovskites. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Chemistry of the main group
 

Pre learning: Periodicity and general trends in properties

Allotropes of carbon and their applications-Structure and property correlation in  diamond and graphite, carbon nanotubes and fullerens-types and synthesis, Polymorphism of phosphorous and sulphur; properties, structure and bonding in boranes, Styx number-formulae for arriving at the number of 2-centre and 3-centre bonds in boranes, Wade’s rule, carboranes and their classification, Properties, structure and bonding in borazines, phosphazenes, Xenon  compounds, Interhalogen compounds, Silicates–Principles of silicate structures,classification and structures, isomorphous replacement, pyroxenes, silicate glasses, borosilicate glass, silica gel, zeolites and molecular sieves*, polyhalides. Oxyacids of nitrogen, phosphorous, sulphur and halogens**

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Solvent systems
 

Bronsted and Lewis concept of acids and bases, Luxflood acid base theory, HSAB concept, acid – base concept in non- aqueous media, levelling effect, super acids, non-aqueous solvents-NH3, sulphuric acid, glacial acetic acid and anhydrous HF.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Bio-inorganic Chemistry
 

Role of metal ions in biological systems-essential and trace metal, ion transport across membranes, sodium potassium pump*, ionophores, oxygen transport mechanism- haemoglobin and myoglobin*, metalloenzymes-carboxypeptidase, carbonic anhydrase, alcohol dehydrogenase, vitamin B12, metal complexes in medicine (cisplatin).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Nuclear chemistry
 

Sub-atomic particles and their properties, nuclear stability (Binding Energy, Packing fraction, Meson theory, Characteristics of nuclear forces), Liquid drop model and shell model of the nucleus. 

 

Course enrichment activities

CSIR Based problems will be solved in the class

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  F. A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson, Advanced inorganic chemistry, 6th ed., John Wiley & sons, 2009.

[2]  J. E. Huheey, E. A. Keiter and R. L. Keiter, Inorganic Chemistry – Principles of Structure and Reactivity, 4th ed., Pearson Education Asia Pvt. Ltd., 2000.

[3]  D. F. Shriver, P. W. Atkins and C.H. Langford. Inorganic chemistry, 3rd ed., ELBS: Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1999. 

[4] N. N. Greenwood and A. E. Earnshaw, Chemistry of the elementals, 2nd ed., Butterworth
Heinemann, 1997.

[5] D. M. P. Mingos, Essential Trends in Inorganic chemistry, Oxford Univ. Press, 1998.

[6] J. D. Lee, Concise inorganic chemistry, 5th ed., Chapman & Hall: Hong Kong,Reprint 2009.

[7] K. F. Purcell and J C. Kotz, Inorganic Chemistry, Indian reprint, Cengage Learning India  Pvt Ltd, 2010.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] G. L. Miessler and D.A. Tarr, Inorganic Chemistry, 4th ed., Prentice Hall, 2010.

[2] K. Hussain Reddy, Bioinorganic Chemistry, New age International publishers, Reprint
2007.

[3] Asim K. Das, Bioinorganic Chemistry, 1st ed., Books and Allied P ltd., 2010.

[4] Bertini, H.B. Gray, S.J. Lippard and J.S.Valentine, Bioinorganic Chemistry, Viva Books,
1998.

[5] H. J. Arnikar, Essentials of nuclear chemistry, 4th ed., NAIL Pub, 1995.

[6] William M Portfield, Inorganic Chemistry-An Unified Approach (Indian Reprint) Academic
Press, 2005.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

 

MCH132 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course on organic chemistry intends to make the students understand the basic concepts like nature of bonding in organic molecules, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, free radical chemistry, natural products and vitamins.

 

Course Outcome

On completion of this course the students will have

CO1 Ability to recall and explain the consequence of various electronic effects and nature of bonding on properties of organic molecules.

CO2 Ability to analyze, predict, and then explain the reaction mechanisms in organic reactions.

CO3 Ability to recall and explain concepts in bonding in organic molecules, free radical chemistry, stereochemistry, carbohydrates, vitamins and polymers.

CO4 A comprehensive understanding about bonding in organic molecules, reaction mechanisms, free radical chemistry stereochemistry, carbohydrates, vitamins and polymers, and apply the same in reactions.

CO5 Ability to explain the significance and applications of bonding in organic molecules, reaction mechanisms, free radical chemistry, stereochemistry, carbohydrates, vitamins and polymers, and substantiate with suitable examples.

(Addresses GA- 1, GA-2, GA-7 and GA-8)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Nature of bonding in organic molecules
 

Hybridization, Delocalized chemical bonding*: Conjugation, cross conjugation, resonance, hyper conjugation. Field effects, steric effects and their influence on the properties of organic molecules (dipole moment, acidity, etc). Consequences of delocalized chemical bonding on bond length, bond angle, dipole moment, acidity and basicity. Tautomerism.  Huckel’s rule. Aromaticity in benzenoid, meso-ionic compounds and non-benzenoid compounds- Introduction, preparation of cyclopropenyl cations, cyclobutadienyl dications, cyclopentadienyl anions, cycloheptatrienium cation, cyclooctatatraenyl dication, Frost diagrams, [10], [14], and [18]-annulenes, azulene. Energy level of πmolecular orbital, antiaromaticity, homo-aromaticity.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Reaction mechanisms: Structure and Reactivity
 

Types of reactions and mechanisms.  Potential energy diagrams, transition states and intermediates, Thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, Hammond’s postulate, Curtin-Hammett principle, methods of determining mechanisms, isotope effects, hard and soft acids and bases.

Generation, structure, stability and reactivity of carbocations*, carbanions, carbenes and nitrenes.

Effect of structure on reactivity –The Hammett equation and linear free energy relationship, substituents and reaction constants, Taft equation.

Nucleophilic substitution reaction at a saturated carbon: SN1, SN2 and SNi mechanisms, Effect of substrate structure, attacking nucleophile, and leaving groups, Neighbouring group participation, ambident nucleophiles and substrates.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Free-radical chemistry
 

Generation of free radicals: Thermal homolysis of per esters and azo compounds,       photochemical methods. Hydrogen abstraction, chain process. Stability: Steric, resonance and hypercojugative effects. Structure and stereochemistry of free radicals. Free radical reactions: Addition, elimination, rearrangement and electron transfer reactions. Use of free radicals in organic synthesis. SET reactions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Stereochemistry
 

Fischer, Newman, Sawhorse and flying wedge projections and their interconversions. Optical isomerism: Elements of symmetry and chirality. D-L and R-S conventions. Cram’s and Prelog’s rules. Felkin-anh model. Conformational analysis of acyclic compounds: ethane, propane, n-butane and  1,2–disubstituted ethanes.  Cyclic alkanes: cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclohexanes (monomethyl, iso-propyl, tert-butyl and di-substituted cyclohexanes e.g., dialkyl, dihalo, diols), and cycloheptane. Conformations of fused and bridged ring systems. Prochirality: Enantiotropic and disastereotropic groups and faces. 

Geometrical isomerism: cis–trans and E-Z conventions.  Methods of interconversion of E and Z isomers. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Carbohydrates
 

Determination of configuration of the monosaccharide. Conformational analysis of glucose and galactose*.   Structural elucidation of sucrose and maltose. Synthesis of aldonic, uronic, aldaric acids and alditols.  Structures of gentiobiose, meliobiose, and chitin.  Photosynthesis of carbohydrates.  Industrial and biological importance of glycosides.       

                                                                                   

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Vitamins
 

Biological importance and synthesis of Vitamins A*, Vit. B1 (thiamine), Vit. B6 (pyridoxine), Vit. C, Vitamin E (α-tocopherol), Vit. H (biotin), Vit. K1, K2, folic acid, pantothenic acid and riboflavin. 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Polymers
 

Conducting Polymers: Synthesis, properties and applications of polyaniline, polypyrrole, polythiophene and poly(p-phenylenevinylene).

Bio-polymers: Basic concepts of biopolymers/biodegradable polymers (polylacetic acid, poly caprolactone, starch, etc.), hydrogels, smart hydrogels and their applications, Recycling.

 

Course enrichment activities

 

CSIR Based problems will be solved in the class

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] B. Smith Michael and March Jerry, March's Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reactions, Mechanisms, and Structure, 6th ed., Wiley publications, January 2007.

[2] A. Carey Francis and J. Sundberg Richard, Advanced Organic Chemistry, 5th ed., Springer, 2007.

[3] Stykes Peter, A guide book to mechanism in organic chemistry, Orient Longman Limited, 2000.

[4]  C. K. Ingold, Structure and mechanism of organic chemistry, Cornell University  Press, 1999.

[5]  H. Pine Stanley, Organic Chemistry, Tata McGraw-Hill Education, 2007.

[6]  R. T. Morrison and  R. N. Boyd, Organic chemistry, 7th-Edition,Fifth impression, Prentice-Hall, 2014.

[7]  R. O. C. Norman and J. M. Coxon, Principles of organic synthesis, Blackie Academic and Professional, 1996.

[8] P. Y. Bruice, Organic Chemisty,7th edition,10th impression, Pearson Education, 2019.

[9] D. Nasipuri, Stereochemistry of organic compounds, New Delhi, New-Age International, 1999.

[10] E. L. Eliel, S. H. Wilen and L. N. Mander, Stereochemistry of carbon compounds, John Wiley 2011.

[11] György Inzelt, Conducting Polymers A New Era in Electrochemistry,Springer, 2008.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] T. W. Graham Solomons and Craig Fryhle, Organic Chemistry, 8th ed., Wiley publication, 2004.

[2] I. L. Finar, Stereochemistry and the Chemistry the Natural Products, 5th ed., Pearson Education Ltd., 2009.

[3]  N. Selwad and  H-D Jakubke, Peptides: Chemistry and Biology, Wiley – VCH, 2002.

[4]  J. Apsimon, Total synthesis of natural products,  Vol. I – Vol. VI, NY,  John Wiley, 2007.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous internal assessment (CIA) forms 50% and the end semester examination forms the other 50% of the marks in both theory and practical. CIA marks are awarded based on their performance in assignments (written material to be submitted and valued), mid-semester test (MST), and class assignments (Quiz, presentations, problem solving etc.) The mid-semester examination and the end semester examination for each theory course will be for two and three hours duration respectively. The CIA for practical sessions is done on a day to day basis depending on their performance in the pre-lab, the conduct of the experiment, and presentation of lab reports. Only those students who qualify with minimum required attendance and CIA will be allowed to appear for the end semester examination.

Assessment Pattern for Theory

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

 

 

MCH133 - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course on physical chemistry intends to make the students aware of topics like quantum mechanics, chemical dynamics and surface chemistry.

 

Course Outcome

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to

 

CO1: Choose and apply the appropriate concepts of quantum mechanics and chemical kinetics to solve problems based on these topics.

CO2: Explain the concepts and illustrate their significance involved in quantum mechanics, chemical kinetics, surface chemistry and nanomaterials.

CO3: Describe the theories and their shortcomings in the above topics after critically evaluating the complexities involved in them.

CO4: Evaluate existing research on the topics, identify gaps where new knowledge is needed, and design a study that might begin to fill these gaps.

(Addresses GA- 1, GA-2, GA-3)

 

Level of knowledge: Basic/Conceptual

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:32
Quantum mechanics
 

a. Formulation of quantum mechanics: Wave particle duality of material particles, de Broglie’s relation, Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle. Equations of wave motion: Progressive and stationary waves, wave equation for a stationary wave (stretched string).

       Schrödinger wave equation. (Time–independent and time-dependent Schrödinger equations).  Eigen function and eigen value.  Physical interpretation of wave function. Concept of operators. Linear, Laplacian, Hamiltonian, commutator and Hermitian operators. Angular momentum operators and their properties. Normalization, orthogonality and orthonormality of wave functions. Postulates of quantum mechanics. Average (expectation) values Solutions of Schrödinger equation for a free particle, particle in a one-dimensional box and three-dimensional box. Quantum mechanical degeneracy, tunneling (no derivation).   (12 Hrs)                                                                                                                 

b. Application of Schrödinger equation to harmonic oscillator and rigid rotator. Eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of angular momentum. Ladder operator method for angular momentum. Schrödinger equation to hydrogen atom in spherical polar coordinates. Solution of Φ, θ equations and statement of solution of R equation. Total wave function of hydrogen atom. Quantum numbers and their characteristics. List of wave functions for initial states of hydrogen-like atoms. Diagrams of radial and angular wave functions. Radial and angular distribution functions and their significance.  Electron spin (Stern – Gerlach experiment) *, spin orbital, antisymmetry and Pauli’s exclusion principle, Slater determinants. Coupling of angular momenta. Russell-Saunders and JJ-coupling, term symbols.  Spin-orbit interaction and explanation of term multiplicities (Na-D doublet), Zeeman effect*.  (12 Hrs)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

c.          Approximate methods: Need for approximate methods. Perturbation method. Application to electron in a box under the influence of an electric field. Application to He atom. Variation theorem- Statement and proof.  Application of variation method to particle in a one dimensional box, linear oscillator and He atom. Slater type orbitals, expressions for Slater orbitals for 1s, 2s, 3s, 2p and 3d electrons (no derivation).  Slater’s rules for calculation of effective nuclear charge.  STOs, for He, C and N. SCF method for many electron atoms. HOMO theory for conjugated systems. Application to ethylene, allyl anion, allyl cation, allyl free radical, butadiene and benzene .  (8 Hrs)                                                                                

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Chemical Dynamics
 

a. Macroscopic and microscopic kinetics: Empirical rate laws and temperature dependence, Methods of determination of order and rate laws, Collision theory of reaction rates-limitations. Transition state theory. Comparison of collision theory and transition state theory, reaction between ions: influence of ionic strength-primary and secondary kinetic salt effects. Diffusion and activation controlled reactions in solution. Thermodynamical formulation of reaction rates (Wyne-Jones and Eyring treatment).   (3 Hrs)

              

 b. Steady state kinetics: Theories of unimolecular reactions, Lindemann theory, RRKM theory (qualitative treatment only), Chain reactions-general characteristics, chain length and chain inhibition (Self study). Mechanisms of thermal reactions (hydrogen-chlorine, pyrolysis of acetaldehyde, decomposition of ethane) and photochemical reactions (H2 - Br2 and H2–Cl2). Comparative study of thermal and photochemical hydrogen-halogen reactions.   (5 Hrs)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

c. Theory of homogeneous catalysis, Enzyme catalysis-comparison of enzyme with chemical  catalysts, mechanism (lock and key theory), Henri-Michaelis-Menten treatment, significance of Michaelis constant, Lineweaver-Burk plot. Effects of concentration, pH, temperature, activators   and inhibitors on enzyme activity (Self Study).  Theory of homogeneous catalysis. Add the following: Acid-base catalysis: specific and general catalysis, Skrabal diagram, Bronsted catalysis law, prototropic and protolytic mechanism with examples, acidity function.   (6 Hrs)                                                                                                                                               

d.     Kinetics of fast reactions-study of fast reactions by stopped flow technique, relaxation method, flash photolysis and NMR method.   (3 Hrs) 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Surface Chemistry
 

Effect of temperature on adsorption, mechanical adsorption, Types of adsorption isotherms, BET and Gibbs adsorption isotherms, estimation of surface area using BET equation, vapour pressure of droplets (Kelvin equation). Application of photoelectron spectroscopy*, ESCA and Auger spectroscopy for the study of surfaces. Mechanisms of heterogeneous catalysis: unimolecular and bimolecular surface reactions, mechanisms of catalyzed reactions like ammonia synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch reactions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:3
Chemistry of nanomaterials
 

Introduction, Synthesis – laser ablation chemical vapour transport method (CVT) and sol gel method, synthesis of metal oxides and its composite nanoparticles by solvo thermal and hydrothermal method.

 

Course Enrichment Activities

 

CSIR-based problems will be solved in the class.

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] P. W. Atkins and Julio de Paula, Physical chemistry, 7th ed. New Delhi: ELBS, 2002.

[2] Mc Quarrie and Simon, Physical chemistry: A molecular approach, New Delhi: Viva, 2011.

[3] A. K. Chandra, Introduction to quantum chemistry, New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill, 2001.

[4] Levine, N. Ira, Quantum chemistry, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2009.

[5] R. K. Prasad, Quantum chemistry. 2nded. New Delhi: New Age International, 2011.

[6] R. K. Prasad, Quantum chemistry through problems and solutions, 1sted. New Delhi: New Age International, 2009.

[7] K. J. Laidler, Chemical Kinetics, 2nd ed. Inc. New York: McGraw Hill, 2012.

[8] J. E. House and M. C. Brown, Principles of Chemical Kinetics, 2nd ed. Elsevier India Pvt.ltd,  2012.

[9] C. Kalidas, Chemical Kinetic Methods, 1st ed. New Delhi: New Age International Publisher, 2010.

[10] J. Kuriakose and J Rajaraman. Kinetics and mechanism of chemical transformation. New Delhi: McMillan Publishers, 2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] A.W. Adamson, Physical chemistry of surfaces, New York: Interscience Publisher Inc.,        2011.

[2] C. N. R. Rao, Nanoscience and technology, Navakarnataka Publications Pvt Ltd, 2011.

[3] A. K. Bandyopadyay, Nanomaterials, NAI publishers, 2010.

[4] K. Krishna Reddy and Balakrishna Rao, Nanotechnology Nanostructures & Nanomaterials,Campus Books International, 2007.

[5] Thomas Engel and Philip Reid, Physical Chemistry, Pearson Education, Inc, 2006.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

MCH134 - ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course on analytical chemistry intends to enlighten the students on topics like separation techniques, optical methods of chemical analysis, electro analytical techniques and thermal methods of analysis. This course will help students to understand the basic routine experiments in all the industrial and research labs.

Course Outcome

After completing the course students will be able to

CO1.: Understand and recall the importance as well the basic principle of the analytical techniques

CO2: Choose an appropriate analytical method by using principles of experimental design and data analysis

CO3: Develop and optimise the conditions of the analytical tool for a particular sample.

CO4: Apply the knowledge of the Material safety data sheet in the lab.

CO5: Gain a comprehensive understanding of modern chemical instrumentation, common separation techniques, NAA activation and isotopic dilution analyses.

(GA1, GA2 GA3, GA7)

 

Level of knowledge: Basic/Analytical

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Analytical chemistry
 

Classifications of analytical methods, factors influencing choice of analytical method, toxic chemicals sampling and handling hazards, material safety data sheets. Miniaturization of analytical methods and its significance in modern chemical analysis. Replicate analysis, reliability of analytical data, mean and median & range precision and accuracy, methods of expressing precision and accuracy: deviation, mean deviation, relative mean deviation, and standard deviation. Detection limits, Quantitation limits, Errors, absolute error, relative error. Determinate errors, classification of determinate errors and their minimization, indeterminate error and normal frequency distribution curve.

Statistical treatment of analytical data: confidence limits, students T-test, rejection of data: Q test, 4d rule and 2.5d rule. Graphical representation of results, methods of averages, methods of least squares. Significant figures, Reporting of analytical data.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Separation Techniques
 

Solvent extraction, efficiency, selectivity*, Nernst distribution law, distribution coefficient, derivation for the most efficient extraction, applications and numerical problems. Methods- batch and continuous extraction of liquids, continuous solid- liquid extraction (Soxhlet extraction of phytochemicals).

Chromatography – classification, mechanisms-adsorption, partition. ion exchange, size exclusion and affinity chromatography.  retention in chromatography, Plate theory, Retention parameters, efficiency, resolution, Peak asymmetry- Gaussian and skew profile, tailing and fronting, peak broadening- van Demeter equation.

Principle and applications of thin layer chromatography.

Gas chromatography- Theory and instrumentation detectors used in GC, temperature programming in GC, Applications, High performance liquid chromatography-Theory and instrumentation. Bonded stationary phases, Normal phase and reversed phase liquid chromatography, Detectors in HPLC: absorbance detector, refractive index detector, electrochemical detector, HPLC-MS, Chiral stationary phases

 Theory and application of Electrophoresis.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Optical methods of chemical analysis
 

Pre-learning topics: Beer-Lambert’s law and derivation. Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter, Beer-Lambert’s law, verification, deviations, molar extinction coefficient

choice of solvents, photometric titrations, Single beam and double beam UV-Vis spectrophotometer.

Atomic absorption spectroscopy- instrumentation and application in quantitative and qualitative analysis, Numerical problems.

Principle, instrumentation and applications of fluorimetry, turbidimetry and nephelometry.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Electro analytical methods
 

Potentiometry- electrode systems, potentiometric titrations- acid- base, precipitation and redox titrations.

Polarography* and Voltammetry- three electrode system, role of supporting electrolyte, Diffusion currents, deposition potential, residual current half-wave potentials, characteristics of the DME.

Amperometric titration and applications of polarography.  Electrogravimetry, Coulometry, Coulometry at constant potential, applications.    Conductometric titrations- ionic conductances, acid-base titrations. Chemically modified electrodes and their Quantitative applications.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Thermal methods of analysis
 

Theory, instrumentation and applications of TGA, DTA and DSC.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Radio analytical methods
 

Pre Learning topics: working principles of scintillation counter, GM counter.

Radioactivity, ionization, germanium detectors, working principles of scintillation counter, GM counter, Radio analytical methods- neutron activation analysis, isotopic dilution analysis, radiotracer technique. Applications of all these techniques use of radioactive isotopes in solving analytical and physico chemical problems*.

 

 

Course enrichment Activities:

Preparation of material safety data sheet for selected compounds, which will help in understanding the sense of safety and practice in the experimental lab. 

 

This activity is in alignment with our graduate attributed GA7 and GA 8

 

 

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  G.D. Christian, Analytical chemistry, 6th ed.  John – Wiley and Sons Inc, 2004.

[2]  Douglas A. Skoog and F. James Holler, Timothy A. Nieman, Principles of instrumental analysis, 1998.

[3]  H.H. Willard, L.L. Merrit, J.A. Dean and F.A. Settle, Instrumental methods of analysis, CBS Publishers: 7th ed., 1986.

[4] A.J. Bard and I.R. Faulkner, Electrochemical methods, 2nd ed., Wiley: New York, 2000.

[5] Wilson Keith and John Walker, Principles and techniques of Biochemistry and Molecular biology, 6th ed., Cambridge, 2005.

[6] Skoog, West, Holler and Crouch. Fundamentals of analytical chemistry, 8th ed. Thomson Asia Pvt. Ltd, 2004.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  F. W. Fifield and D. Kealy, Principles and practice of Analytical Chemistry, 5th ed. 1991.

[2] S. M. Khopkar, Basic concepts of analytical chemistry, 3ed ed., New age international,  2009.

[3] Robert A. Meyers, Encyclopedia of Analytical Chemistry: Applications, Theory, and  Instrumentation, 15 volume Set, Wiley, 2011.

[4]   Robinsen, Undergraduate instrumental analysis 6th ed, Taylor and francies, 2004

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

MCH151 - INORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This practical course on inorganic chemistry intends to provide the students scientific skills in qualitative and preparative techniques.  

Course Outcome

On completion of this course the students will be able to demonstrate

 

CO1-Ability to recall and explain the principles involved in qualitative analysis.

CO2-Ability to apply the concepts like common ion effect and solubility product in analysing anions and cations.

CO3-Ability to choose a specific method for quantitative analysis of complexes

CO4-Ability to analyse common cations, anions, less familiar cations and metal complexes in different samples

(Addresses GA- 1, GA-2, GA-3 and GA-7)

 

Level of Knowledge: Basic/Analytical

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:90
A. Semi-micro qualitative analysis
 

Semi-micro qualitative analysis of mixtures containing i) two common cations ii) two anions out of which one is interfering anion and iii) one of the following less familiar elements: W, Mo, Ce, Th, Zr, V, U and Li.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:90
B. Preparation and quantitative analysis of inorganic complexes
 

1.       Ferrous oxalate

2.       Potassium trioxalatoferrate(III)trihydrate.

3.       Hexammine cobalt(III)chloride.

4.       Cis and trans-potassium dioxalatodiaquochromate(III).

5.       Preparation of a coordination complex using Schiff base ligand and characterization by UV and IR spectroscopic methods.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]   J. Bassett., G.H. Jeffery and J. Mendham, Vogel's Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (7th  Edition) Revised by G Svehla, Longman, ELBS, 2001.

 [2]   J. Bassett, G.H. Jeffery and J. Mendham, and R.C. Denny, Vogel’s text book of qualitative  chemical analysis, 5th ed., Longman Scientific and Technical, 1999.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]    V.V. Ramanujam.  Inorganic semi micro qualitative analysis. The National Pub. Co: 1972.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Duration

Points

Marks

CIA 1

Mid-SemTest [MST]*

3 Hrs

50

20

CIA 2

Class work, PreLab assignments

---

40

20

CIA 3

Record book

---

20

10

ESE

(Two examiners)

6 Hrs

50

50

 Total

100

MCH152 - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This practical course on physical chemistry is aimed to develop experimental skills in students in topics like chemical kinetics, colorimetry, cryoscopy and adsorption. This course imparts team building, imagination leads to new explanations and new solutions.

Course Outcome

On completion of this course the students will be able to demonstrate

CO1-Ability to recall and explain the principles involved in chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics.

CO2-Ability to apply and reinforce the concepts learnt in chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics through experiments.

CO3-Ability to validate theoretical knowledge gained in the above topics through experimental verification.

CO4-Ability to design new experiments to improve the existing protocols in practical experiments.

(Addresses GA- 1, GA-2, GA-3 and GA-7)

 

Level of Knowledge: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:90
Chemical Kinetics
 

 

1.       Determination of the velocity constant, catalytic coefficient, temperature coefficient, t1/2 and energy of activation for the acid hydrolysis of methyl acetate.

2.       Evaluation of Arrhenius parameters for the reaction between potassium persulphate and potassium iodide (1st order).

3.       Velocity constant for the saponification of ethyl acetate.

4.       Determination of the order of reaction between hydrogen peroxide and potassium iodide (clock reaction).

5.       Determination of relative strength of acids (HCl) by ester hydrolysis.

6.       Determination of equilibrium constant for acid hydrolysis of an ester.

7.       Determination of equilibrium constant of keto-enol tautomerism. (ethyl acetoacetate and acetoyl acetone, AcAc)

8.       Determination of Transport number of Ag+ and NO3 by Hittorf’s method. 

9.       Study the primary salt effect on the kinetics of ionic reactions and test the Bronsted relationship (iodide ion is oxidized by persulphate ion).

 

Colorimetry 

1.       Test for the validity of Beer–Lambert Law and determination of the unknown concentration of a solution. Calculation of molar extinction coefficient.

2.       Titration of ferrous ammonium sulfate with potassium permanganate colorimetrically.

3.       Simultaneous estimation of Mn and Cr in a solution of KMnO4 and K2Cr2O7.

4.       Kinetics of reaction between K2S2O8 – KI Colorimetrically. 

5.       Determination of concentration of Fe by spectrophotometric titration using EDTA.

 

Cryoscopy 

6.       Determination of molecular weight of a solute by cryoscopy.

7.       Determination of degree of dissociation of an electrolyte and association of benzoic acid in benzene.

 

Partial Molal Volume

8.       Determination of partial molal volume of ethanol by reciprocal density method.

9.       Determination of PMV by apparent molar volume method, NaCI – H2O system.

Phase diagram

10.   Construction of phase diagram of a two–component system and determination of eutectic temperature and eutectic composition.

11.   Construction of phase diagram of a three–component system and etermination of the % of the components in the given mixture.

Adsorption 

12.   Adsorption of oxalic on charcoal. Verification of Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

Polymers

13.   Determination of molecular weight of a polymer material by viscosity method.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  Levitt, Findlay’s practical physical chemistry. Longman’s London: 1966.

[2]  Shoemaker and Garland. Experiments in physical chemistry. McGraw Hill International edn: 1996.

[3]  J. B. Yadav, Advanced practical chemistry, Krishna Prakashan Media Pvt. Ltd, Meerut, 2010. 

[4]  Wilson, Newcomb and others, Experimental physical chemistry.  Pergamon Press: New York, 1962.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]        A.M. James and D.E. Pritchard. Practical physical chemistry, Longman Group Ltd: 1968.

[2]        V.D. Athawale and Parul mathur. Experimental physical chemistry. New Age International: New Delhi, 2001. 

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Duration

Points

Marks

CIA 1

Mid-SemTest [MST]*

3 Hrs

50

20

CIA 2

Class work, PreLab assignments

---

40

20

CIA 3

Record book

---

20

10

ESE

(Two examiners)

6 Hrs

50

50

 Total

100

MAC252 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This practical course on organic chemistry intends to provide the students scientific skills in qualitative and preparative techniques.

Course Outcome

 

 

 

Course Learning Outcome

 

In this practical course the students will acquire practical skills in organic qualitative analysis

 

After completion of the course the students will demonstrate

 

 

 

CO1: understanding of the concepts and the chemistry behind the separation of organic mixtures and preparation of organic compounds

 

CO2: Ability to apply the skills in the preparation of organic compounds

 

CO3: Ability to analyze and interpret the given organic mixture

 

CO4: Ability to use the chemicals economically

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:54
Qualitative Analysis
 

Separation of a binary mixture of organic compounds and identification of the separated components by systematic qualitative organic analysis. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:36
Preparations
 

Preparation of the following compounds: 

1. p- Nitro aniline from acetanilide.

2. p-Bromoaniline from acetanilide.

3. m-Nitro benzoic acid from methyl benzoate.

4. Anthranilic acid from phthalic anhydride.

5. Cannizarro reaction: Benzaldehyde 

6. Friedel - Crafts reaction

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

[1]           B. B. Dey, M. V. Sitaraman and T. R. Govindachar, Laboratory manual of organic chemistry, New Delhi: Allied Publishers, 1996.

[2]        A. I. Vogel, Text book of practical organic chemistry, 1996.

[3]        V. K. Ahluwalia and R. Aggarwal, Comprehensive practical organic chemistry: Preparations and Quantitative analysis, University press, 2004.

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  B. B. Dey, M. V. Sitaraman and T. R. Govindachar, Laboratory manual of organic chemistry, New Delhi: Allied Publishers, 1996.

[2]  A. I. Vogel, Text book of practical organic chemistry, 1996.

[3]  V. K. Ahluwalia and R. Aggarwal, Comprehensive practical organic chemistry: Preparations and Quantitative analysis, University press, 2004.

 

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Duration

Points

Marks

CIA 1

Mid-SemTest [MST]*

3 Hrs

50

20

CIA 2

Class work, PreLab assignments

---

40

20

CIA 3

Record book

---

20

10

ESE

(Two examiners)

6 Hrs

50

50

 Total

100

MCH211 - COMPUTERS FOR CHEMISTS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description

This course on computers for chemists intends to provide the students the required knowledge and skill to use the various tools and software packages which are helpful in studying the various topics in chemistry.

 

Course Outcome

Course Outcome

On completion of this course the students will be able to

CO1: Recall and explain, the basic concepts of quantum mechanical computational methods

CO2:Understand, explain density functional theory methods to solve problems in chemistry.

CO3-Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding about different computational chemistry software employed in research.

CO4- Choose the appropriate tools and carrying out independent research 

 

(Addresses GA- 2, GA-3, GA-4, GA-5, GA-6 and GA-7)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Theoretical background to Computational Chemistry
 

Introduction to computational chemistry: As a tool and its scope.

Non-quantum mechanical computational methods - Molecular mechanics: Force fields - bond stretching, angle bending, torsional terms, non-bonded interactions, electrostatic interactions and the corresponding mathematical expressions. Commonly used force fields - AMBER and CHARMM.

 Semi empirical methods: Huckels and extended Huckel methods. Strengths and weaknesses. PPP, ZDO, NDDO, INDO, MNDO (AM1, PM3) and CNDO approach.(Mentioning only).

 Quantum mechanical computational methods - Abinitio methods:

Hatree Fock Methods: Introduction to SCF. RHF, ROHF and URH. (no need for derivation). Wave functions for open shell state, Slater determinants, Roothan concept. Electron correlation and Post Hatree Fock Methods- Configruation interaction, coupled cluster methods, Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, quadratic configuration interaction, composite methods like G2, G3, CBS.

Basis functions-Slater type orbitals (STO) and Gaussian type orbitals (GTO) basiis sets: minimal, split valence, polarized and diffuse basis sets, contracted basis sets, Pople’s style basis sets and their nomenclature, Dunning’s basis sets, Aldrich’s basis sets.

Density functional theory methods (DFT) –Basics- Hohenberg-Kohn theorems, Exchange correlation functional Kohn-Sham orbitals, Local density approximation. Generalized gradient approximation, hybrid and double hybrid functionals. (Rigorous mathematical treatment not needed).

 Types of calculations- single point, geometry optimization, frequency. Potential energy surface-stationary point, saddle point or transition state, local and global minima.

Introduction to molecular dynamics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Computational Chemistry software
 

Introduction to the following methods with practical experience.

Introduction of the following packages

Visualization software: Avogadro, Chimera, UCLA

Molecular mechanics and docking: AMBER/TINKER Autodock and Autodock Vina, HEX

Semi empirical studies: Gaussian / MOPAC

Abinitio and DFT studies: GAMESS/ Gaussian / ORCA

Molecular dynamics: GROMACS (optional)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Chemoinformatics
 

Data mining and analysis, QSAR, QSPR, Data analysis, introduction to machine learning and artificial intelligence in Chemistry

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. EG Lewars, Computational Chemistry: Introduction to the Theory and Applications of Molecular and Quantum Mechanics, Springer

2. F Jensen, Introduction to Computational Chemistry, Wiley

3. Ramesh Kumari and Narosa. Computers and their applications to Chemistry, Narosa, 2nd Edition, Reprint 2011.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. EG Lewars, Computational Chemistry: Introduction to the Theory and Applications of Molecular and Quantum Mechanics, Springer

2. F Jensen, Introduction to Computational Chemistry, Wiley

3. Ramesh Kumari and Narosa. Computers and their applications to Chemistry, Narosa, 2nd Edition, Reprint 2011.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test (Internal)

[MST]

1 Hrs (25 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Internal

2 Hrs (50 marks)

50

Total

100

MCH212 - SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATIONS: WRITING AND PRESENTATIONS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:25
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course gives an overview of different aspects of scientific communication like written communication, poster and oral presentations and writing grant proposals.

Course Outcome

Course Learning Outcome

On completion of this course the students will be able to demonstrate

CO1-Ability to recall and explain the terminologies in scientific communications

CO2-Ability to apply the concepts of scientific communications in writing scientific literature and research proposal

CO3-A comprehensive understanding about written and oral scientific communications.

CO4-Ability to apply the concepts of scientific communications in preparing posters, writing manuscripts and grant proposals

(Addresses GA- 2, GA-3, GA-4, GA-5, and GA-6).

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:1
Introduction
 

Research – What is it? How do researchers communicate? Types of scientific communication.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:1
Scientific Literature
 

Searching the scientific literature using Pubmed, Web of ScienceUsing online search

engines. What is a refereed journal? Plagiarism and how to avoid it. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:1
Beginning to Write
 

Establishing the constraints-Organizing the writing-Preparing outlines Standard formats and types of scientific papers.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:1
Content
 

Creating a literature review-Preparing other sections of a research report (abstract, introduction, materials and methods, results and discussion, conclusions)-Including and summarizing research data. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:1
Style and grammar
 

Scientific writing style-First-person vs. Third-person; Passive vs. active voice Avoiding excessive wording-Grammar-Avoiding misuse of words.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:1
Reference citations
 

How to use references- Within the text - How to make lists of references. 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:1
Revising
 

Dealing with revisions-Accepting criticism-Making sense of reviewers’ comments. Making the changes-What to do if you don’t agree with reviewers’ comments.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:2
Other communication
 

Other types of scientific writing- research proposals- creating a fact sheet/bulletin articles for popular press- memos, letters and emails.

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:1
Poster Presentations
 

Organization and formats for posters Using Microsoft PowerPoint.

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:2
Oral Presentations
 

Designing and preparing slides for an oral presentation- Importing tables, charts and graphs from Excel- Optimizing pictures for use in presentations-Using visual aids without overdoing it.

Unit-11
Teaching Hours:1
Mock Oral Presentation
 

Team assignment for oral presentation of a scientific paper.

Unit-12
Teaching Hours:2
Mock Grant Proposal
 

Individual assignment for grant proposal writing.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]. L. Bowater and K. Yeoman, Science communication: a practical guide for scientists, Wiley, 2013.

[2]. J. E. Harmon and A. G. Gross, The Craft of Scientific Communication, Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing, 2010.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]. M. Bucchi and B. Trench, Handbook of Public Communication on Science and Technology. (Eds.)  London: Routledge, 2008.

[2]. Cheng, M. Claessens, T. Gascoigne, J. Metcalfe, B. Schiele, and S. Shi, Communicating Science in Social Contexts: New models, New Practices, (eds.), New York: Springer, 2008. 

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test (Internal)

[MST]

1 Hrs (25 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

 

 

 

 

Total

50

MCH231 - INORGANIC CHEMISTRY - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course on inorganic chemistry intends to enlighten the students on topics in coordination chemistry like theories of metal ligand bonding, metal-ligand equilibria, electronic and magnetic properties of metal complexes.

 

Course Outcome

On completion of this course the students will be able to demonstrate

CO1-Ability to recall and explain the concepts of metal-ligand bonding and metal-ligand equilibria in solution.

CO2-Ability to apply the theories of metal-ligand bonding in predicting the structures of various complexes and correlating with their properties

CO3-A comprehensive understanding about the electronic spectroscopy of transition metal complexes

CO4-Ability to evaluate the significance of chiral and magnetic properties in metal complexes 

(Addresses GA- 1, GA-2, GA-3 and GA-7)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Metal ? Ligand equilibria in solution
 

Step-wise and overall formation constants and their relationship, trends in step-wise constant, kinetic and thermodynamic stability of metal complexes, factors affecting the stability of metal complexes with reference to the nature of the metal ion and ligand, chelate and macrocylic effects*and their thermodynamic origin, determination of binary formation constants by spectrophotometry, polarography and ion exchange methods.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Metal ? Ligand bonding
 

Crystal field theory*, stereochemistry and splitting of metal d-orbitals in complexes with coordination numbers 3 to 8, structural evidences for CF splitting-hydration, ligation and lattice energies, Spectrochemical series, Factors affecting 10 Dq, Jahn–Teller distortion in metal complexes and metal chelates, Limitations of CFT, evidences for metal–ligand orbital overlap, Nephelauxetic effect and series, ESR, NMR and NQR spectral evidences for M-L covalency. MO theory, 18 e rule, Group theoretical approaches based MO energy level diagrams of H2O, tetrahedral and octahedral complexes (including π-bonding), Structure and bonding of Zeise’s salt.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Structure and bonding
 

Hydride, dihydrogen, simple metal carbonyl, nitrosyl, dinitrogen and tertiary phosphine complexes, stereochemical non-rigidity*, self-assembly in supramolecular chemistry*; stereoisomerism-chirality, optical activity, CD, ORD, cotton effect and magnetic circular dichroism, absolute configurations.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Electronic spectra of transition metal complexes
 

Types of electronic transitions, Spectroscopic ground states, selection rules, term symbols for dn ions, Racah parameters, Orgel, correlation and Tanabe-Sugano diagrams, spectra of 3d metal aqua complexes of trivalent V, Cr, divalent Mn, Co and Ni, [CoCl4]2-; calculation of Dq, B and β and x parameters, charge transfer spectra, spectra of lanthanides and actinides.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Magnetic properties of metal complexes
 

Origin and types of magnetic behaviour- diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferro and antiferromagnetism, magnetic susceptibility and its measurement by the Guoy method, temperature dependence of magnetism– Curie and Curie-Weiss laws, types of paramagnetic behaviour – spin-orbit coupling, magnetic behaviour of lanthanide ions, quenching of orbital contribution and spin only behavior.

Course enrichment activities

CSIR Based problems will be solved in the class

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  F. A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson and P. L. Gaus, Basic inorganic chemistry, 3rd ed., John Wiley
& sons, 1995.

[2]  F. A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson, Advanced inorganic chemistry, 6th ed., John Wiley & sons,
2009.

[3]  J. E. Huheey, E. A. Keiter and R. L. Keiter, Inorganic Chemistry – Principles of Structure
and Reactivity, 4th edition, Pearson Education Asia Pvt. Ltd., 2000.

[4]  D. F. Shriver, P. W. Atkins and C.H. Langford, Inorganic chemistry, 3rd ed., ELBS: Oxford
University Press, Oxford, UK, 1999. .

[5]  N. N. Greenwood and A. E. Earnshaw, Chemistry of the elementals, 2nd ed., Butterworth
Heinemann, 1997.

[6]  D. M. P. Mingos, Essential Trends in Inorganic chemistry, Oxford Univ. Press, 1998.

[7]  J. D. Lee, Concise inorganic chemistry, 5th ed., Chapman&Hall: Hong Kong, Reprint 2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  K. F. Purcell and J. C. Kotz, Inorganic Chemistry, Indian reprint, Cengage Learnining India Pvt Ltd, 2010.

[2]  G. L. Miessler and D. A. Tarr, Inorganic Chemistry, 4th ed., Prentice Hall, 2010.

[3]  D. N. Sathyanarayana, Electronic absorption spectroscopy and related techniques,
Universities Press: 2001.

[4]  William M Portfield, Inorganic Chemistry-An Unified Approach (Indian Reprint) Academic
Press, 2005.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

 

MCH232 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course on organic chemistry intends to make the students understand topics like aromatic substitution, addition, elimination and rearrangement reactions, peptide chemistry and nucleic acids. This course helps the students to develop logical approach to solve problems.

Course Outcome

On completion of this course the students will have

CO1 Ability to analyze and recall the aromatic substitution reactions, addition reactions, elimination reactions, rearrangements, nucleic acids, peptides and synthetic molecular receptors.

CO2 Ability to predict and explain concepts in aromatic substitution reactions, addition reactions, elimination reactions, rearrangements, nucleic acids, peptides and synthetic molecular receptors.

CO3 A comprehensive understanding about aromatic substitution reactions, addition reactions, elimination reactions, rearrangements, nucleic acids, peptides and synthetic molecular receptors.

CO4 Ability to explain the significance and applications of aromatic substitution reactions, addition reactions, elimination reactions, rearrangements, nucleic acids, peptides and synthetic molecular receptors and substantiate with suitable examples.

(Addresses GA- 1, GA-2, GA-6 and GA-8)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:11
Aromatic substitution reactions
 

Electrophilic substitution reactions: The arenium ion mechanism, orientation and reactivity, energy profile diagrams.  The ortho/para ratio, ipso attack, orientation in other ring systems.  Quantitative treatment of reactivity in substrates and electrophiles.  Diazonium coupling, Vilsmeier reaction, Gattermann-Koch reaction. 

Nucleophilic substitution reactions: The SN Ar, SN1, benzyne and SRN1 mechanisms. Reactivity – effect of substrate structure, leaving group and attacking nucleophile. The von Richter, Sommelet-Hauser and Smiles rearrangements.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Addition reactions
 

Addition to carbon multiple bonds: Mechanistic and stereochemical aspects of addition reactions involving electrophiles, nucleophiles and free radicals. Regio, stereo and chemoselectivities.  Orientation and reactivity.  Addition to cyclopropane ring.  Hydrogenation of double and triple bonds, hydrogenation of aromatic rings. Hydroboration, Michael reaction*. 

Addition to carbon-heteroatom multiple bonds: Mechanism of metal hydride reduction of saturated and unsaturated carbonyl compounds, acids, esters and nitriles. Additional of Grignard reagents and organo lithium reagents to carbonyl compounds and unsaturated carbonyl compounds.  Addition of water and formation of acetals, ketals, oximes and hydrazones from carbonyl compounds, Wittig reaction*. Mechanism of condensation reactions involving enolates-Aldol, knoevenagel, Clasisen, Mannich, Benzoin, Perkin and Stobbe reactions*. Ammonolysis of esters, hydrolysis amides. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Elimination reactions
 

The E2, E1 and E1cB mechanisms. Orientation of the double bond.  Reactivity – effects of substrate structure, attacking base, the leaving group and the medium. Mechanism and orientation in pyrolytic elimination.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Rearrangements
 

Introduction to types of rearrangements, Wagner–Meerwein, Pinacol–Pinacolone, Wolff, Beckmann, Hofmann*, Curtius, Lossen and Schmidt rearrangements.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Nucleic acids
 

Introduction, protecting groups for hydroxyl group in sugar, amino group in the base and phosphate functions. Methods of formation of internucleotide bonds: DCC and phosphodiester approaches, phosphoramide method, Solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:14
Peptides
 

Classification and nomenclature. Sanger and Edman methods of sequencing. Cleavage of peptide bond by chemical and enzymatic methods.  Peptide synthesis – Protection of amino group (Boc-, Z- and Fmoc-) and carboxyl group as alkyl and aryl esters.  Use of EDHCl, EEDQ, HOBt and active esters, acid halides, anhydrides in peptide bond formation reactions.  Deprotection and racemization in peptide synthesis. Solution and solid phase techniques.  Synthesis of oxytocin.  Introduction to peptidomimetics. 

Enzymes-enzyme catalyzed organic reactions.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
Synthetic molecular receptors
 

Definition and significance. Structures and function of receptors with molecular clefts. Molecular tweezers*, receptors with multiple hydrogen bonding sites, cyclophanes, calixarenes and cyclodextrins.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  B. Smith Michael and March Jerry, March's Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reactions,
Mechanisms,
and Structure, 6th Edition, Wiely publications, 2007.

[2]A. Carey Francis andSundberg Richard, Advanced Organic Chemistry, 5th ed., Springer,
2007.

[3] Sykes Peter, A guide book to mechanism in organic chemistry, Orient Longman Limited,
2000.

[4] C. K. Ingold, Structure and mechanism of organic chemistry, Cornell University Press,
1999.

[5] T. W. Graham Solomons and Craig Fryhle, Organic Chemistry, 8th Edition, Wiley
 publication 2004.

[6]  H. Pine Stanley , Organic Chemistry, Tata McGraw-Hill Education, 2007.

[7]  R. T. Morrison and R. N Boyd, Organic chemistry, Prentice-Hall, 6th-Edition, 2008.

[8]  R. O. C Norman and  J. M Coxon,  Principles of organic synthesis,  Blackie Academic and
 Professional, 1996.

[9]   M.  Bodansky, Peptides chemistry: A practical text book, NY, Springer-Verlag, 1998.

[10]  N. Selwad and H. D  Jakubke, Peptides: Chemistry and Biology, Wiley – VCH, 2002.

[11] P. Y. Bruice, Organic Chemisty,7th edition,10th impression, Pearson Education, 2019.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  G. C. Barrett and D. T. Elmore, Amino Acids and Peptides, Cambridge University Press,
1998.

[2] Nasipuri, Stereochemistry of organic compounds, New Delhi, New-Age International,
1999.

[3] L. Eliel and L. Norman Allinger, Stereochemistry of carbon compounds vol-VII, John
Wiley 2007.

[4] I. L Finar, Stereochemistry and The Chemistry Natural Products, 5th edition volume-2,
Pearson Education Ltd., 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

 

 

MCH233 - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:04

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This physical chemistry course intends to enlighten the students on topics like classical and statistical thermodynamics and electrochemistry. This course induces to understand the energy concerns.

 

Course Outcome

 

After the completion of the course, students will be able to demonstrate

 

 CO1: A comprehensive understanding of theoretical electrochemistry

 

CO2: Explain the concepts of classical, statistical, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, and different electrode processes

 

CO3: Summarize the concepts of classical, statistical, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, different models of electrical double layers, ionics, and interfaces

 

CO4: Apply knowledge acquired to the solution of problems, and design experimental work in the laboratory

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:29
Statistical thermodynamics-12 Hrs
 

Concepts of distribution, thermodynamic probability and most probable distribution. Distribution laws. Derivation of Maxwell Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac  distribution equations (using Lagrange's method of undetermined multipliers). Comparison of the three statistics. Concept of an ensemble-Canonical, grand canonical and microcanonical ensembles.

Partition functions – translational, rotational, vibrational and electronic partition functions. Calculation of thermodynamic properties in terms of partition functions. Applications of partition functions. 

 

Theory of heat capacity of solids – Einstein’s theory and Debye theory. Application of Fermi-Dirac statistics to metal for the interpretation of electronic heat capacity. Application of Bose-Einstein statistics to helium.  

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:29
Non equilibrium thermodynamics- 6 Hrs
 

Thermodynamics of irreversible processes with simple examples. Criteria for non-equilibrium states. Uncompensated heat and its physical significance. Entropy production- rate of entropy production, entropy production in chemical reactions, the phenomenological relations. The principle of microscopic reversibility, the Onsager reciprocal relations. Thermal osmosis. Thermoelectric phenomena.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:29
Classical thermodynamics-11 Hrs
 

Brief resume of concepts of laws of thermodynamics – free energy, chemical potential and entropies. Partial molar properties – partial molar free energy, partial molar volume, and their significance. Thermodynamics of mixing, Gibbs-Duhem-Margules equation. Determination of these quantities. Concept of fugacity and its determination by graphical method and compressibility factor method.  Non ideal systems–Excess functions for non-ideal solutions. Activity and activity coefficient. Relationship between mole fraction, molality, molarity and activity coefficients*. Determination of activity coefficient by EMF and solubility methods.  Phase rule – Derivation of phase rule from the concept of chemical potential, application of phase rule to three component systems.  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:31
Electrochemistry of solutions-10 Hrs
 

Ionic atmosphere, physical significance of χ (Chi), Debye-Huckel theory to the problem of activity coefficient, Debye Huckel limiting law*, the Huckel and Bronsted equation, qualitative verification of Debye-Huckel equation, Debye-Huckel Onsager conductance equation, Bjerrum theory of ion association-triples ion-conductance minima.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:31
Electrical double layer-8 Hrs
 

Introduction to electrode – electrolyte interface, parallel plate capacitor model of double layer, Diffuse double layer, Stern Theory of double layer, thermodynamics of electrified interfaces, concept of surface excess, determination of charge density on the electrode. Electrocapillary curves- Lipmann equation (derivation). 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:31
Applied Electrochemistry-3 Hrs
 

Conversion and storage of electrochemical energies-Batteries, Primary and secondary fuel cells, Corrosion and prevention*.       

Course enrichment activities

CSIR based problems will be discussed in the class. Structure and working of batteries will be demonstrated.    

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:31
Irreversible electrode process-10 Hrs
 

Irreversible electrode process: polarization and over voltage, types of overvoltages.  Electrolytic polarization, dissolution and deposition potential.  Determination of anode and cathode overpotential, concentration polarization, Variation of current with cell voltage, metal deposition overvoltage, Thickness of the diffusion layer, Derivation of Butler- volmer equation, Exchange current density factors affection exchange current density. Influence of current density, pH, temperature, rate of growth of deposits on over voltage.

Theories of overvoltage: Bubble formation, Combination of atoms, Ion discharge and proton transfer as slow process.*     

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

[1]   J. Rajaraman and J. C. Kuriakose, Kinetics and mechanism of chemical transformation,
 Macmillan Publishers India Ltd, 2000.

[2]    McQuarrie, A. Donald and John D Simon. Molecular thermodynamics. California:
University Science Books 1999.

[3]    S. Glasstone, Thermodynamics for Chemists, New Delhi:  Maurice Press, 2008.

[4]   Rajaraman and Kuriacose, Thermodynamic, East West, 1986.

[5]   M.C. Gupta, Statistical Thermodynamics, Wiley eastern Ltd., 1993.

[6]   N. D. Smith, Elementary Statistical Thermodynamics, N.Y: Plenum press, 1982.

[7]   L.K. Nash, Elements of Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics, Addison-Wiley, 1970.

[8]   Samuel Glasstone. Textbook of Physical Chemistry. 2nd ed. New Delhi: MacMillan Ltd., 1991.

[9]   Samuel Glasstone, An Introduction to Electrochemistry, New Delhi:  East-West edition, 1942. Reprint BiblioBazaar, 2011.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]   D.R. Crow, Principles and Applications of Electrochemistry, 3rd ed. London: Chapman hall, 1988.

[2]   O. M. Bockris, John Reddy and K. N. Amulya, Modern Electrochemisty 2A, Fundamentals of  Electrodics, Springer, New Delhi, 2006.

[3]   O. M. Bockris, John Reddy and K. N. Amulya, Modern Electrochemistry 2B: Electrodics in Chemistry, Springer, New Delhi, 2006.

[4]   O. M. Bockris, John Reddy and K. N. Amulya, Modern Electrochemistry, Springer, New Delhi, 2006.

[5]   Gordon M Barrow, Physical chemistry Tata Mcgraw-hill, New Delhi, special Indian edition 2007.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

MCH234 - SPECTROSCOPY - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This introductory course on spectroscopy intends to make the students get an idea on topics like symmetry and group theory, microwave, infrared, Raman and electronic spectroscopy.  This course intended to serve as a resource to enhance student learning in the field of theoretical spectroscopy, which helps them in their higher education and research career.

 

Course Outcome

Upon completion of the course student will be able to:

CO1:   Recall, explain, and apply the basic concepts of symmetry elements and group theory.

CO2:   Understand, explain and apply the theoretical aspects of different spectroscopy techniques such as rotational, vibrational, Raman, and electronic spectroscopies.

CO3:   Correlate the spectra and the structural characteristics of the compounds.

CO4:   Predict spectroscopic responses based on the the symmetric properties

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Symmetry and Group Theory
 

Symmetry elements and symmetry operations, Definition of group, point groups, cyclic groups, subgroups, symmetry Classes, Simple theorems in group theory. Schöenflies notation, Representations of groups by matrices, Reducible and irreducible representations, Great Orthogonality theorem (without proof) and its applications, derivation of the orthonormalization conditions.       Mulliken symbols for irreducible representations. Construction of character tables and their uses (representation for the Cn, Cnv, Cnh, Dnh etc groups to be worked out). Reducible representation to irreducible representation using reduction formula. Direct products, Applications of group theory to quantum mechanics and spectroscopy.Chemical applications of Group theory for molecular vibrations. Molecular vibration of symmetrical AB2 (bent) molecule, Symmetry of normal modes of ethylene.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Microwave Spectroscopy
 

 Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter, Rotation of molecules, types of rotors, diatomic rigid rotor- rotational energy expression energy level diagram, spectrum of a rigid diatomic rotor, selection rules, expression for the energies of spectral lines, consideration of intensities, effect of isotopic substitution, centrifugal distortion and the spectrum of a non-rigid rotor. Rotational spectra of polyatomic, linear and symmetric top molecules. Applications, Stark effect. Instrumentation*, Quadrupole hyperfine interaction, Detection of Interstellar molecule. 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Infrared Spectroscopy
 

Molecular Vibrations, Simple diatomic harmonic and anharmonic oscillators- vibrational energy expression, energy level diagram. Fundamental and hot transitions, Selection rules, Overtones and combination bands, Fermi resonance. Effect of isotopic substitution*. Vibrational wave functions and their symmetry, selection rules.

Diatomic vibrating rotor, Selection rules, vibration-rotation spectra of diatomic molecules. P, Q and R branchesVibrations of polyatomic molecules: Normal coordinates, vibrational energy levels. Vibration-rotation spectra of polyatomic molecules- parallel- and perpendicular vibrations of linear and symmetric top molecules. Instrumentation- FTIR and sampling techniques.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Raman Spectroscopy
 

Raman Effect: Basic principles, selection rules, polarizability ellipsoids, quantum mechanical theory of the Raman effect, Classical theory of Raman Effect, explanation of Rayleigh and Raman lines based of classical theory. Vibrational Raman spectra, Mutual exclusion principle. Pure rotational Raman spectra of linear and symmetric top molecules. Advantages of Raman spectroscopy*. Structural determination from Raman and IR spectroscopy-AB2 and AB3 molecules. Instrumentation and sampling procedure.  

 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Electronic Spectroscopy
 

Born- Oppenheimer approximation, Electronic transition, vibrational coarse structure, rotational fine structure of electronic transition, Fortrat diagram, Franck-Condon principle, Franck-Condon factor, Dissociation and pre-dissociation. Electronic structure of diatomic molecules- basic results MO theory, potential energy diagrams, term symbols for linear molecules, selection rules, spectra of singlet and triplet molecular hydrogen. Electronic spectra of polyatomic molecules- localized MOs, Decay of excited states, Jablonski diagram, fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopy and non-radiative decay.

Course enrichment activities

 

A demonstration of UV-Vis, IR, and Raman Spectrometers will be organised for the students in batches.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

[1]  F. A. Cotton, Chemical Applications of Group Theory, Wiley Eastern, 1990.

[2]  D. S. Schonland, Molecular Symmetry,Van Nostrand 1965.

[3] C. N. Banwell and E.M. McCash, Fundamentals of Molecular Spectroscopy, TMH Edition, 2012.

[4] G. M. Barrow, Introduction to Molecular Spectroscopy. McGraw Hill, Int. Students Edition. 1988.

[5]  J. D. Graybeal, Molecular Spectroscopy, McGraw Hill Int. Student Edition, 1990.

[6]  M. S. Gopinathan and V Ramakrishnan, Group Theory in Chemistry, Vishal Publishing Co,  2011.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  L. Robert  Carter, Molecular Symmetry & Group Theory, John Wiley & Sons Inc Sea Pte Ltd, 2012.

[2]  K. Veera Reddy, Symmetry and Molecular Spectroscopy, New Age International Publishers, 2012.

[3]  J. M. Hollas, Modern Spectroscopy, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd, 2010.  

[4]  D. N. Sathyanarayana, Vibrational Spectroscopy: Theory and Applications, New Age International Publishers, 2004.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Pattern for Theory

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

 

2 Hrs(50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance(75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

MCH251 - INORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This practical course on inorganic chemistry intends to provide the students scientific skills in quantitative techniques.

 

 

 

Course Outcome

Course Outcome

 

On completion of this course the students will be able to demonstrate

 

CO1-Ability to recall and explain the principles involved in quantitative analysis.

 

CO2-comprehensive understanding of the principles of gravimetric and volumetric methods

 

CO3-Ability to choose a specific method for quantitative analysis different samples

 

CO4-Ability to evaluate the amount of metal ions quantitatively in different samples

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:90
Inorganic Chemistry Practical
 

1.      Gravimetric determination of Fe in an iron ore as Fe2O3.

2.      Volumetric/redox and gravimetric determination of the following mixtures:                   

(a) Copper and nickel (b) Copper and iron (C) Copper and Zinc (d) Nickel and zinc (e) Iron and chromium.

3.      Analysis of alloys: (a) German silver (b) Steel (c) Solder.

4.      Analysis of ores: (a) Haematite, (b) Dolomite, (c) Pyrolusite

5.      Flame photometric determination of Na/K in cement and soil samples.

6.      Estimation of copper/iron by spectrophotometric method.

7.      Determination of ionic nature of coordination complex by ion exchange chromatography and conductivity methods.

8.     Determination of ground state dipole moment of various compounds.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

 

[1]        F. A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson, Advanced inorganic chemistry, 6th ed., John Wiley & sons,
2009.

 

[2]        J. E. Huheey, E. A. Keiter and R. L. Keiter, Inorganic Chemistry – Principles of Structure and Reactivity, 4th edition, Pearson Education Asia Pvt. Ltd., 2000.

 

[3]        J. Bassett., G. H. Jeffery J. Mendham, and R. C. Denny, Vogel’s text book of quatitative chemical analysis. 5th edition, Longman Scientific and Technical, 1999.

 

[4]        G. Marr and B.W. Rockett, Practical inorganic chemistry, Von Nostrand Reinhold: 1972.

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

[1]        K. F. Purcell and J. C. Kotz, Inorganic Chemistry, Indian reprint, Cengage Learnining India Pvt Ltd, 2010.

 

[2]        G. L. Miessler and D. A. Tarr, Inorganic Chemistry, 4th ed., Prentice Hall, 2010.

 

[3]     D. N. Sathyanarayana, Electronic absorption spectroscopy and related techniques,
Universities Press: 2001.

 

[4]        William M Portfield, Inorganic Chemistry-An Unified Approach (Indian Reprint) Academic
Press, 2005.

 

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Duration

Points

Marks

CIA 1

Mid-SemTest [MST]*

3 Hrs

50

20

CIA 2

Class work, PreLab assignments

---

40

20

CIA 3

Record book

---

20

10

ESE

(Two examiners)

6 Hrs

50

50

 Total

100

MCH252 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description

This practical course on organic chemistry intends to provide the students scientific skills in the analysis of organic mixtures and separation of organic compounds

Course Outcome

Course Learning Outcome

In this practical course the students will acquire practical skills in organic analysis and separation techniques.

After completion of the course the students will demonstrate

CO1: understanding of the concepts and the chemistry behind the separation of organic mixtures

CO2: Ability to apply the skills in the separation of organic compounds

CO3: Ability to analyze and interpret the given organic mixture

CO4: Ability to use the chemicals economically

 

(Addresses GA1, GA2, GA3, GA5, GA8)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
Qualitative Analysis
 

Separation of a binary mixture of bifunctional organic compounds and identification of the    separated components by systematic qualitative organic analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Separations
 

● Separation of p-rosaniline and methyl red by column chromatography.

● Separation of amino acids by column chromatography.

● Separation of carbohydrates by thin layer chromatography. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Reading

[1]B. B. Dey, M. V. Sitaraman and T. R. Govindachari, Laboratory manual of organic chemistry, New Delhi: Allied Publishers, 1996.

[2]A. I. Vogel, Text book of practical organic chemistry, 1996.

[3]V. K. Ahluwalia and R. Aggarwal, Comprehensive practical organic chemistry:Preparations and Quantitative analysis, University press, 2004.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]B. B. Dey, M. V. Sitaraman and T. R. Govindachari, Laboratory manual of organic chemistry, New Delhi: Allied Publishers, 1996.

[2]A. I. Vogel, Text book of practical organic chemistry, 1996.

[3]V. K. Ahluwalia and R. Aggarwal, Comprehensive practical organic chemistry:Preparations and Quantitative analysis, University press, 2004.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

Final  mark

CIA1

Prelabquiz/Class work /Assignment

Each lab

Each lab (20 marks)

20

 

10

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

3 Hrs (50 marks)

50

25

CIA3

Record

Each lab

 

20

10

CIA3

Attendance(75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

From IPM

 

5

ESE

Centralized

6 Hrs (100 marks)

100

50

Total

200

100

MOC252 - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description

This practical course on physical chemistry intends to provide the students with scientific skills in conductometric and potentiometric experiments.

Course Outcome

 

On completion of this course the students will be able to demonstrate

CO1-Ability to recall and explain the principlesinvolved in electrochemistry and  chemical catalysis.

CO2-Ability to apply and reinforce the concepts learnt in electrochemistry and  chemical catalysis through  experiments.

CO3-Ability to validate theoretical knowledge gained in the above topics through experimental verification.

CO4-Ability to design new experiments to improve the existing protocols in practical experiments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:36
Conductivity