CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

School of Education

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Education
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EDU112 COMPUTER TRAINING Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 100
EDU113 SPORTS AND YOGA Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 100
EDU131 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU132 CURRICULUM PROCESSES Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU133 ASSESSMENT AND LEARNING Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU134 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU135 FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU141A TEACHING AND LEARNING OF CHEMISTRY Discipline Specific Elective 4 3 100
EDU141B TEACHING AND LEARNING OF ENGLISH Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU141C TEACHING AND LEARNING OF PHYSICS Discipline Specific Elective 4 3 100
EDU141D TEACHING AND LEARNING OF COMMERCE Discipline Specific Elective 4 3 100
EDU142A TEACHING AND LEARNING OF SOCIAL SCIENCE Discipline Specific Elective 4 3 100
EDU142B TEACHING AND LEARNING OF MATHEMATICS Discipline Specific Elective 4 3 100
EDU142C TEACHING AND LEARNING OF BIOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 4 3 100
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EDU212 CREATIVITY,ACTIVITY AND SERVICE(CAS) Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 25
EDU213 THEATRE IN EDUCATION Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 100
EDU221 EXTENDED ESSAY Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 1 1 25
EDU222 THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 1 1 25
EDU231 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU232 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN EDUCATION Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU233 GENDER, SCHOOL AND SOCIETY Core Courses 2 2 50
EDU234 PERSONAL SAFETY AND SEXUALITY Core Courses 2 2 50
EDU241A TEACHING AND LEARNING OF CHEMISTRY Discipline Specific Elective 4 3 100
EDU241B TEACHING AND LEARNING OF ENGLISH Discipline Specific Elective 4 3 100
EDU241C TEACHING AND LEARNING OF PHYSICS Discipline Specific Elective 4 3 100
EDU241D TEACHING AND LEARNING OF COMMERCE Discipline Specific Elective 4 3 100
EDU242A TEACHING AND LEARNING OF SOCIAL SCIENCE Discipline Specific Elective 4 3 100
EDU242B TEACHING AND LEARNING OF MATHEMATICS Discipline Specific Elective 4 3 100
EDU242C TEACHING AND LEARNING OF BIOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
EDU281 INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL-PHASE-I Skill Enhancement Course 5 4 100
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EDU331 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 03 100
EDU332 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU333 INCLUSIVE EDUCATION Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU334 SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES OF EDUCATION Core Courses 4 3 100
EDU335 GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING Core Courses 4 2 50
EDU341A STATISTICS IN EDUCATION Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
EDU341B PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION Discipline Specific Elective 2 2 50
EDU381 RESEARCH PROJECT Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EDU481 SUMMER INTERNSHIP Skill Enhancement Course 0 2 100
EDU482 INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL-PHASE-II Skill Enhancement Course 25 13 200
    

    

Department Overview:

School of Education, CHRIST (Deemed to be University), Bangalore offers a range of undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral programmes in education. It is the only academic institution in India to provide learners with the opportunity to pursue an International Baccalaureate integrated programme in the Bachelor of Education programme.

Mission Statement:

Vision: To lead and educate wholly-developed educators and citizens for a sustainable future

  

Introduction to Program:

Introduction to the Programme

School of Education is set up as a premier department for teacher training to mould future secondary school teachers. The International Baccalaureate (IB) Educators Certificate (IBEC) in teaching and learning (DP) offers the IBEC Certificate through the Bachelor of Education and Postgraduate Diploma in International Education. The vision of the department is achieved through the implementation of an innovative curriculum. The curriculum is designed to prepare competent and professional educationists who will be able to perform various roles in the field of education. 

Program Objective:

Programme Outcomes

At the end of the programme, the graduating students must be able to:

  • Research Competence: 
  • Apply the knowledge of research in solving social and educational problems
  • ICT Competence: 
  • Demonstrate digital literacy and digital citizenship
  • Domain Expertise: 
  • Integrate subject-specific content, pedagogical, and technological knowledge in teaching and assessment
  • Leadership: 
  • Develop critical thinking, creativity, communication, and collaborative skills
  • Create well-rounded professionals who are adaptable, life-long learners, and committed to a more sustainable future
  • Service-Minded: 
  • Internalise and practice the expectations of the profession including codes of ethics, professional standards of practice, and relevant law and policy
  • Inclusion-Minded: 
  • Teach and assess for inclusion and equity of diverse groups such as gender
Assesment Pattern

 

The courses which do not follow the above pattern are discussed below: 

Method of Evaluation for

HOL111 and 211 (Holistic Education): Objective type online examination

EDU234: Personal Safety and Sexuality CIA25 marks [PSS handbook]

EDU 226 TOK (Theory of Knowledge): CIA25 marks [ TOK handbook]

EDU 225: Extended Essay: CIA25 marks. [  Extended Essay handbook].

EDU212 CAS (Creativity, Activity and Service): CIA25 marks [CAS handbook]

EDU112, EDU113 and EDU215- Activity-based learning

Question Paper Format for End semester examination
Format for all core courses and core electives except for EDU 281, EDU381,382,

(Internship in school)  234, 433, 435, 441 A and 441 B and EDU 481

Part A-15 Marks x 4 questions: Answer any 4 out of 6 = 60 Marks Part B-05 Marks x 8 questions: Answer any 8 out of 10 = 40 Marks

EDU 233 10 Marks x 5 (6) questions. 5*10=50 marks 

Method of Evaluation of EDU 281 Internship in school- Phase I -100 Marks

Method of Evaluation of EDU 381: Summer Internship 100 Marks [Graded]

Method of Evaluation of EDU 382: Internship in Schools-Phase II TOTAL 200 Marks [Internship Policy]

EDU 433 Inclusive Education

CIA 1: To be decided based on participant dynamics: 20 marks (will be reduced to 10 marks.)

CIA 2: To be decided based on participant dynamics: 50 marks (Department.)

CIA 3: Practicum (Written report) End-semester Examination) Attendance
Question Paper Format: 50 marks (will be reduced to 25 marks.): 50 marks: 5 Marks x 10: Answer any 10 out of 12

Evaluation Format for EDU 435: 5 Marks x 10 (12) questions: Answer any 10 out of 12

Method of Evaluation for EDU 441-A, EDU 441-B End Semester Test -Theory paper: 25 Marks (5 marks x 5 Answer any 5 out of 7) department. Practicum (Written report): 25 marks Total : 50 marks 

Examination And Assesments

Examinations and Assessments

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each course carries a maximum of 100 marks (except Internship in School-Phase II) and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester Exam (ESE) Mid Semester exam (CIA II) Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

: 50% : 25% : 25% : 100%

50 marks (2 Hours)

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam Total 50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam: 100 marks (3 Hours)

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. 

End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks. 

CIA-I and CIA-III: Continuous Internal Assessment

Continuous Internal Assessment I

CIA- I will be Written- Group or Individual and Viva or Presentation 

Continuous Internal Assessment III

The following methods may be adopted Multiple choice-based tests, Practical Activity, Presentation/Viva, Group Discussion, Project, Skill-based assignments/activities

Attendance

The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows

95%-100% : 05 marks
90%-94% : 04 marks
85%-89% : 03 marks

80%-84% : 02 marks

76%-79% : 01 mark 

EDU112 - COMPUTER TRAINING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Computer training is offered as a mandatory activity in the first and second semester. Fifteen hours of computer training is allotted for each semester. It is a complete hands-on activity. The training would be conducted by peer tutors. Exercises will be given after each session for practice. 

Learning Objectives

 

 

     To acquire knowledge of computers, its accessories and software.

     To develop skill in using MS Office and their operations.

     To develop skill in using MOODLE and other LMS

     To acquire the knowledge of online courses.

     To acquire skill in basics of web designing.

     To acquire working knowledge of basic photo editors and movie makers.

 

     To acquire working knowledge and skills of developing lesson plans using application software.

Course Outcome

Students will be well equipped in using many Browsers, search engines, educational softwares, application softwares and teaching and learning need based softwares.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Teaching - learning Software
 

Email /browsing , MOODLE and Online courses, Advanced MS-WORD, MS-PowerPoint, MS-Publisher, MS-EXCEL, Prezi, Blogs, Web Page – HTML, Goldwave – Song editor, PowToon, GoAnimate, Picasa – Photo Editor, Basic Movie Maker and other application software. Quiz application software: Kahoot and Hot Potatoes. Video editing software : Adobe Spark and Ulead.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Internet resources

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Internet resources

Evaluation Pattern

It is a graded course. All assignments given during the training sessions will be graded.

EDU113 - SPORTS AND YOGA (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Description

This training is offered in the first, second and fourth semesters of the programme. As there is a need for physical exercise and healthy living of a student teacher this training is given in the form of a yoga workshops and completing in interclass sports and games. Many Yoga sessions will be conducted covering: Introduction, Meaning of Yoga, Ashtanga Yoga (8 stages of Yoga), Types of Yoga, Importance of Yoga Asanas and Pranayama, Techniques and Importance of Meditation in school etc. Various Interclass games like basketball, volleyball and throwball will be conducted. An annual sports day covering track and field events will be conducted to build sportive spirit among the student teachers. The training programme is mandatory for all student teachers.

 

Learning Objectives

 

     To enable student-teachers to understand the need and importance of Yoga in Education.

 

     To sensitize the student teachers towards physical and mental fitness and its importance.

     To introduce the philosophical bases, stages and types of Yoga and to apply in their life.

     To introduce meditation and its importance in the classroom.

     To practice and enable them to transact in it the educational institutions.

     To understand the importance of good posture and common postural deformities among students and provide awareness.

Course Outcome

Students will be well equipped in various sports activities and Yoga practices.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Yoga and Sports
 

Introduction, Meaning of Yoga, Ashtanga Yoga (8 stages of Yoga), Types of Yoga, Importance of Yoga Asanas and Pranayama, Techniques and Importance of Meditation in school etc. Various Interclass games like basketball, volleyball and throwball . Annual sports day : track and field events 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hands on practice

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Hands on practice

Evaluation Pattern

It is a graded course. Participation in all sessions of Yoga and Sports hours will be considered for grading.

EDU131 - INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is offered in the first semester. It creates awareness about the educational systems at the national and international levels. This course will help the students in acquiring the knowledge of educational schools of thought. The student teachers will understand the need for developing a sound understanding of philosophical bases of International Baccalaureate education. Students also acquire the knowledge of principles and processes of teaching, learning and current pedagogical practices in the International Baccalaureate education. Educational thoughts of great thinkers and their influence in the society are also discussed to motivate the teacher trainees to reflect about their roles as teachers.

 

  • To describe school education boards at the national and international levels.

  • To explain the nature, scope, and functions of education at the national and international levels.

  • To critically reflect on the philosophy of the International Baccalaureate education.

  • To explain philosophical theories underpinning the International Baccalaureate education.

  • To explain approaches to teaching and learning at the International Baccalaureate education.

  • To recognize and appreciate the contributions of Indian and western educational thinkers.

  • To recognize and explain educational schools of thought

  • To demonstrate the essential knowledge to perform competently as an IB teacher

  • To articulate in writing a teaching philosophy that draws on international-mindedness and identifies elements of the IB mission and philosophy aligned with this teaching philosophy.

  • To read and understand the IB DP policies

 

Course Outcome

 

  • Describe school education boards at the national and international levels.

  • Explain the nature, scope, and functions of education at the national and international levels.

  • Critically reflect on the philosophy of the International Baccalaureate education.

  • Explain philosophical theories underpinning the International Baccalaureate education.

  • Explain approaches to teaching and learning at the International Baccalaureate education.

  • Recognize and appreciate the contributions of Indian and western educational thinkers.

  • Recognize and explain educational schools of thought

  • Demonstrate the essential knowledge to perform competently as an IB teacher

  • Articulate in writing a teaching philosophy that draws on international-mindedness and identifies elements of the IB mission and philosophy aligned with this teaching philosophy.

  • Read and understand the IB DP policies

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Education
 

Meaning, nature, and scope of education. Vedic, Buddhist, Jain, and Islamic Education System. Individual and social aim of education. Functions of Education – at individual level, national level, and global level.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Philosophy and Education
 

Meaning and Functions of Philosophy; Branches of Philosophy: Metaphysics, Epistemology and Axiology; Relationship between Philosophy and Education with respect to teacher, student, curriculum, and teaching.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Philosophical Schools of Thought
 

Idealism, Naturalism, Marxism, Realism and Pragmatism; Indian educational Thinkers: Mahatma Gandhi, Swami Vivekananda, Aurobindo and Rabindranath Tagore. Western educational thinkers: Jean Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, Montessori.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to International Baccalaureate Education
 

History of International Baccalaureate; IB key influential educationalists - John Dewey, A.SNeil, Jean Piaget, Jerome Bruner and their key insights contributing to IB. Theories underpinning IB, IB education, IB mission, IB organization. Educational aim of IB.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Approaches to Teaching and Learning in International Baccalaureate education
 

Ten attributes of IB learner profile, Approaches to learning; Thinking skills, Communications skills, Social skills, Self-management skills, and Research skills. Approaches to teaching; based on inquiry, focused on conceptual understanding, developed in local and global contexts, focused on effective teamwork and collaboration, differentiated to meet the needs of all learners, informed by formative and summative assessment. Academic honesty practices in IB. Conceptual understanding of International mindedness in IB DP. IB DP Policies for learner, IB DP Policies for teacher, IB learner resources, IB teacher resources, IB teacher job Description.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anand, C.L. (1993). Teacher and education in the emerging Indian society. NCERT.

Badami, B.S., (2007). Philosophical and sociological foundations of education. Vidhyanidhi Publications

Chartock, R. K. (2004). Educational foundations: An anthology (2nd ed.). Pearson.

Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2003). Philosophical foundations of education (7th ed.). Merrill Prentice Hall.

Siegel, H. (2012). The Oxford handbook book of philosophy of education. (1st ed.). Oxford University Press.

Anand, C.L. (1993). Teacher and education in the emerging Indian society. NCERT.

Badami, B.S., (2007). Philosophical and sociological foundations of education. Vidhyanidhi Publications

Chartock, R. K. (2004). Educational foundations: An anthology (2nd ed.). Pearson.

Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2003). Philosophical foundations of education (7th ed.). Merrill Prentice Hall.

Siegel, H. (2012). The Oxford handbook book of philosophy of education. (1st ed.). Oxford University Press.

Anand, C.L. (1993). Teacher and education in the emerging Indian society. NCERT.

Badami, B.S., (2007). Philosophical and sociological foundations of education. Vidhyanidhi Publications

Chartock, R. K. (2004). Educational foundations: An anthology (2nd ed.). Pearson.

Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2003). Philosophical foundations of education (7th ed.).

Merrill Prentice Hall.

Siegel, H. (2012). The Oxford handbook book of philosophy of education. (1st ed.). Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Goldman, A. I. (2008). A causal theory of knowing. The Journal of Philosophy, 64(12).  http://www.jstor.org

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org 

IB. (2013). IB Learner Profile. http://www.ibo.org

IB. (n.d). Middle Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

IB. (n.d). Primary Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org 

IB. (2017). The History of the IB.  http://www.ibo.org

IB. (2017). What is an IB education?  http://www.ibo.org

Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2003). Philosophical foundations of education (7th ed.).

Merrill Prentice Hall.

Wiphi Open Access Philosophy. (2016, Feb 26). The Gettier Problem [Video].  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lB-XJjmvoE

Wiphi Open Access Philosophy. (2016, Feb 26). Introduction to theory of knowledge [Video].  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_Y3utIeTPg&t=76s

Hrera, S. R. (2012). Approaches to international mindedness in IB world schools.http://www.ibo.org

IB. (2019). Approaches to teaching and learning in the Diploma Programmehttp://resources.ibo.org

IB. (2020). Diploma Programme Assessment Procedures. http://resources.ibo.org

IB. (2013). IB Learner Profile.  http://www.ibo.org

Tomlinson, C., & Imbeau, M. B. (2011). Managing a differentiated classroom: A practical guide. https://www.researchgate.net

 

Tomlinson, C. (2014). The differentiated classroom: Responding to the needs of all learners. (2nd ed.). ASCD.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE)                                       :          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II)                                   :          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)                :           25%

                                        Total                                   :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam                         :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam                         :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks.

CIA-I and CIA-III: Continuous Internal Assessment

 

Continuous Internal Assessment I

CIA- I may have one or two components - Written (reports) Group or Individual - Viva or Presentation may also be conducted

 Continuous Internal Assessment III

The following methods may be adopted

Multiple choice based test.

Practical Activity

Presentation/Viva

Group Discussion

 Attendance 

The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows

95%-100%         : 05 marks

90%-94%           : 04 marks

85%-89%           : 03 marks

80%-84%           : 02 marks

76%-79%           : 01 mark

EDU132 - CURRICULUM PROCESSES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is offered as a core course in the first semester of the programme. It introduces the students to a variety of theoretical perspectives, principles, and philosophies in Education. It helps the students acquire knowledge on curriculum designs, development, and evaluation. It engages the students in practices of international mindedness and inquiry-based learning.

Course Outcome

After the completion of this course, the student will be able to:

Analyze the importance of philosophical, psychological and sociological bases of curriculum construction in the local, national and international contexts;
Apply and demonstrate the principles, stages, and criteria of curriculum construction

Illustrate the curriculum processes in the International Baccalaureate PYP, MYP and DP programmes

Recognize and practice IB curriculum framework

Develop and practice professional competencies in educational settings

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit- 1 Introduction to Curriculum
 

Meaning and concept of curriculum, aims, objectives, goals and types of curriculum design. Philosophical foundations of the curriculum. Sociological foundations of the curriculum. Psychological foundations of the Curriculum. A Glance at School Curriculum of State Board, CBSE, ICSE IGCSE and IB.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit- 2 Introduction to International Curriculum
 

Curriculum framework in International Baccalaureate (IB) programmes: Primary year programme (PYP), Middle year programme (MYP), and Diploma Programme (DP). IB curriculum as a continuum from PYP to DP. IB DP programme standards and practices. Principles of learning underpinning the IB curriculum. Structure of IB curriculum; DP curriculum framework logo, DP subject logo, IB Diploma Programme model and its constituent parts, Core elements of IB curriculum: Extended essay, Theory of Knowledge, Creativity, Activity and Service, Role of subject groups, learner profile attributes, and DP core elements in developing international-mindedness. Working with MY IB for DP curriculum-related resources. Impact of IB curriculum on student learning. Critiquing the IB curriculum. IB Language policy.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Unit- 3 Curriculum Development
 

Principles of Curriculum Construction, Stages, Criteria of curriculum design. Interdisciplinary, trans-disciplinary and multidisciplinary curriculum. Curriculum Development Models- analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation. Tyler model of Curriculum Development: Taba model of curriculum development. Differentiated Learning Strategies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Unit- 4 Curriculum Evaluation
 

Evaluation, an integral part of the Curriculum - Criteria for evaluating curriculum – Models of curriculum evaluation. Tyler’s Model, Stufflebeam’s CIPP model, Stake’s Responsive model, Eisner’s model.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Unit- 5 Instructional Design
 

Instructional design, Principles of instructional design, Types of instructional design: Backward design, ADDIE, Merril’s Model, Kirkpatrick, Gagne’s Nine Events of Instruction, ASSURE model. Curricular mapping.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Batra, P. (2015). Curriculum in India. Curriculum Studies in India, 35–63. doi: 10.1057/9781137477156_2

Mathews, J. (n.d.). Curriculum Development. Curriculum Exposed, 113–123. doi: 10.4324/9780429454264-10

Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005) Understanding by design (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development ASCD.

Harlacher, J. E., Sakelaris, T. L., & Kattelman, N. M. (2013). What is Curriculum-Based Evaluation? Practitioner’s Guide to Curriculum-Based Evaluation in Reading, 47–61. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4614-9360-0_4

An Overview of Instructional Design. (2015). Mastering the Instructional Design Process, 1– 16. doi: 10.1002/9781119176589.ch1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Jain, M. (2015). Curriculum Studies in India. Curriculum Studies in India, 111–139. doi: 10.1057/9781137477156_5

Stobie, T. (n.d.). Coherence and Consistency in International Curricula: A Study of the International Baccalaureate Diploma and Middle Years Programmes. The SAGE Handbook of Research in International Education, 140–151. doi: 10.4135/9781848607866.n13

Planning and Managing Instructional Design Projects. (2015). Mastering the Instructional Design Process, 334–340. doi: 10.1002/9781119176589.ch19

Lam, J. T. S. (2012). Curriculum Evaluation. Curriculum Change and Innovation, 189–214. doi: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888139026.003.0008

Rubio, A. M. D. (2017). Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005) Understanding by design (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development ASCD. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal19(1), 140. doi: 10.14483/ calj.v19n1.11490

Evaluation Pattern
 
 
 

Question Paper Format for End semester examination

Part A-15 Marks x 4 questions: Answer any 4 out of 6 = 60 Marks Part B-05 Marks x 8 questions: Answer any 8 out of 10 = 40 Marks

 

 

 

CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks. CIA-I and CIA-III: Continuous Internal Assessment

 

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

EDU133 - ASSESSMENT AND LEARNING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 This core course offered in the first semester. It brings out the relationship between teaching, learning and assessment. It creates an understanding on the assessment of learners understanding. It trains the trainee teacher in numerous ways of formative and summative assessments with respect to International Baccalaureate diploma programme.  

Course Objectives

The course develops in the students an understanding of the assessment practices in national and international schooling. It familiarizes them with domain-based assessment practices. The students would be trained in developing effective assessment tasks and instruments. Furthermore, students would be equipped with computational skills of descriptives statistics.

Course Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

·       Describe the fundamental concepts of assessment

·       Explain assessment practices in national and international school

·       Evaluate the assessment of TOK, EE, CAS as per IB DP.

·       Critically analyse subject wise assessment practices in IB DP

·       Develop assessment tools.

·       Develop skills and competencies in constructing and using rubrics, diagnostic test

 

·       Compute various descriptive statistics

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Fundamental concepts of Assessments
 

Level of Knowledge– Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Measurement and Evaluation, Principles of assessment, Assessment for learning, Assessment as learning, and assessment of learning, Formative assessment, Summative assessment, Norm referenced testing, Criterion referenced testing, Internal assessment, External assessment. Assessment based on Bloom’s taxonomy, Peer Assessment, Performance Assessment- GRASPS model.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Tests and assessment tools
 

Level of Knowledge– Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Concept, Construction, and uses of Teacher made Test (Unit test), Standardized Test, Diagnostic Test. Characteristics of a Good assessment Tool; Validity, Reliability, Objectivity, and Utility. Construction of Test Items – Essay type, Short Answer Type, Objective type- Multiple choice, Fill in the blanks, True or False, Matching type. Qualitative tools-Anecdotal record, interview. Quantitative Tools- Rating scale, Checklist.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Designing assessment tasks and feedback
 

Level of Knowledge– Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Class quiz- construction of e-quiz and quiz, Worksheet- construction, Construction of analytical and reflective type questions, Home assignment, Rubrics: meaning, types, and construction. Unit test procedures in IB DP. Using LMS/Moodle for formative assessment. Assessment Portfolios, working with thinking, Predicting students’ grade in IB. Concept of Feedback-TypesofFeedback-teacherfeedback,peerfeedback,performancefeedback.Parents’ feedback practices at IB. Student feedback practices atIB.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Assessment in International Baccalaureate Education
 

 

Level of Knowledge– Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Assessment of TOK presentation, TOK essay assessment rubric. Extended essay assessment rubric, EE viva voce, TOK and EE assessment matrix. Academic honesty in the assessment. Maximum and minimum points for IB Course certificate, non-regular IB diploma, and IB Diploma certificate. CAS experience authenticating procedure. Subject wise internal and external assessment ratios and points. Subject wise Mark boundaries. Assessment of student whom language of instruction is not the mother tongue, Assessment of special educational needs students,Supportsystemrequiredofinclusiveeducation.SubjectwiseSummativeassessments for standard and higher levels. IB examination regulations, Working with managebac, Inthinking, and IBIS.

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Statistics in Assessment- Descriptive Statistics
 

Level of Knowledge– Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Tabulation of data- frequency distribution table; Descriptive statistics- Measures of Central tendencies- Mean, Median, Mode- Meaning, computation for grouped and ungrouped data, uses; Measures of variability- Range, Standard deviation, Quartile deviation- Meaning, computation for grouped and ungrouped data, uses; Interpretation based on measures of central tendencies, measures of variability; Percentiles.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Binkley, M, Erstad, O, Herman, J, Raizen, S, Ripley, M and Rumble, M. 2010. “Defining 21st century skills”. http://atc21s.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/1-Defining-21st-Century-Skills.pdf.

Black, P. & William, D., (1998). Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessment. London: Granada Learning.

Chapman, C., & King, R. (2005). Differentiated assessment strategies: One tool doesn’t fit all. Corwin Press.

Gardner, J. (2012). Assessment and Learning. SAGE.

IB. (2020). Diploma Programme Assessment Procedures. http://resources.ibo.org

Rao, V. K. (2006). Perspectives in Educational Evaluation. Commonwealth Publishers.    .

Reynolds, C. R., Livingston, R. B., & Willson, V. (2011). Measurement and assessment in education, (2nd ed). PHI Learning.

Singh, B. (2004). Modern educational measurement and evaluation system. Anmol.

Swaprupa, R.T. (2004). Educational measurement and evaluation. Discovery.

Coolidge, F. L. (2013). Statistics: A gentle introduction. (3rd edition). SAGE.

Datta, N. C. (2006). Educational Psychology and Evaluation. Hyderabad: Universities Press.

IB. (2020). Diploma Programme Assessment Procedures.  http://resources.ibo.org

Pathak (2012). Measurement and evaluation in education. Pearson Education.

Reid, H. M. (2013). Introduction to statistics-fundamental concepts and procedures of

data analysis. SAGE.

 

Erickson, L. (2012). Concept-based teaching and learning. IB Position Paper.

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. Routledge.

IB. (2020). Diploma Programme assessment procedures.  http://resources.ibo.org

Kohn, A. (2000). Punished by rewards. Houghton Mifflin.

Wagner, T. (2010). The global achievement gap. Basic Books.

William, D. (2011). Embedded formative assessment. Solution Tree Press.

 Fall, R, Webb, N and Chudowsky, N. 1997. “Group discussion and large-scale language arts assessment: Effects on students’ comprehension”. CSE Technical Report 445. Los Angeles, California, USA. CRESST.

Gallagher, T. 1991. “Language and social skills: Implications for assessment and intervention with school-age children”. In T Gallagher (ed), Pragmatics of language: Clinical practice issues. Pp 11–41. San Diego, California, USA. Singular Press.

Hattie, J. 2009. Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement . New York, USA. Routledge.

Hembree, R. 1988. “Correlates, causes, effects and treatment of test anxiety”. Review of Educational Research. Vol 58. Pp 7–77.

Saner, H, McCaffrey, D, Stecher, B, Klein, S and Bell, R. 1994. “The effects of working in pairs in science performance assessments”. Educational Assessment. Vol 2, number 4. Pp 325–338.

Schulz, C. 2011. Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error. London, UK. Portobello Books.

Wagner, T. 2010. The Global Achievement Gap. New York, USA. Basic Books.

Weissberg, M, Berentsen, M, Cote, A, Cravey, B and Heath, K. 1982. “An assessment of the personal, career, and academic needs of undergraduate students”. Journal of College Student Personnel. Vol 23. Pp 115–122.

Wiliam, D. 2011. Embedded Formative Assessment. Bloomington, Indiana, USA. Solution Tree Press.

Yaworski, J, Weber, R and Ibrahim, N. 2000. “What makes students succeed or fail? The voices of developmental college students”. Journal of College Reading and Learning. Vol 30, number 2. Pp 195–219.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Aggarwal, J.C. (2003). Essentials of Examination System Evaluation Tests and Measurement, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.

Coolidge, Frederick L. (2013). Statistics- A Gentle Introduction-3rd edition. New Delhi:SAGE Publications Pvt Ltd.

Datta, N. C. (2006). Educational Psychology and Evaluation. Hyderabad: Universities Press Pvt. Ltd.

Garret, H.E. (1971).Statistics in Psychology and Education. Bombay: Vakils Feller, Simons Pvt. Ltd.

Pathak (2012).Measurement and Evaluation in Education, New Delhi, Pearson Education.

Reid, Howard M. (2013). Introduction to Statistics-Fundamental Concepts and Procedures of Data Analysis. New Delhi: SAGE Publications Pvt Ltd.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Method of Evaluation BEd

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE)                                       :          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II)                                   :          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)                :           25%

                                        Total                                   :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam                         :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam                         :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 

EDU134 - EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Description

This course is offered as general paper in the first semester. It develops the knowledge of psychological methods and its application in the educational context. It enhances the views of a teacher towards the pupils in a positive way viz., Intelligence, Individual differences, Interest, Attention, Attitude, Memory etc. It helps to develop teachers attitude and retain healthy atmosphere in the class .

 

 

Course Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

          Explain various methods of Educationalpsychology.

          Describe the various developmental characteristics ofadolescents

          Explain the various types ofIntelligence

          Analyse the various types ofPersonality

                     Compare the various learningTheories

          Describe the various factors affectinglearning

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Meaning and Scope of Educational Psychology
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual and Basic

 

Meaning and Scope of Educational Psychology; Methods of Educational Psychology- Observation, Case Study, Experimentation, Meaning, Steps, Uses and Limitations;

Need of Educational Psychology to the teacher.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Learners as a Developing Individual
 

Level of Knowledge – Application

 

Different stages of growth in man- Concept of Growth and Development; Adolescents Psychology - Meaning, Characteristics, Various developments viz., Physical, Mental, Social and Emotional; developmental tasks of adolescents -Piaget 's  stages of cognitive development; Mental Health- Meaning, Causes for mental ill health, role of a teacher in fostering mental health.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Understanding the Difference between the Learners
 

Level of Knowledge – Comprehension                                                             

 

Individual differences- Meaning and factors- heredity and environment; Differences between individual learners, learning style, self-concept, self-esteem, attitude, aptitude, skills and competencies, interest Intelligence- Meaning , different types of test with examples, IQ and its  distribution; Multiple Intelligence by Howard Gardner; Emotional Intelligence- concept, dimensions and its importance; Gifted children- Meaning, Nature, Identification, Educational programmes for gifted children; Educationally Backward Children– meaning, characteristics, causes and remedial instruction; Creativity - meaning, characteristics of creative children, role of teachers and parents in fostering creativity.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Personality
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual

 

Personality- Meaning and Classification; Structure of Personality- Sigmund Freud's theory; Assessment of Personality - Subjective, Objective and Projective techniques; Role of a teacher in moulding personality.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Theoretical Perspectives of Learning
 

Level of Knowledge – Theoretical                                                                      

 

Learning - Meaning and  Nature; Learning Theories of learning -Trial and Error leaning  theory and laws of learning; Classical conditioning theory and its educational implications; Operant conditioning theory and its educational implications; Gestalt theory and its educational implications; Gagne's  hierarchy of learning and its educational implications;  Constructivism – meaning and types- Cognitive constructivism – Piaget’s theory of cognitive development and social constructivism- Vygotsky theory of cognitive development and its educational implications; Concept formation; Concept learning - meaning, types, approaches to teach concepts; Learning in constructivist’s perspective.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Factors Affecting Learning
 

Level of Knowledge – Comprehension

 

Maturation- Meaning and Educational Implications; Motivation- Meaning and Techniques to motivate the students, Abraham Maslow’s theory of motivation; Memory- meaning, process - registration, retention, recall and recognition and types -STM and LTM; Transfer of learning – meaning, types and its educational implications; Biological and hereditary factors influencing learning- Attention, interest, and readiness as factors influencing scholastic learning.

Text Books And Reference Books:

References

Brown, KW, Ryan, RM and Creswell, JD. 2007. “Mindfulness: Theoretical foundations and evidence for its salutary effects”. Psychological Inquiry. Vol 18, number 4. Pp 211–237.

Campbell, RL and Svenson, LW. 1992. “Perceived level of stress among university undergraduate students in Edmonton, Canada”. Perceptual and Motor Skills. Volume 75, number 2. Pp 552–554.

CASEL. 2013. “Social and Emotional Core Competencies”. http://www.casel.org/social-and-emotionallearning/core-competencies.

Chambers, R, Lo, BCY and Allen, NB. 2008. “The impact of intensive mindfulness training on attentional control, cognitive style, and affect”. Cognitive Therapy and Research. Volume 32, number 3. Pp 303–322.

Claxton, G. 2008. What’s the Point of School? Oxford, UK. OneWorld Publications.

Costa, A. and Lowery, L. 1989. Techniques for Teaching Thinking. (Pacific Grove, CA. Midwest).

Cumming, TM. 2010. “Using technology to create motivating social skills lessons”. Intervention in School and Clinic. Vol 45, number 4. Pp 242–250.

de Bruin, AB, Thiede, KW, Camp, G and Redford, J. 2011. Generating keywords improves metacomprehension and self-regulation in elementary and middle school children. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. Vol 109, number 3. Pp 294–310.

Deci, EL, Koestner, R and Ryan, RM. 1999. “A meta-analytic review of experiments examining the effects of extrinsic rewards on intrinsic motivation”. Psychological Bulletin. Vol 125. Pp 692–700.

Deci, EL. 1975. Intrinsic Motivation. London, UK. Plenum Press.

Derry, SJ and Murphy, DA. 1986. “Designing systems that train learning ability: from theory to practice”. Review of Educational Research. Vol 56, number 1. Pp 1–39.

Dewey, J. 1997. Education and experience. New York, USA. Touchstone.

Dreyfus, H and Dreyfus, SE. 2000. Mind over machine. New York, USA. Free Press.

Dweck, CS. 1999. Self-Theories: Their Role in Motivation, Personality, and Development. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Psychology Press.

Dweck, CS. 2008. “Can personality be changed? The role of beliefs in personality and change”. Current Directions in Psychological Science. Vol 17, number 6. Pp 391–394.

Elksnin, LK and Elksnin, N. 1998. “Teaching social skills to students with learning and behaviour problems”. Intervention in school and clinic. Vol 33, number 3. Pp 131–140.

Fasko, D. 2003. “Critical thinking: origins, historical development, future direction”. Critical thinking and reasoning: Current research, theory and practice. Pp 3–20.

Gokhale, A. 1995. “Collaborative Learning Enhances Critical Thinking.” Journal of Technology Education. Vol 7, number 1. PP. 22-30

Gustavson, A and Nall, HC. 2011. “Freshman Overconfidence and Library Research Skills: A Troubling Relationship?” College & Undergraduate Libraries. Vol 18, number 4. Pp 291–306.

Hattie, J, Biggs, J and Purdie, N. 1996. “Effects of learning skills interventions on student learning: a metaanalysis”. Review of Educational Research. Vol 66, number 2. Pp 99–136.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Essential Reading

Aggarwal, J. C. (2006). Psychology of Learning and Development. New Delhi: Shipra Publishing House Ltd.

Bhatnagar, A. B. (1996). Advanced Educational Psychology. Meerut: Loyel Book Depot.

Chauhan, S. S. (1987). Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House, Pvt. Ltd.

Dandapani, S. A. (2003). Text Book of Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Anmol Publication.

Das, R. C., & Vital, (1984). Curriculum and Evaluation. New Delhi: NCERT.

Gagne, R. M. (1987). The Conditions of Learning.(3rd ed.). New York: Tinchart and Winston Inc.

Kossyln, S. M., & Rosenberg, R. S. (2001). Psychology: The brain, the person, the world. Needham Heights: Pearson Education Company.

Kundu, C. L., &Tuttoo, D. N. (1985).Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

MangalS.K(2013). Advanced Educational Psychology, Prentice Hall Publications,:New Delhi

Munn, N. L. (1967). Introduction to psychology. Calcutta: Oxford & IBH Publishing Company.

Passi, B. K., Goel, D. R., &Senapathy, H. K. (2004).Piagetian Teaching Model for Cognitive Development. Agra: Model Printers.

Somashekar T V(2006) Educational Psychology, NirmalaPrakashana; Bangalore

 

Recommended Reading

Harasim, L. (2012). Learning theories and online technologies. (1st ed., pp. 1-201). New York: Taylor & Francis Group. Retrieved from http://www.amazon.com/Learning-Theory-Online-Technologies-Harasim-ebook/dp/B0073V0ZOA

Nevid, J. (2009). Essentials of psychology concepts and applications. (3rd ed., pp. 383-418). Belmont: Macmillan company. Retrieved from https://books.google.co.in/books?id

Evaluation Pattern

Method of Evaluation BEd

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE)                                       :          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II)                                   :          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)                :           25%

                                        Total                                   :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam                         :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam                         :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 

 

EDU135 - FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the first semester. This course introduces students to research, types of research, and the essential elements of educational research.

The objective of the course is to enable students to put educational research into practice, to make presentations, and to publish.

Course Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

  • Describe the nature and scope of educational research.

  • Critically review the research literature.

  • Recognise theoretical framework required for conducting research

  • Employ quantitative and qualitative methods to do research.

  • Formulate statement of the problem, research questions, objectives, and hypothesis

  • Describe the sampling technique, research design, and procedure

  • Construct and use different kinds of tools and techniques of collecting Data.

  • Articulate the process of research

  • Articulate the format of a manuscript for publication

  • Create a manuscript for publication

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Research
 

Meaning and nature, need and importance and scope of educational research; action research; nature and scope of action research. Identification of research problem, sampling techniques, variables, research tools, formulating research question, hypothesis construction.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Review of Literature and References
 

Review of literature, types of review of literature, in-text citation, reference style: APA. Introduction to Mendeley.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Quantitative Methods
 

Correlation design, survey design, experimental design. Analysing quantitative data and interpretation: Correlation, Descriptive analysis, Inferential analysis. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Qualitative Methods
 

Ethnographic research, content analysis, case study, meta-analysis. Data collection in qualitative research: In-depth interview, focus group interview. Analysing qualitative data and interpretation.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Manuscript Template
 

Abstract & Keywords, Introduction, Literature Review, Theoretical Framework, Research Questions, Method (Sampling, Design Procedure, Analysis Procedure), Results and Discussion, Timeline and Planning

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Psychological Association. (2021). APA style blog. https://apastyle.apa.org/blog

Best, J. W., & Kahn, J. V. (2014). Research in education. Pearson. 

Cohen, L. Manion. L & Morrison, K. (2007). Research methods in education. Routledge.  

Creswell, J. W., & Creswell, J. D. (2017). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kumar R. (2005). Research methodology: A step by step guide for beginners. Pearson.

Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (2017). The Sage handbook of qualitative research. Sage.

Patton, M. Q. (2015). Qualitative research & evaluation methods: Integrating theory and practice (4th ed.). Sage.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I and CIA III: Continuous Internal Assessment 

End Semester exam (ESE): 50% 

Mid Semester exam (CIA II): 25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I & III): 25%

Total: 100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam: 50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam: 100 marks (3 Hours) 

CIA II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks.

Mid Semester Exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment.

The End Semester Exam marks will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria. 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

10 marks

25 marks

10 marks

5 marks

 

 

EDU141A - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF CHEMISTRY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the aims and objectives of teaching Chemistry at national and international schools. It introduces the essential elements of Chemistry teaching and practice needed to teach Chemistry in an effective and inspirational manner. It develops the skills and competencies required for a Chemistry teacher to teach Chemistry in the global context.                                                                                 

                                                                                                                    

The course will help the students to gain mastery of content in Chemistry and help them to identify various resources and use those resources effectively in the teaching of chemistry.

Course Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

 

·         Explain Chemistry content of secondary school level

·         Apply theory of knowledge (TOK) with respect toChemistry.

·           Recognise the role of Chemistry in local and globalcontext.

·         Differentiate between Taxonomy of objectives in differentdomains

·         Develop the skill of preparing a Course outline, Unit plan, and Lesson plan as perIB

·         Apply appropriate Teaching methods in teaching chemistrycontent

·         Apply collaborative Teaching techniques inclassroom

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Essentials of Chemistry for Chemistry learner.
 

States of matter, Physical Change and Chemical Change; Structure of atom: Discovery of subatomic particles: Dalton’s atomic theory, Rutherford model, Bohr model; Heisenberg‘s uncertainty principle ,Pauli’s exclusion principle ,Afbau principle, Hund’s rule of maximum multiplicity :Electronic configuration ;Periodic classification of elements ;early classification and modern classification ,Periodic properties-atomic radii, ionization energy and electron affinity: Chemical bonding: Ionic bond, Covalent bond, Co-ordinate bond: Hybridization. Metals and non-metals: Differences; Important chemical reactions of metals: Extraction of Iron

and copper: Extraction of silicon; Uses of silicon compounds; Phosphorous; Allotropic forms:Extraction of phosphorous, chemical properties: uses of phosphorous: Sulphur: occurrence and extraction; Allotropic forms; uses

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Teaching Chemistry
 

Meaning and nature of science, scope of Chemistry, Significance of Chemistry in daily life, Importance of Chemistry as a school subject, Practical, disciplinary and recreational Values of Chemistry; Scientific attitude– Meaning, characteristics of a scientific attitude person, techniques of developing scientific attitude Theory of Knowledge in Chemistry; Ways of knowing; Senseperception, Reasoning, Language, Emotion, Imagination, Faith, Intuition, and Memory. Role of a teacher in theory of knowledge; Stimulate, Facilitate, and Guide. Constructing Theory of knowledge questions in Chemistry. Developing international mindedness with respect to Chemistry. Understanding the learner profile of a student.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Aims and Objectives of Teaching and Learning Chemistry
 

Meaning of the terms Aim, Objective, Learning outcome, and Specification; Objectives of Teaching Chemistry. Relationship of Inquiry, action, and reflection.: Bloom’s and Anderson’s Taxonomy of teaching and learning

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Effective Planning for Teaching and Learning in Chemistry
 

Lesson Plan: Meaning and importance; Herbartian Lesson Plan, Evaluation Approach to Lesson plan, IB course outline; Templates and construction, IB Unit Plan: Templates and construction, Flanders classroom interaction analysis.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches to Teaching and learning Chemistry
 

 

Pedagogy vs. andragogy, Approaches to teaching (ATT) Approaches to learning (ATL)as per IB, Inquiry based teaching and learning: Structured inquiry, Guided inquiry, Open inquiry, Differentiated teaching strategies, Technology for teaching and learning, Collaborative Teaching techniques: Socratic Seminar, Flipped classroom, fishbowl discussion method,

Think-pair-share, Jigsaw technique, graphic organisers, Spider web discussion method. Process oriented guided inquiry learning, Experiential learning, Problem and project-based learning, Case based learning, Discovery learning.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Essential skills for a Chemistry teacher
 

Approaches to learning (ATL) as per IB: Thinking skills, Communication skills, Social skills, Self-management skills, Research skills, Oral and written communication skills, Critical thinking skills, Problem solving skills, Teamwork and collaborative skills, Metacognitive skills, Self-regulated learner.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Felder, (2007). “Enquiry-Based Learning: Definitions and Rationale”. Manchester, UK. Centre for Excellence in Enquiry-Based Learning, The University of Manchester.

Mathew & Mollykutty, (2013). Science Education: Theoretical Bases of Teaching and Pedagogic Analysis: Rainbow book publishers, Chengannur, Kerala

Mathew &Mollykutty,(2013).Science Education: Theoretical Bases of Teaching and Pedagogic Analysis: Rainbow book publishers, Chengannur, Kerala

Bloom, BS. (1956), Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Handbook I: The Cognitive Domain. New York: David McKay Co Inc

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Devetak, I., & Gla?ar, S. A. (2014). Learning with Understanding in the Chemistry Classroom. Retrieved from https://books.google.co.in/books?id=CIfEBAAAQBAJ

Tro, N. (2017). Know It All Chemistry: The 50 Most Elemental Concepts in Chemistry, Each Explained in Under a Minute. Retrieved from https://books.google.co.in/books? id=aEN0vgAACAAJ

Devetak, I., & Gla?ar, S. A. (2014). Learning with Understanding in the Chemistry Classroom. Retrieved from https://books.google.co.in/books?id=CIfEBAAAQBAJ

 

Mathew &Mollykutty,(2013).Science Education: Theoretical Bases of Teaching and Pedagogic Analysis: Rainbow book publishers, Chengannur, Kerala

Kamala, N. (2005). Content Cum Method of Teaching Chemistry. Bangalore: SumukhaPrakashana.

Tilke, A.(2011.) The International Baccalaureate Diploma Program and the School Library: Inquiry-Based Education. Santa Barbara, California, USA. ABC-CLIO, LLC.

Trilling, B and Fadel, C. (2009). 21st Century Skills: Learning for Life in our Times. San Francisco, California, USA. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE)                                       :          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II)                                   :          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)                :           25%

                                        Total                                   :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam                         :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam                         :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 

CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks.

CIA-I and CIA-III: Continuous Internal Assessment

 

Continuous Internal Assessment I

CIA- I will be in two components - Written (reports) Group or Individual - Viva or Presentation may also be conducted

 

Continuous Internal Assessment III

The following methods may be adopted

Multiple choice based test.

Practical Activity

Presentation/Viva

Group Discussion

 

Attendance 

The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows

95%-100%         : 05 marks

90%-94%           : 04 marks

85%-89%           : 03 marks

80%-84%           : 02 marks

76%-79%           : 01 mark

EDU141B - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF ENGLISH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 This discipline-specific course is offered in the first semester of the programme. It introduces students to the principles of teaching and learning English, and comprehends the importance and role of English in National and International spheres. It helps in assessing learners’ understanding for and of learning, making connections with TOK, CAS and the extended essay. It develops the linguistic skills, planning and implementation of lesson plans through different approaches.

Course Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

 

  • Illustrate the pedagogical principles underpinning the IBDP programme

  • Differentiate the role of English in National and International spheres and create opportunities to learn and teach

  • Research and design appropriate learning activities

  • Create and experiment with course plans, unit plans and lesson plans and provide meaningful learning opportunities

  • Demonstrate independent implementation of approaches to teaching and learning

  • Construct meaningful opportunities for content analysis and transaction

  • Present effectively use of resources in the English classroom

  • Discuss and demonstrate professional competencies

  • Examine the application of TOK, EE and CAS in teaching and learning English

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Essentials of English language & Literature for English language & Literature learner
 

Language and communities (nation/region, subcultures)
Language and the individual (multilingualism/bilingualism, language profile/identity) Language and knowledge (science and technology, argot and jargon)
Language and social relations (social and professional status, race)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Teaching English in a classroom
 

 

Meaning, definition, functions of language. Fundamental principles of language learning. Need and importance of teaching and learning English. Importance of English in school. Challenges of teaching English. Significance of English language & Literature in daily life. Theory of Knowledge: Ways of knowing; Sense perception, Reasoning, Language, Emotion, Imagination, Faith, Intuition, and Memory. Role of a teacher in the theory of knowledge; Stimulate, Facilitate, and Guide. Knowledge framework. International mindedness with respect to English language & Literature. Linking the learner profile

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Aims and Objectives of Teaching and Learning in English
 

Relationship of Inquiry, action, and reflection. Setting up the purpose of a English language & Literature unit. Aims and objectives of teaching English. Writing objectives for classroom teaching based on content. Listing of Specifications under General Objectives, Criteria for Writing Instructional objectives

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Effective Planning for Teaching and Learning in English
 

 

The teaching of Prose and poetry. Anderson’s Revised Taxonomy. Unit plan and Lesson Plans: Meaning and importance; Herbartian Lesson Plan, Evaluation Approach to Lesson plan, IB course outline; Templates and construction, IB Unit Plan: Templates and construction; Anderson's Revised Taxonomy; Evaluation Approach to Lesson plan, Unit Plan: Meaning, importance, format and Uses; Unit planning in International Baccalaureate.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Approaches to Teaching and learning English language
 

Approaches to Teaching (ATT) Approaches to learning (ATL) as per IB, Inquiry-based teaching. Structural Approach; Communicative Approach; Humanistic Approach; Community Language Learning. Differentiated teaching strategies, Teaching in local and global contexts. Effective use of Technology for teaching and learning, Collaborative Teaching techniques: Socratic Seminar, flipped classroom, fishbowl discussion method, Think-pair-share, Jigsaw technique, graphic organizers, Spider web discussion method. Process-oriented guided inquiry learning, Experiential learning, Problem and project-based learning, Case-based learning, Discovery learning.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Essential Skills for an English teacher
 

 

Listening Skills; Speaking Skills; Reading Skills; Writing Skills Study skills Thinking skills, Communication skills, Social skills, Self-management skills, Research skills, Oral and written communication skills, Critical thinking skills, Problem-solving skills, Teamwork and collaborative skills, Metacognitive skills.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Harry, B., Waterman, R. (2008). Building Collaboration Between Schools and Parents of English Language Learners: Transcending Barriers, Creating Opportunities. National Institute for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems.  http://www.colorincolorado.org/research/effectiveness

Brinton D. (2014). Integrating language and Content: Issues and Options.  http://www.tesol.org/connect/tesol-resource-center

Micek T. (2014). Visual, Auditory and Kinesthetic Styles.  http://www.tesol.org/connect/tesol-resource-center

Binkley, M, Erstad, O, Herman, J, Raizen, S, Ripley, M and Rumble, M. (2010). Defining 21st century skills.  http://atc21s.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/1- Defining-21st-Century-Skills.pdf.

Vallabi, J.E. (2011). Teaching of English: Principles and Practices. Hyderabad. Neelkamal Publications.

Vallabi, J.E. (2012). Teaching of English II (Special English): Principles and Practices.Hyderabad. Neelkamal Publications.

Venkateswaran, S. (2008). Principles of Teaching English. UP: Vikas Publishing House Pvt Ltd.

Rokhaniyah, H. (2016). The Implementation of Collaborative Learning to Enhance the Students’ Critical Thinking in Writing. At Tadib, 11(1). doi: 10.21111/at-tadib. v11i1.627

Daniels, H., Steineke, N., and Moses, S. (2014). Teaching the social skills of academic interaction: step-by-step lessons for respect, responsibility, and results. Thousand Oaks: Corwin.

Wren., & Martin. (2008). High School English Grammar &Composition. New Delhi. Chand Publishing.

 

Woodward, T. (2004). Planning Lessons and Courses. Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ricards, C.J. and Rodgers, S.T. (2001). Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching.

Cambridge University Press.

Arora, N (2012), English Language Teaching: Approaches and Methodologies, MacMillan India Ltd

McWilliam, E. (2008). Unlearning how to teach. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 45(3), 263–269. doi: 10.1080/14703290802176147

Bergmann, J. and Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education.

Web English Teacher (2014). Technology Integration Resources.  www.webenglishteacher.co

Lake D. Baerg K.and Paslawski, T. (2015). Teamwork, leadership and communication: collaboration basics for health professionals. Edmonton, Alberta: Brush Education Inc

Himmele P. and Himmele W. (2009). The language-rich classroom: a research-based framework for English language learners. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

 

Summers, J. And Smith, B. (2009). Communication skills handbook: how to succeed in written and oral communication. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE)                                       :          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II)                                   :          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)                :           25%

                                        Total                                   :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam                         :     50 marks  (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam                         :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Question Paper Format for End semester examination

Part A-15 Marks x 4 questions: Answer any 4 out of 6 = 60 Marks Part B-05 Marks x 8 questions: Answer any 8 out of 10 = 40 Marks

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

EDU141C - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF PHYSICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the aims and objectives of teaching Physics at national and international schools. It introduces the essential elements of Physics teaching and practice needed to teach Physics in an effective and inspirational manner. It develops the skills and competencies required for a physics teacher to teach physics in the global context.


  •     To acquire knowledge of the content of Physics operating at the national and international boards of schooling.

     To acquire knowledge of nature of physics.

     To understand the pedagogical principles underpinning the international schooling programmes.

     To appreciate the role of Physics in daily life.

     To develop scientific attitude among students.

     To understand the Aims and Objectives of teaching Physics.

     To state meaningful specific objectives in behavioral terms for teaching and learning.

     To develop the skill of preparing a Unit plan and Lesson plan.

     To achieve mastery over Approaches to learn (ATL) Physics.

     To achieve mastery over inquiry based classroom teaching.

     To inculcate international mindedness.

Course Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

  • Explain Physics content knowledge suitable for the age group of 11 to 18 years old.

  • Recognise and explain the role of Physics in local and global context.

  • Create opportunities to develop international mindedness of school students.

  • Use command terms in developing teaching and learning plans.

  • Create Course outline, Unit plan, and Lesson plan 

  • Apply inquiry-based teaching and learning

  • Apply collaborative teaching techniques

  • Demonstrate and explain Physics experiments in laboratory

  • Recognise and use IB learner profile attributes in teaching Physics.

  • Recognise and use approaches to teaching (ATT) Physics.

  • Recognise and use approaches to learning (ATL) Physics.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Essentials of physics for physics learner
 

Magnetism and electricity: Properties of magnetic field, Electromagnetic induction, Solenoid, Fleming’s LHR AC Generator, Fleming’s RHR DC Motor, Ohm’s law, Resistance, Factors affecting Resistance, Problems on resistance involving series and parallel circuit. Dynamics: Motion is relative, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration, Problems on Equations of Motion, Centrifugal and Centripetal forces, Principle of moments and problems based on uniform meter rule. Calorimetry: Heat capacity, Specific heat capacity, Latent heat, Law of calorimetry, problems based on calorimetry. Optics: Lens, types of lenses, Real and virtual images, ray diagrams, Prisms, types of prisms and its ray diagrams.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Teaching Physics in a global classroom
 

Meaning and nature of Physics, scope of Physics, Significance of Physics in daily life,Importance of Physics as a school subject, Practical, disciplinary and recreational Values of Physics; Scientific attitude– Meaning, characteristics of a scientific attitude person, techniques of developing scientific attitude. Integration of Physics with other school subjects. International mindedness with respect to physics. Linking the learner profile in Physics class.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Aims and Objectives of Teaching and Learning Physics
 

Aims and objectives of teaching Physics, Relationship of Inquiry, action, and reflection. Setting up of purpose of a physics unit: transferable goals, content, skills, application: Bloom’s and Anderson’s Taxonomy of thinking for teaching and learning, Command terms for setting objectives.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Effective Planning For Teaching and Learning in Physics
 

Lesson Plan: Meaning and importance; Herbartian Lesson Plan, Evaluation Approach to Lesson plan, IB course outline; Templates and construction, IB Unit Plan: Templates and construction, Flanders classroom interaction analysis.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches to Teaching Physics
 

Pedagogy vs. andragogy, Approaches to teaching (ATT) Approaches to learning (ATL)  as per IB, Inquiry based teaching and learning: Structured inquiry, Guided inquiry, Open inquiry, Differentiated teaching strategies, Technology for teaching and learning, Collaborative Teaching techniques: Socratic Seminar, Flipped classroom, fishbowl discussion method, Think-pair-share, Jigsaw technique, graphic organisers, Spider web discussion method. Process oriented guided inquiry learning, Experiential learning, Problem and project-based learning, Case based learning, Discovery learning.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Essential Skills for a Physics teacher
 

Thinking skills, Communication skills, Social skills, Self-management skills, Research skills, Oral and written communication skills, Critical thinking skills, Problem solving skills, Teamwork and collaborative skills, Metacognitive skills, Self-regulated learner

Text Books And Reference Books:

BergHomer, Bowen-Jones. (2014). IB Physics Course Book 2014 edition: The only DP resources a developed with the IB. UK: Oxford University Press

Homer., & David. (2014). Physics: course companion. UK: Oxford University Press.

Kirk, Tim. (2014). Physics Study Guide 2014 edition: Oxford IB Diploma Programme. UK: Oxford university press.

Kirk, Tim. (2012). Physics: course companion. UK: Oxford University Press.

Goldman, A. I. (2008). A causal theory of knowing. The Journal of Philosophy, 64(12).  http://www.jstor.org

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org IB. (2013). IB Learner Profile.  http://www.ibo.org

Hrera, S. R. (2012). Approaches to international mindedness in IB world schools.http://www.ibo.org

Audet, RH., & Jordan, LJ (eds). (2005). Integrating inquiry across the curriculum. Thousand Oaks, California, USA. Corwin Press.

Bergmann., J. & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Reading

Costa, AL., & Kallick, B. (2009). Habits of mind across the curriculum: Practical and creative strategies for teachers. Alexandria, Virginia, USA: ASCD.

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

William, D. (2011). Embedded Formative Assessment. Bloomington, Indiana, USA. Solution Tree Press.

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org Nayak, A K. (2004). Teaching of Physics. New Delhi: Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd.

Veer, U. (2004). Modern Teaching of Physics. New Delhi: Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd.

IB. (2019). Approaches to teaching and learning in the Diploma Programmehttp://resources.ibo.org

Tomlinson, C., & Imbeau, M. B. (2011). Managing a differentiated classroom: A practical guide. https://www.researchgate.net

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

Fahey. (2012). Ways to learn through inquiry: guiding children to deeper understanding. UK: International Baccalaureate Organization (UK) Ltd.

Gaikwad, P. (2011). Advanced instructional strategies [compendium]. Silang, Philippines: Adventist Institute of Advanced Studies.

Hutchings, W. (2007). Enquiry-Based Learning: Definitions and Rationale. Manchester, UK: Centre for Excellence in Enquiry-Based Learning. The University of Manchester

Lee, VS. (2004). Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors. Virginia, USA: Stylus Publishing LLC.

Tilke, A. (2011). The International Baccalaureate Diploma Program and the School Library: Inquiry-Based Education. Santa Barbara, California, USA: ABC-CLIO, LLC.

IB. (2019). Approaches to teaching and learning in the Diploma Programmehttp://resources.ibo.org

 

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE)                                       :          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II)                                   :          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)                :           25%

                                        Total                                   :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam                         :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam                         :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 

CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks.

CIA-I and CIA-III: Continuous Internal Assessment

 Continuous Internal Assessment I

CIA- I may have one or two components - Written (reports) Group or Individual - Viva or Presentation may also be conducted

 Continuous Internal Assessment III

The following methods may be adopted

Multiple choice based test.

Practical Activity

Presentation/Viva

Group Discussion

 Attendance 

The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows

95%-100%         : 05 marks

90%-94%           : 04 marks

85%-89%           : 03 marks

80%-84%           : 02 marks

76%-79%           : 01 mark

EDU141D - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF COMMERCE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description

This course introduces students to the aims and objectives of teaching Commerce at national and international schools. It introduces the essential elements of Commerce teaching and practice needed to teach Commerce in an effective and inspirational manner. It develops the skills and competencies required for a Commerce teacher to teach Commerce in the global context.

 

 

Course Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

 

      Solve problems of the content of Commerce operating at the national and international boards of schooling suitable for the age group of 11 to 18 years old.

      Apply the underpinning principles of teaching and learning in Commerce

      Formulate goals and objectives in Teaching and Learning in Commerce

      Develop Course outlines, Unit plans, and Lesson plans

      Apply approaches to teaching (ATT) and approaches to learning (ATL) in everyday teaching of Commerce

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Essentials of Commerce for the Commerce learner
 

Level of Knowledge – Working Knowledge

Business organization and environment- Introduction to Commerce, Types of organization, Organizational objectives, stakeholders, External environments, Growth and evolution, Organizational planning tools Human Resource Management-Functions and evolution of human resource management, Organizational Structure, Leadership and management, Motivation, Organizational/ Corporate culture, Industrial/employee relationship, Finance and Accounts -Sources of finance, Costs and revenues, Break-even analysis, Final Accounts, Profitability and liquidity ratios, Efficiency ratio analysis, Cash flow, Investment appraisal, Budgets.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Teaching Commerce in a classroom
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual and Basic

Commerce as an area of study in Commerce and management studiee, scope of Commerce, Significance of Commerce in daily life, Theory of Knowledge in Commerce; Ways of knowing; Sense perception, Reasoning, Language, Emotion, Imagination, Faith, Intuition, and Memory. Role of a teacher in theory of knowledge; Stimulate, Facilitate, and Guide. Constructing Theory of knowledge questions in Commerce. International mindedness with respect to Commerce. Linking the learner profile in Commerce class.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Aims and Objectives of Teaching and Learning Commerce
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual and Basic

Meaning of the terms Aim, Objective, Learning outcome, and Specification; Objectives of Teaching Commerce. Relationship of Inquiry, action, and reflection. Setting up of purpose of a Commerce unit: transferable goals, content, skills, application: Bloom’s and Anderson’s Taxonomy of thinking for teaching and learning, Listing of Specifications under General Objectives, Criteria for Writing Instructional objectives.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Effective Planning for Teaching and Learning in Commerce
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Lesson Plan: Meaning and importance; Herbartian Lesson Plan, Evaluation Approach to Lesson plan, IB course outline; Templates and construction, IB Unit Plan: Templates and construction, Flanders classroom interaction analysis.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches, Methods & techniques of Teaching and learning Commerce
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Pedagogy vs. andragogy, Approaches to teaching (ATT) Approaches to learning (ATL) as per IB. Methods of Teaching- Inquiry based teaching and learning: Structured inquiry, Guided inquiry, Open inquiry, Process oriented guided inquiry learning, laboratory method, Experiential learning, Problem and project-based learning, Case based learning, Discovery learning, fishbowl discussion method, Spider web discussion method. Collaborative Teaching techniques: Differentiated teaching strategies, Socratic Seminar, Flipped classroom, Think-pair-share, Jigsaw technique, graphic organisers.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Essential skills for a Commerce teacher
 

Level of Knowledge-Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Thinking skills, Communication skills, Social skills, Self-management skills, Research skills, Oral and written communication skills, Critical thinking skills, Problem solving skills, Teamwork and collaborative skills, Metacognitive skills, Self-regulated learner.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dessler, G. (2018). Human resource management. New York: Pearson.

Erasmus, B., Strydom, J. W., & Rudansky-Kloppers, S. (2016). Introduction to Commerce. Cape Town: Oxford University Press Southern Africa.

Pizzey, A. (2001). Accounting and finance: a firm foundation. London: Continuum. Wissman, J., Knippa, A., & Roberts, K. K. (2008). Leadership and management. Overland

Park, KS: Assessment Technologies Institute.(n.d.).

https://ibpublishing.ibo.org/exist/rest/app/tsm.xql?doc=d_0_tok_gui_1304_1_e&part=

2&chapter=4.

Heydorn, W., & Jesudason, S. (2014). Decoding theory of knowledge for the IB diploma: Themes, skills and assessment. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

IB TOK: What is the knowledge framework? (n.d.).  http://theoryofknowledgestudent.com/knowledge-framework.

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2010). Quick flip questions for the revised Blooms taxonomy. Janesville, WI: Edupress.

Bloom, B. S. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing a revision of Blooms Taxonomy of educational objectives. New York: Longman.

Gershon, M. (2015). How to use Blooms taxonomy in the classroom: the complete guide.

Scotts Valley, CA: Createspace.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Daily Lesson Plans - IB Business and Management. (n.d.).

https://sites.google.com/site/ibbusinessandmanagementmitchem/daily-lesson-plans.

Interactive Education. (2005). Lesson plan. Whangaparaoa, N.Z.

Mishra, R. C. (2009). Lesson planning. New Delhi, India: A.P.H. Pub. Corp.

Paulson, D. (1970). Unit planning: a guide for effective teaching. Philadelphia: Lutheran Church Press.

Alvarado, A. E., & Herr, P. R. (2003). Inquiry-Based Learning Using Everyday Objects Hands-On Instructional Strategies That Promote Active Learning in Grades 3-8. Place of publication not identified: Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse.

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: reach every student in every class every day. Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education.

Compayré Gabriel, & Payne, W. H. (2002). The history of pedagogy. Honolulu, HI: Univ.

Press of the Pacific.

Hamilton, B. O. N. I. (2018). Integrating Technology in The Classroom: tools to meet the need of every student. Place of publication not identified: ISTE.

Reidsema, C., Kavanagh, L., Hadgraft, R., & Smith, N. (2017). The flipped classroom practice and practices in higher education. Singapore: Springer.

Approaches to teaching and learning in the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme. (n.d.).  https://www.ibo.org/globalassets/digital- tookit/flyers-and-artworks/approaches-to-teaching-learning-dp-en.pdf.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE):          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II):          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 25%

                                       Total :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam          :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam           :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 

CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks.

 

CIA-I and CIA-III: Continuous Internal Assessment

 

EDU142A - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF SOCIAL SCIENCE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the aims and objectives of teaching Social Science at national and international schools. It introduces the essential elements of Social Science teaching and practice needed to teach Social Science in an effective and inspirational manner. It develops the skills and competencies required for a Social Science teacher to teach Social Science in a global context.

Course Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

  • Acquire Social Science content knowledge suitable for the age group of 11 to 18 years old.

  • Reflect on IB knowledge framework.

  • Identify elements of the Theory of knowledge (TOK) with respect to Social Science subject.

  • Recognize and practice IB learner profile attributes.

  • Analyze Approaches to teaching (ATT) as per IB curriculum.

  • Analyze the Approaches to learning (ATL) as per IB curriculum.

  • Appreciate the role of Social Science in the local and global context.

  • Develop international mindedness.

  • Create Course outline, Unit plan, and Lesson plan as per IB Learner profile, CAS and TOK.

  • Critically evaluate the student centric approaches of teaching Social Science subject.

  • Demonstrate skills of incorporating collaborative and cooperative teaching techniques with respect to Social Science subject.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Essentials of Social Science for a Social science learner
 

 

The Ancient Civilizations/Cultures of India: Vedic Period, Dynasties: Maurya, Gupta, Vardhana; Religions: Buddhism, Jainism, Islam & Christianity World Civilizations: Harappa, Egypt, China, Mesopotamia-origin, development, features and its contributions. Physical Features of India: Major geographical divisions and their importance (Himalayan Mountain Ranges, River plains, Desert, Deccan Plateau and Coastal Plains). The Earth-Structure, size & shape, continents and oceans, latitudes and longitudes, layers of earth, structure, composition, internal and external forces. Constitution-constituent assembly, drafting and framing of the constitution, salient features, fundamental rights and duties, directive principles of the state policy, its important to state and citizen. Basics of economics-meaning. Importance, resources and economic activities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Teaching Social Science
 

Meaning and nature of Social Science, the scope of Social Science, Geography, Economics and Political Science

Significance of Social Science in daily life, Importance of Social Science as a school discipline, Practical, disciplinary and recreational Values of teaching Social Sciences. Social Science as an art and science, Components of Social Sciences, Difference between Social Science, Natural Science and Social Studies., the scope of Social Science, Significance of Social Science in daily life, Theory of Knowledge in Social Science; Ways of knowing; Sense perception, Reasoning, Language, Emotion, Imagination, Faith, Intuition, and Memory. Role of a teacher in the theory of knowledge; Stimulate, Facilitate, and Guide. Constructing Theory of knowledge questions in Social Science. International mindedness with respect to social science. Linking the learner profile in social science class.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Aims and Objectives of Teaching and Learning social science
 

Aims and objectives of Teaching Social Science-History, Economics, Geography and Political Science Relationship of Inquiry, action, and reflection. Setting up of the purpose of a Social Science unit: transferable goals, content, skills, application: Bloom’s and Anderson’s Taxonomy of thinking for teaching and learning, Criteria for Writing Instructional Objectives.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Effective Planning for Teaching and Learning in Social Science
 

Designing-meaning, importance, steps and formats of Lesson Plan: Herbartian Lesson Plan, Evaluation Approach to Lesson plan, Unit Plan Meaning, importance, format and Uses; Approach to Lesson plan, IB course outline; Templates and construction, IB Unit Plan: Templates and construction, Flanders classroom interaction analysis.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches to Teaching Social science
 

 

Pedagogy vs. andragogy, Approaches to teaching (ATT) Approaches to learning (ATL) as per IB, Inquiry-based teaching and learning: Structured inquiry, Guided inquiry, Open inquiry, Differentiated teaching strategies, Technology for teaching and learning, Collaborative Teaching techniques: Socratic Seminar, Flipped classroom (Bergmann and Sams,2012), fishbowl discussion method, Think-pair-share, Jigsaw technique, graphic organisers, Spider web discussion method.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Essential skills for a global Social Science teacher
 

 

Thinking skills, Communication skills, Social skills, Self-management skills, Research skills, Oral and written communication skills, Critical thinking skills, Problem-solving skills, Teamwork and collaborative skills, Metacognitive skills, Self-regulated learner.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Cannon Marin-Manmaux (2014) IB 20th Century World History Course Book: Oxford IB Diploma Programme Oxford University Press

Richards John F. (2005). The Mughal Empire, English. Foundation Books. Singh Mahesh Vikram (2009). Delhi Sultanate. Centrum Press, Haryana.

Goldman, A. I. (2008). A causal theory of knowing. The Journal of Philosophy, 64(12).  http://www.jstor.org

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org IB. (2013). IB Learner Profile.  http://www.ibo.org

Hrera, S. R. (2012). Approaches to international-mindedness in IB world schools.

http://www.ibo.org

Carr, E. H. (1961). What is History? London, Macmillan and Co. Ltd.

Chowdhuri, K. P. (1975). Effective Teaching of History in India, New Delhi, NCERT. Ghate, V. D. (1962). The Teaching of History, Bombay, Oxford University Press.

Anderson, LW and Krathwohl, DR (eds). 2001. A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Longman. New York, USA.

Audet, RH., & Jordan, LJ (eds). (2005). Integrating inquiry across the curriculum. Thousand Oaks, California, USA. Corwin Press.

Bergmann., J. & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education.

Jadav, N. (2001). Teaching of History, Anmol Publication. New Delhi,

Kochhar, S.K. (1998). The Teaching of Social Studies. Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi:

Kohli, A.S. (2004). Teaching of Social Studies. Anmol Publications. New Delhi Sharma, S. K. Teaching of History, Lotus Press. New Delhi,

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

William, D. (2011). Embedded Formative Assessment. Bloomington, Indiana, USA. Solution Tree Press.

Derry, SJ and Murphy, DA. (1986). “Designing systems that train learning ability: from theory to practice”. Review of Educational Research. Vol 56, number 1. Pp 1–39.

Siddiqui, M.H. (2009). Teaching of History. New Delhi: APH Publishing Corporation. Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (2011) Understanding by Design® Guide to Creating High

Quality Units. Alexandria, VA. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ACSD)

 

Klein, JD. (1992). Effects of cooperative learning and need for affiliation on performance, time on task and satisfaction. Educational Technology

Research and Development. Vol 40, number 4. Pp 39–48.

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

McKinney, P.(2014). Information Literacy and Inquiry-Based Learning: Evaluation of a Five-Year Programme of Curriculum Development. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. Vol 46. PP. 148-166.

Trilling, B & Fadel, C. (2009). 21st Century Skills: Learning for Life in our Times. San Francisco, California, USA. John Wiley & Sons,

 

Wiggins, A. (2011). Spider web.  http://alexiswiggins.pbworks.com

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Tomlinson, C., & Imbeau, M. B. (2011). Managing a differentiated classroom: A practical guide. https://www.researchgate.net

Fahey. (2012). Ways to learn through inquiry: guiding children to deeper understanding. UK: International Baccalaureate Organization (UK) Ltd.

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

Kaplan, A. (1998). Clarifying Metacognition, Self-Regulation, and Self-Regulated Learning: What's the Purpose? Educational Psychology Review. Vol 27. Pp. 447–484.

Krapels, RH & Davis, BD. (2003). Designation of ‘communication skills’ in position Listings.

Business Communication Quarterly. Vol 6, number 2. Pp. 90–96.

Zimmerman, BJ & Schunk, D (Eds). (1989). Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement. Springer. New York, USA.

Fahey. (2012). Ways to learn through inquiry: guiding children to deeper understanding. UK: International Baccalaureate Organization (UK) Ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows: