CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ELECTRONICS

School of Sciences

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Science (Computer Science, Mathematics, Electronics)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 3 100
CSC331 DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING Core Courses 4 4 100
CSC351 PYTHON PROGRAMMING LAB Core Courses 2 2 50
ELE331 COMMUNICATION ELECTRONICS Core Courses 4 4 100
ELE351 COMMUNICATION ELECTRONICS LAB Core Courses 2 2 50
ENG321 ENGLISH-III Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 2 100
FRN321 FRENCH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 3 100
HIN321 HINDI Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 3 100
KAN321 KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 03 50
MAT331 REAL ANALYSIS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAT351 PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR MATHEMATICS Core Courses 2 2 50
SAN321 SANSKRIT Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 3 100
TAM321 TAMIL Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH - 3 3 100
CSC431 COMPUTER NETWORKS AND JAVA PROGRAMMING - 4 4 100
CSC451 JAVA PROGRAMMING LAB - 2 2 50
ELE431 MICROPROCESSOR AND MICROCONTROLLER - 4 4 100
ELE451 MICROPROCESSOR AND MICROCONTROLLER LAB - 2 2 50
ENG421 ENGLISH-IV - 3 2 100
FRN421 FRENCH - 3 3 100
HIN421 HINDI - 3 3 100
KAN421 KANNADA - 3 03 50
MAT431 ALGEBRA - 4 4 100
MAT451 PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR MATHEMATICAL MODELLING - 2 2 50
SAN421 SANSKRIT - 3 3 100
TAM421 TAMIL - 3 3 100
5 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CSC541A DATA ANALYTICS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CSC541B INTERNET OF THINGS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CSC541C DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
CSC541D BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CSC542A UNIX OPERATING SYSTEM Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CSC542B WEB TECHNOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CSC542C MOBILE APPLICATIONS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CSC542D GRAPHICS AND ANIMATION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CSC542E .NET TECHNOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CSC551A DATA ANALYTICS LAB Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
CSC551B INTERNET OF THINGS LAB Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CSC551C DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING LAB Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
CSC551D BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE LAB Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
CSC552A UNIX OPERATING SYSTEM LAB Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
CSC552B WEB TECHNOLOGY LAB Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
CSC552C MOBILE APPLICATIONS LAB Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
CSC552D GRAPHICS AND ANIMATION LAB Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
CSC552E .NET TECHNOLOGY LAB Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
ELE531 EMBEDDED SYSTEMS AND IOT FUNDAMENTALS Core Courses 3 3 100
ELE541A OPTOELECTRONIC DEVICES AND COMMUNICATION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
ELE541B ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
ELE541C DIGITAL SIGNALS AND SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
ELE551 EMBEDDED SYSTEMS AND IOT FUNDAMENTALS LAB Core Courses 2 2 50
ELE551A OPTOELECTRONIC DEVICES AND COMMUNICATION LAB Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
ELE551B ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION LAB Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
ELE551C DIGITAL SIGNALS AND SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE LAB Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
MAT531 LINEAR ALGEBRA Core Courses 3 3 100
MAT541A INTEGRAL TRANSFORMS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
MAT541B MATHEMATICAL MODELLING Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
MAT541C GRAPH THEORY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
MAT541D CALCULUS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
MAT541E OPERATIONS RESEARCH Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
MAT551 LINEAR ALGEBRA USING PYTHON Core Courses 2 2 50
MAT551A INTEGRAL TRANSFORMS USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
MAT551B MATHEMATICAL MODELLING USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
MAT551C GRAPH THEORY USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
MAT551D CALCULUS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
MAT551E OPERATIONS RESEARCH USING PYTHON Discipline Specific Elective Courses 2 2 50
6 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CSC631 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS - 3 3 100
CSC641A INTRODUCTION TO SOFT COMPUTING - 3 3 100
CSC641B CLOUD COMPUTING - 3 3 100
CSC641C COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE - 3 3 100
CSC641D OOAD USING UML - 4 4 100
CSC641E USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN(UX) - 3 3 100
CSC681 MAIN PROJECT - 4 4 100
ELE631 VERILOG AND FPGA BASED DESIGN - 3 3 100
ELE641A NON-CONVENTIONAL ENERGY SOURCES AND POWER ELECTRONICS - 3 3 100
ELE641B NANOTECHNOLOGY AND NANOELECTRONICS - 3 3 100
ELE641C DATA COMMUNICATION AND NETWORKING - 3 3 100
ELE651 VERILOG AND FPGA BASED DESIGN LAB - 2 2 50
ELE681 PROJECT LAB - 2 2 50
MAT631 COMPLEX ANALYSIS - 3 3 100
MAT641A MECHANICS - 3 3 100
MAT641B NUMERICAL METHODS - 3 3 100
MAT641C DISCRETE MATHEMATICS - 3 3 100
MAT641D NUMBER THEORY - 3 3 100
MAT641E FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS - 3 3 100
MAT651 COMPLEX ANALYSIS USING PYTHON - 2 2 50
MAT651A MECHANICS USING PYTHON - 2 2 50
MAT651B NUMERICAL METHODS USING PYTHON - 2 2 50
MAT651C DISCRETE MATHEMATICS USING PYTHON - 2 2 50
MAT651D NUMBER THEORY USING PYTHON - 2 2 50
MAT651E FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS USING EXCEL AND PYTHON - 2 2 50
MAT681 PROJECT ON MATHEMATICAL MODELS - 5 5 150

AEN321 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This course is taught in the second year for students from different streams, namely BA, BSc

 

and BCom. If the first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ

 

University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian voices in English and Indian

 

regional literatures in translation for the Additional English students of the first year, the

 

second year syllabus intends to take that project a little further and open up the engagement

 

of the students to texts from across the world. The syllabus - selection of texts will

 

concentrate on readings from South Asian, Latin American, Australian, Canadian, and Afro-

 

American. It will voice subaltern concerns of identity, gender, race, ethnicity and problems of

 

belongingness experienced by humanity all over the globe.

 

The syllabus will extend the concerns of nation and nationality and marginalization,

 

discussed within the Indian context to a more inclusive and wider global platform. We have

 

consciously kept out ‘mainstream’ writers and concentrated on the voices of the subalterns

 

from across the world. There is an implicit recognition in this project that though the aspects

 

of marginalization and the problems facing subalterns are present across cultures and

 

nations, the experiences, expressions and reflections are specific to each race and culture.

 

The course will address these nuances and specificities and enable our students to become

 

more aware and sensitive to life and reality around them. This will equip the students, who

 

are global citizens, to understand not just the Indian scenario, but also situate themselves

 

within the wider global contexts and understand the spaces they will move into and negotiate

 

in their future.

 

There is a prescribed text book Blends: Voices from Margins for the second year students,

 

compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

Course Objectives

 

The course objectives are

 

 to enable students to look at different cultures through Literature

 

 to help students develop an understanding of subaltern realities and identity politics

 

 to inculcate literary sensibility/taste among students across disciplines

 

 to improve language skills –speaking, reading, writing and listening

 

 to equip the students with tools for developing lateral thinking

 

 to equip students with critical reading and thinking habits

 

 to reiterate the study skills and communication skills they developed in the previous

 

year and extend it.

Course Outcome

CO1: it will enable students to understand and analyse the nuances of cultures, ethnicities and other diversity around them and become sensitive towards them.

CO2 : They will be able to critique literature from a cultural, ethical, social and political perspectives

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Children?s Novel
 

TetsukoKuroyanagi: Tottochan: The Little Girl at the Window12

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Short Story
 

Liliana Heker : “The Stolen Party

 

 Higuchi Ichiyo: “Separate Ways”

 

 Harukki Murakami "Birthday Girl"

 

 Luisa Valenzuela: “I’m your Horse in the Night”

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Poetry
 

Poetry 12 Hrs

 

 Silvio Curbelo: “Summer Storm”

 

 Nancy Morejon: “Black Woman”

 

 Ruben Dario: “To Roosevelt”

 

 Mina Asadi: “A Ring to me is a Bondage”

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Essay
 

Essay 9Hrs

 

 Amy Tan: “Mother Tongue

 

 Linda Hogan: “Waking Up the Rake”

 

 Isabelle Allande: “Open Veins of Latin America”

Text Books And Reference Books:

Blends Book II

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Oxford Encyclopeadia on Latin American History

Children's Literature -  Kimberley Reynolds (CUP)

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: A written test for 20 marks. It can be an Open Book test, a classroom assignment, an

 

objective or descriptive test pertaining to the texts and ideas discussed in class.

 

CIA2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 works

 

CIA 3: This is to be a creative test/ project in small groups by students. They may do

 

Collages, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes, presentations, debates,

 

charts or any other creative test for 20 marks. This test should allow the students to explore

 

their creativity and engage with the real world around them and marks can be allotted to

 

students depending on how much they are able to link the ideas and discussions in the texts

 

to the world around them.

 

Question Paper Pattern

 

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

 

Section A: 4x5= 20

 

Section B: 2x15=30

 

Total 50

 

End Semester Exam: 3 hrs

 

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

 

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

 

Total 50

CSC331 - DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course enables the students to apply the concepts of database management system and helps to understand the concept of software engineering principles. This course also focuses on the important steps in designing the software project.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the basic concepts of relational database models and software engineering.

CO2: Demonstrate database operations using Relational Calculus and Algebra.

CO3: Design normalized database applications.

CO4: Analyze and find the practical solutions to the problem by applying the software process.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
DATABASES AND DATABASE USERS
 

Data- Database- Database management system- Characteristics of the  database  approach-  Role of Database administrators- Role of Database Designers- End Users- Advantages  of Using a DBMS and When not to use a DBMS-Database System Concepts and Architecture- Data Models- Categories of data models- Schemas- Instances- and  Database  states-  The  Three schema architecture- Data independence- DBMS Languages and Interfaces- Classification of Database Management Systems.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
BASIC SQL
 

SQL data definition and data types- specifying constraints in SQL- SQL functions- Basic queries-Filtering data using where- Group by statements- DDL- DML- Retrieving data from multiple tables- Sub queries- Concept of a view in SQL.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
THE RELATIONAL ALGEBRA AND RELATIONAL CALCULUS
 

Relational Algebra: Unary relational operations; Binary relational operations ; Examples of queries in relational algebra, Relational calculus: The Tuple relational calculus; The Domain relational calculus.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
DATA MODELING USING ENTITY_RELATIONSHIP MODEL
 

Using  High   Level   Conceptual   Data   Models   for   Database   Design-    Example  Database applications-Entity types- Entity Sets-Attributes and Keys- Relationships- Relationship types- Roles and Structural constraints- Weak Entity Types- Drawing E- R Diagrams.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
DATABASE DESIGN
 

Functional dependencies and Normalization for Relational Databases-  Normalization  concepts- Normal forms-1NF- 2NF- 3NF- BCNF- 4NF.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
SOFTWARE AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
 

Nature of software - Defining software, Software Application Domains, Legacy Software - Software Engineering, The software process, Software Engineering practice - The essence of Practice, General Principles - Software Crisis and Myths.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
PROCESS MODELS
 

A generic process model – Defining a framework activity, identifying a Task Set, Process Patterns - Process Assessment and improvement, Prescriptive Process Models – The waterfall Model, Incremental Model, Evolutionary Process Model, Concurrent Models - A Final Word on Evolutionary Processes

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:6
UNDERSTANDING REQUIREMENTS
 

Requirements Engineering, Establishing the groundwork – Identifying Stakeholders, Recognizing multiple viewpoints, Working toward Collaboration, Asking the first questions - Eliciting requirements - Collaborative requirement gathering, Quality function Deployment, Usage Scenario Elicitation Work Products - Developing use cases, building the requirements model – Elements of the requirements Model, Analysis pattern - Negotiating requirements, validating requirements.

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:6
DESIGN CONCEPTS
 

The design within the context of Software Engineering, The design process – Software quality guidelines and attributes, The evolution of software design - Design concepts – Abstraction, Architecture, Patterns, Separation of concerns, Modularity, information hiding, Functional Independence, refinement, Aspects, Refactoring, Object Oriented design concepts Design classes. The design Model – Data Design elements, Architectural Design elements, Interface Design Elements, Component - Level Design elements, Deployment level Design elements.

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:7
Software Testing
 

A Strategic approach to testing- Verification and Validation, Organizing for software testing, software testing strategy, Criteria for completion of testing-Test strategies for conventional software - Unit testing, Integration testing- Test strategies for Object Oriented software-Unit testing in the OO Context, Integration testing in the OO Context - Validation testing, White- box testing, Basic path testing- Flow Graph Notation, Independent program paths, Deriving test cases, Graph matrices- control structure testing – Condition testing, Data flow testing, loop testing- Black-box testing-Graph-based testing methods, Equivalence partitioning, boundary value analysis.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Fundamentals of Database Systems, Shamkanth B Navathe, Ramez Elmasri, 7th Edition, Pearson Education, 2017.

[2] Pressman S Roger, Software Engineering A Practitioner’s Approach, McGraw Hill International Editions, 7th edition, 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Database System Concepts, Abraham Silberschatz, Henry F Korth, S Sudarshan, McGraw Hill Education, 6th edition, 2017.

[2] Sommerville, Ian, Software Engineering, Addison Wesley, 9th Edition, 2010.

[3] Pankaj Jalote, Software Engineering: A Precise Approach, Wiley India, 2010.

[4] Stephen R. Schach, Software Engineering, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited, 2007.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA: 50%

ESE: 50%

CSC351 - PYTHON PROGRAMMING LAB (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the programming paradigms associated with python. It explores the object-oriented programming, Graphical programming aspects of python with help of built-in modules.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the use of built-in objects of Python.

CO2: Demonstrate significant experience with python program development environment.

CO3: Develop GUI programming concepts.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
PYTHON DATA STRUCTURES
 

Sequences, Mapping and Sets- Dictionaries- Functions - Lists and Mutability – String Operations.

Program 1

Demonstrate the use of lists, sets, tuples, dictionaries and perform the string operations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
MODULES AND OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING PYTHON
 

Mechanism of Module Execution - Problem Solving Using Lists and Functions - Classes: Classes and Instances-Inheritance.

Program 2

Perform the usage and creation of custom modules and demonstrate the features of OOP concepts using Python.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
EXCEPTION HANDLING AND REGULAR EXPRESSION
 

Exception Handling: Catching and Raising Exceptions, Custom Exceptions – Regular Expression: Character Classes, Quantifiers, Grouping and Capturing, Assertions and Flags.

Program 3

Demonstrate the usage of Exception Handling and Perform Regular Expression operations for different scenario.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
GUI PROGRAMMING - ROOT WINDOW
 

GUI Programming Introduction-Tkiner module-Root window-Widgets-Button-Label.

Program 4

Create a system application using Tkinter and perform the usage of different widgets.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
GUI PROGRAMMING - WIDGETS AND TABLES
 

Tkinter Message types – Text – Menu - Listboxes – Spinbox - Creating tables.

Program 5

 

Perform the operation using list and populate the values in the form of tables inside GUI using Tkinter.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
WEB FRAMEWORK - DJANGO
 

Introduction-Web framework-creating model to add database service - Django administration application.

Program 6

Develop a web application using Django and explain the procedure of creating model and accessing model using Django administration application.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:3
Numpy
 

Computation on NumPy-Aggregations-Computation on Arrays-Comparisons, Masks and Boolean Arrays-Sorting Arrays.

Program 7

Demonstrate Indexing and Sorting using Numpy.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
Pandas
 

Pandas Objects-Data indexing and Selection-Operating on Data in Pandas-Handling Missing Data.

Program 8

Demonstrate handling of missing data using Pandas.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Wesely J.Chun,Core Python Application Programming ,Prentice Hall,third edition 2015.

[2]T.R.Padmanabhan, Programming with Python,Springer Publications,2016.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Zhang.Y ,An Introduction to Python and Computer Programming, Springer Publications, 2016.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA – 50 %

ESE - 50 %

ELE331 - COMMUNICATION ELECTRONICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The rapid growth of communication technologies and their pervasive applications in all walks of life today emphasize the importance of a course in electronic communication systems. This paper provides comprehensive coverage of the field of electronic communication and various technologies. It starts with basic concepts of noise, modulation and demodulation techniques through which radio communication techniques are introduced. The basic principles of data communication, satellite communication, and mobile communications are included. A brief study on the latest technologies like CDMA, LTE, 4G and 5G etc will help the students to up-date their knowledge of current technologies. Units III and IV caters to regional and national needs.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse the applications of Electronic communication in daily life

CO2: Demonstrate the concepts of modulation and demodulation

CO3: Illustrate the various block diagrams in electronic(satellite) communication

CO4: Apply the knowledge of various communication techniques in designing circuits

CO5: Demonstrate what is E-waste, health-hazardous elements and how to manage its disposal

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Analog modulation and demodulation
 

Introduction to communication – means and modes. Need for modulation. Block diagram of an electronic communication system, frequency allocation for a radio communication system in India (TRAI). Electromagnetic communication spectrum, band designations and usage. Concept of Noise, random processes & its measurements (qualitative), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, Thermal noise voltage. Amplitude Modulation, modulation index and frequency spectrum. Power relations in AM, modulation by several sine waves, Generation of AM (Emitter Modulation), Amplitude Demodulation (diode detector), Concept of Single side band generation and detection. Frequency Modulation (FM) and Phase Modulation (PM), modulation index and frequency spectrum, equivalence between FM and PM, FM detector (slope detector), Qualitative idea of Super heterodyne receiver

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Pulse and digital modulation
 

Introduction to pulse and digital communication, Sampling theorem, Sampling techniques, Analog pulse modulation methods, Basic Principles of PAM, PWM, PPM, diagrams, advantages and disadvantages of each method, Pulse Code Modulation, Digital Carrier Modulation Techniques, Sampling, Quantization, quantization error and Encoding. Block diagram of a simple PCM communication system, Advantages and applications of PCM.Digital: Need for digital transmission, Concept of Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK), Frequency Shift Keying (FSK), Phase Shift Keying (PSK), and Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK). Latest trends in digital modulation, Characteristics of data transmission circuits, Channel capacity, Shannon limit, Nyquist rate, data transmission speed, bit rate and baud rate, noise, cross talk etc

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Satellite communication and applications
 

Introduction and need of a satellite, the launching of a satellite, the use of Kepler's laws, satellite orbits, geostationary satellite advantages.  Satellite subsystems-block diagram,  ground station – simplified block diagram, of an earth station, satellite visibility, satellite attitude and station keeping, transponders (C - Band), satellite bandwidth, path loss, uplink, downlink and cross-link, frequency reuse, spatial isolation, solar panels, antennas-types satellite applications, remote sensing, weather forecast, Google map, satellite TV, cable TV, TV channels, DTH Technology, Digital TV,

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Mobile telephony system
 

The basic concept of mobile communication, frequency bands used in mobile communication, the concept of cell sectoring and cell splitting, frequency reuse in mobile communication, hand off, improving coverage and cell systems, SIM number, IMEI number, need for data encryption, architecture (block diagram) of mobile communication network, the idea of GSM, CDMA, TDMA and FDMA technologies, a simplified block diagram of mobile phone handset, 2G, 3G and 4G concepts, LTE and 5 G (qualitative only).

Health hazards of mobile phone communication and usage.Introduction to Electronic-waste, hazards of e-waste, the materials responsible, management of e-waste, Indian and global scenario of e-waste management

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]. Dennis Roddy & John Coolen, (2002). Electronic Communication, (4th Edition.) PHI,

[2]. George Kennedy & Bernad Davis, (2005). Electronic Communication Systems, (4th Edition .), TATA McGraw Hill.

[3]. Louis Frenzel,(2002) Communication Electronics,(3rd Edition.), TMH.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]. Wayne Tomasi,(2011). Advanced Electronics Communication Systems-,(6th Edition.), Prentice-Hall.

[2]. B.P. Lathi (2011). Modern Digital and Analog Communication Systems, (4th Edition.), Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Components

Marks

CIA 1

Assignment

10

CIA2

MSE

25

CIA 3

Quiz, MCQ test, presentation, minor project, MOOC,

Industry/Educational Visits, Awareness campaign on E-waste and Management, health hazards of mobile telephony etc.

10

Attendance

 

05

ESE

 

50

Total

100

ELE351 - COMMUNICATION ELECTRONICS LAB (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This practical course provides an overview of the experiments connected with electronic  communication techniques. The lab sessions allow the students to construct, analyse and  troubleshoot circuits using transistors, op-amp IC 741, IC 555. The experiments are from analogue,  pulse and digital modulation techniques

Course Outcome

This paper enables the students to 

 ● Acquire experimental skills, analyse the results and interpret data. 

● Demonstrate and construct circuits for different aspects of analogue communication

● Design, model and develop various digital communication devices

● Illustrate how to acquire data and verify the working of different communication circuits  and devices

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
List of experiments
 

 

1. Voltage-controlled oscillator

 

2. Tuned amplifier

 

3. To study pulse width modulation (PWM)

 

4. To study pulse position modulation (PPM)

 

5. To study ASK modulation

 

6. To study FSK modulation.

 

7. Saw-tooth generator using IC 555

 

8. To design an amplitude modulator and demodulator using a transistor.

9. To study pulse amplitude modulation (PAM)

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]. Poorna Chandra Rao & Sasikala,( 2004), Handbook of experiments in Electronics and  Communication- VIKAS Publishing house

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

[1]. Dennis Roddy &John Coolen, (2002). Electronic Communication, (4th Edition) PHI, 

[2]. George Kennedy & Bernad Davis, (2005). Electronic Communication Systems, (4th Edition.),  TATA McGraw Hill

Evaluation Pattern

 

No.

Components

Marks

CIA

pre-lab work, class work,  MSE

25

ESE

(two examiners)

25

Total

50

 

ENG321 - ENGLISH-III (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description

English is offered as a course for all the students in BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA F&A classes in the third and fourth semesters. The aim is to strengthen the communication skills, and particularly study skills of the learners further, through adequate practice and exposure to good examples of writing, thought, ideas and human values. In addition, they will be trained in study skills through tasks in academic genres such as message, letter, essay, data interpretation etc. It aims to not only equip learners with skills but also sensitize them towards issues that concern human life in today’s globalised context. The course content is selected to meet the requirements of the departmental goal of “empowering the individual to read oneself, the social context and the imagined”; institutional goal of ensuring “holistic development”; and the national goal of creating competent and valuable citizens. The primary objective of this course is to help learners develop appropriate employability skills and demonstrate suitable conduct with regards to communication skills. The units are organised in order to help the learners understand the academic and workplace demands and learn by practice.

 

Course Objectives     

 

 

·       To enable learners to develop reading comprehension for various purposes

 

·       To enable learners to develop writing skills for academic and professional needs

 

·       To enable learners to develop the ability to think critically and express logically

 

·       To enable learner to communicate in a socially and ethically acceptable manner

 

·       To enable learners, to read, write and speak with clarity, precision and accuracy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise the errors of usage and correct them. Recognize their own ability to improve their own competence in using the language

CO2: Read independently unfamiliar texts with comprehension. Read longer texts, compare, and evaluate them.

CO3: Understand the importance of writing in academic life. Write simple sentences without committing errors in spelling and grammar. Plan a piece of writing using drafting techniques.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to university grammar
 

 

Subject verb agreement

 

Tenses

 

Preposition

 

Voices

 

Clauses

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Strategies for Reading
 

 

Skimming and scanning

 

Strategies of reading

 

Reading and understanding reports

 

Reading content/ texts of various kinds

 

Inferencing skills

 

Academic vocab

 

Academic phrases

 

Professional expression

 

Study skills- library and referencing skills (organising reading, making notes, managing time, prioritising)

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Strategic writing for academic purpose
 

 

Mind mapping

 

Organising ideas

 

Accurate usage of vocabulary

 

Paragraph strategy

 

Cohesion and sequencing (jumbled sentences to paragraph)

 

Extended writing 

 

Formal and informal writing

 

Reports (all types including illustration to report and report to illustration and/or graphs, charts, tables and other statistical data)

 

Proposal writing (for projects, for research)

 

Academic essays/ articles

 

Persuasive writing, extrapolative writings

 

Case study writing

 

Executive summaries

 

Editing, proofreading skills

 

Resume vs CV

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Listening and Oral communication
 

 

Self-introduction

 

Body language

 

Talks, speeches and presentations

 

Conversation

 

Telephone conversation

 

Meetings

 

Group discussion

 

Seminar / conference presentation

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Business communication
 

 

Principles of communication

 

Process of communication

 

Types of communication

Barriers in communication

Text Books And Reference Books:

NIL

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

ENGlogue -2

Evaluation Pattern

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: Classroom assignment/test/ written or oral tasks for 20 marks keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.

CIA 2: Mid-semester exam for 50 marks.

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any creative assignments.

 

 End- semester 50 marks 

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRN321 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the Arts, Science and Commerce UG program

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to communicate with native speakers and make presentations on small topics

CO 2: Proficiency in literary analysis, appreciation and review of poems,play ,films and fables

CO3: Acquaintance of culture, civilization, social values and etiquettes, and gastronomical richness

CO 4: Ability to do formal and informal, oral and written communication.

CO 5: Overall knowledge on functional and communicative aspects and get through a2 level exams.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 1
 

To perform a tribute: artist, work, you are going to…..

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 2
 

Towards a working life

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 3
 

France Seen by...

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 4
 

Mediamania

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme
 

Act 1, 2 & 3

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.        Berthet, Annie, Catherine Hugot et al. Alter Ego + A2. Paris : Hachette, 2012

2.      Gonnet, Georges. Molière- Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme .Paris : Hachette, 1971

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Lichet, Raymond., Puig Rosado. Ecrire à tout le monde. Paris : Hachette, 1980

2.      French websites like Bonjour de France, FluentU French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN321 - HINDI (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description:

The detailed text book “Shambook” is a Khanda Kavya written by Jagdeesh Gupta. To improve the creative writing skills, Nibandh, Kahani and Kavitha lekhan are included.Bharathiya chitrakala is also a part of the syllabus to improve the knowledge aboutIndian paintings.

Course Objectives:

Students are exposed to different forms of poetry especially, Khanda Kavya. It will help them to understand the contemporary socio-political issues.By learning about the tradition of Indian painting and legendary painters of India , students get to know about the richness and culture  of the Indian paintings. Creative writing sharpens their thinking, analytical  and writing skills 

Course Outcome

CO1: By the end of the course the student should be able to: ● CO1: Improve their writing skill in literary Hindi by doing asynchronous session assignments and CIAs. ● CO2: Improve their analytical skills through critical analysis of the poetry. ● CO3: Will be able to learn the different aspects of Official correspondence. ● CO4: To improve their basic research skills while doing the CIAs. By the end of the course the student should be able to: ● CO1: Improve their writing skill in literary Hindi by doing assignments and CIAs

CO2: Improve their analytical skills through critical analysis of the poetry.

CO3: To improve their basic research skills while doing the CIAs

CO4: To understand the contributions of painters to Indian painting.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Shambooh
 

Khanda Kavya “Shambook” [Poetry] By:Jagdeesh Gupta. Pub: Raj Pal & Sons

 

Level of knowledge:Analitical    

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Creative writing
 

Nibandh lekhan, Katha lekhan, Kavitha lekhan.

Level of knowledge:Conceptual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Bharathiya chithrakala -parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav, vikas aur pramukh shailiyam

pramukh kalakar-1.M F Hussain 2.Ravindranath Tagore 3.Raja Ravi Varma 4.Jamini Roy.

Level of knowledge: Conceptual

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Khanda Kavya”Shambook[Poetry] ByJagdeesh Gupta.Pub: Raj Pal & Sons
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

.1. Sugam Hindi Vyakaran – Prof. Vamsidhar and Dharampal Shastry, SikshaBharathi,New Delh

2. Essentials of Screen writing: The art, craft and business of film and television writing

By: Walter Richard.

3. Writing and Script: A very short introduction

By: Robinson, Andrew.

4 .Creative writing By John Singleton

5. Adhunik  Hindi Nibandh By Bhuvaneshwarichandran Saksena.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-wikipedia)

CIA-2(Mid sem examination)

CIA-3(wikipedia article creation)

End semester examination

KAN321 - KANNADA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Language Kannada is offered to students of third Semester BA/B.Sc as Second language for fifty marks. Students of this semester will study an anthology of Modern Kannada Poetry and an Autobiography of Laxman Gaikwad. This course prepares the students to understand the new era. At the dawn of the twentieth century, B.M. Srikantiah, regarded as the “Father of modern Kannada Literature”, called for a new era of writing original works in modern Kannada while moving away from archaic Kannada forms. Students will study modern Kannada poetry from B.M.Sri to Dalit poet Dr. Siddalingiah. An anthology of modern poetry is selected to understand the beauty of modern Kannada poets through their writings. Uchalya is an autobiographical novel that carries the memories of Laxman Gaikwad right from his childhood till he became an adult. Laxman Gaikwad took birth in a criminal tribe of India belonging to Orissa/ Maharastra. The original text is translated to Kannada by Chandrakantha Pokale.

 

Course Objectives:

Understand and appreciate poetry as a literary art form.

Analyse the various elements of Poetry, such as diction, tone, form, genre, imagery, symbolism, theme, etc.

Appreciates to  learn the elements of autobiography.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Able to define autobiography

CO2: Outline a personal autobiography

CO3: Delineate different types of autobiography

CO 4: Proficiency in communication skills

CO5 : Understand the principles of translation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Modern Kannada Poetry
 

1. Kariheggadeya Magalu- B.M.Sri

2. Hunnime Ratri- Kuvempu

3. Anna Yagna-Bendre

4.Mankuthimmana Kagga-D.V.G

5.Ikkala- K.S. Narasimha Swamy

6. Kannad padgol- G.P.Rajarathnam

7.Hanathe hachchuttene- G.S.S

8.Adugemane Hudugi-Vaidehi

9. Nehru Nivruttaraguvudilla- Adgaru

10. Nanna Janagalu.-Siddalingaiah

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Autobiography- Uchalya- Lakshman Gayekwad (Marathi)
 

Text: Uchalya

Author:Lakshman Gayekwad

Translation: Chandrakantha Pokle

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Creative Writings
 

 

1 Dialogue Writing

2 Essay writing

3 short story building

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. English Geethegalu- Sri, Publishers: B.M.Sri Smarka Prathistana, Bangalore-19 (2013)

2. Kannada Sahitya Charithre- Volumes 1-4, Editor: G. S. Shivarudrappa, Prasaranga, Bangalore Univeristy.

3. Hosagannada Kavitheya Mele English Kavyada Prabhava- S. Ananthanarayana

4. Hosagannadada Arunodaya- Srinivasa  Havanuru

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Hosagannda Sahitya- L.S. Sheshagiri Rao

2. Kannada Sahitya Sameekshe- G. S. Shivarudrappa

3. Bhavageethe- Dr. S. Prabhushankara

4. My Experiments with Truth- M.K. Gandhi

5. Ouru Keri- Siddalingaiah

Evaluation Pattern
 
Evaluation Pattern
 

CIA-1 Wikipedia Assignments- 20 Marks

CIA-2 Mid Semsester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA-3 Wikipedia Assignment-20 Marks

Attendance -10 Marks

End Semester Examination- 50 Marks

 
   

MAT331 - REAL ANALYSIS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description : This course enables the students to understand the basic techniques and theories of real Analysis.

 

Course objectives : This course will help the learner to

COBJ1. examine the convergence or divergence of sequences and series.

COBJ2. understand the different types of convergence and their properties.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: understand the concepts of limits, infimum, supremum, and boundedness of sequences.

CO2: examine the convergence of series using various tests.

CO3: distinguish between different types of convergence of sequence and series.

CO4: identify the region of convergence for sequence and series of functions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Sets and Sequences
 

Open sets, closed sets, closure of a set, countable and uncountable sets, topology of real line. Sequences: Definition of Sequences, limit of a sequence, algebra of limits of a sequence, convergent, divergent, and oscillatory sequences, problems thereon. Bounded sequences, Monotonic sequences and their properties, Cauchy sequence.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Infinite Series
 

Infinite series, Cauchy convergence criterion for series, geometric series, comparison test, convergence of p-series, D'Alembert's Ratio test, Raabe's test, Cauchy's Root test, alternating series, Leibnitz’s test. Definition and examples of absolute and conditional convergence.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Sequence and Series of functions
 

Sequences and series of functions, Pointwise and uniform convergence. Mn - test, M-test, Statements of the results about uniform convergence. Power series and radius of convergence.

Text Books And Reference Books:

S.C.Malik and Savita Arora, Mathematical Analysis , Second Edition, New Delhi, India: New Age international (P) Ltd., 2005.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. R.G. Bartle and D. R Sherbert, Introduction to Real Analysis, John Wiley and Sons (Asia) P. Ltd., 2000.
  2. E. Fischer, Intermediate Real Analysis ,1 st ed.(Reprint), Springer Verlag, 2012.
  3. K.A. Ross, Elementary Analysis- The Theory of Calculus Series- Undergraduate Texts in Mathematics, Springer Verlag, 2003.
  4. S Narayana and M.D. Raisinghania, Elements of Real Analysis, Revised ed., S. Chand & Company Ltd, 2011.
  5. T. M. Apostol, Calculus (Vol. I), John Wiley and Sons (Asia) P. Ltd., 2002.
Evaluation Pattern

 

Component

Mode of Assessment

Parameters

Points

CIA I

MCQ,

Written Assignment,

Reference work, etc.,

Mastery of the core concepts

Problem solving skills

 

10

CIA II

Mid-semester Examination

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

25

CIA III

Written Assignment, Project

Problem solving skills

10

Attendance

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

05

ESE

 

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

50

Total

100

MAT351 - PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR MATHEMATICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: The course Python programming for Mathematics is aimed at enabling the students to appreciate and understand some concepts in mathematics like Matrices, sequences, series, geometric shapes and fractals with the help of Python programming language. It is designed with a learner-centric approach wherein the students will acquire mastery in the subject by using Python programing language as tool.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to

COBJ1. Acquire programming skill in solving mathematical problems using Python

Course Outcome

CO1: demonstrate the use of Python to understand and interpret the concepts in sequences and series.

CO2: apply Python to finding the area of the curve.

CO3: acquire proficiency in using Python to find out the inverse determinant, transpose, Eigen values of a Matrix.

CO4: visualize shapes and Fractals

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Proposed Topics
 
  1.  Introduction to NumPy and Sympy
  2. Algebra and Symbolic Math with SymPy
  3. Matrices - determinant, transpose, lower and upper triangular matrices, Eigen values
  4. Solving linear and nonlinear equations
  5. Test for Convergence of Sequences
  6. Test for Convergence of Series
  7. Drawing Geometric Shapes and Fractals
  8. Complex functions in Python
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. H. Brian, A Practical Introduction to Python Programming, Creative Commons Attribution, 2012.
  2. A. Saha, Doing Math with Python: Use Programming to Explore Algebra, Statistics, Calculus, and More!, No Starch Press, 2015.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

H. P. Langtangen, A Primer on Scientific Programming with Python, 2nd ed., Springer, 2016.

Evaluation Pattern

The course is evaluated based on continuous internal assessments (CIA) and the lab e-record. The parameters for evaluation under each component and the mode of assessment are given below.

Component

Parameter

Mode of  Assessment

Maximum

Points

CIA I

Mastery of the  concepts

Lab Assignments

20