Department of
COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING






Syllabus for I & II Semester
Bachelor of Technology (Information Technology)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EE133P BASIC ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 5 4 100
CE134P BASICS OF CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ENGINEERING MECHANICS 4 4 100
BS136 BIOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS 2 2 50
EG135 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 4 3 100
MA131 MATHEMATICS - I 3 3 100
PH132P PHYSICS 4 4 100
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EC233P BASIC ELECTRONICS 5 4 100
ME235 BASIC MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND NANOSCIENCE 3 3 100
CH232P CHEMISTRY 5 4 100
CS234P COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 5 4 100
MA231 MATHEMATICS - II 3 3 100
HS236 TECHNICAL ENGLISH 2 1 50
ME251 WORKSHOP PRACTICE LAB 2 1 50
        

  

Assesment Pattern

ASSESSMENT - ONLY FOR THEORY COURSE (without practical component) Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks) End Semester Examination(ESE) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks) Components of the CIA CIA I : Subject Assignments / Online Tests: 10 marks CIA II : Mid Semester Examination (Theory): 25 marks CIA III : Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project: 10 marks Attendance: 05 marks Total: 50 marks Mid Semester Examination (MSE) : Theory Papers: The MSE is conducted for 50 marks of 2 hours duration. Question paper pattern; Five out of Six questions have to be answered. Each question carries 10 marks End Semester Examination (ESE): The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration. The syllabus for the theory papers are divided into FIVE units and each unit carries equal weight in terms of marks distribution

ASSESSMENT - THEORY COURSE WITH PRACTICAL COMPONENT Internal Assessment (CIA) : Components of the CIA CIA I : Subject Assignments / Online Tests: 10 marks CIA II : Mid Semester Examination (Theory): 10 marks CIA III : Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project: 10 marks Attendance: 05 marks Total: 50 marks Mid Semester Examination (MSE) : Theory Papers: The MSE is conducted for 50 marks of 2 hours duration. Question paper pattern; Five out of Six questions have to be answered. Each question carries 10 marks End Semester Examination (ESE): The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration. The syllabus for the theory papers are divided into FIVE units and each unit carries equal weight in terms of marks distribution. ESE marks will be scaled down to 30.  Laboratory component: 35 marks for overall practical CIA. A score of 40 % in overall CAI marks for the practical component is considered as the eligibility to attend the End semester examination of the respective course.

Examination And Assesments

Assessment is based on the performance of the student throughout the semester. Assessment of each paper by three Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and one End Semester Examinations in each semester.

 

Department Overview:

Department of Sciences and Humanities aims at fostering curiosity for science among the engineering students of Christ University and help them understand fundamentals of Chemistry Physics and Mathematics. The department offers various courses and few certificate courses to B.Tech. and M.Tech. students. The department runs a regular course on professional development for undergraduate students.

Mission Statement:

Vision - To transform youth into responsible citizens having intensive caring mind for the society. Mission- Nurturing curiosity among students for the natural phenomena and helping them to apply scientific knowledge in developing technology.

Introduction to Program:

The department offers various courses to first year and higher semester B.Tech. students, and for M.Tech. students. It also offers a few certificate courses for undergraduate students.

Program Objective:

*

EE133P - BASIC ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed to solve and analyse DC and AC networks. It also covers the fundamental principles of alternator, transformer, motors, renewable energy systems and power converters. It also emphasise the concepts in smart grid and electrical vehicles to cope up with current trends in electrical engineering.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To solve DC networks

CO2: To solve AC networks

CO3: To understand working modes of alternator, transformer and motors

CO4: To understand renewable energy systems and power converters

CO5: To illustrate concepts smart grid and electrical vehicles

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
DC Circuits
 

Basic electrical quantities, KCL,  KVL, voltage and current division rules, circuit reduction using series, parallel and star-delta transformation of resistors. Superposition theorem, Thevenin’s theorem, Source transformations- Electromagnetism- Faraday’s laws, comparison of electric and magnetic circuits.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
AC Circuits
 

Comparison of DC and AC , Generation of sinusoidal signal, Representation of AC, inductance and capacitance, behaviour of pure R, L and C in AC circuits, RL, RC and RLC series circuits- derivations,  phasor diagrams, real power, reactive power, power factor and resonance. Three phase balanced circuits, voltage and current relations in star and delta connections.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Power System Components
 

Power system components-overview, Alternator-construction, working and generated voltage equation, Transformer – types, construction, working, emf equation, voltage regulation and efficiency, Switchgears (Fuse, MCB, relay), earthing, electric safety, standards and best practices. 

DC Motor- construction and working, torque and speed equations of shunt motors, Single phase induction motors - construction and working, BLDC motor and its applications in e-mobility.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Power Converters and Renewable Energy
 

Power supplies and converters, SCR as a switch single phase rectifiers and inverters, DC power supply.

 Solar standalone system and its characteristics, Solar PV grid tied system description, Wind energy systems- types, types of renewable systems- stand alone, grid tied systems and hybrid and micro-grids.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Smart Grid and Electric Vehicles
 

Introduction to smart grid, Home automation systems, Application of IoT in electrical systems, smart meters, communication systems in electrical systems, Artificial intelligence in power system.

Introduction to electric vehicles- building blocks, charging stations. Different types of batteries and terminologies and BMS applications

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:30
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
 

Verification of superposition theorem

Wiring practice – multiple switching and two way switching

Phase angle measurement in R, RL and RLC  circuits

Energy measurement in single phase circuits – with R and RL loads

Power factor improvement

Regulation and efficiency of  single phase transformer.

Speed – torque characteristics of a DC shunt motor

Speed – torque characteristics of single phase induction motor

Characteristics of solar PV modules

Electrical appliances control using Arduino

Variable DC voltage using DC-DC converter (Demonstration)

Power circuit control using relay and a contactor. (Demonstration)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. D. P. Kothari and I. J. Nagrath, “Basic Electrical Engineering”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2010.

T2. V K. Mehta, Vivek Mehta, “Principles of Power System”, S. Chand, 2005, reprint 2015.

T3. D. P. Kothari and K C.Singal, “Renewable Energy Sources and Emerging Technologies”,  PHI, 2011.

T4. James Larminie, John Lowry,  ‘Electric Vehicle Technology Explained’, Wiley , 2015.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Weedy, Cory, Ekanayake, ‘ Electric Power Systems’,  John Wiley & Sons; 5th edition, 2012.

R2.Hina Fathima (Editor), ‘Hybrid-Renewable Energy Systems in Microgrids: Integration, Developments and Control’, Woodhead Publishing Series in Energy, 2018.

R3.Nikos Hatziargyriou, ‘Microgrids: Architectures and Control’, Wiley, 2014

R4. D. C. Kulshreshtha, “Basic Electrical Engineering”, McGraw Hill, 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

 

COURSES WITH THEORY AND PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Minimum marks

to pass

Maximum

marks

1

Theory CIA

30

-

30

2

Theory ESE

30

12

30

3

Practical CIA

35

14

35

4

Attendance

05

-

05

4

Aggregate

100

40

100


 

DETAIL OF MARK FOR COURSES WITH THOERY AND PRACTICAL

THEORY

PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Min. marks to pass

Max. marks

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Min. marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

CIA-1

20

10

-

10

Overall CIA

50

35

14

35

2

CIA-2

50

10

-

10

3

CIA-3

20

10

-

10

4

Attendance

05

05

-

05

Attendance

NA

NA

-

-

5

ESE

100

30

12

30

ESE

NA

NA

-

-

TOTAL

65

-

65

TOTAL

 

35

14

35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minimum marks required to pass in practical component is 40%.

Pass in practical component is eligibility criteria to attend Theory End semester examination for the same course.

A minimum of 40 % required to pass in ESE -Theory component of a course.

Overall 40 % aggregate marks in Theory & practical component, is required to pass a course.

There is no minimum pass marks for the Theory - CIA component.

Less than 40% in practical component is refereed as FAIL.

Less than 40% in Theory ESE is declared as fail in the theory component.

Students who failed in theory ESE have to attend only theory ESE to pass in the course

CE134P - BASICS OF CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ENGINEERING MECHANICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: 

·         The students will understand the basics of civil engineering and Engineering Mechanics

·         The students will understand the basic principles and laws of forces of nature, measurements, calculations and SI units.

·         The students will understand mechanics that studies the effects of forces and moments acting on rigid bodies that are either at rest or moving with constant velocity along a straight path for static condition only.

The students will understand the basic concepts of forces in the member, centroid, moment of inertia and Kinetics of bodies.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: After a successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

CO1: Understand basics of Civil Engineering, its scope of study and materials of construction. (L1)(PO1)(PSO1)

CO2: Comprehend the action of Forces, Moments and other loads on systems of rigid bodies and Compute the reactive forces and the effects that develop as a result of the external loads.  (L3)(PO1,PO2)(PSO2)

CO3: Compute Centroid and Moment of Inertia of regular and built up sections. (L3)(PO1) (PSO1)

CO4: Understand basic concepts of virtual work and energy method for a particle and rigid body (L2) (PO1, PO2, PSO1)

CO5: Express the relationship between the motion of bodies and equipped to pursue studies in allied courses in Mechanics. (L3) (PO1, PO2) (PSO1)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Engineering Mechanics
 

Basic idealizations-Particle, Continuum, Rigid body and Point force, Newtons laws of motion. Force, classification of force systems, Principle of Physical Independence of forces, Principle of Superposition of forces and Principle of Transmissibilty of forces, Moment, Couple and its characteristics. Composition and resolution of forces, Paralleologram Law of forces, Polygon law. Resultant of coplanar concurrent force systems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Civil Engineering
 

Scope of different fields of Civil Engineering: Surveying, Building Materials, Construction Technology, Structural Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Hydraulics, Water Resources Engineering, Transportation Engineering. Role of Civil Engineers in Infrastructure Development.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Equilibrium of force systems
 

Free body Diagram, Lami’s Theorem, Equations of Equilibrium, Equilibrium of coplanar concurrent forces.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Composition of Coplanar Concurrent and Non Concurrent Force System.
 

Resultant of coplanar concurrent force systems. Varignon’s Theorem, Resultant of coplanar   non concurrent force systems.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Support Reactions
 

Types of loads and supports, Types of beams, Statically determinate and indeterminate beams, Support Reactions in beams, Numerical Problems on support reactions for statically determinate beams (point load, Uniformly distributed load, Uniformly varying load and moments).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Centroid and Moment of inertia
 

Definition of centroid and centre of gravity, Centroid of simple plane figures and built-up sections. Moment of inertia / Second Moment of area, Parallel axis theorem and Perpendicular axis theorem, Moment of Inertia of composite areas, Polar Moment of inertia and radius of gyration.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Virtual Work and Energy Method
 

Virtual displacements, principle of virtual work for particle and ideal system of rigid bodies, degrees of freedom. Active force diagram, systems with friction, mechanical efficiency. Conservative forces and potential energy (elastic and gravitational), energy equation for equilibrium. Applications of energy method for equilibrium, Stability of equilibrium

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Kinetics
 

Definitions, Displacement, Average velocity, Instantaneous Velocity, Speed, Acceleration, Average Acceleration, Variable Acceleration, Acceleration due to gravity. Types of motion-Rectilinear, Curvilinear and Projectile motion. Relative motion and Motion under Gravity, Numerical Problems.

Kinetics: D Alemberts Principle and its application in Plane motion.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Textbooks:

T1. Bhavikatti S.S. Elements of Civil Engineering, 4th Edition and Engineering Mechanics ,2nd edition, New Delhi, Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd, 2008.

T2. Shesh Prakash and Mogaveer, Elements of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, 1st edition, New Delhi, PHI learning Private Limited,2009.

T3. Jagadeesh T.R. and Jay Ram, Elements of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, 2nd edition, Bangalore, Sapana Book House, 2008.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Timoshenko, and Young, Engineering Mechanics, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 2013.

R2. Meriam J. L, and Kraige, L. G, Engineering Mechanics, 5/E, Volume I, Wiley India Edition, India, Feburary 2018

R3. Irvingh H Shames, Engineering Mechanics, 4/E, PHI learning Private Limited, New Delhi, 2008

R4. Ferdinand P. Beer and E. Russel Johnston Jr., Mechanics for Engineers: Statics, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New Delhi. International Edition 2013

R5. Bansal R. K, Engineering Mechanics, Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd, New Delhi, 2015

Goyal and Raghuvanshi, Engineering Mechanics, New Edition, PHI learning Private Limited, New Delhi. 2011

R6. Rajasekaran, S, Sankarasubramanian, G., Fundamentals of Engineering Mechanics, Vikas Publishing House Pvt., Ltd., 2011.

R6. Kukreja C.B., Kishore K.Ravi Chawla., Material Testing Laboratory Manual, Standard Publishers & Distributors 1996.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 10 %

CIA-2 - 25 %

CIA-3 10 %

ATTENDANCE 5%

ESE 50%

BS136 - BIOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student will be able to do:

CO1: Discuss the hierarchical of life and the classification of species.

CO2: Differentiate between single celled and multi-cellular organisms based on their cell structure.

CO3: Explain structure, types and functioning of key components as proteins, carbohydrates, fats and DNA/RNA.

CO4: Elaborate on the different pathways for energy production, cell division, photosynthesis and genetic transfer.

CO5: Discuss about the construction and working of biosensors for various applications.

CO6: Discuss about the architecture and organization of implantable electronics, which are used to sense and monitor different body functions.

CO7: Discuss the fundamental of the common laboratory equipment, its functioning and the electronics associated with it.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY
 

General Anatomy of the body, Tissues level of organization (Types, origin, function & repair), Composition and Function of blood and its components: WBC, RBC, platelets, Hematopoiesis, Structure and function of heart, Properties of cardiac muscle, The Cardiac Cycle, Electrocardiogram –heart beat, HRV, QRS cycle, Functional anatomy of muscular system, types of muscles, respiratory system- mechanics, gas exchange and transport

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
BIOSENSORS
 

General principles - Construction of biosensors, immobilization of receptor components in biosensors- Types –metabolism, semiconductor, optical, piezoelectric, immunosensors - Applications – lab-on-a-chip, food and beverage, defence, environmental applications, Medical instruments

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
MODERN IMAGING SYSTEMS
 

X ray, digital radiography – x-ray computed tomography- Nuclear medical imaging systems, Magnetic resonance imaging system, Positron emission tomography, Ultrasonic imaging system, thermal imaging, .

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
BIOMECHANICS
 

Key mechanical concepts - 9 fundamentals of biomechanics -Muscle action, Range of motion principle, Force motion principle - Tissue loads -Response of tissue to force -Biomechanics of passive muscle tendon unit- Biomechanics of bone - Biomechanics of ligaments - Mechanical characteristics of muscles- Force time principle - Stretch-shortening cycle

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
MATERIALS FOR ORGANS AND DEVICES
 

Materials – polymers, metals, ceramics, hydrogels, degradable biomaterials - Host reaction to biomaterials and their evaluation -Application of biomaterials – heart valves, orthopaedic applications, Cochlear and dental implants, soft tissue replacements, Hard tissue replacements

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. F. Scheller, F. Schubert, “Biosensors, Volume 11 of Techniques and Instrumentation in Analytical Chemistry”, Elsevier.

T2. Vinod Kumar Khanna, “Implantable Medical Electronics: Prosthetics, Drug Delivery, and Health Monitoring”, Springer, 2015

T3. Khandpur,  “Handbook of Biomedical Instrumentation”, Tata McGraw-Hill Education, 2003

T4. David A. Winter, “Biomechanics and Motor Control of Human Movement”, John Wiley & Sons, 2009

T5. Duane Knudson, “Fundamentals of Biomechanics”, Springer Science & Business Media, 2013

T6. Buddy D. Ratner, Allan S. Hoffman, Frederick J. Schoen, Jack E. Lemons, “Biomaterials Science: An Introduction to Materials in Medicine”, Academic Press, 2012

T7.G. Pocock, C. D. Richards, and D. A. Richards, Human physiology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018.

T8 L. Sherwood, Fundamentals of human physiology. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning, 2012.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Bansi Dhar Malhotra, Anthony Turner, “Advances in Biosensors: Perspectives in Biosensors”, Volume 5 of Advances in Biosensors, Elsevier, 2003

Evaluation Pattern

As per university norms

EG135 - ENGINEERING GRAPHICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To create an awareness and emphasize the need for Engineering Graphics.
  • To teach basic drawing standards and conventions.
  • To develop skills in three-dimensional visualization of engineering components.
  • To develop an understanding of 2D and 3D drawings using the Solidworks software.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the importance of BIS standards and scales and be able to use it in Engineering drawings and be Able to graphically construct geometric 2 Dimensional figures with hand tools and solve numericals related to them. [L1,L2] [PO1]

CO2: Use the CAD software and be able to create basic 2D computer geometries like points, lines, and planes. [L1,L2] [PO1,PO2]

CO3: Understand the concept of projection and sectioning of solids and be able to create the drawings manually. [L1,L2] [PO1,PO2]

CO4: To create Drawings of surfaces of regular solids after development Manually. [L1,L2] [PO1,PO2]

CO5: To create isometric drawings from Orthographic projections by using isometric scale Manually and using CAD software. [L1,L2] [PO2,PO5]

CO6: To create projection of solids, sectioning development of surface using CAD software and be able to draw basic 3D shapes in CAD. [L1,L2] [PO2,PO5]

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Introduction to Engineering Drawing
 

Principles of Engineering Graphics and their significance, usage of Drawing instruments, BIS conventions, lettering, Scales – Plain, Diagonal and Vernier Scales.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Orthographic Projections (First Angle Projection Only)
 

Principles of orthographic projections, introduction to first angle and third angle projection, projections of points, lines (inclined to both planes) and planes. (No application problems).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Introduction of Computer Aided Engineering Drawing (CAED)
 

Introduction and customization of user interface consisting of set up of the drawing page and the printer, including scale settings, setting up of units and drawing limits; ISO and ANSI standards for coordinate dimensioning, orthographic constraints, snap to objects manually and automatically, producing drawings by using various coordinate input entry methods to draw straight lines, applying various ways of drawing circles. Annotations, layering & other functions covering applying dimensions to objects, applying annotations to drawings, setting up and use of layers, layers to create drawings, create, edit and use customized layers, changing line lengths through modifying existing lines.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Projections of Regular Solids
 

Projection of solids inclined to both the Planes, draw simple annotation, dimensioning and scale (both manual and CAD software).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Sections of solids
 

Sections and sectional views of right angular solids - Prism, Cylinder, Pyramid, Cone– Auxiliary Views; (both manual and CAD software).    

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Isometric Projections
 

Principles of Isometric projection – Isometric Scale, Isometric Views, Conventions; Isometric Views of simple and compound Solids, conversion of Isometric Views to Orthographic Views and Vice-versa, Conventions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Development of surfaces
 

Development of surfaces of right regular solids - prism, pyramid, cylinder and cone; draw the sectional orthographic views of geometrical solids.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Introduction to Modeling and Assembly
 

Introduction to Computer aided modeling of solid part and assembly using CAD software Parametric and non-parametric solid and wireframe models, part editing and 2D drafting of assembly.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Overview of Computer Graphics
 

Demonstrating knowledge of the theory of CAD software: The Menu System, Toolbars (Standard, Object Properties, Draw, Modify and Dimension), Drawing Area (Background, Crosshairs, Coordinate System), Dialog boxes and windows, Shortcut menus (Button Bars), The Command Line (where applicable), The Status Bar, Different methods of zoom as used in CAD, Select and erase objects.; Projection of solids, Isometric of Simple and compound Solids, sections of solids and development of surfaces.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

1. Bhatt N.D., Panchal V.M. & Ingle P.R., (2014), Engineering Drawing, Charotar Publishing House.

2. N S Parthasarathy and Vela Murali (2015) Engineering Drawing, Oxford University Press.

3. Shah, M.B. & Rana B.C. (2009), Engineering Drawing and Computer Graphics, Pearson Education.

4. Agrawal B. & Agrawal C. M. (2012), Engineering Graphics, TMH Publication.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

1. S. Trymbaka Murthy, “Computer Aided Engineering Drawing”, I.K. International    Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.,  New Delhi.

2. Narayana, K.L. & P Kannaiah (2008), Text book on Engineering Drawing, Scitech.

3. K.R. Gopalakrishna, “Engineering Graphics”, 15th Edition, Subash Publishers Bangalore.

Evaluation Pattern

ASSESSMENT PATTERN FOR ENGINEERING GRAPHICS COURSE

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

1

CIA-1

20

10

2

CIA-2

50

25

3

CIA-3

20

10

4

Attendance

05

05

5

ESE

100

50

 

 

TOTAL

100

MA131 - MATHEMATICS - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is outlined to those who intend to apply the subject at the proper place and time, while keeping him/her aware to the needs of the society where he/she can lend his/her expert service, and also to those who can be useful to the community without even going through the formal process of drilling through rigorous treatment of Mathematics. At the end of this course, students will

  • have a solid base of understanding elementary linear algebra as required for further undergraduate work in engineering.
  • be able to differentiate  a function partially with respect to each of its variables in turn
  • be able to utilize methods of integration to compute length of arcs, surface area and volume of solids
  • be skilled in using integration to compute problems important in physics and engineering 
  • learn the meaning and computation of the curl and divergence of a vector field.
  • be able to solve first order differential equations that are separable, linear or exact

Learning Outcome

CO1: Checking  the  consistency of system of linear equations and hence finding solution.

CO2: Finding the differentiation of multivariable functions using the concept of total derivatives, Jacobian,  Evaluating definite integrals by Leibnitz rule of differentiation under integral sign.

CO3: Evaluation of definite integrals as surface area and volume of solid of revolution using reduction formulae.

CO4: Solving first order nonlinear differential equations by reducing into homogenous, linear and exact forms.

CO5: Finding the velocity and acceleration of a moving particle, vector potential, scalar potential.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Linear Algebra
 

Fundamental concepts of Matrix, Rank of a Matrix, Consistency and solution of linear simultaneous equations, Eigen values and Eigen Vectors, Diagonalization

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Differential Calculus - I
 

Partial Differentiation: Partial derivatives, Total differential coefficient,

differentiation of composite and implicit functions, Jacobians and properties. Leibnitz’s Rule of differentiation under integral sign.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Integral Calculus - I
 

Reduction formulae for the integration of  sin^n {x}, cos^n {x}, sin^n {x}cos^n {x}and evaluation of these integrals with standard limits - Problems. Derivative of arc length, Applications of integration to find surfaces of revolution and volumes of solids of revolution.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Differential Equation - I
 

Solution of first order and first degree differential equations: Reducible to Homogeneous, Linear and Exact differential equation, Applications of differential equations. orthogonal trajectories.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Vector Calculus - I
 

Vector differentiation. Velocity, Acceleration of a particle moving on a space curve. Vector point function. directional derivative, Gradient, Divergence, Curl, Laplacian. Solenoidal and Irrotational vectors - Problems. Standard vector identities.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.  Dr. B. S. Grewal, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, 39th Edition, Khanna Publishers, July  2005.

T2.  H. K. Das & Rajnish Verma, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, S. Chand & Company Ltd., 2011.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Erwin Kreyszig, “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, 8th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc,  2005.

R2. Thomas and Finney, “Calculus”, 9th Edition, Pearson Education, 2004

R3. Peter V. O’Neil, “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, Thomson Publication, Canada, 2007

R4. B. V. Ramana, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, Tata McGraw – Hill, 2009.

R5. Michael Artin, “Algebra”, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall of India Private Limited, New Delhi, 2002

R6. Kenneth Hoffman and Ray Kunze, “Linear Algebra”, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall of India, Private Limited, New Delhi, 2002.

R7. George F. Simmons and Steven G. Krantz, “Differential Equation, Theory, Technique and Practice”, Tata McGraw – Hill, 2006.

R8. M. D. Raisinghania, “Ordinary and Partial Differential Equation”, Chand (S.) & Co. Ltd., India, March 17, 2005.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

End Semester Examination(ESE): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

 

Components of the CIA

CIA I  :  Subject Assignments / Online Tests                  : 10 marks

CIA II :   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                : 25 marks                   

CIAIII:Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications: 10 marks

Attendance                                                                           : 05 marks

            Total                                                                              : 50 marks

 

Mid Semester Examination (MSE) : 

The MSE is conducted for 50 marks of 2 hours duration.

Question paper pattern; Five out of Six questions have to be answered. Each  question carries 10 marks

 

End Semester Examination (ESE):

The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration.

The syllabus for the theory papers are divided into FIVE units and each unit carries equal Weightage in terms of marks distribution.

Question paper pattern is as follows:

Two full questions with either or choice will be drawn from each unit. Each question carries 20 marks. There could be a maximum of

three sub divisions in a question. The emphasis on the questions is to test the objectiveness, analytical skill and application skill of the

concept, from a question bank which reviewed and updated every year

The criteria for drawing the questions from the Question Bank are as follows

50 % - Medium Level questions

25 % - Simple level questions

25 % - Complex level questions

PH132P - PHYSICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION

Course objectives: This paper contains five UNITS which are Modern Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Electrical and Thermal Conductivities in Metals, Elastic and Dielectric Properties of Materials, Lasers, Optical Fibers.

This paper aims at enabling the students to understand the fundamentals covered in this paper.

SUBJECT OBJECTIVES:

• Identify the fundamental aspects of modern physics and quantum mechanics.

• Compare classical and quantum free electron theory.

• Outline the salient properties of elastic and dielectric materials.

• Apply the concepts learnt in Laser, Fiber optics in the field of Engineering.

• Apply optical phenomenon in technology.

 

·      

Learning Outcome

 

Sl NO

DESCRIPTION

REVISED BLOOM’S TAXONOMY (RBT)LEVEL

1.

Explain the principles of Classical Physics and Modern Physics.

 

L2

2.

Explain the salient features of Quantum Physics.

 

L2

3.

Apply the principles of Physics to study free electron theory

L3

4.

Differentiate between the different materials for various scientific applications.

L4

5.

Apply the principles of optics in the field of LASERS and Optical Fiber.

L3

6.

Utilize the theoretical concepts of classical physics, optics and material science to have    hands on training for a better understanding of the subject.

L3

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Modern Physics
 

Introduction, Planck’s theory - Deduction of Wien’s displacement law and Rayleigh Jean’s law from Planck’s law, Compton effect,  de Broglie hypothesis – extension to electron particle. Phase velocity, group velocity, expression for group velocity based on superposition of waves, relation between group velocity and particle velocity. Problems.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Quantum Mechanics
 

 Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and its physical significance. Application of uncertainty principle (Non-existence of electron in the nucleus). Wave function. Properties and Physical significance of a wave function Schrodinger - Time independent wave equation – Application: Setting up of a one dimensional Schrödinger wave equation of a particle in a potential well of infinite depth : Probability density and Normalization of wave function – Energy Eigen values and Eigen function. Problems.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Electrical and Thermal Conductivities of metals
 

Classical free-electron theory. Introduction, assumptions and limitation of classical free-electron theory. Thermal Conductivity. Wiedemann - Franz law, calculation of Lorentz number.

Quantum free-electron theory – Postulates of quantum free electron theory, Fermi - Dirac Statistics. Fermi-energy – Fermi factor. Density of states. Carrier concentration in metals. Expression for electrical resistivity/conductivity - Merits of Quantum free electron theory. Problems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Materials Science
 

Elasticity : Introduction - Bending of beams – Single Cantilever – Application of Cantilever in AFM, Young’s modulus-Non uniform bending. Problems.

 

Dielectrics : Dielectric constant and polarisation of dielectric materials. Types of polarisation. Equation for internal fields in liquids and solids (one dimensional). Clausius – Mossotti equation. Ferro and Piezo – electricity(qualitative). Frequency dependence of dielectric constant. Important applications of dielectric materials. Problems.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Applied Optics
 

Lasers: Principle and production. Einstein’s coefficients (expression for energy density). Requisites of a Laser system. Condition for Laser action. Principle, Construction and working of He-Ne and semiconductor diode Laser. Applications of Laser – Laser welding, cutting and drilling. Measurement of atmospheric pollutants. Problems.

 

Optical Fibers : Introduction, Principle andPropagation of light in optical fibers. Angle of acceptance. Numerical aperture. Types of optical fibers and modes of propagation. Applications –optical fiber communication system. Problems.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:30
Physics Laboratory (Any Eight to be performed)
 

 

Expected Tools (Software / Hardware) to be used :                                                          30 Hrs

Vernier Callipers, Screw Gauge, Travelling Microscope

Sl No

EXPERIMENT NAME

CO

1.

Basic Measuring Instruments

         Vernier Callipers

         Screw Gauge

         Travelling Microscope

 

2.

Verification of Stefan’s law

Utilize the theoretical concepts of classical physics, optics and material science to have    hands on training for a better understanding of the subject. (CO6)

3.

Planck’s Constant (Determination of Planck’s constant using

LED or using the principle of  photoelectric effect)

Utilize the theoretical concepts of classical physics, optics and material science to have    hands on training for a better understanding of the subject. (CO6)

4.

Determination of Fermi energy.

Utilize the theoretical concepts of classical physics, optics and material science to have    hands on training for a better understanding of the subject. (CO6)

5.

 Young’s modulus – Non-uniform bending.

Utilize the theoretical concepts of classical physics, optics and material science to have    hands on training for a better understanding of the subject. (CO6)

6.

Measurement of Dielectric Constant( Charging & discharging of

capacitor).

Utilize the theoretical concepts of classical physics, optics and material science to have    hands on training for a better understanding of the subject. (CO6)

7.

Ultrasonic Interferometer.

Utilize the theoretical concepts of classical physics, optics and material science to have    hands on training for a better understanding of the subject. (CO6)

8.

Interference at a wedge.

Utilize the theoretical concepts of classical physics, optics and material science to have    hands on training for a better understanding of the subject. (CO6)

9.

 Laser Diffraction (Determination of grating constant and number of rulings per inch using diffraction grating).

Utilize the theoretical concepts of classical physics, optics and material science to have    hands on training for a better understanding of the subject. (CO6)

10.

 Frequency determination – Melde’s apparatus

Utilize the theoretical concepts of classical physics, optics and material science to have    hands on training for a better understanding of the subject. (CO6)

11.

Photo Multiplier Tube – Demonstration only

Utilize the theoretical concepts of classical physics, optics and material science to have    hands on training for a better understanding of the subject. (CO6)

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

1.      M.N.Avadhanulu and P.G. Kshirsagar, “A Text Book of Engineering Physics”, S.Chand & Company Ltd, Revised Edition 2014.

2.      John Wiley “Engineering Physics”,Wiley India Pvt. Ltd, 1st Edition 2014.

  1. S.O. Pillai,  “Solid State Physics”,  New Age International, 7th  Edition 2015.

4.      S.P. Basavaraju, “ Engineering Physics”, Revised Edition 2015.

5.      Charles Kittel, “Introduction to Solid State Physics” , 8th Edition.

6.      Arthur Beiser, “Concepts of Modern Physics” , Special Indian Edition 2009.

7.      Ajoy Ghatak, “Optics”, 5th Edition 2012.

 

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1.      R.K. Gaur and S.L. Gupta, "Engineering Physics", Dhanpatrai and Sons, New Delhi, 2011.

2.      Sehgal Chopra Sehgal, “ Modern Physics ", Tata McGraw-Hill, Revised Edition, 2014.

3.      Halliday, Resnick and Krane, "Fundamentals of Physics Extended",

John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York, 10th Edition, 2013.

4.      P.Mani, “Engineering Physics”, Dhanam publishers, Revised Edition 2011.

5.      H.J. Sawant, "Engineering Physics", Technical Publications, Revised Edition, 2014.

6.      V. Rajendran, “Engineering Physics”, Tata Mcgraw Hill Publishing Company Limited, 1st Edition, 2009.

7.       K.Eric Drexler, “Nanosystems - Molecular Machinery, Manufacturing and Computation”, John Wiely & Sons, 2005.

8.       J David, N Cheeke , “Fundamentals and Applications of Ultrasonic Waves”, CRC Press 2nd Edition, 2012.

9.      Frederick J Bueche and Eugene Hecht “Schaum Outline of Theory and Problems of College Physics”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 11th Edition, 2012.

10.  M. Ali Omar, “ Elementary Solid State Physics”, Addison-Wesley 1st Edition, 1993.

 

 

Physics Lab:

Text Books:

 Physics Laboratory Manual for the First / Second Semester B.Tech, CUFE, 2015.

Reference Book :

 Sathyaseelan H, Laboratory Manual in Applied Physics”, New Age International, 3rdEdition, 2012.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Arthur Beiser, “Concepts of Modern Physics” , Special Indian Edition 2009

S.P. Basavaraju, “ Engineering Physics”, Revised Edition 2015.

R.K. Gaur and S.L. Gupta, "Engineering Physics", Dhanpatrai and Sons, New Delhi, 2011. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 20 Marks has 2 components

Test 1 - UNIT 1 - 10 Marks

Test 2 - UNIT 2 - 10 Marks

 

CIA II Mid Sem Exam

Unit 1, Unit 2 and half of Unit 3 - 50 marks

 

CIA III (20 Marks) - 1 component

Unit 3 and Unit 4 OR ASSIGNMENT/Mini Project - 20 marks

 

OVERALL LAB Evaluation (50 Marks) has 3 components   

        Component 1- Evaluation of Record   through Google classroom – 10 Marks

        Component 2- Viva- one to one Interaction through Cisco webEx/ Google meet/Microsoft Teams – 10 Marks

 

        Component 3- End Sem Lab Exam – 30 Marks

Evaluation Rubrics-

Evaluation of Record book (10 Marks)

CATEGORY

Excellent (10-9)

Very Good (8-7)

Good (6-5)

Average (4-2)

Needs to improve (1)

Component -1

 Evaluation of 

Record Book

Punctuality, Neatness, Diagram, labeling, Tabular column, graph Proper Calculations with accurate result with units.

Punctuality, Diagram, labeling, Tabular column, graph Proper Calculations with accurate result without units.

Punctuality, Diagram without labeling, Tabular column, graph Proper Calculations with less accurate result without units

Punctuality, Diagram without labeling, Tabular column, graph Proper Calculations with less accurate result without units

Punctuality, Diagram without labeling, Tabular column, graph, Calculations with less accurate result without units. Late submission

 

 

Component 2, Viva- one to one Interaction through Cisco webeX/ Google Team/Microsoft Teams – 10 Marks

Evaluation Rubrics:

 

CATEGORY

Excellent

(10-9)

Very Good

(8-6)

Good

(5-4)

Average

(3-2)

Needs to improve

(1)

Viva

Answered all the 5 questions appropriately

Answered all the 5 questions but not appropriately

Answered 3 questions appropriately

Answered 2 questions appropriately

Answered only 1 question appropriately

 

Component 3, ESE Lab exam-10+10+10 = 30 Marks

Write-up

Formulae with proper units, Clear, accurate diagrams are included and make the experiment easier to understand. Diagrams are labelled neatly and accurately. Neat and appropriate Circuit diagram/Ray diagram, Model graph, Tabular column

Formulae with no units Diagrams are included and are labelled neatly and accurately. Appropriate Circuit diagram/Ray diagram, Model graph, Tabular column. Not written neatly

Some Formulae are missing. Diagrams are included and are labelled.  Appropriate Circuit diagram/Ray diagram, Tabular column. Model graph is not included

Some Formulae are missing. Diagrams are included and are labelled.  Appropriate Circuit diagram/Ray diagram, Tabular column.

Formulae are missing Needed diagrams are missing OR are missing important labels. Appropriate Tabular column. Missing model graph and circuit diagram

Calculation and Result

All calculations are shown and the results are correct and labelled appropriately.

Some calculations are shown and the results are correct and labelled appropriately.

Some calculations are shown and the results labelled appropriately.

Some calculations are shown and the results labelled are not appropriate.

No calculations are shown OR results are inaccurate or mislabelled.

Simulation

Taking readings from the simulation with proper explanation

 

 

 

 

EC233P - BASIC ELECTRONICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims at imparting knowledge about electronic and digital systems, semiconductor theory and operational amplifiers. This course also includes a practical component which allows the students to recognize the different elements used in electronics and digital systems. 

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student will be able to :

CO1: Describe the basic semiconductor principles , working of p-n junction diode and transistors [L2] [PO1]

CO2: Demonstrate the operation of diodes in rectifiers, voltage regulator and clipper [L3] [PO1]

CO3: Explain the operation of bipolar junction transistor including the amplification and biasing [L2] [PO1, PO6]

CO4: Explain the operation and applications of Operational Amplifier [L2] [PO1]

CO5: Discuss conversions between binary, decimal, octal and hexadecimal number system [L2] [PO1]

CO6:Implement digital logic gates and its application as adders. [L3] [PO1, PO6]

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
BASIC SEMICONDUCTOR AND PN JUNCTION THEORY
 

Atomic Theory – Atom, Electron Orbits and Energy Levels - Conduction in solids – Electron Motion and Hole Transfer, Conventional Current and Electron Flow –Conductors, Insulators and Semiconductors – Energy  Band Diagrams – Variation of band gap with temperature. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Semiconductors –  Doping, n type and p type material, Majority and minority carriers, Charge Carrier Density, Mass Action Law. Semiconductor Conductivity – Drift Current, Diffusion Current, Charge Carrier Velocity, Condyctivity.The pn Junction – Biased Junctions – Junction Currents and Voltages.VI Characteristics – Static and Dynamic Resistance.Zener diode characteristics, Zener and Avalanche breakdown.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
DIODE APPLICATIONS
 

Diode Approximations – DC Load Line Analysis - DC voltage applied to diodes (Si and zener diodes only). (Simple analysis using KCL and KVL). Rectifiers – Half Wave rectifier – Full Wave Rectifier – Bridge Rectifier : dc load current and voltage, rms load current and voltage, ripple factor, efficiency, PIV. Simple Capacitor Filter(Analysis not expected) – Simple Shunt Zener Voltage Regulator

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
BIPOLAR JUNCTION TRANSISTOR
 

Bipolar Junction Transistors: Transistor Construction – Operation – Common Base Configuration – Transistor Amplifying action – Common Collector – Common Emitter. Transistor currents.Common emitter current gain – Common Base Current gain – Relationship.

Transistor Biasing : Operating Point – Significance – Fixed Bias and Voltage Divider Bias – Simple analysis. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS
 

Block diagram, Op-amp transfer characteristics, Basic Op-amp parameters and its value for IC 741- offset voltage and current, input and output impedance, Gain, slew rate, bandwidth, CMRR, Concept of negative feedback, Inverting and Non-inverting amplifiers, Summing Amplifier, Subtractor, Differential Amplifier, integrator, differentiator, Voltage follower, Introduction to Oscillators, the Barkhausen Criterion for Oscillations, Applications of Oscillator 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
DIGITAL ELECTRONICS
 

Sampling theorem, Introduction, decimal system, Binary, Octal and Hexadecimal number systems, addition and subtraction, fractional number, Binary Coded Decimal numbers. Boolean algebra, Logic gates, Two Variable and three variable K – maps - Half-adder, Full-adder, Logic Design based on two and three input variables only. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. David A. Bell, “Electronic Devices and Circuits” – Vth Edition, OUP, 2011

T2. N. P. Deshpande, “Electronic Devices and Circuits – Principles and Applications”, TMH, 2017

T3. Robert L Boylestad& Louis Nashelsky, "Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory", 3rd Edition, 2015

T4. Morris Mano, “Digital Logic and Computer Design”, PHI, EEE, 2014

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Donald A. Neamen, “Electronic Circuits”, 3rd Edition, TMH, 2017

R2. Thomas L. Floyd, “Electronic Devices”, Seventh Edition, Pearson Education, 2012

R3. Albert Malvino, David. J. Bates, ―Electronic Principle, 8th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill,  2015

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 70 marks

ESE 30 marks

ME235 - BASIC MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND NANOSCIENCE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

1. To elucidate and critically demonstrate the Energy sources and basic thermodynamic concepts behind energy transfer.

2. To distinguish and elaborate on the different types of prime movers.

3. To describe the functioning of refrigeration and air-conditioning.

4. To evaluate and apply the concepts of nano-science in real engineering applications.

5. To demonstrate and apply the process of machining and metal joining in the basic applications.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Classify the energy resources and state the basic laws of the thermodynamics and illustrate with an example modes of heat transfer.  [L1, L2] [PO1, PO2].

CO2: List the types of I.C. Engines and turbines, discuss the working principle of I.C. engines and turbines. [L1, L3] [PO1, PO2, PO3].

CO3: Define the terms refrigeration and air-conditioning, identify their application areas. [L1, L2, L3] [PO1, PO2, PO3].

CO4: Explain the fundamental concept of nanotechnology and describe the characterization methods for nanomaterials. [L1, L2, L3] [PO1, PO2].

CO5: Summarize the operations performed by using machine tools and distinguish between welding soldering and brazing process. [L1, L2, L3] [PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4].

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
NON-CONVENTIONAL ENERGY RESOURCES
 

Non-conventional energy sources: Solar, Wind, hydraulic, Ocean-thermal, Geo-thermal, Tidal energy and bio mass energy plants working principle. Merits and demerits..

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
CONVENTIONAL ENERGY RESOURCES
 

Conventional Energy resources: Fossil fuel and nuclear fuel, Merits and demerits. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
I.C. ENGINES
 

Classification, I.C. Engines parts and their function, working of 2 Stroke and 4 stroke engines. Basic terms - Indicated power, brake power frictional power, thermal efficiency, mechanical efficiency (simple problems).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
TURBINES
 

Steam Generators

Boilers, fire and water tube boilers (Lancashire and Babcock and Will Cox boiler-working with simple sketches).

Steam turbines

Classifications, Principle of operation of Impulse and reaction turbines.

Gas Turbines

Open cycle and closed cycle gas turbines working principle.

Water Turbines

Classification, working principle of Pelton wheel, Francis turbine and Kaplan turbine.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
REFRIGERATION
 

Types of refrigerants and properties of good refrigerant, Refrigerating effect and unit of Refrigeration (definition). Working principle of vapour Compression refrigeration and vapour absorption refrigeration (with a sketch). Applications areas of a refrigeration system.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
AIR-CONDTIONING
 

Definition, types, Room air-conditioning working principle (with a sketch), Applications.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
INTRODUCTION TO NANOTECHNOLOGY
 

Introduction to about Nanomaterials, characterization of nanomaterials-SEM, XRD, AFM and Mechanical properties, Advantages, limitations and applications of Nanomaterials.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
MACHINE TOOLS
 

Lathe Machine-Types, Parts and different operations like-turning, facing, grooving, parting off, taper turning, and threading (simple sketch)

Drilling Machine-Types, Parts and different operations like-drilling, reaming, boring, counterboring, counter sinking and tapping (simple sketch).

Milling Machine-Up milling, down milling, Plane milling, End milling, Slot milling and gear cutting (sketches only for following operations).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
METAL JOINING
 

Definitions, classification of soldering, Brazing and welding. Differences between soldering, brazing and Welding. Description of Electric Arc welding and Oxy-Acetylene gas welding (Simple sketch).

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. K.R. Gopalkrishna, “A text Book of Elements of Mechanical Engineering”, Subhash Publishers, Bangalore, 2008.

T2. S. Trymbaka Murthy, “A Text Book of Elements of Mechanical Engineering”, 3rd revised edition, I .K. International Publishing House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi. 2010.

T3. P.K.Nag, “Engineering Thermodynamics” Tata McGraw-Hill Education, 2005.

T4. B.S. Murthy, P. Shankar, Baldev Raj, B.B. Rath and James Munday, “Nano Science and Nano Technology ", University Press IIM, 2002.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Dr. R. P. Reddy, “Elements of Mechanical Engineering”, 1st Edition, Himalaya Publishing House, New Delhi, 2012.

R2. Hajra Choudhury S K, “Elements of Workshop Technology” 13th Edition, Volume 1, Machine Tools, India Book Distributing Company Calcutta, 2010.

R3. Hajra Choudhury S K, “Elements of Workshop Technology” 13th Edition, Volume 2, Machine Tools, India Book Distributing Company Calcutta, 2012.

R4. Charles P. Poole and Frank J. Owens, “Introduction to Nanotechnology”, Wiley India Edition, 2012.

Evaluation Pattern

ASSESSMENT PATTERN FOR THEORY COURSE

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

1

CIA-1

20

10

2

CIA-2

50

25

3

CIA-3

20

10

4

Attendance

05

05

5

ESE

100

50

 

 

TOTAL

100

CH232P - CHEMISTRY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper contains five units which are Spectroscopic techniques and applications, Electrochemical Energy Systems, Corrosion Science, Chemical thermodynamics, Material Characterization Techniques and Water Technology. And it aims at enabling the students to know various Spectroscopic techniques, corrosion and its control, basics of thermodynamics, concepts in water technology and material characterization.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to explain the basic principles of IR spectroscopy and UV Visible Spectroscopy. {L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO2: Students will be able to outline the oxidation and reduction reactions that are relevant to study the concepts of corrosion science and electrochemistry. {L2} { PO1, PO2, PO9}

CO3: Students will be able to analyze the various types of corrosion occurring on metal surfaces by knowing the electrochemical theory of corrosion. {L4} { PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO4: Students will be able to explain the basic concepts of thermodynamics, 1st law and 2nd law of thermodynamics. {L2} { PO1, PO2}

CO5: Students will be able to illustrate the fundamentals of characterization techniques and wastewater treatment. {L3} { PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4, PO9}

CO6:  Demonstrates competence in collecting, recording and interpreting data in the experiments performed. {L3} { PO1,PO4, PO7,PO9 }

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Spectroscopic Techniques and Applications
 

Introduction- Types of spectrum - electromagnetic spectrum - molecular energy levels - Beer Lambert’s law (Numerical). UV-Visible Spectroscopy – Principle - Types of electronic transitions - Energy level diagram of ethane and butadiene. Instrumentation of UV-Visible spectrometer and applications.

IR-Spectroscopy – Principle - Number of vibrational modes - Vibrational energy states of a diatomic molecule and -Determination of force constant of diatomic molecule (Numerical) –Applications.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Electrochemical Energy Systems
 

Conductance, Ionic conductance, Transport number, Ionic mobility, activity coefficient and mean activity coefficients. Single electrode potential- origin, sign conventions. Derivation of the Nernst equation. Standard electrode potential Construction of Galvanic cell–classification - primary, secondary and concentration cells, Concentration cell with and without transference, EMF of a cell, notation and conventions. Reference electrodes –calomel electrode, Ag/AgCl electrode. Measurement of single electrode potential. Numerical problems on electrode potential and EMF. Ion-selective electrode- glass electrode, Determination of pH using a glass electrode.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Corrosion Science
 

Corrosion - definition, Chemical corrosion and Electro-chemical theory of corrosion, Types of corrosion, Differential metal corrosion, Differential aeration corrosion (pitting and water line corrosion), and Stress corrosion. Factors affecting the rate of corrosion, Corrosion control:  Inorganic coatings – Anodizing and Phosphating, Metal coatings –Galvanization and Tinning, Corrosion Inhibitors, Cathodic and Anodic protection.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Chemical Thermodynamics
 

Definition of thermodynamic terms: system, surrounding etc. Types of systems, intensive and extensive properties.First law of thermodynamics, internal energy, enthalpy, relation between internal energy & enthalpy, heat capacity, free energy.Second law of thermodynamics, Spontaneous & non-spontaneous reactions, Gibbs-Helmholtz equation & related problems. Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Lavoisier & Laplace law, Exergonic & endergonic reactions in cells, Hess’s law & its applications, Van’t Hoff isotherm, Equilibrium constant.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Material Characterization & Water Technology
 

Theory and Applications of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Powder Xray diffraction (pXRD)

Water Technology: Impurities in water, Biochemical Oxygen Demand and Chemical Oxygen Demand. Numerical problems on BOD and COD. Sewage treatment. Purification of water- Desalination, Flash evaporation, Electrodialysis and Reverse Osmosis.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:30
Chemistry Laboratory
 

PART –A

1. Determination of the viscosity coefficient of a given liquid using Ostwald’s viscometer.

2. Determination of copper by spectrophotometric method.

3. Conductometric estimation of acid using standard NaOH solution.

4. Determination of pKa value of a weak acid using pH meter.

5. Potentiometric estimation of FAS using standard K2Cr2O7 solution

PART - B

1. Determination of Total Hardness of a sample of water using disodium salt of EDTA.

2. Determination of percentage of Copper in brass using standard sodium thiosulphate solution.

3. Determination of Calcium Oxide (CaO) in the given sample of cement by Rapid EDTA method.

4. Determination of Iron in the given sample of Haematite ore solution using potassium dichromate crystals by external indicator method.

5. Determination of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) of the given industrial waste Water sample.

 

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.  Dr. B.S. Jai Prakash, “Chemistry for Engineering Students”, Subhas Stores, Bangalore, Reprint 2015

T2.  M. M. Uppal, Engineering Chemistry”, Khanna Publishers, Sixth Edition, 2002

T3. Jain and Jain, A text Book of Engineering Chemistry”, S. Chand & Company Ltd. New Delhi, 2009, Reprint- 2016

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.C. N. Banwell, “Fundamentals of Molecular Spectroscopy”, McGraw-Hill, 4th Edition. 1995.

R2. Donald L. Pavia, “Introduction to Spectroscopy”, Cengage Learning India Pvt. Ltd., 2015.

R3. Atkins P.W. “Physical chemistry” ELBS 9 Edition 2009, London

R4. Stanley E. Manahan, Environmental Chemistry”, Lewis Publishers, Reprint 2009

R5. B. R. Puri, L. R. Sharma & M. S. Pathania, ”Principles of Physical Chemistry”, S. Nagin Chand & Co., 33rd Ed., Reprint- 2016

R6. Kuriakose J.C. and Rajaram J. “ Chemistry in Engineering and Technology” Vol I & II, Tata Mc Graw – Hill Publications Co Ltd, NewDelhi, First edition Reprint 2010

R7. Ertl, H. Knozinger and J. Weitkamp, "Handbook of Heterogeneous Catalysis" Vol 1-5, Wiley - VCH.

R8. B. Viswanathan, S. Sivasanker, A.V. Ramaswamy, "Catalysis: Principles & Applications" CRC Press, March 2002, Reprint 2011.

R9. D K Chakrabarty, B. Viswanathan, ”Heterogeneous Catalysis” New Age International Publishers, 2008.

R9. J. Bassett, R.C. Denny, G.H. Jeffery, Vogel's textbook of quantitative inorganic analysis”,5th Edition

R10. Sunita and Ratan Practical Engineering Chemistry, S.K. Kataria & Sons, 2013.

Evaluation Pattern

DETAIL OF MARKS

THEORY

PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

Minimum marks to pass

Maximum marks

1

CIA-1

20

10

-

10

Overall CIA

50

35

14

35

2

CIA-2

50

10

-

10

3

CIA-3

20

10

-

10

4

Attendance

05

05

-

05

Attendance

NA

NA

-

-

5

ESE

100

30

12

30

ESE

NA

NA

-

-

 

 

TOTAL

65

-

65

TOTAL

 

35

14

35

·         Minimum marks required to pass in practical component is 40%.

·         Pass in practical component is eligibility criteria to attend Theory End semester examination for the same course.

·         A minimum of 40 % required to pass in ESE -Theory component of a course.

·         Overall 40 % aggregate marks in Theory & practical component, is required to pass a course.

·         There is no minimum pass marks for the Theory - CIA component.

·         Less than 40% in practical component is refereed as FAIL.

·         Less than 40% in Theory ESE is declared as fail in the theory component.

·         Students who failed in theory ESE have to attend only theory ESE to pass in the course

CS234P - COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

● To provide exposure to problem-solving through programming.

● To provide a basic exposition to the goals of programming

● To enable the student to apply these concepts in applications which involve perception, reasoning and learning.

Learning Outcome

 

 
CO1 Demonstrate the fundamental concepts of Computer Programming.
CO2 Make use of the decision making, branching and Looping statements for solving problems.
CO3 Build an application using functions to achieve code reuse.
CO4 Inspect code optimization by using pointers.
CO5 Develop applications using Strings and Files.
 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Algorithms And Flowcharts, Constants, Variables And Datatypes,Operators, Managing Input And Output Operations
 

Algorithms and flowcharts: Algorithms, Flowcharts, Examples on algorithms and flowcharts. Basic structure of a C program, C Tokens, Data types. Declaration of variables. Operators: Arithmetic operators, Relational operators, Logical operators, Assignment operators, Increment and Decrement operators, Conditional operator, Bitwise operators, Special operators, Arithmetic expressions, Evaluation of expressions, Precedence of Arithmetic operators, Type conversions in expressions, Operator precedence and associatively.Managing input and output operations: Reading a character, writing a character, Formatted Input, Formatted Output

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Decision Making And Branching, Looping
 

Decision making and branching: Decision making with if statement, Simple if statement, The if…else statement, Nesting of if…else statements, The else … if ladder, The switch statement, The ?: operator, The Goto statement ,Looping: The while statement, The do statement, The for statement, Jumps in Loops

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Arrays, User Defined Functions
 

Arrays: One-dimensional Arrays, Declaration of one-dimensional Arrays, Initialization of one-dimensional Arrays, Two-dimensional Arrays, Initializing two-dimensional Arrays.User-defined functions: Need for User-defined Functions, A multi-function Program, Elements of user - defined Functions, Definition of Functions, Return Values and their types, Function Calls, Function Declaration, Category of Functions, No Arguments and no Return Values, Arguments but no Return Values, Arguments with Return Values, No Argument but Returns a Value, Functions that Return Multiple Value, recursion –recursive functions, Limitations of recursion.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Pointers
 

Understanding the pointers, Accessing the Address of a Variable, Declaring Pointer Variables, Initialization of Pointer Variables, Accessing a Variable through its Pointer, Pointer Expressions, Pointer Increments and Scale Factor, Pointers and Arrays, Pointers and Character Strings, Pointers as Function Arguments

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Strings, Derived Types, Files
 

Strings: String concepts: declaration and initialization, String I/O functions, Array of strings, String manipulation function, Structure: Basic of structures, structures and Functions, Arrays of structures, structure Data types, type definition.Files: Defining, opening and closing of files, Input and output operations, Standard Library Functions for Files

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Deitel and Deitel, "C How to Program", Prentice Hall 2010 (Reprint).

T2. Herbert Schildt, "C++ : The Complete Reference", McGraw - Hill Osborne Media; 3rd edition 2012 ( Reprint).

T3. YashvantKanetkar, “Let Us C 13E”, BPB Publications – 13th Edition, 2013.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.Shelly and Junt, “Computers and Commonsense”, 4th edition, Prentice Hall of India, 2010 (Reprint).

R2. Dennis P. Curtin, Kim Foley, Kunal Sen, Cathleen Morin, “Information Technology: The Breaking wave”, Tata MC GrawHill Companies, 2010 (Reprint).

R3. Peter Norton, “Introduction to Computers”, 2011 (Reprint).

Evaluation Pattern
 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) for Theory papers: 70% (70 marks out of 100 marks) ·

End Semester Examination(ESE) : 30% (30 marks out of 100 marks)

MA231 - MATHEMATICS - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Mathematics is a necessary avenue to scientific knowledge which opens new vistas of mental activity. A sound knowledge of engineering Mathematics is a ‘sine qua non’ for the modern engineer to attain new heights in all aspects of engineering practice. This course provides the student with plentiful opportunities to work with and apply the concepts, and to build skills and experience in mathematical reasoning and engineering problem solving.At the end of this course, the students will

  • be introduced to the tools of integration of multivariate functions over areas and volumes.
  • learn the technique of multidimensional change of variables to transform the coordinates over which integration proceeds by utilizing Jacobian.Specifically,students will learn how to transformbetween an integral over an area or volume in Cartesian coordinates to polar coordinates.
  • be able to solve higher order homogenous/ non-homogenous linear differential equations with constant coefficients
  • be able to solve Cauchy’s and Legendre’s equations.
  • learn the fundamental vector calculus integral theorems of Green, Stokes’ and Divergence. Students will also learn how these theorems represent conservation principles for physical vector fields important in gravitation and electric fields.
  • be able to perform operations with Laplace and inverse Laplace transforms to solve higher order differential equations

Learning Outcome

CO1: Find the angle between the polar curves and radius of curvature  by applying differentiation

CO2: Calculate the area and volume of solids using double and triple integration

CO3: Solve linear differential equations of higher order by using inverse differential operator, Method of undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters

CO4: Solve initial value problems using Laplace Transforms method

CO5: Establish the relation between the line and surface integral, surface and volume integral using Green’s, Stoke’s and Gauss Divergence theorem

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Differential Calculus ? II
 

Polar curves and angle between Polar curves. Pedal equations of polar curves, Radius of curvature – Cartesian, parametric, polar and pedal forms.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Integral Calculus ? II
 

Double integrals, Cartesian and polar co – ordinates, change of order of integration, change of variables between cartesian and polar co – ordinates, triple integration, area as a double integral, volume as a triple integral

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Differential Equations ? II
 

Linear differential equations of second and higher order with constant coefficients. Method of variation of parameters. Legendre’a and Cauchy’s homogeneous differential equations.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Laplace Transforms
 

Definition - Transforms of elementary functions – Properties, Derivatives and integrals of transforms- Problems. Periodic function. Unit step function and unit impulse function,           Inverse transforms, Solutions of linear  differential equations.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Vector Calculus ? II
 

Vector Integration - Green’s theorem in a plane, Gauss’s divergence theorems, Stoke’s, (without proof) and simple application.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.  Dr. B. S. Grewal, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, 39th Edition, Khanna Publishers, July 2005.

T2.  H. K. Das & Rajnish Verma, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, S. Chand & Company Ltd., 2011.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Erwin Kreyszig, “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, 8th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc,  2005

R2. Thomas and Finney, “Calculus”, 9th Edition, Pearson Education, 2004

R3. Peter V. O’Neil, “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, Thomson Publication, Canada, 2007

R4. B. V. Ramana, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, Tata McGraw – Hill, 2009

R5. George F. Simmons and Steven G. Krantz, “Differential Equation, Theory, Technique and Practice”, Tata McGraw – Hill, 2006

R6. M. D. Raisinghania, “Ordinary and Partial Differential Equation”, Chand (S.) & Co. Ltd., India, March 17, 2005

R7. Paras Ram, “Engineering Mathematics through Applications”, 1st Edition, CBS Publisher, 2011

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

End Semester Examination(ESE): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

 

Components of the CIA

CIA I  :  Subject Assignments / Online Tests                  : 10 marks

CIA II :   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                : 25 marks                   

CIAIII:Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications: 10 marks

Attendance                                                                           : 05 marks

            Total                                                                              : 50 marks

 

Mid Semester Examination (MSE) : 

The MSE is conducted for 50 marks of 2 hours duration.

Question paper pattern; Five out of Six questions have to be answered. Each  question carries 10 marks

 

End Semester Examination (ESE):

The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration.

The syllabus for the theory papers are divided into FIVE units and each unit carries equal Weightage in terms of marks distribution.

Question paper pattern is as follows:

Two full questions with either or choice will be drawn from each unit. Each question carries 20 marks. There could be a maximum of

three sub divisions in a question. The emphasis on the questions is to test the objectiveness, analytical skill and application skill of the

concept, from a question bank which reviewed and updated every year

The criteria for drawing the questions from the Question Bank are as follows

50 % - Medium Level questions

25 % - Simple level questions

25 % - Complex level questions

 

HS236 - TECHNICAL ENGLISH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

Technical English Course consist of five units covering; Vocabulary Building, Basic Writing Skills, Identifying Common Errors in Writing, Essay Writing and Oral Communication. These components will be explained followed by tasks to strengthen communication skills of the learners by strengethening their vocabulary, improve reading comprehension skills and effective writing skills with appropriate command over grammar. 

Course Objectives: 

Upon Successful completion of this course, the student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to respond effectively, efficiently, and appropriately in written and oral communication.

Learning Outcome

CO1: acquire basic proficiency in all the English language skills; reading, listening comprehension, writing and speaking skills 

CO2: have a better understanding of the Mechanics of English language 

CO3: make an organized and well prepared oral presentation to meet the needs of individual and small groups

CO4: write well structured academic essays

CO5: take part in group discussions with better speaking skills 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Vocabulary Building
 

Concept of word formation, Synonyms, Antonyms, Homophones, Prefixes and suffixes, Misused and confused words.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Basic Writing Skills
 

Sentence structure, Parts of speech, Fragments, Run-on errors, Phrases and clauses, Misplaced  and  Dangling modifiers, Structure of paragraphs Techniques of writing  precisely.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Identifying Common Errors in Writing
 

Subject verb agreement(concord), Articles, Prepositions, Tenses, Redundancies, cliché’s , Misused and confused words

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Essay Writing (Language Laboratory)
 

Structure of an Academic essay, Writing introduction , Thesis statement, Writing body paragraphs , Writing  concluding paragraph, Unity, Support, Coherence and sentence skills , Different types of essay.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Oral Communication
 

(Interactive practical sessions in lang. lab), Listening comprehensions, Pronunciation, Intonation, Stress and rhythm, Interview and  formal presentation skills.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1: Practical English Usage. Michael Swan. OUP. 1995.

T2: Remidial English Grammar. F. T. Wood. Macmillan. 2007.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1: On Writing Well. Willian Zinsser. Harper Resource Book. 2001.

R2: Study Writing. Liz Hamp-Lyons. Cambridge University Press. 2006.

R3: Communication Skills.Sanjay Kumar and Pushp Latha. Oxford University Press. 2011.

R4: Exercises in Spoken English.Parts. I - III. CIEFL, Hyderabad. Oxford University Press. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA

50 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

 

 

CIA 1

Quiz/Assignment/Essay writing/Grammar Test

CIA 2

Mid Semester Exam: MSE

CIA 3

Presentation/English Lab/Portfolio

 

ME251 - WORKSHOP PRACTICE LAB (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To provide the students with the hands on experience on different trades of engineering like fitting, welding, carpentary & sheet metal.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of and comply with workshop safety regulations. [L1,L2] [PO1,PO2, PO7, PO10]

CO2: Select and perform a range of machining operations to produce a given project. [L1,L2,L3] [PO1,PO6,PO7,PO9,PO10]

CO3: Identify and use marking out tools, handtools, measuring equipment and to work to prescribed tolerances. [L1,L2,L3] [PO1,PO2,PO6,PO9,PO10]

CO4: Demonstrate a knowledge of welding process selection and capabilities. [L2,L3] [PO1,PO2,PO7,PO9,PO10]

CO5: Demonstrate a knowledge of welding, joint design and the application of welding. [L2,L3,L4] [PO1,PO2,PO6,PO7,PO9,PO10]

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
List of Experiments:
 

 

List of Experiments (If any):

Practical Hours

1. Safety Precautions and description of workshop tools and equipments.

1

2. Study of fitting tools and equipments.

2

3. Demonstrate and make a square fitting model.

4

4. Demonstrate and make a V fitting model.

2

5. Demonstrate and make a dovetail fitting model.

4

6. Study of electric arc welding tools and equipments.

1

7. Demonstrate and make a Butt Joint welding model.

2

8. Demonstrate and make a Lap Joint welding model.

2

9. Demonstrate and make a T-Joint welding model.

2

10. Demonstrate and make a L-Joint welding model.

2

11. Study of sheet metal tools and equipments.

1

12. Demonstrate and make a rectangular tray.

2

13. Study and demonstration of Carpentry tools, joints and operations.

1

14. Study and demonstration of MIG welding.

2

15. Study and demonstration of TIG welding.

2

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

1. S. K. H. Choudhury, A. K. H. Choudhury, Nirjhar Roy, “The Elements of Workshop Technology”, Vol 1 & 2, Media Propoters and Publishers, Mumbai, 2018.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

1. P. Kannaiah and K.L. Narayana, “Manual on Workshop Practice”, Scitech Publications, (1999).

2. T Jeyapoovan, “Engineering Practices Lab - Basic Workshop Practice Manual,” ISBN: 81-259-1800-0.

3. H.S.Bawa, “Workshop Practice”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company Limited, (2007).

Evaluation Pattern

ASSESSMENT PATTERN FOR PRACTICAL COURSES

ONLY PRACTICAL

 

Component

Assessed for

Scaled down to

1

CIA

50

25

2

ESE

50

25

 

 

TOTAL

50