CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF LIFE SCIENCES

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
BSc (Biotechnology, Botany/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA141D TALENT MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141F SUSTAINABILITY?AND GREEN MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BLS101-1 PLANT DIVERSITY-I (PHYCOLOGY, MYCOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY) Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
BLS111-1 PLANT DIVERSITY-I LAB Major Core Courses-I 2 1 50
BLS161A-1 MUSHROOM CULTIVATION TECHNIQUES Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
BLS161B-1 ALGAL TECHNOLOGY Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 50
BLS162A-1 AQUARIUM FISH KEEPING Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
BLS162B-1 SERICULTURE Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
BLS162C-1 APICULTURE Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
BTY101-1 FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
BTY111-1 FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY LAB Major Core Courses-I 2 1 50
CHE121-1 BASIC CHEMISTRY Allied Core Courses 3 3 100
CHE141A CHEMISTRY AND SOCIETY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CHE141B NUTRICHEM Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM141 FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC141 PROGRAMMING IN C Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC143 WEB DESIGNING USING HTML, PHP AND MYSQL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DMT142 INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DMT143 INTRODUCTION TO ACTING Multidisciplinary Courses 2 3 100
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO145 ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG181-1 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST142 READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST143 STORYTELLING, GAMES AND ETHICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST145 POETICS , POLITICS AND PIVOTAL PEOPLE OF ROCK N ROLL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST146 FOOD AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST148 THE OCEANS IN CINEMA: A BLUE HUMANITIES READING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS141 HISTORY AND CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW145 PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED142 AUDIO AND VIDEO PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MED143 CELEBRITY PR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
MED144 HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
PHY141 FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY142 ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL143 SUBALTERN STUDIES: NARRATIVES OF THE COMMUNITIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY143 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY156 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY159 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEADERSHIP Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC142 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE141 THEATRE APPRECIATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA142F FINANCIAL EDUCATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142G GROUP AND TEAM EFFECTIVENESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BLS103-2 PLANT DIVERSITY-II (BRYOPHYTES, PTERIDOPHYTES AND GYMNOSPERMS) Major Core Courses-II 3 3 100
BLS104-2 PLANT ANATOMY AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Major Core Courses-II 3 3 100
BLS113-2 PLANT DIVERSITY-II LAB Major Core Courses-II 2 1 50
BLS114-2 PLANT ANATOMY AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY LAB Major Core Courses-II 2 1 50
BTY102-2 FUNDAMENTALS OF CELL BIOLOGY Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
BTY103-2 BIOCHEMISTRY Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
BTY112-2 FUNDAMENTALS OF CELL BIOLOGY LAB Major Core Courses-I 2 1 50
BTY113-2 BIOCHEMISTRY LAB Major Core Courses-I 2 1 50
CHE141 CHEMISTRY IN ACTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM149 INVESTMENTS AND TRADING STRATEGIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC153 INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (DBMS) Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC157 VISUALIZATION TECHNIQUES USING EXCEL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
ECO146 GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ECO147 THINKING THROUGH THE ENVIRONMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ENG181-2 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 2 100
EST149 INTRODUCTION TO WRITING TAMIL MODERN POETRY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
EST151 COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY: DARSANA AND PHILOSOPHY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
EST152 SKILLS FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
EST153 PARTITION NARRATIVES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST156 RETELLING OF EPICS IN INDIAN LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION - 3 3 100
LAW146 LAW AND PRACTICE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
MED148 LANGUAGE OF CINEMA: A VISUAL APPROACH Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
MED150 ARTS APPROACHES TO PEACEBUILDING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY141B RENEWABLE ENERGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
POL143 POLITICS AND SOCIETY OF INDIA SINCE INDEPENDENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL144 INDIA AND THE WORLD Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY158 STRESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY160 UNDERSTANDING ADDICTION AND SUBSTANCE USE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC142 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SW141 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE144 ACTING FOR MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

1.      The programme is offered to students opting for a BSc degree with the combinations of Biotechnology and Botany and BSc (Biotechnology Honours/Honours with Research) or BSc (Botany Honours/Honours with Research). The programme leads the students to higher learning in biological and applied sciences and contributes to society’s welfare. It is designed to help the students to understand the importance and judicious use of technology for the sustainable growth of mankind in synergy with nature. The courses in BSc (Biotechnology, Botany /Honours/Honours with Research) provide students with vital core science concepts and an application-oriented undergraduate education. Biotechnology courses aim to prepare students for jobs in the vitally important and rapidly growing biotechnology sector. Additionally, Students acquire foundational knowledge and skill sets covering fundamental sciences and technology. Given the need to improve undergraduate instruction that encourages interdisciplinary training and teamwork, this programme develops adaptable students with a strong foundation in competencies relevant to the evolving biotechnology industry. It gives the students hands-on instruction in biotechnology skills and methods. During the study of this programme, students will be trained to use an experimental learning strategy to integrate the program's laboratory and lecture components. This programme combines cutting-edge biotechnology research with instruction practically and uniquely.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: apply the fundamental principles, basic concepts, methods and scientific theories in key areas of science and multidisciplinary fields

PO2: use skills for critical assessment of a wide range of ideas and complex problems relating to the chosen field of study.

PO3: imbibe ethical, moral and social values in personal and social life leading to a highly cultured and civilized personality and developing various communication skills such as reading, listening, speaking, etc., which will help in expressing ideas and views clearly and effectively.

PO4: exhibit critical thinking with scientific temper

PO5: utilize the theoretical and practical knowledge of basic concepts of science to apply in various branches of biotechnology

PO6: exhibit deeper understanding of the fundamental and applied concepts of biotechnology subjects in entrepreneurial sectors and sustainable environmental management

PO7: demonstrate and apply the fundamental knowledge of the basic principles in major fields of plant science.

PO8: produce competent plant biologists who can employ and implement their gained knowledge in basic and applied aspects that will strongly influence the prevailing paradigm of agriculture, industry, healthcare and environment to provide sustainable development.

Assesment Pattern

Evaluation will be done on the basis of CIA1 (10%), CIA2 [Mid Semester Examination] (25%), CIA3 (10%), Attendance (5%) and End Semester Examination (50%).

CIA1: Assignment/test/poster preparation/review writing etc. for 20 marks

CIA2: MID SEMESTER EXAMINATION for 50 marks

CIA3: Assignment/test/poster preparation/review writing etc. for 20 marks

Attendance in class: 10 marks

END SEMSTER EXAMINATION: Consist of 1 section. Section A consist of 5 questions carrying 20 marks each. 

Examination And Assesments

The evaluation scheme for each course shall contain two parts; (a) internal evaluation and (b) external evaluation. 50% weightage shall be given to internal evaluation and the remaining 50% to external evaluation and the ratio and weightage between internal and external is 1:1.  (a) Internal evaluation: The internal evaluation shall be based on predetermined transparent system involving periodic written tests, assignments, seminars and attendance in respect of theory courses and based on written tests, lab skill/records/viva and attendance in respect of practical courses.

BBA141D - TALENT MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Human Resource is considered as a valuable resource in every organization. The world class companies compete among themselves to attract the best talent across the globe.  They view talent as competitive differentiator and one where the acquisition, engagement, development and retention of talent is considered as a strategic priority of business.  This course exposes the students to methods and practices to acquire, engage and develop talent, focus on development of strategic leaders within an organization and also deals with how talent and knowledge can be managed effectively for the development of the organization

Course Outcome

CO 1: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts, principles and models related to talent and knowledge management

CO 2: 2. Evaluate the importance of talent management in developing organizations

CO 3: 3. Learn to apply the theories and concepts studied in the classroom to practical situations

CO 4: 4. Analyse the various talent and knowledge management practices and their value to organizations

CO 5: 5. Solve the issues pertaining to talent and knowledge management

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Talent Management
 

Meaning and concept of talent management, need and scope for talent management, Talent vs Knowledge, Talent management models: Process and Integrated model, Talent management initiatives, Techniques for potential appraisal, Talent management grid, Benefits of talent management.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Creating Talent Management Systems
 

Building blocks for talent management strategy, Developing and implementing Effective Talent Management System, Measuring the effectiveness of talent management, creating talent management system for organizational excellence.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Competency mapping and approaches to talent management
 

Competency Mapping- Meaning, Importance and Steps in competency mapping, Competency model, Role of leaders and HR in talent management, Talent Management Approaches, Mapping Business Strategies and Talent Management Strategies, Achieving competitive advantage, Best practices in talent management- Case studies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management
 

Introduction to knowledge management, types of knowledge, Benefits of Knowledge Management, Integrating talent management and knowledge management, Role of Information technology in talent and knowledge management.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Recent Trends and Best Practices in Talent Management
 

Introduction, Use of Technology in Talent Management, Use of AI in Talent Management, Talent Management using Design Thinking

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Project Work: Field study & Report Submission
 

Experiential Learning Activity: Identifying any one organization in the manufacturing or service sector- Interacting, observing and conducting interviews with their senior HR leaders to understand how they manage and retain talent in their organizations.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

       Lance A. Berger, Dorothy Berger (2017): Talent management handbook, McGraw Hill New York.

 

       Mohapatra.M & Dhir.S (2022); Talent Management-A contemporary perspective (2022), Sage Publications

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

       Mark Wilcox (2016), Effective Talent Management: Aligning strategy, people and performance, (1st ed.), Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.

       Marshal Gold Smith and Louis Carter (2018): Best practices in talent management, A Publication of the practice institute, Pfeiffer, A Wiley Imprint.

       Atheer Abdullah Mohammed (2019), Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management: Theory and practice, Lamber Publishing co.,

       Cappeli Peter: Talent on Demand –Managing Talent in an age of uncertainty, Harvard Business press.

Sphr Doris Sims, Sphr Matthew Gay(2007),Building Tomorrow’s Talent : A Practitioner’s Guide to Talent Management and Succession Planning, Author House

Evaluation Pattern

Component

 

Maximum marks

Weightage

Total Marks in Final Grade

CIA1

20

50%

10

CIA2

20

50%

10

CIA3

50

50%

25

Attendance

5

100 %

05

Total = 50

 

BBA141F - SUSTAINABILITY?AND GREEN MARKETING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is designed to understand the importance of Sustainability and Green Marketing on consumer satisfaction and environmental safety. Green revolution, going green, environment protection, and sustainable development have become the buzz words today. Consumers are gradually becoming conscious buying eco-friendly products. This course aims at understanding the concept of Green Products and Marketing. This course also revisits the factors that affect consumers’ purchase decision in general. This course will lead the exploration of the leading edge of this paradigm shift that is now underway. This course introduces students to the concepts and processes of Green marketing and takes them deeper into the world of Green marketing.

Course Objectives: This course intends

 

  • To examine green marketing and its importance from the perspective of consumers and businesses.

  • To evaluate evidence of emerging green consumer segments and how marketers address those needs.

  • To explain the current state of the environment resulting from past and present human consumption practices.

  • To elaborate on opportunities, challenges, and issues in designing and implementing sustainable green marketing strategies.

 

 

Course Outcome

CLO1: Analyze green marketing and its importance from the perspective of consumers and businesses.

CLO2: Assess evidence of emerging green consumer segments and how marketers address those needs.

CLO3 : Interpret the current state of the environment resulting from past and present human consumption practices.

CLO4: Discuss the opportunities, challenges, and issues in designing and implementing sustainable green marketing strategies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Sustainability and Fundamentals of Green Marketing
 

Meaning, Concept and Evolution of Sustainability, Green Marketing, Types of Green Marketing, Difference  between Marketing and Green Marketing, Green Product, Green Marketing, Importance of Green Marketing, Benefits of Green Marketing, Adoption of Green Marketing, Green Marketing Mix, Strategies for Green Marketing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Segmentation of Green Marketing
 

Green Spinning, Green Selling, Green Harvesting, Enviropreneur Marketing, Compliance Marketing, Green Washing, Climate Performance Leadership Index, Promotional Channels of Green Marketing.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Green Marketing Initiatives
 

Green Firms, HCL’s Green Management Policy, IBM’s Green Solutions, IndusInd Bank’s Solar Powered ATMs, ITCs Paperkraft, Maruti’s Green Supply Chain, ONCGs Mokshada Green Crematorium, Reva’s Electric Car, Samsung’s Eco-friendly handsets, Wipro Infotech’s Eco-friendly computer peripherals

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Environmental consciousness
 

 

Introduction to Environment, Importance of environmentalism, Environmental movement, Benefits of green environment to society, E-waste exchange, Extended Producer Responsibility Plan, Guidelines for Collection and Storage of E-Waste, Guidelines for Transportation of E-Waste, Guidelines for Environmentally Sound Recycling of E-Waste

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Socially Responsible Marketing
 

Sustainable Marketing, Social Criticisms of Marketing, Marketing’s Impact on Individuals, Marketing’s Impact on Society as a Whole, Marketing’s Impact on Other Businesses, Actions to Promote Sustainable Marketing, Business Actions Toward Sustainable Marketing, Principles and Marketing Ethics.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Ottman, J. A. (2011). The new rules of Green Marketing: Strategies, tools, and inspiration for Sustainable Branding. Barrett-Koehler Publisher. 

  2. Ottman, J. A. (2001). Green Marketing: Opportunity for Innovation. NTC Business Books.

  3. Dahlstrom, R. (2011). Green Marketing Management. South-Western Cengage Learning.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Esty, D. C., & Simmons, P. J. (2011). The green to gold business playbook: How to implement sustainability practices for bottom-line results in every business function. Wiley. 

  2. Grant, J. (2009). The Green Marketing Manifesto. Wiley.  
Evaluation Pattern
CIA 1: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 2: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 3: 50 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 25 MARKS)

Attendance 5 marks 

Total 50 marks 

 

BLS101-1 - PLANT DIVERSITY-I (PHYCOLOGY, MYCOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY) (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The present course deals with the study of lower groups of plants and the diseases caused in plants. The units of Phycology and Mycology deals with the general characters, thallus organization, morphology and life cycles of different algae and fungi. The unit of plant pathology discusses the diseases caused in plants and evaluates the symptoms, causal agents and control measures of infected plants.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the algal characters, their life forms, economic and their ecological importance.

CO2: Analyze the fungal characteristics and life forms of fungi and the economic and ecological significance.

CO3: Understand the variations existing in the structure and reproduction in Algae and Fungi.

CO4: Evaluate the symptoms, causal agents and control measures of infected plants.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Phycology
 

General characteristics; Ecology and distribution; Range of thallus organization and reproduction; Classification of algae (Fritsch); Morphology and life-cycles of the following: Scytonema, Chlamydomonas, Volvox, Chara, Pinnularia, Sargassum, and Polysiphonia (Development of antheridium and oogonium in Volvox and Polysiphonia). Economic importance of algae

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Mycology
 

Introduction- General characteristics, ecology and significance, range of thallus organization, cell wall composition, nutrition, reproduction and classification by Ainsworth; True Fungi- General characteristics, ecology and significance, life cycle of Phytophthora (Mastigomycotina), Rhizopus (Zygomycotina) Penicillium, Peziza (Ascomycotina), Puccinia, Agaricus (Basidiomycotina), Colletotrichum (Deuteromycotina). Symbiotic Associations- Lichens: General account, reproduction and significance; Mycorrhiza: ectomycorrhiza and endomycorrhiza and their significance.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Plant Pathology
 

Introduction, terms and definitions, Parasitism and its types, disease (different disease cycle: monocyclic, polycyclic, and polyetic. Symptoms of disease, categories of symptoms (Necrotic, Atrophic and hypertrophic). Concept on different types of plant diseases: systemic disease, soil borne disease, seed borne disease, and air borne diseases, dissemination of plant diseases and its types, Epidemiology and disease forecasting, methods used in disease forecasting. Diseases caused by both biotic and abiotic agents. Control of plant diseases, chemicals used in plant disease control. Integrated plant disease management. Classification of plant diseases. 

Study of selected plant disease:

Fungal diseases: Black stem rust of wheat, Tikka disease of groundnut [host, symptoms, causal organism, disease cycle and disease management], 

Bacterial diseases: Citrus Canker [host, symptoms, causal organism, disease cycle and disease management].

Viral Diseases: Tobacco mosaic virus [host, symptoms, causal organism, disease cycle and disease management].

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Hait Bhattacharya and Ghosh. A Text book of Botany, Volume 1, New Delhi: NCBA, 2012.

  2. Pandey, B. P. College Botany, Vol. I: Algae, Fungi, Lichens, Bacteria, Viruses, Plant Pathology, Industrial Microbiology and Bryophyta. New Delhi: S. Chand & Company Ltd, 2001.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Kumar, H.D. (1999). Introductory Phycology. Affiliated East-West. Press Pvt. Ltd. Delhi. 2nd edition.

  2. Tortora, G.J., Funke, B.R., Case, C.L. (2010). Microbiology: An Introduction, Pearson Benjamin Cummings, U.S.A. 10th edition.

  3. Sethi, I.K. and Walia, S.K. (2011). Text book of Fungi & Their Allies, MacMillan Publishers Pvt. Ltd., Delhi.

  4. Alexopoulos, C.J., Mims, C.W., Blackwell, M. (1996). Introductory Mycology, John Wiley and Sons (Asia), Singapore. 4th edition.

  5. Raven, P.H., Johnson, G.B., Losos, J.B., Singer, S.R., (2005). Biology. Tata McGraw Hill, Delhi, India.

  6. Bendre, A.M., Kumar, A. (2017). A Text Book of Practical Botany 1. Rastogi Publications, New Delhi, 9th Edition.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

 CIAI – Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 CIAII – Midsemester exam – 25%

 CIAIII - Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 Attendance – 5%

 End Semester Theory Exam – 50%

 

BLS111-1 - PLANT DIVERSITY-I LAB (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The present course deals with the study of lower groups of plants and the diseases caused in plants. The units of Phycology and Mycology deals with the vegetative and reproductive structures (asexual and sexual stages/spores) of algae and fungi. The unit of plant pathology discusses the diseases caused in plants and evaluates the symptoms, causal agents and control measures of infected plants.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the vegetative structure and reproduction of algal forms

CO2: Understand the vegetative and reproductive structures of fungal forms

CO3: Evaluate the symptoms, causal agents and control measures of infected plants

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
PLANT DIVERSITY - I (PHYCOLOGY, MYCOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY) LAB
 

1. Study of vegetative and reproductive structures of Scytonema, Chlamydomonas, Volvox,  Chara, Pinnularia, Sargassum, and Polysiphonia through temporary preparations and permanent slides.

2. Rhizopus and Penicillium: Asexual stage from temporary mounts and sexual structures through permanent slides.

3. Peziza: Sexual stage from temporary mounts (Apothecium) and V. S. of apothecium through permanent slides

4. Puccinia: Herbarium specimens of Black Stem Rust of Wheat and infected Barberry leaves; section/tease mounts of spores on Wheat (primary host) for Uredospore and teleutospore observation. Observation of permanent slides of uredospores, teleutospores, pycniospores and aeciospores. 

5. Agaricus: Specimens of button stage and full grown mushroom. 

6. Lichens: Study of growth forms of lichens (crustose, foliose- Parmelia and fruticose - Usnea)

7. Mycorrhiza: ecto mycorrhiza and endomycorrhizae (Photographs)

8. Study of symptoms, causal organisms and control measures of Black stem rust of wheat, Tikka disease of groundnut, Citrus Canker, and Tobacco mosaic virus.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Hait Bhattacharya and Ghosh. A Text book of Botany, Volume 1, New Delhi: NCBA, 2012.

  2. Pandey, B. P. College Botany, Vol. I: Algae, Fungi, Lichens, Bacteria, Viruses, Plant Pathology, Industrial Microbiology and Bryophyta. New Delhi: S. Chand & Company Ltd, 2001.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Kumar, H.D. (1999). Introductory Phycology. Affiliated East-West. Press Pvt. Ltd. Delhi. 2nd edition.

  2. Tortora, G.J., Funke, B.R., Case, C.L. (2010). Microbiology: An Introduction, Pearson Benjamin Cummings, U.S.A. 10th edition.

  3. Sethi, I.K. and Walia, S.K. (2011). Text book of Fungi & Their Allies, MacMillan Publishers Pvt. Ltd., Delhi.

  4. Alexopoulos, C.J., Mims, C.W., Blackwell, M. (1996). Introductory Mycology, John Wiley and Sons (Asia), Singapore. 4th edition.

  5. Raven, P.H., Johnson, G.B., Losos, J.B., Singer, S.R., (2005). Biology. Tata McGraw Hill, Delhi, India.

  6. Bendre, A.M., Kumar, A. (2017). A Text Book of Practical Botany 1. Rastogi Publications, New Delhi, 9th Edition.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) (50%)

CIA-I – Performance – 20 Marks

CIA-II- Mid Semester Practical Examination – 20 Marks

CIA-III – Record – 10 Marks

 ESE - 50 Marks (50%)

BLS161A-1 - MUSHROOM CULTIVATION TECHNIQUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Mushroom cultivation offers the students theoretical and practical knowledge on mushroom farming.  Course provides the necessary skill sets for the students to identify the mushrooms at species level and will enable the students to differentiate poisonous and edible mushrooms. Prospects and the scope of mushroom cultivation will be detailed in the course. The course introduces methods of growing edible mushrooms, including culture maintenance, basic mushroom substrate selection process. Course also covers an important aspect of pest management and disease control strategy.

Course Outcome

CO1: The post-harvest technology provides insights into different approaches employed to preserve and process the mushrooms.

CO2: Take measures to control the various diseases/infections that may affect the productivity of the mushroom

CO3: Know the different mushroom cultivation practices.

CO4: Overcome problems faced while introducing different species of mushrooms.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Mushroom cultivation
 

Introduction - Present scenario and prospects for Mushroom Cultivation; Nutritional and medicinal value of edible mushrooms; Brief description of Poisonous mushrooms; Types of edible mushrooms available in India - Volvariella volvacea, Pleurotus citrinopileatus, Agaricus bisporus; mushroom growing room and environmental growing systems, sterile techniques, an overview of techniques for mushroom cultivation, strain selection and improvement

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Cultivation Technology of mushrooms
 

Cultivation Technology of mushrooms: Infrastructure, substrates (locally available), Polythene bag, vessels, Inoculation hook, inoculation loop, low-cost stove, sieves, culture rack, mushroom unit (Thatched house), water sprayer, tray, small polythene bag. Pure culture: Medium, sterilization, preparation of spawn, multiplication. Mushroom bed preparation - paddy straw, sugarcane trash, maize straw, banana leaves. Factors affecting the mushroom bed preparation- Low-cost technology, composting technology in mushroom production -Role of composting in Mushroom cultivation, Appropriate materials to prepare different types of compost, Methods of composting – preparation and pasteurization, Determination of quality of compost, Hazards & risks associated with composting.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Disease control and pest Management:
 

Disease control and pest Management: diseases of mushrooms, inspection of Mushroom bags or beds for early detection of pests and diseases, sterilized casing to control nematodes, Spraying fungicide after casing to check dry bubbles, Spraying insecticide for control of mites, Use of caustic chemicals to keep rodents away

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Storage and nutrition
 

Short-term storage (Refrigeration – up to 24 hours), Long-term Storage (canning, pickles, papads), drying, and storage in salt solutions, preservation of mushrooms. Nutrition - Proteins - amino acids, mineral elements nutrition - Carbohydrates, Crude fibre content - Vitamins.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Mushroom Packaging:
 

Packaging, storing and grading of Mushroom & post-harvest procedures: Sorting the Mushrooms on size and quality, Packaging Mushrooms with labels containing the month and year of harvesting, quantity and type of Mushroom etc, Management of spent substrates and waste disposal of various mushrooms.Use of spent Mushrooms in vermi-composting and organic farming, Preparation of value-added products of Mushroom

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Mushroom Foods
 

Food Preparation: Types of foods prepared from the mushroom. Research Centres - National level and Regional level. Cost-benefit ratio - Marketing in India and abroad, Export Value.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Field visit
 

Field Visit & Interaction with Mushroom cultivators and other Support Agencies

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Paul Stamets, J.S. and Chilton, J.S. 2004. Mushroom cultivation A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home, Agarikon Press.

2. Tewan and Pankaj Kapoor S.C. 1993. Mushroom cultivation. Mittal Publication. Delhi.

3. Marimuth et al., 1991. Oyster Mushrooms. Dept. of Plant pathology, TNAU, Coimbatore.

 4. Shu Fing Chang, Philip G. Miles and Chang, S.T. 2004. Mushrooms Cultivation, nutritional value, medicinal effect and environmental impact. 2nd ed., CRC press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Nita Bahl (1984-1988) Hand book of Mushrooms, II Edition, Vol. I & Vol. II.

 2.      Kumar, N., 1997, Introduction to Horticulture, Rajalakshmi Publications, Nagercoil.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

 CIAI – Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 CIAII – Midsemester exam – 25%

 CIAIII - Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 Attendance – 5%

 End Semester Theory Exam – 50%

BLS161B-1 - ALGAL TECHNOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the basic science and technology of algae cultivation. It provides students with the skills required to work in the algae cultivation (algaculture) industry or create their own algal culture business. Students will learn the controlled environment requirements for successfully cultivating various algae species. The program emphasizes training in algal cultivation technologies, including algal culture extension training. Knowledge acquired will prepare students for jobs as Greenhouse/Agricultural Workers, Plant Technicians, Plant Managers, Laboratory Technicians, Sales Managers, Public Relations and Outreach, Extension Service and/or Business Owners/Managers

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the standard cultivation methods of microalgae, including photobioreactors and open ponds

CO2: Analyze the significant cultivation methods of seaweeds, along with detailed life history of selected high-value seaweed species from India

CO3: Examine the cultivation and optimization strategies of biofuel production and carbon capture and sequestration using algae

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to algae and their significance
 

Algal taxonomy and classification, Algal life cycle and growth requirements, Algal biochemistry and metabolism, Algal ecology and distribution.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Cultivation Methods for Microalgae
 

Lab scale culture, Photo-bioreactors: types and optimization, Open systems: Ponds, Organic Spirulina cultivation, Strategies to increase biomass in algal culture systems.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Cultivation Methods for Seaweeds
 

Life history of major commercially important seaweed species of India (Including Kappaphycus, Sargassum, Ulva, Porphyra), Nursery rearing of Zoids of seaweed species, Commercial mariculture methods of seaweeds, Floating raft method, semi-floating raft method, off-bottom method and bottom planting method, Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Production of Biofuel
 

Major algal species for biofuel research, advantageous for using algae for biofuel production in comparison with terrestrial plants like Jatropha, strategies to increase the oil content of algae, downstream processing for the biofuel production.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Carbon Capture and Sequestration with algae
 

Introduction to Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS), CCS as mitigation for climate change, CCS through algae, strategies to increase carbon sequestration levels, Major algal species as candidates for CCS.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Algal Applications in Wastewater Treatment
 

 

Algae-based wastewater treatment systems, Nutrient removal and recovery using algae, Algal-bacterial symbiotic systems

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Field Visit and Practical Applications and Case Studies
 

 

Visit to algal cultivation centers, Hands-on experience in algal biomass production, Algal harvesting and processing techniques, Analyzing algal samples and evaluating productivity.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Hoek, C. Van D et al (2009) Algae: An Introduction to Phycology. Cambridge University Press

 

2. Bast, F. (2014). An Illustrated Review on Cultivation and Life History of Agronomically Important Sea plants. In Seaweed: Mineral Composition, Nutritional and Antioxidant Benefits and Agricultural Uses, EdsVitor Hugo Pomin, 39-70. Nova Publishers, New York ISBN: 978-1-63117-571-8

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Kumar, H.D. (1999). Introductory Phycology. Affiliated East-West Press, Delhi

2. Sahoo, D. (2000). Farming the ocean: seaweed cultivation and utilization. Aravali International, New Delhi.

3. Bast, F (2014). Seaweeds: Ancestors of land plants with rich diversity. Resonance, 19(2) 1032-1043 ISSN: 0971-8044

4. Chisti, Y. (2013). Constraints to commercialization of algal fuels. Journal of Biotechnology, 167(3), 201-214.

5. Grossman, A. R., & Bhaya, D. (2014). Algal genomics: exploring the diversity of algal genomes. Genomics of Cyanobacteria, Chloroplasts, and Mitochondria, 339-363.

6. Huesemann, M. H., & Benemann, J. R. (2012). Biofuels from microalgae: a review of technologies for production, processing, and extractions of biofuels and co-products. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 16(1), 431-454.

 7. Schnurr, P. J., & Espie, G. S. (2016). Photosynthesis in the marine green alga Ulva: impacts of light and salinity stress on electron flow to oxygen. Journal of Phycology, 52(2), 297-309.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

 CIAI – Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 CIAII – Midsemester exam – 25%

 CIAIII - Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 Attendance – 5%

 End Semester Theory Exam – 50%

BLS162A-1 - AQUARIUM FISH KEEPING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

To learn the basic principles, themes and steps needed to set-up and maintain an aquarium. This course will introduce students about the basic principles, themes and steps needed to set-up and manage a fish aquarium; explore various theoretical and practical approaches to aquarium keeping. This course will include sessions that emphasising that Aquarium keeping is an active field of entrepreneurship, as well as sessions that help students develop core skills within the context of the course.

Course Outcome

CO1: Comprehend the key skills needed to set up an aquarium,

CO2: Identify and differentiate the different aquarium/ornamental fishes.

CO3: Formulate fish food that provides complete nutritional benefits.

CO4: Analyze the required budget to set up a well maintained home aquarium

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Aquarium Fish Keeping
 

Scope of Aquarium Fish industry as a Cottage Industry, Different varieties of exotic and indigenous fishes. Principles of a balanced aquarium; Fabrication, setting up and maintenance of freshwater and marine aquarium.  Aquarium accessories and decorative.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Biology of Aquarium Fishes
 

Breeding and rearing of ornamental fishes. Broodstock management. Application of genetics and biotechnology for producing quality strains. Common characters and sexual dimorphism of Fresh water and Marine Aquarium fishes such as Molly, Sword tail, Gold fish, Angel fish, blue morph, Anemone fish and Butterfly fish.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Ornamental plants
 

Diversity of ornamental plants in India; identification, importance, propagation and maintenance of ornamental plants;Lighting and aeration

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Water quality management
 

 

Common physical, chemical and biological parameters of water affecting ornamental fishes, Management of water quality parameters of water.Water filteration system-biological, mechanical and chemical. Types of filters.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Food and Feeding of Aquarium Fishes.
 

 

Nutritional requirements of aquarium fishes; Different kinds of feeds; Preparation of dry feeds Aquarium fish feeds. Dry, wet and live feeds. 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Management of aquarium fish
 

 

Common diseases and their control; Conditioning, packing, transport and quarantine methods. Trade regulations and wildlife act in relation to ornamental fishes.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Aquarium : Fish Keeping C B L Srivastava Published by Kitab Mahal. 

  2. Aquariums: The Complete Guide to Freshwater and Saltwater Aquariums, Jan 2009 by Thierry Maitre-alain, Chrisitan Piednoir.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. David Alderton- “Freshwater Aquariums”. 
  2. Mary Bailey –“The Complete Guide to Aquarium Fish Keeping”. 
  3. Andrew Cleave- “Aquarium Fish”. 
  4. Archana Sinha- Breeding And Culture Of Freshwater Ornamental Fish. 
  5. K.V.Jayashree,C.S.Tharadevi&N.Arumugum-HomeAquariumandOrnamental Fish Culture.
  6. Marine Aquarium (Fish: Keeping and Breeding Them in Captivity) 
  7. Boruchowitz, Davie. Published by Chelsea House Publications (1998) 
  8. Aquarium Setting Up (Fish: Keeping and Breeding Them in Captivity) Axelrod, Herbert R. Published by Chelsea House Publications (1998)

 

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: CIA 1(Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments) - 20 marks; CIA 2 (Midsemester Examination) Theory and Practical - 60 marks; CIA 3 (Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments - 20 marks) 

Internal Assessment (Test) Theory and Practical - 100 marks

 

Both the assessments will be scaled down to 50

 

BLS162B-1 - SERICULTURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course will introduce students about the basic concepts of origin and growth of sericulture and sericulture as science; explore various theoretical and practical approach of mulberry cultivation and silkworm rearing. This course will include sessions that emphasising that Sericulture is an active field of research and entrepreneurship, as well as sessions that help students develop core skills within the context of the course.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop an expert manpower to handle the own sericulture units/ entrepreneurship/ corporate sector units.

CO2: Gain scientific knowledge about mulberry cultivation silkworm rearing techniques.

CO3: Create awareness about Soil to Silk concept, Sericulture Extension and innovative technology /techniques etc.

CO4: Develop entrepreneurship skills among the students.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction
 

Sericulture: Definition, history and present status; Silk route: Types of silkworms (Tasar, Muga, and Eri) and their food plants, Mulberry and non-mulberry Sericulture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Biology of Silkworm
 

Morphology and Life cycle of Bombyx mori, Structure of silk gland and secretion of silk.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Biology of Mulberry Plant
 

Botanical description of mulberry. Economic importance of mulberry Plant; Morphology of mulberry plant; Different cultivars of mulberry; Floral biology of mulberry: Structure of male and female flowers, Planting system, pruning and training, propagation, irrigation, fertilizer application, manuring, composting, vermicomposting weeding method; Diseases of mulberry Leaf (Leaf spot, Powdery mildew, Leaf Rust, Leaf blight), root (root rot disease, root knot disease) and pest management (Mealy bug, Bihar hairy caterpillar, Jassid, Leaf roller, Scale insect, Termites and mites their preventive and control measures).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Rearing of Silkworms
 

Mulberry cultivation, Selection of land and establishment of mulberry garden, Different methods of planting –Organic and inorganic manure application, Rearing house and rearing appliances- Egg transportation and incubation –Egg handling – Hatching –Brushing –Silk worm rearing techniques

Disinfectants: Formalin, bleaching powder, Resham Keet Oushadh (RKO) Silkworm rearing technology: Early age and Late age rearing Types of mountages, Spinning, harvesting and storage of cocoons. 

 

Reeling methods – Reeling and Re-reeling –Silk examination, cleaning, lacing, bookmaking and grading of silk. Field visit to silk worm rearing centre and reeling industry.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Pests and Diseases
 

Pests of silkworm: Uzi fly, dermestid beetles and vertebrates Pathogenesis of silkworm diseases: Protozoan, viral, fungal and bacterial Control and prevention of pests and diseases.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Text Book of Tropical Sericulture. Publ., Japan Overseas Corporation volunteers – 1975. 

  2. Silkworm Rearing Techniques in the Tropics, Dr. S. Omura, Japan International Cooperation Agency, 1980. 

  3. Muga Silk Industry by S. N. Choudhary, Directorate of Sericulture and weaving, Govt. of Assam, 1982. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. The natures and property of soils (9th edition) N. C. Brady (Mac Millan pub. Co. Inc., New York.

  2. Studies on soils of India, S. V. Govind Rajan and H. G. Gopala Rao (1970), Vikas Publ. House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.

  3. Handbook of Practical Sericulture: S.R. Ullal and M.N. Narasimhanna CSB, Bangalore  

  4. Appropriate Sericultural Techniques; Ed. M. S. Jolly, Director, CSR & TI, Mysore.  

  5. Handbook of Silkworm Rearing: Agriculture and Technical Manual-1, Fuzi Pub. Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan1972.  

  6. Manual of Silkworm Egg Production; M. N. Narasimhanna, CSB, Bangalore 1988.  

  7. Silkworm Rearing; Wupang—Chun and Chen Da-Chung, Pub. By FAO, Rome 1988. 

  8. Tasar culture. Dr. M. S. Jolly et. al., CSB, 1974.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: CIA 1(Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments) - 20 marks; CIA 2 (Midsemester Examination) 60 marks; CIA 3 (Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments - 20 marks)

Internal Final Assessment: Theory and Practical - 100 marks

Both the assessments will be scaled down to 100

BLS162C-1 - APICULTURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course begins with a brief history of apiculture and its importance. Concise information on the equipment needed, handling of honey bee colonies, seasonal management, and economics has been provided. Because this course includes both theory and practice, the reading material is simple and to the point, which will aid them in learning practical beekeeping more effectively.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand economic importance of honey bees and developments taking place in modern beekeeping.

CO2: Differentiate hive bees from wild bees and species from subspecies.

CO3: Familiar with different equipment used in modern beekeeping for domesticating hive bee

CO4: Learn manipulations required for quality honey production, safety of honey bees and increasing colony productivity.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Basics of Apiculture
 

Honey bee species and identification: Introduction to honey bee; Origin, systematics and distribution; Types of honey bees, Species of honey bees. Bee identification

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Bee Keeping Techniques
 

Basic requirements for starting bee keeping: Getting Started in Beekeeping - Land and Buildings, Equipments and supplies - Vehicle, hives; Seasonal management of honey bees: Honey bees on Canola, Spring management of bees, Wintering bees, Apiary management for winter/early spring pollination. Summer management honey production; Queen rearing and colony multiplication: Raising honey bee queens. Developmental stages of queen bee, Requirements for rearing good queens, Methods of rearing queens, Hopkins Method, Alley Method, Miller Method, Dequeening Method, Raising Queen on double and Whole Brood Comb.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Bee Enemies, Diseases, Pesticide Poisoning
 

Bee enemies  - Wax Moth, Ants, Wasps, Microorganisms, Pests. Diagnosis and Identification; Bacterial, viral, fungal & protozoan diseases: Bacterial disease - American Foulbrood, European Foulbrood, Viral disease - Deformed Wing Virus, Sacbrood Viru, Black Queen Cell Virus, Kashmir Bee Virus, Acute Bee Paralysis Virus; Fungal disease - Chalkbrood, Stonebrood; Protozoan disease - Nosemosis, Nosema cerana; Pesticide poisoning of bees and mitigation: Definition of pesticides, types of pesticides and their length of residual toxicity, Pesticides and pollinators, Toxicity to bees – Honey bee health, Colony collapse disorder

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Bee Products, Economics and Marketing
 

Bee products (honey, pollen, royal jelly, bees wax, propolis & venom) and their significance; Value added honey products; Economics of bee keeping, Economic Value of Commercial Beekeeping; Marketing of bee products (honey comb and honey, pollination services, wax, propolis, pollen, royal jelly, Bee venom, adult and larval bees.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Graham, J M (1992) The hive and the honey bee. Dadant and Sons, Hamilton, IIIinois.

  2. Mishra R.C. (1995) Honey bees and their management in India. ICAR Publication, New Delhi.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Gupta, J.K., Sharma, H K and Thakur, R K. 2009. Practical Manual on Beekeeping. Department of Entomology and Apiculture, Dr Y S Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Nauni, Solan, p 83. 

  2. Gupta, J K. 2010. Spring management of honey bee colonies. In “OAPI-012 Management of honey bee colonies; Seasonal and specific management (Block 2), Indira Gandhi National open university, school of Agriculture, New Delhi, UNIT-I, pp 5-14, p 105.

  3. Gupta, J K. 2010.Management in summer. In “OAPI-012 Management of honey bee colonies; Seasonal and specific management (Block 2), Indira Gandhi National open university, school of Agriculture, New Delhi, UNIT-II, pp 15-25, p 105.

  4. Gupta, J K. 2010.Management in monsoon season. In “OAPI-012 Management of honey bee colonies; Seasonal and specific management (Block 2), Indira Gandhi National open university, school of Agriculture, New Delhi, UNIT-III, pp 26-33, p 105.

  5. Gupta, J K. 2010.Management in autumn season. In “OAPI-012 Management of honey bee colonies; Seasonal and specific management (Block 2), Indira Gandhi National open university, school of Agriculture, New Delhi, UNIT-IV, pp 34-40, p 105.

  6. Gupta, J K. 2010.Management in winter. In “OAPI-012 Management of honey bee colonies; Seasonal and specific management (Block 2), Indira Gandhi National open university, school of Agriculture, New Delhi, UNIT-V, pp 41-50, p 105.

  7. Gatoria, G.S., Gupta, J. K., Thakur, R.K. and Singh, J. 2011. Mass queen bee rearing and multiplication of honey bee colonies.
    All India Co-ordinated project on honey bees and pollinators, ICAR, HAU, Hisar, p70.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment: CIA 1(Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments) - 20 marks; CIA 2 (Midsemester Examination) 60 marks; CIA 3 (Quiz/ Tests/ MCQs/ Assignments - 20 marks)

Internal Final Assessment: Theory and Practical - 100 marks

Both the assessments will be scaled down to 100

BTY101-1 - FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course introduces the students to the world of microbes discussing their salient features and importance. It discusses the fundamental principles and procedures of microbiology research and highlights GLP. The course further covers the basics of biostatistics essential for dealing with the analytical part of biological research. It surveys bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa, as well as their growth characteristics and morphology. This course guides the students to learn appropriate microbiology.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the fundamentals of microbial culture and microscopy

CO2: To learn the biology of bacteria, viruses and fungi.

CO3: To make the students adept in microbial physiology and biochemistry.

CO4: To learn pathogenesis of major human diseases and the problem of antimicrobial resistance.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:13
Introductory Microbiology
 

 

History and scope of Microbiology, Microscopy – Light, Phase contrast, Fluorescence & Electron microscopy: Stains and staining techniques - Gram’s, acid fast, capsular, flagellar and endospore staining. Physical and Chemical control of microorganisms. Methods of Sterilization, Methods for  isolation of pure culture, Culture and Media preparation – Solid and Liquid – Types of Media – Synthetic and Complex, Enriched, Enrichment, Selective and Differential media  Anaerobic culture technique – Candle Jar method, Wright‟s tube, Roll tube, Mclntoshfilde‟s jar method. Methods for enumeration of bacteria, Characters used for classification of microbes.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Bacteria
 

 

Structure of bacteria, classification based on shape and arrangement of cells, flagella – structure & function, Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial cell wall structural features, endospore formation, Functions of pili and capsule,  Antibiotics - history, mode of action, antibiotic resistance- types, causes, Superbugs

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Virus
 

 

Viruses – Structure and classification, Plant Viruses – TMV, CaMV, Animal viruses – HIV, Hepatitis B, Herpes Simplex Virus,  Phages- types, plaque assay, life cycle of bacteriophage  Lambda.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:3
Fungi and Algae
 

 

Fungi- Salient features, classification and reproduction of fungi, beneficial and harmful fungi, Life Cycle of Rhizopus, Mycorrhizae and lichens- types and significance, Algae - classification, uses of algae.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Physiology and Biochemistry of Microbes
 

 

Nutritional classification of microbes, Effect of physical factors on bacterial growth, Association of microorganisms (Parasitism, Saprophytism, Mutualism and Symbiosis, Commensalism, Respiration: EMP, HMP and ED Pathways, Bacterial photosynthesis, Nitrogen metabolism (nitrogen fixation), Bioluminescence.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Pathogenic Microorganisms
 

 

Epidemic, endemic and pandemic, Bacterial diseases of man – Tetanus, Tuberculosis, Pneumonia and Cholera, Viral diseases: AIDS – Life cycle of HIV, Parasites: Life cycle of Entamoeba and Plasmodium. Zoonosis, Emerging and reemerging diseases (Ebola, Nipah, Corona). 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1) Joanne Willey and Kathleen Sandman and Dorothy Wood, (2020).Prescott‟s Microbiology 11thEd. Mc Graw Hill Book

2) M. J. Pelczar Jr, E. C. S. Chan and N. R. Krieg, Microbiology, 5 th ed. New Delhi: Tata McGgraw Hill Education Pvt Ltd., 2004.

3) R. C. Dubey and D. K. Maheswari, Microbiology, New Delhi: S. Chand & Company Ltd., 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1) M. T. Madigan. J. M. Martinko. D. Stahl. D. P. Clark, USA: Brock's Biology of Microorganisms 13 ed. Benjamin Cummings. 2010.

2) G. J. Tortora, B. R. Funke, and C. L. Case, An Introduction to Microbiology, 11 th ed. USA: Benjamin Cummings, 2012.

3) R. Ananthanarayan and C. K. J. Paniker, Ananthanarayan and Paniker’s Textbook of Microbiology 8 thed. Universities Press. 2009.

4) Gerard J. Tortora, Berdell R. Funke & Christine L. Case,(2013). Microbiology – An Introduction 11thEd. Pearson

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

 CIAI – Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 CIAII – Midsemester exam – 25%

 CIAIII - Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 Attendance – 5%

 End Semester Theory Exam – 50%

BTY111-1 - FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY LAB (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The paper introduces the students with the fundamental principles and practices of microbiology and provides hands-on experience in working with microbes. All these are of immense application in medical, industrial and agricultural fields. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To investigate and gain hands on experience in the different techniques in the field of microbiology

CO2: To inspect techniques to culture and differentiate microorganisms.

CO3: To illustrate various methods of sterilization employed in microbiology lab.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Name of the experiment
 

1. Safety measures in microbiology laboratory

2. Instrumentation

3. Cleaning and Sterilization of Glasswares and preparation of Cotton plug

4. Preparation of Culture Media

5. Isolation of Microorganisms from environment

6. Study of Colony Characteristics of Bacteria

7. Pure culture techniques

8. Simple staining of bacteria

9. Gram staining

10. Motility testing of bacteria

11. Endospore staining

12. Sensitivity of bacteria to antibiotics

13. Biochemical tests (IMViC & Catalase)

14. Study of fungi

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. T. R. Johnson and C. L. Case, Laboratory Experiments in Microbiology, 10 th ed.: San Fransisc: Benjamin Cummings, 2012.

2. Joanne Willey and Kathleen Sandman and Dorothy Wood, (2020).Prescott‟s Microbiology 11thEd. Mc Graw Hill Book.

3. M. J. Pelczar Jr, E. C. S. Chan and N. R. Krieg, Microbiology, 5 th ed. New Delhi: Tata McGgraw Hill Education Pvt Ltd., 2004.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. N. Kannan, Laboratory manual in General Microbiology, New Delhi: Panima Publishing Corporation, 2002.

2. R. Ananthanarayan and C. K. J. Paniker, Ananthanarayan and Paniker’s Textbook of Microbiology 8 thed. Universities Press. 2009.

3. Gerard J. Tortora, Berdell R. Funke & Christine L. Case,(2013). Microbiology – An Introduction 11thEd. Pearson

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA-I – Performance – 20 Marks

CIA-II- Mid Semester Practical Examination – 20 Marks

CIA-III – Record – 10 Marks

 ESE - 50 Marks

CHE121-1 - BASIC CHEMISTRY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce the students to basic concepts of acids and bases including Organic and Analytical Chemistry. In this course the students also acquire knowledge of the applications of bioinorganic chemistry.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to recall the fundamentals of structure and properties of atoms, nature and types of chemical bonding, periodicity of elements in the periodic table, the concepts of nucleophiles, electrophiles, electronegativity, and resonance.

CO2: Students will be able to interpret organic molecular concept and reactions.

CO3: Students will be able to explain concepts of bioinorganic chemistry.

CO4: Students will be able to apply the concept of acids and bases, analytical chemistry and photochemistry.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Concepts of Chemistry
 

Periodic table; Chemistry of s, p, d, block elements: introduction, properties. Chemical compound formation, chemical bonding, ionic bonding; Covalent bonding; general characteristics, sigma and pi bonds, bond length, bond order, formal charge; Hydrogen bond (theories of hydrogen bonding, valence bond treatment); Metallic bond

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Metal ions in biological systems
 

Metal ions in biological systems, Ion transport, Mechanism of action of sodium potassium pump. Oxygen transport systems- Metalloporphyrins - Haemoglobin and myoglobin, pH of blood.

Metal storage and transport – ferritin and transferrin, Electron transfer proteins-cytochromes, Chlorophyll and photosynthesis (mechanism not expected), Metalloproteins as enzymes – Carbonic anhydrase, Carboxy peptidase, cytochrome P 450, alcohol dehydrogenase

Toxicity of metal ions-Pb, Hg and As. Anticancer drugs: Cis-platin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin –Structure and significance.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Acids and Bases
 

Prelearning: Concept of acidity and basicity. Arrheinus concept, Lewis concept Lowry – Bronsted concept of acids and bases. relative strengths of acid base pairs, Lux Flood concept, Solvent system concept, Limitations, relative strength of acids and bases. explanation of levelling effect on the basis of the solvent system concept.

Hard and soft acids and bases- Pearson concept, application of HSAB principles – Stability of compounds / complexes, predicting the feasibility of a reaction.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Organic Chemistry
 

Classification & nomenclature of organic compounds; Hybridization; Isomerism; Electronic Displacements: Inductive Effect, Electromeric Effect, Resonance, Hyperconjugation and steric effect. Effect of the above on strength of organic acids and bases: Comparative study with emphasis on factors affecting pK values. Nucleophiles and electrophiles. Types of organic reactions: Addition, elimination, substitution, rearrangement and redox reactions (definition and one example each).

Hydrocarbons; Organic compounds containing halogens, oxygen and nitrogen; Polymers.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Analytical Chemistry
 

Introduction to quantitative and qualitative analysis.

Introduction to separation techniques: crystallization and precipitation, Solvent extraction: Introduction– Classification– Principles and application of solvent extraction.

Nernst’s distribution law, distribution coefficient.

Chromatographic techniques: Introduction, Classification, Principles and Applications of column chromatography, thin layer chromatography, ion exchange chromatography, gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (mention only). solid phase extraction

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Optical methods of analysis- Photochemistry
 

Consequences of light absorption: The Jablonski Diagram, Laws of photochemistry: Grotthuss-Draper law, Stark-Einstein law, Differences between photophysical and photochemical processes with examples. Comparison of photochemical and thermal reactions.

Kinetics of photochemical reactions: (1) Kinetics of Hydrogen-Chlorine reaction (2) Kinetics of Hydrogen-Bromine reaction (4) Kinetics of dimerisation of anthracene.

Photosensitization, photostationary equilibrium. Singlet and triplet states-Fluorescence, Phosphorescence, Luminescence, Bioluminescence, chemical sensors.

Beer-Lambert’s law: Absorption coefficient and molar extinction coefficient. Applications.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Bahl, A. &Bahl, B.S. Advanced Organic Chemistry, S. Chand, 2010.

2. B. Mehta, M. Mehta, Organic Chemistry, PHI Learning Private Limited, 2017.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. P.S. Kalsi and J.P. Kalsi, Bioorganic, Bioinorganic and Supramolecular Chemistry, 1 st

Edition, New Age International Publishers (P) Ltd., New Delhi, 2007.

2. J. D. Lee, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 5th edn., Blackwell Science, London.

3.. Glasstone Samuel, Textbook of Physical Chemistry. 2 nd ed. Mcmillan, 2007.

Evaluation Pattern
 

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3, 

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

 

 

CHE141A - CHEMISTRY AND SOCIETY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course gives an insight into the implications of chemistry in daily life. This course will equip the students with better understanding of how the different forms of matter influences human lives. This also sensitizes them on the judicious use and safe handling of chemicals.

Course Objectives: Non Science students get to know about the various constituents present in household chemicals and use them judiciously.

Course Outcome

CO1:: Ability to identify the influence of different chemical substances in daily lives

CO2:: Evaluate the judicious use of different chemicals and their safe handling in day today life

CO3: Ability to analyse the environmental issues and adopt sustainable practices

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction
 

Explanation of terms like Poison, toxic, irritant, flammable liquid, combustible liquid, corrosive, solvents, etc.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Environmental chemistry
 

Air quality, air pollution, green house effect, acid rain, destruction of ozone layer, control of air pollution. Water pollution, Water quality criteria for domestic and industrial uses, soil pollution and its causes. Pollution abatement methods.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Energy and environment
 

Mention the following- Mineral resources – Metals and non-metals Fuel and energy resources, different energy sources, Wood, Petroleum and natural gas Nuclear energy – Solar energy –energy sources of tomorrow and green energy sources. Batteries and fuel cells.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
House hold chemicals and its impact on environment
 

Ecofriendly chemicals, biodegradable and non degradable chemicals. (Bleach, ammonia, disinfectants, carpet freshener, air freshener, window cleaner, furniture polish, etc). Laundry products (laundry detergent, fabric softener, etc) Soaps, Detergents and special cleaners.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
Polymers
 

Classification, uses. Recycling of polymers.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Acids and Bases
 

Acid and bases, their general characteristics. Household uses of acids and bases.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:3
Biomolecules
 

Carbohydrates, proteins, Vitamins and minerals – Sources and Deficiency diseases.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
Preservatives and additives
 

Chemicals used as colouring agents and as preservatives. Food adulteration.

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
Drugs and cosmetics
 

Analgesics, antivirals, antibiotics-examples. Health and beauty products (hairspray, hair remover, nail polish, nail polish remover, hair colouring products, talcum powder, lipstick etc).

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:6
Home maintenance
 

Paint, varnish, oils and stain removers. Garden chemicals (fertilizers, pesticides, insecticides, herbicides etc.) examples, advantages and disadvantages.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] A. K. De,. Environmental Chemistry 6 th ed, New Age International Pvt Ltd Publishers;2006.

[2] J. Toedt, D. Koza and K. Van Cleef-ToedChemical Composition of Everyday Products 2005.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Kerry k. Karukstis and Gerald R. Van Hecke Chemistry Connections, The Chemical Basis

of Everyday phenomena, 2 nd Ed., 2003.

[2] J. Schwarcz, All new commentaries on the science of everyday food and life, 2005.

[3] Raymond Chang Chemistry, 8 th Ed. Tata Mc Graw-Hill, 2005.

[4] Sriram and P.Yogeeswari, Dorling Medicinal Chemistry, Kindersley Pvt. Ltd., 2007.

Evaluation Pattern

Total Marks for each Semester – 100

1. CIA -1 ………………………. 25Marks

2. Mid-term Test (CIA-2)……………………… 25 Marks

3. End-semester examination ………………… 50 Marks

TOTAL 100 Marks

CHE141B - NUTRICHEM (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course gives an insight into nutrition and its importance in leading a healthy life.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss about nutrition and its importance in leading a healthy life.

CO2: Explain the elements of nutrition and dietry requirement.

CO3: Summerise about food analysis, food microbiology and therapeutic nutrition

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Fundamentals of nutrition
 

FaFactors Influencing Food Selection: Flavours, appearance and other aspects of food,     Demographics Culture and Religion, Health, Social-Emotional Influences, and Environmental Concerns, Food Industry and the Media.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Basic Nutrition Concepts
 

NNutrition, Energy content in food, Nutrients, Nutrient Density, Characteristics of a Nutritious Diet.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Nutrient Recommendations
 

Dietary Reference Intakes, Digestion, Absorption, and Metabolism, Gastrointestinal Tract and secretions, Food groups, Organic Foods, GM foods.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Nutrition biochemistry
 

Elements of nutrition - Dietary requirement of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Biological value of proteins. Concepts of protein quality. Protein sparing action of carbohydrates and fats. Essential amino acids, essential fatty acids and their physiological functions.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Vitamins
 

Dietary sources, biochemical functions, requirements and deficiency diseases associated with vitamin B complex, C and A, D, E and K vitamins.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Minerals
 

Nutritional significance of dietary sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, iodine, zinc and copper.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:2
Malnutrition
 

Prevention of malnutrition, supplementary foods.

     

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:2
Food science and food analysis
 

Food additives and preservatives.

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:6
Food microbiology
 

Food safety, Fermentation, food spoilage and food borne pathogens, food processing.

 

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:6
Therapeutic nutrition
 

Life style diseases and personalized nutrition therapy, nutraceuticals and its classifications.

Unit-11
Teaching Hours:2
Public nutrition
 

Health organizations, NGO’s etc. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  Ganesh Narayanan Chauhan,  5th ed Foods that heal. Popular Book Depot 2012

[2]   Mohinder Singh, 2nd ed. Health and  food Gyan Publishing House 2003.

[3]   S. A. Iqbal and Y. Mido 1st ed Food Chemistry. Discovery Publishing House, 2008.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  Kittler and Sucher, 5th ed. Food and Culture Thomson Wadsworth 2007.

[2]   Anita Tull, 3rd Food Nutritioned.Oxford University Press, 1997.

            

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Internal

2 Hrs (50 marks)

50

Total

100

Final score is calculated out of 50

 

COM141 - FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will enable the students to have fundamental knowledge about financial accounting. The topics covered are Book-keeping, Subsidiary Books, preparation of Ledger and Financial Statements and Analysis of Financial Statements.

Course Outcome

CO1: Define the concepts and terminology used in accounts.

CO2: Compare the book prepared through Single Entry System and Double Entry System.

CO3: Prepare the basic subsidiary books required by a business.

CO4: Rearrange the information in Journal to prepare the ledger accounts, Trial Balance and Financial Statements.

CO5: Compare and comment on the basic information provided by the Financial Statements of Real Companies and other organizations.

CO6: Analyse the Financial Statements of different organizations and take decisions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Accounting:
 

Accounting – Meaning, Objectives, Accounting as source of information, Internal and External users of accounting information and their needs. Qualitative Characteristics of Accounting Information– Reliability, Relevance, Understandability and Comparability. Book-Keeping – Meaning – Definition. Accounting, Difference between Book-keeping, and Accounting. Accounting Concepts and Conventions. Accounting terms – Capital – Assets – Liabilities – Expenses – Income – Fund – Net worth – Capital Expenditure – Revenue expenditure– Capital Receipts – Revenue Receipts – Debtors – Creditors – Goods – Cost – Gain – Stock – Purchase – Sales – Loss – Profit – Voucher – Discount – Transaction – Drawings, etc. System of Book Keeping: Single entry system and Double entry system of Book Keeping – Accounting Process - introduction.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Books of Original Entry
 

Books of Accounts – Journal – Rules of Journalizing (Debit and Credit) – Steps in Journalizing - Meaning – Importance – Different types of Subsidiary books – Cash book – Petty cash book – Purchase book – Purchase returns book – Sales book – Sales return book – Bills receivables book – Bills payable book – Journal Proper – Process of recording transactions in the respective books.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Preparation of Ledger and Trial Balance
 

Ledger – Types of Accounts – Posting to Ledger accounts – Balancing the Ledger accounts – Trial Balance – Meaning – Objectives and Preparation of Trial Balance.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Final Accounts
 

Financial statements – Meaning – Objectives – Financial reporting through Financial Statements – Preparation of Trading account – Profit and Loss account – Balance Sheet, Cash Flow Statement

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:13
Analysis and Interpretation of Financial Statements
 

Methods of analysis of financial statements, techniques of analysis and interpretation – Comparative Income Statements, Comparative Balance Sheets, Common Size Income Statements, Common Size Balance Sheets, Trend Analysis, Ratio Analysis (problems on the above topics).

Text Books And Reference Books:

Grewal, T. S. (2020). Double Entry Bookkeeping. Delhi: Sultan and Sons.

Jain, S. P & Narang, K. L (2020). Advanced Accountancy (Vol 13 & Vol2). Kalyani Publication

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Raman, B. S (2016). Accountancy. Mangalore: United Publishers.

2. Khan,M.Y.&.Jain,P.K.(2021)Management Accounting(8ed). NewDelhi: TataMcGraw Hill

3. Arora,M.N. (2016).Cost and Management Accounting(3ed). Mumbai: Himalaya Publishing House.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 25 marks]

Other teste - 20 marks

Final Exam - 50 marks

Attemdance - 5 marks

 

CSC141 - PROGRAMMING IN C (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the C programming language, covering its history, features, data types, and program structure. Students will learn to apply decision control and loop structures, along with various operators, to create basic programs. Additionally, the course covers functions, recursion, arrays, and pointers to provide a solid foundation for C programming and problem-solving.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the fundamentals of C programming, including its history, features, variables, and data types.

CO2: Apply decision control statements, loop control structures, and various operators to write basic C programs.

CO3: Analyze and design functions, including recursion and passing values/arrays, and understand storage classes in C.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to C
 

 

Types of Programming Language- History of C, Features of C , C Tokens, variables and keywords and identifiers ,Types of C constants and variables, Rules for constructing variable names, Structure of C program, Input /output statements in C

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Data types and Control Structures
 

Data Types, Type declaration, Different Operators in C - Arithmetic, Logical, Relational, Bitwise, Conditional, Expressions, Hierarchy of operations.

Control structures

 

Decision control statements-if, switch, go to statement, conditional operator statement. Loop control structures- while, do-while, for loop, Break statement, Continue statement.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Function
 

Introduction, function definition and prototyping, Types of functions, passing values to function, recursion, passing arrays to functions. I/O functions- formatted & unformatted console I/O functions Storage classes in C- Automatic, Register, Extern and Static Variables.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Arrays
 

 

One dimensional and multidimensional arrays, Declaration, initialization, Reading values into an array, Displaying array contents and Array Manipulations. String-Basic Concepts, Library Functions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Pointers
 

Definition, notation, pointer and arrays, pointers and functions-call by value and call by reference.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Balagurusamy, E. Programming in ANSI C 4th Edition. Tata McGraw-Hill, 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Kanetkar, Yashavant. Let Us C. 4th Edition. BPB Publications, 2012.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

CSC143 - WEB DESIGNING USING HTML, PHP AND MYSQL (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the fundamentals of HTML and PHP for web development. Students will learn HTML tags for content structuring and essential PHP scripting concepts, including variables, conditional statements, and error handling. Additionally, they will explore form handling, loops, and MySQL database interactions using PHP. By the end, students will be equipped to create dynamic web applications and understand the essentials of web programming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply HTML basics, including tags for structure, lists, images, hyperlinks, and tables.

CO2: Develop PHP scripts with variables, data types, conditional statements, and error handling techniques.

CO3: Utilize PHP for form handling, switch-case statements, loop structures, and working with arrays in MySQL database.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-1
 

 

Basic HTML tags- HTML, HEAD, BODY, TITLE, Paragraphs, Headings, Line Breaks, Dividers- P, H1, …H6, BR, HR, Character Entity References- Quotes, ampersands, angle brackets, and non-breaking spaces Lists- OL, UL, DL, Formatting-URL and Paths, Images- IMG, Hyperlinks, Table-TABLE, TR, TD, TH, Form-FORM, INPUT, TEXTAREA, SELECT, OPTION, Frames-FRAMESET, FRAME

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
PHP Basic
 

Writing PHP scripts - Writing PHP scripts, learn about PHP code structure, how to write and execute a simple PHP script and to add comments within your code.

Variables and Data Types- Learn about Variables, values and Data Types in PHP: boolean, integer, float, string, array, object, Resource, null.

Numbers and mathematical Operators- Introducing Numbers and mathematical 0perators, some PHP functions for more complex operations with numbers.

PHP Strings- Working with strings, using simple and double quotes, escaping quotes and other characters, concatenating strings, some functions for strings.

 Constants- Introducing Constants, syntax for defining constants, differences between variables and defined constants.

PHP Error Handling and Debugging-Error Handling, debugging and trigger errors and how to adjust the level of error reporting, handling exceptions.

 

If ... Else conditionals, Comparative and Logical operators - Make PHP script takes decisions with If, Else, Elseif conditional statements. Compare two values with Comparative and Logical operators. The ternary operator.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-3
 

Using HTML Forms - Using HTML Forms, PHP form handling, get data sent from form fields through GET and POST method, form validation.

$_GET, $_POST Variables - How to send data with get and post methods to a PHP script and access it with superglobal $_GET, $_POST variables.

Switch ... Case ... - PHP MySQL course - Switch ... Case ... conditional statement, switch with break and default instructions.

While Loops - Using While and Do Wile Loops. End the While loops with the break instruction. Syntax and examples.

For and For each Loops - Using for () and for each () Loops. End the "For" loops with the break instruction. Syntax and examples.

 

PHP Arrays - Creating Numeric (indexed) Arrays and Associative arrays. Accessing, modifying and traversing array elements.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-4
 

PHP MySQL Introduction, Data Types - PHP MySQL Introduction, database structure, tables. MySQL naming rules, and column's data types.

PHP MySQL - INSERT INTO - Insert data in MySQL table, INSERT INTO query. Insert data from a form into a database.

 

PHP MySQL - SELECT, ORDER BY - Retrieve and display data from a MySQL table, SELECT SQL command. Determine the number of records. Sort query results with ORDER BY clause (ASC and DESC).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-5
 

PHP MySQL - WHERE and LIKE - Selecting specific data from a database with the WHERE clause and Conditionals. Check for string matching with LIKE and NOT LIKE terms.

PHP MySQL – UPDATE - UPDATE query to edit / change existing records in MySQL table.

 

PHP MySQL – DELETE - The DELETE statement, used to entirely remove records from a database table.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Powell, HTML & XHTM: The Complete Reference, 4th Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill Edition
[2] Steven Holzner, PHP: The Complete Reference, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2008


Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

[1] Robin Nixon, Learning PHP, My SQL and Java Script, Kindle Edition, O'Reilly Media 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

DMT142 - INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introduction to Carnatic music focus on the basic fundamentals of Carnatic music. This course helps to improve the vocal quality as the lessons works as voice culture to the begginner.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to render the Swara-s in three speeds

CO2: Ability to identify and render the 7 Swara-s

CO3: Ability to render Sarala, Janta, Dhatu, Tarasthayi, and Alankara-s in three speeds.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Svaravali varisas and Janti varisas
 

Lessons in three speeds

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Tarasthayi and Dhattu varisas
 

All the lessons in to three speeds

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Alankaras and Geethams
 

Sapta tala alankaras and any for geethams

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carnatic music reader by Panchapakesha Iyer

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ganamrutha Bodhini

Evaluation Pattern

Final assessment for 100 Marks

DMT143 - INTRODUCTION TO ACTING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This introductory course explores fundamental acting techniques, including character development, improvisation, and emotional expression. Engage in various acting exercises and scene work to enhance students' understanding of the craft. This course further develops confidence and creativity as the students delve into the art of storytelling through performance.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise and explain the basics of acting.

CO2: Demonstrate and interpret the interrelationship between speech, movement and text.

CO3: Relate and experiment with the interconnection between text and acting design.

CO4: Apprise and critique the role of the actor as a performing medium.

CO5: Design and develop original piece of work.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Voice and Speech
 

This unit delves into the artistry of vocal expression and its profound impact on theatrical performance. Through rigorous vocal exercises and comprehensive training, students will develop various vocal techniques, mastering the nuances of pitch, tone, resonance, and articulation. Emphasizing voice integration with the actor's body and emotions, this transformative learning experience empowers students to deliver compelling, authentic, and emotionally resonant performances on stage and beyond.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Actor and the Stage
 

This unit delves into the essence of captivating stage presence, refining students' gestures and body language skills. Participants will learn to create profound connections with their co-actors through immersive exercises, fostering authentic and compelling performances. Embark on a transformative journey, honing acting prowess and embracing the art of storytelling.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Actor and the Text
 

This unit delves into captivating interplay between the actor and the text. Explore the essence of character portrayal through an in-depth analysis of themes, situations, and scenes within various dramatic texts. Uncover the art of embodying diverse roles, harnessing emotional depth, and expressing emotions. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stanislavski, C. (1989). Actor Prepares. Taylor & Francis Group.

Chekhov, M. (1953). To the actor: On the technique of acting. Harper & Row.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Merlin, B. (2017). Acting: The Basics. Taylor & Francis Group.

Kahan, S. (1991). Introduction to acting (3rd ed.). Allyn and Bacon.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Mode of Assessment - Final Assessment

  • Performance Presentation - 100 Marks

ECO143 - DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates on democracy and emerging issues in economies.  The course discusses how various socioeconomic factors act as constraints on economic growth and development. This basic framework allows a student to delve into the causes and consequences of various strategies/methods taken/applied by policymakers and practitioners and how it affects the overall objective of the state/economy through a trifocal analysis of the economy, society, and market keeping the central theme of ‘Democracy.’This course will introduce students to:

  • Growing crisis of wealth distribution and income inequality.
  •  Sectoral significance and state intervention in policy making.
  • Informal sector and labor market participation and rights.
  • Analyze corruption in emerging economies through various case studies.
  • Discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory, and measurement.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise the growing crisis of wealth and income inequality among the members of the economy.

CO2: Understand the economic crisis in different sectors and government interventions in practices.

CO3: Get familiar informal sector and labour market participation and rights.

CO4: Understand debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption.

CO5: Investigate issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing challenges in economies through the lens of democracy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratization and Society
 

Theories of Democratization; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratization; The Global Wave of Democratization; Causes and Dimensions of Democratization: The Political Economy of Democracy; Political Culture, Mass Beliefs and Value Change; Gender and Democratization; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratization Processes: Role, impact on policy reforms and cultural change.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratisation and Society
 

Theories of Democratisation; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratisation; The Global Wave of Democratisation; Causes and Dimensions of Democratisation: The Political Economy of Democracy: Political Culture, Mass Beliefs, and Value Change; Gender and Democratisation; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratisation Processes: Role, Impact on Policy Reforms and Cultural Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation;   Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratization; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation; Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratisation; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of political transitions: Choice of the economic and political regime; Theoretical extensions: growth, trade, political institutions; Democracy and the public sector; the state, the treat of expropriation and the possibility of development: Social and economic wellbeing and policy reforms.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of Political Transitions: Choice of Economic and Political Regime; Theoretical Extensions: Growth, Trade, Political Institutions; Democracy and the Public Sector; the State, the Threat of Expropriation and the Possibility of Development: Social and Economic Wellbeing and Policy Reforms

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development
 

A Marxian theory of democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development
 

A Marxian Theory of Democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; The Case Study of India; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development Indian Experience
 

India’s Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality, and Public Reasoning; A case study on Gujarat experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome; Kerala experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development: Indian Experience
 

India's Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality and Public Reasoning, A Case Study on Gujarat's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome; Kerala's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhagwati, J. N., & Panagariya, A. (2012). India's Tryst with Destiny: Debunking Myths that Undermine Progress and Addressing New Challenges. HarperCollins Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Boix, C. (2003). Democracy and Redistribution. Cambridge University Press.

Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2015). An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions. Economics Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 20 Marks

CIA 3: 45 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

ECO145 - ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to provide a holistic and a deeper understanding of the trade-off between ecology and development. Through an inter-disciplinary lens an organic approach is adopted to understand the trade-off. This course, therefore, seeks to cultivate not only the moral and ethical thinking of the ecology but also it tries to put forth an action plan from a policy front. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To evoke a sense of deep ecology and social justice.

CO2: To familiarize the students with the development paradigms and how it affects the ecology.

CO3: To examine the problems behind value designations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Value
 

The Value Problem in Ecological Economics- Values in Ecological Value Analysis: What Should We Be Learning from Contingent Valuation Studies? - Natural Capital in Ecological Economics-Entropy in Ecological Economics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Development
 

The environmental impact of land development-Development of water resources-Development and changing air quality- Urban development and environmental change-Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?- Power Inequality and the Environment.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecofeminism and Ecocriticism
 

Gender and environment; Ecofeminism; androcentrism; Deep ecology – ecofeminism debate; Ecocriticism; Nature writings; Thinking like a mountain; The forgetting and remembering of the air - The Varna Trophic System An Ecological Theory of Caste Formation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Action Plans
 

Reading Ecology, Reinventing Democracy-Scientists or Spies?- Revisiting the Debates on Man-Nature Relation- Lecture of Medha Patkar- Ecological Fiscal Transfers and State-level Budgetary Spending in India- -Bourgeois Environmentalism, the State, the Judiciary, Urban Poor, Significance of Silent Valley- Silent Valley: A controversy that focused global attention on a rainforest 40 years ago- Equity and Justice

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      1.Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

2.Daly & Farley. (2011). Ecological Economics (Principles and Applications). Island Press

3.Pepper, D. (2002). Eco-socialism: from deep ecology to social justice. Routledge

1.      4.Gupta, Avijit. (1998).Ecology and Development in Third World. Routledge

4. Patel, S. (1997). Ecology and Development. Economic and Political Weekly, 2388-2391.

5. Sankar, U. (ed.) (2000). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press

6. Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

7.Venkatachalam, L. (2007). Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?. Ecological economics, 61(2-3), 550-558.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.    1. Plumwood, V. (1993).  Feminism and the Mastery of Nature. London: Routledge

2. Warren, K.J. (ed), (1994).  Ecological Feminism. London: Routledge.

3.Shiva, V. (2016). Staying alive: Women, ecology, and development. North Atlantic Books.

4.Kavoori, P. S. (2002). The Varna Trophic system: an ecological theory of caste formation. Economic and Political Weekly, 1156-1164. 

5.Gill, K. (2009). Bourgeois environmentalism’, the State, the Judiciary, and the ‘urban poor’: The political mobilization of a scheduled caste market. Of Poverty and Plastic (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2010), 209.

6. Kaur, A., Mohanty, R. K., Chakraborty, L., & Rangan, D. (2021). Ecological fiscal transfers and state-level budgetary spending in India: Analyzing the flypaper effects. Levy Economics Institute, Working Papers Series July.

7.Parameswaran, M. P. (1979). Significance of Silent Valley. Economic and Political Weekly, 1117-1119.

8. Lewis, M. (2002). Scientists or spies? Ecology in a climate of Cold War suspicion. Economic and Political Weekly, 2323-2332.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 25 Marks

CIA 2- 25 Marks

CIA 3- 50 Marks 

ENG181-1 - ENGLISH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities, and politics and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO2: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO3: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare
 
  • 1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde
  • 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors  Just a minute talk, cubing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer
 

 Why We Travel-Pico Iyer 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
1. Thinking Like a Mountain By Aldo Leopold
 

Thinking Like a Mountain  By Aldo Leopold

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article
 

 

Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
1. My Story- Nicole DeFreece
 

 

 My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Casey at the Bat- Ernest Lawrence Thayer
 
  • Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer
Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Additional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20 

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks

EST142 - READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:3
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Reading Sports and Literature

Course Description: The Sports and Literature course aims to explore the relationship between sports and literature through the analysis of various literary works. By examining texts that center around sports themes, this course will delve into the cultural, social, and personal aspects of sports as portrayed in literature. Students will develop critical thinking, analytical, and communication skills as they engage with a diverse range of texts, including novels, short stories, poems, and essays. Through class discussions, readings, and written assignments, students will gain a deeper understanding of the literary representation of sports and its significance in society.

Course Objectives:

To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

 

To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Course Outcome

CO1: To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

CO2: To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

CO3: To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

CO4: To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

CO5: To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Sports and Literature
 

Defining the relationship between sports and literature

Historical perspectives on sports in literature

 

The role of sports in society and culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The Heroic Athlete
 

 

Exploring the archetype of the hero in sports literature

Analysis of sports heroes and their portrayal in literary works

 

Themes of triumph, perseverance, and sacrifice

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Gender and Sports
 

 

Gender representation in sports literature

Examination of gender roles and expectations in athletic contexts

 

Sports as a means of empowerment and resistance

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Identity
 

 

Sports as a vehicle for personal and collective identity

Intersectionality and the portrayal of race, ethnicity, and class in sports literature

 

The relationship between sports and national identity

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Sports and Coming-of-Age
 

 

Analysis of sports as a backdrop for personal growth and maturation

The challenges and conflicts faced by young athletes in literature

 

Themes of ambition, dreams, and disillusionment

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Society
 

Unit 6: Sports and Society

Critical examination of the social issues depicted in sports literature

Sports as a reflection of broader societal dynamics

 

Ethics, values, and controversies in the world of sports

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. "The Natural" by Bernard Malamud
  2. "Friday Night Lights" by H.G. Bissinger
  3. "The Art of Fielding" by Chad Harbach
  4. "Seabiscuit: An American Legend" by Laura Hillenbrand
  5. "The Contender" by Robert Lipsyte
  6. "The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner" by Alan Sillitoe
  7. "A Fan's Notes" by Frederick Exley
  8. "The Boys of Summer" by Roger Kahn
  9. "The Sportswriter" by Richard Ford
  10. "Open" by Andre Agassi
  11. "Fever Pitch" by Nick Hornby
  12. "The Crossover" by Kwame Alexander (young adult literature)
  13. "The Runner" by Cynthia Voigt (young adult literature)
  14. "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" by Sherman Alexie (young adult literature)
  15. "The Fighter" by Michael Farris Smith
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. "The Boxer" by Joyce Carol Oates
  2. "The Runner" by Don DeLillo
  3. "Blindside" by Michael Lewis
  4. "The Tennis Partner" by Abraham Verghese
  5. "Basketball" by John Updike
  6. "The Chariot" by Ray Bradbury
  7. "The Trophy" by Alberto Alvaro Ríos
  8. "The Catch" by W.P. Kinsella
  9. "In the Ring" by Andre Dubus
  10. "Roller Derby Queen" by Margot Livesey
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-20

CIA 2- MSE 50

CIA 3- 30

ESE- 50

EST143 - STORYTELLING, GAMES AND ETHICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: In the last 20-25 years the field of game studies has evolved significantly. It is globally recognised. Video games have been studied using inter, multi and transdisciplinary methods to understand culture, identity, media, narration and communication. The course will provide a historical, social, cultural and critical foundation about games, digitality, storytelling and its moral and ethical world. This will enable students to understand the connection between identities, moralities and our current engagement with the gaming world. This will help in broadening the interdisciplinary focus and assessment of storytelling in diverse forms and connect it with the ethical issues of the contemporary world.

 

Course Objectives: The course will survey the evolution of ideas connecting storytelling, gaming and ethics and morality. It will introduce the latest research in gaming and ethics as evidenced in the globalised world. It will provide a methodology for students to assess and critically evaluate the meaning, content, intent, narration (compared to other broader media), ideology and ethical implications of gaming in the contemporary world.

Course Outcome

CO1: ? will be able to understand the narrative conventions of gaming, their uses and ideological effects

CO2: ?will evaluate how narrative choices reflect ethical contextualisation

CO3: ?will be able to analyse and evaluate contemporary social, cultural and political issues and perspectives reflected in games

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: What is gaming ? Basic introduction
 

While gaming has been popular, studying games with its historical, social and cultural context requires a foundation in history of games. Locating games within cultures of social transactions and strategic implications will provide the required base to begin the course.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Gaming, Society and Narration
 

This unit is divided into three smaller subunits. The students will be divided into smaller groups in class and asked to explore the following blog to choose any one area of interest within the subcategories mentioned. The class will progress accordingly. They have to choose between games and colonialism, games and gender, games and philosophy (utopia/dystopia).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Games and Ethics
 

This unit is focussed on ethical framework of games.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Unit IV: Storyboard ? design a game (basic story line)
 

The students are expected to narrate and design a basic concept for a game to respond to the questions raised in the course.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Unit I: What is gaming – Basic introduction                                                         (10 hours)

While gaming has been popular, studying games with its historical, social and cultural context requires a foundation in history of games. Locating games within cultures of social transactions and strategic implications will provide the required base to begin the course.

1.     Roberts, J. M., Arth, M. J., & Bush, R. R. (1959). Games in culture. American anthropologist61(4), 597-605.

2.     Chapter 1 from Grace, L. D. (2019). Doing things with games: Social impact through play. CRC Press.

Unit II: Gaming, Society and Narration                                                                (15 hours)

This unit is divided into three smaller subunits. The students will be divided into smaller groups in class and asked to explore the following blog to choose any one area of interest within the subcategories mentioned. The class will progress accordingly. They have to choose between games and colonialism, games and gender, games and philosophy (utopia/dystopia).

https://coe-gamecult.org/

Reading: Shaw, A. (2010). What is video game culture? Cultural studies and game studies. Games and culture5(4), 403-424.

Salter, A., & Blodgett, B. (2017).  Toxic Geek Masculinity: Sexism, Trolling, and Identity Policing (Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2017), 73-99.

Case study: Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice

Unit III: Games and Ethics                                                                                      (15 hours)

Kowert, R., & Quandt, T. (Eds.). (2015). The video game debate: Unravelling the physical, social, and psychological effects of video games. Routledge. (Chapter 2/4/5).

Gotterbarn, D. The ethics of video games: Mayhem, death, and the training of the next generation. Inf Syst Front 12, 369–377 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10796-009-9204-x

Schrier, K. (2015). EPIC: A framework for using video games in ethics education. Journal of Moral Education44(4), 393-424.

Sicart, M. (2015). Playing the good life: Gamification and ethics. The gameful world: Approaches, issues, applications, 225-244.

Unit IV: Storyboard – design a game (basic story line)

The students are expected to narrate and design a basic concept for a game to respond to the questions raised in the course.

1.     Workshop by gaming planner/designer

2.     https://www.pluralsight.com/blog/film-games/creating-game-concept-first-step-getting-game-ground

3.     https://uxdesign.cc/a-board-game-design-process-a-game-is-a-system-5469dfa4536

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended readings:

Bolter, J. et al. (1999). Remediation. Understanding New Media. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 20-52; 88-102.

Burrill, D. A. (2008). Die tryin': videogames, masculinity, culture (Vol. 18). Peter Lang. (13-44).

Mukherjee, S. (2017). Videogames and Postcolonialism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 1-52. (Rise of the Tomb Raider).

Schrier, K. (2017). Designing role-playing video games for ethical thinking. Educational Technology Research and Development65(4), 831-868.

Sicart, M. (2013). Beyond choices: The design of ethical gameplay. MIT Press.

Zhang, Y. (2009). Ian Bogost, Persuasive Games: The Expressive Power of Videogames.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Examination and Assessment

Assessment Pattern    

20 (CIA 1)

20 (CIA 3)

50 (CIA 2)

50 (End Semester)

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of an author, book review, narrative analysis of a dominant idea of the contemporary time, debates or seminar/panel discussions.

Mid semester exam (class test) – A written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks. Section A (10 marks) will have objective questions (20, ½ marks each). Section B will have 4 questions (10 marks each) to assess conceptual clarity. Section B will have one compulsory question which will be analytical.

End-semester exam (class test) – Three sections: Section A (10 marks) will have objective questions (20, ½ marks each). Section B will have 1 conceptual question (10 marks each). They will be conceptual. Section C (15 marks each) will be having two case studies - one purely based on identification of features, styles, and narrative devices, and second question will be evaluative and analytical.

Consolidated marks will be sent after the final examination.

EST145 - POETICS , POLITICS AND PIVOTAL PEOPLE OF ROCK N ROLL (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

 Rock Music is a sound and dissonance rich discourse with its own socio-cultural practices and aesthetics. This course is an academic introduction to this space and its role in the identity formation of a generation, of a people and a Nation in motion.

 

Course Objectives

 

  • To engage with popular music as aural texts 
  • To study the popular music practitioner as an activist and artist
  • To appreciate the significance of  social critique and a counter cultural aesthetic

Course Outcome

CO1: ? To critically appreciate characteristics and concerns of popular music

CO2: To read popular music as cultural artefact and socio-political entities

CO3: ? To regard popular music as the voice and identity of a generation and locate its historical trajectory

CO4: ? To engage with artists and performances as cultural texts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
A brief history of Popular Music before the Beatles
 

Tin Pan Alley and song pluggers, World War II

Sheet Music

Swing and ragtime

Vaudeville

Frank Sinatra: My Way. Strangers in The Night, New York, New York

Nashville, Music Row, Elvis Presley

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Birth of a Genre (From Gospel to Rock)
 

 Bill Haley 

Chuck Berry

  Buddy Holly   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Classic Rock and the British Invasion
 

The Beatles and Beatlemania

Establishing an aesthetic of Mod

  TV and bands 

The Rolling Stones  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Art Rock and the Album Era: Concept Albums and Album Art
 

 

Bands as Artists                                                                                                                 

Beatles / Sgt Pepper’s  

Pink Floyd /The Wall

The Who / Tommy

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
The Politics of Rock n Roll Folk rock: People power; Guerrilla Minstrels Folksong as Protest
 

 

Counter Culture: Vietnam, Draft, Gender, the Mystic East, Woodstock, Ban the Bomb   

Woody Guthrie

Bob Dylan

Joan Baez

Janis Joplin

Simon and Garfunkel

Jimi Hendrix

Pearl Jam

Riot bands

Text Books And Reference Books:

Whats that sound? An introduction to Rock and its history .

 

Jon CovachUniversity of Rochester

and the Eastman School of Music

Andrew Flory

Carleton College

 

W. W. NORTON AND COMPANY

NEW YORK • LONDON

fifth Edition

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Baugh, Bruce. “Prolegomena to Any Aesthetics of Rock Music”. The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 51, No. 1 (Winter, 1993): 23-29. JSTOR. The American Society for Aesthetics. Web. 26Jul, 2016. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/431967>

Camilleri, Lelio. “Shaping Sounds, Shaping Spaces”.  Popular Music, Vol. 29, No. 2 (May 2010): 199-211. JSTOR.  Cambridge University Press. Web. 16August, 2016. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/40926918>

Chrysalis, Thanos. “Spatio-Aural Terrains”. Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 16, Noises Off: Sound Beyond Music (2006):40-42. JSTOR. The MIT Press. Web. 29 April, 2015. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4540592

Denisoff R.S. The Sounds of Social Change: Studies in Popular USA Culture. 1972. Rand Mcnally& Co.

Denisoff, R. S.  Great Day Coming.  1991. Ann Arbor, MI: U-M-I Out-of-Print Books on Demand.

Denisoff, R. S. "Sing a Song of Social Significance": Political Consciousness and the Song of Persuasion.  1972.  Ohio: Bowling Green State University Popular Press.

Denisoff, R. S. Solid Gold Popular Record Industry.  1975. New Brunswick, New Jersey Transactions Inc

Ewen, D. Great Men of American Popular Song: The History of the American Popular Song told through the Lives, Careers, Achievements, and Personalities of its Foremost Composers and Lyricists--from William Billings of the Revolutionary War through Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Burt Bacharach.  1972. Englewood Cliffs, NJ, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

Forcucci, S. L. A Folk Song History of America: America through its Songs.  1984. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall

Fox, Aaron A.. “The Jukebox of History: Narratives of Loss and Desire in the Discourse of Country Music”. Popular Music, Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan,1992): 53-72. JSTOR, Cambridge University Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/853227 >

Ganchrow, Raviv. “Perspectives on Sound-Space: The Story of Acoustic Defense”. Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 19, Our Crowd—Four Composers Pick Composers (2009): 71-75. JSTOR. The MIT Press. Web. 29April, 2015. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/40926354>

Hamm, C.  Music in the New World. 1983. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Hampton, W. Guerrilla Minstrels.  1986. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Kingman, D.  American Music: A Panorama. 1979. New York: Schirmer books.

Klonsky, M. “Down in The Village: A Discourse on Hip”. New American Review, 13. 1971. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Kostelanetz, Richard. “Text-Sound Art: A Survey (Concluded)”. Performing Arts Journal, Vol. 2, No. 3 (Winter, 1978): 71-84. JSTOR. Performing Arts Journal, Inc. Web. 16 August,2016. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/3245364 >

 

Kramer, Lawrence. “Music, Metaphor and Metaphysics”.  The Musical Times, Vol. 145, No. 1888 (Autumn, 2004): 5-18. JSTOR.  Musical Times Publications Ltd. Web. 26 March,2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/4149109>

Kun, Josh D. “The Aural Border”. Theatre Journal, Vol. 52, No. 1, Latino Performance (March. 2000): 1-21. The John Hopkins University Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/25068738 >

Poulin, A. The American Folk Scene: Dimensions of the Folksong Revival.  1967. New York: Dell Pub. Co.

Qureshi, Regula Burckhardt. “Music Anthropologies and Music Histories: A Preface and an Agenda”. Journal of the American Musicology Society, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Autumn 1995): 331-342. JSTOR. University of California Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/3519830 >

 

Račić, Ladislav. “On the Aesthetics of Rock Music”. International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music, Vol. 12, No. 2 (Dec.1981): 199-202. JSTOR. Croatian Musicological Society. Web. 1Dec., 2017. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/836562>

Ricks, C.  The Force of Poetry. 1995. Oxford University Press.

Rodnitzky, J. L.  Minstrels of the Dawn: The Folk-Protest Singer as a Cultural Hero. 1976. Chicago: Nelson-Hall.

Tagg, Philip. “Analyzing popular music: theory, method and practice.” Popular Music 1 (1979): 68-70. Web.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment: (20 marks).

Choose a song that has been an effective anthem for a cause or genre and analyse it in about 500-750 words.  

CIA II: (Mid Sem 50 marks) Choose a pivotal figure from Rock history and trace their career and impact on society. Consider image and sound in the construction of this image.

CIA III:(20marks) The class in groups of 5-6 will anthologise a series of songs, artists and their work.

 

Archiving:

End Semester:

 Identify a Bangalore based band or genre of popular music with approval of your course instructor . Conduct a study of their work and evolution and impact on the city and vice versa. Use data beyond library sources and provide due evidence. Your archive entry must include a 750-1000word reflective essay that validates your choice of artist, understanding of the form and significance of the work. You must also identify, interview and record these interactions. Provide clips from concerts duly cited. Include memorabilia like tickets, album art, newspaper or magazine clips  

 

EST146 - FOOD AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

 

This course offers an interdisciplinary exploration of the connections between food and literature, focusing on how food has been represented in literary works from different cultures and time periods. In addition, the course will provide an overview of the history and evolution of food culture, as well as the politics and economics of food production and consumption. By examining culinary themes in literary works, students will gain a deeper understanding of how food functions as a powerful symbol and narrative device in literature, reflecting social, cultural, and historical contexts. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the rich connections between food and literature, fostering critical thinking, cultural awareness, and personal reflection.

 

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

 

 

 

1.     To enhance the ability to identify and interpret the symbolic, metaphorical, and cultural significance of food within literary works.

 

2.     To help explore how food reflects and shapes social, historical, and cultural aspects of different societies and communities, shaping individual and collective identities and reflect social hierarchies and inequalities.

 

3.     To develop the ability to craft vivid and evocative descriptions by learning techniques for using sensory details, imagery, and figurative language to bring culinary experiences to life in their own writing.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will develop a deeper understanding of the cultural context of food and its representation in literature and its portrayal journalistic genres.

CO2: Students will be able to appreciate the influence of food on individual and collective identities.

CO3: They will understand how food can reinforce or challenge social hierarchies and inequalities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Unit I- Introduction to Food and Literature
 

Definition and scope; cultural, historical, and social significance of food; overview of how literature incorporates culinary themes

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

Anton Chekhov: "Gooseberries"

 

Margaret Atwood: "Bread"

 

Borden Deal: “The Taste of Watermelon"

 

Mona Gardner: "The Dinner Party"

 

Shobha Narayan: “First Foods”Excerpt from Monsoon Diary: A Memoir with Recipes

 

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Poetry
 

Li-Young Lee: "Eating Together"

 

Gwendolyn Brooks: "Kitchenette Building"

 

Seamus Heaney: "At a Potato Digging "

 

Risa Potters: "In My Mother’s Things"

 

Choman Hardi: “My Mother’s Kitchen”

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Essays
 

Ligaya Mishan: What We Write About When We Write About Food (NY Times, 2022)

 

Roland Barthes: Wine and Milk

 

Jackie Varriano: “How Female Food writers penned their way out of the home kitchen” 

 

Nimisha Sinha: “Delicious Fictions: Reading Food in Literature”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

§  Chekhov, Anton. Gooseberries. United Kingdom, Penguin Books Limited, 2015.

 

§  Atwood, Margaret. “Bread.Women on War: An International Anthology of Women's Writings from Antiquity to the Present. United States, Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 2003.

 

§  Deal, Bordan “The Taste of Watermelon”. 1979

 

§  Gardner, Mona. “The Dinner Party.” The Saturday Review of Literature. 1941.

 

§  Narayan, Shoba. Monsoon Diar:  A Memoir with Recipes. India, Penguin Group, 2004.

 

§  Lee, Young- Li. “Eating Together” Poetry Foundation.< https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43015/eating-together-56d221af2bf26> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Brooks, Gwendolyn. “kitchenette building” Poetry Foundation. < https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43308/kitchenette-building> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Heaney, Seamus. “At a Potato Digging” < https://genius.com/Seamus-heaney-at-a-potato-digging-annotated> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Potters, Risa. “In My Mother’s Things”Rattle. https://www.rattle.com/in-my-mothers-things-by-risa-potters/ Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Hardi, Choman. “My Mother’s Kitchen” Poetry Archive. < https://poetryarchive.org/poem/my-mothers-kitchen/> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Mishan, Ligaya. “What We Write About When We Write About Food” The new York Time Style Magazine. 18 February 2022. < https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/18/t-magazine/food-writing-journalism-criticism.html> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Varriano, Jackie. “How Female Food writers penned their way out of the home kitchen”  02 March 2022. < https://www.seattletimes.com/life/food-drink/how-women-food-writers-penned-their-way-out-of-the-home-kitchen/ > Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Barthes, Roland. “Wine and Milk.”Mythologies: The Complete Edition, in a New Translation. United States, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013.

 

§  Sinha, Nimisha.Delicious Fictions: Reading Food in Literature.” Caffe Dissensus. 28 January 2020. < https://cafedissensus.com/2020/01/28/delicious-fictions-reading-food-in-literature/> Accessed on 22 July 2023

 

§  Shahani, Gitanjali G. Food and Literature. United States, Cambridge University Press, 2018.

 

§  Fitzpatrick, Joan. 2012a. "Food and Literature: An Overview." The Routlege International Handbook of Food Studies. Edited by Ken Albala. Routledge International Handbooks. London. Routledge. pp. 122-34

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

§  Gilbert, Sandra M.. The Culinary Imagination: From Myth to Modernity. United States, W. W. Norton, 2014.

 

§  Hosking, Richard. Food and Language: Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium of Food and Cookery 2009. United Kingdom, Prospect Books, 2010.

 

§  Waxman, Barbara Frey. “Food Memoirs: What They Are, Why They Are Popular, and Why They Belong in the Literature Classroom.” College English, Vol. 70, No. 4, Special Focus: Food (Mar., 2008): 363-383

 

§  Ferrier, Peyton. “Food in Popular Literature.” Choices, Vol. 29, No. 1 (1st Quarter 2014): 1-6

 

§  Jones, Michael Owen . “Food Choice, Symbolism, and Identity: Bread-and-Butter Issues for Folkloristics and Nutrition Studies (American Folklore Society Presidential Address, October 2005)” The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 120, No. 476 (Spring, 2007), pp. 129-177

 

§  Daly. Suzanne, and Ross G. Forman. “Introduction: Cooking Culture: Situating Food and Drink in the Nineteenth Century.” Victorian Literature and Culture, Vol. 36, No. 2 (2008), pp. 363-373

 

§  Holtzman, Jon D. “Food and Memory.” Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 35 (2006), pp. 361-378

 

§  Tigner, Amy L., and Carruth, Allison. Literature and Food Studies. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2017.

 

§  Fisher, Mary Frances Kennedy. The Gastronomical Me. United States, World Publishing Company, 1948.

 

§  "Feast and Famine: Food Imagery and Class Identity in Victorian Literature" by Debra L. Gimlin (Victorian Literature and Culture)

 

§  Albala, Ken. Routledge International Handbook of Food Studies. United States, Taylor & Francis, 2013.The Routledge Companion to Literature and Food. United States, Taylor & Francis, 2018.

 

§  Counihan, Carole, and Penny Van Esterik. Food and Culture: A Reader. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print.

 

§  Humble, Nicola. The Literature of Food: An Introduction from 1830 to Present. India, Bloomsbury Publishing.

 

§  J. Michelle Coghlan. The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food. India, Cambridge University Press, 2020.

 

§  Fitzpatrick, Joan, and Boyce, Charlotte. A History of Food in Literature: From the Fourteenth Century to the Present. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2017.

 

§  Kara K. Keeling, Scott T. Pollard. Critical Approaches to Food in Children's Literature. N.p., Taylor & Francis, 2012. Print.

 

§  < https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/18/t-magazine/food-writing-journalism-criticism.html>

 

§  Julia Rappaport: “Take a bite out of food writing”

 

§  < https://www.writermag.com/improve-your-writing/nonfiction/take-bite-food-writing/>

 

§  < https://www.seattletimes.com/life/food-drink/how-women-food-writers-penned-their-way-out-of-the-home-kitchen/>

 

§  Ceillie Clark- Keane: “Women Writing Food” < https://blog.pshares.org/women-writing-food/>

 

§  Barthes, Rolan. “Wine and Mild.” Mythologies. New York: Hill and Wang, 195: 58-61. Print.

 

§  Kapla, David M. “Introduction: The Philosophy of Food.” The Philosophy of Food. University of California Press, 2012:1-23. <https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt7zw2cx.3 >

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: Presentation (20 Marks)

 

Create a character diary or character letter in the voice of a character from any chosen literary work.

 

 

 

Mid Semester: Research paper (50 Marks)

 

Analyze literary works (novel/ poem/short story/ play) for food-related social issue addressed in their narrative and write a research paper in 1000- 1500 words considering the broader social, political or cultural significance of these issues/ representations.

 

 

 

CIA 3: Photo Essay (20 Marks)

 

Create a photo essay on a particular cuisine, street food, or food markets in Bangalore focusing on any kind of its presentation.

 

 

 

End Semester: Food Narrative Project (50 Marks)

 

Create a food narrative project based on a specific food culture (local/regional) or a family/ community recipe. The foodscape should focus on these four aspects- recipe, anecdote, history and relevance, the transformative culinary experience and the rationale for the choice of recipe. Recall specific sensory details associated with your chosen theme or focus. Consider the taste, smell, texture, and appearance of the food. Reflect on the ambiance, sounds, and emotions evoked by the culinary experience. Conduct research to explore the cultural, historical, or social context to your food narrative. It should include photographs, videos, or any other visual or auditory elements.

 

EST148 - THE OCEANS IN CINEMA: A BLUE HUMANITIES READING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Moving from land to ocean marks a shift in our understanding with fluidity as the focal point. ‘Blue Humanities’ or ‘Blue Cultural Studies’ uses the ocean as the lens to foreground diverse historical, social, cultural, economic and political aspects. The expansive field of Blue Humanities adopts a multidisciplinary approach, weaving together insights from environmental studies, oceanography, marine studies, cultural studies, film studies, history, etc. The course specifically focuses on revisiting the cliched conceptualization of the ocean as vast, alien, terra nullis and ahistorical. The ‘Oceanic Turn’ transitions from the surface to the depths below to explore the three-dimensional ocean through socio-cultural representations. Reading the ocean and the sea through cinema from across the world will help understand how the ocean is portrayed in myriad ways ‘foregrounding and problematizing issues connected to gender, race, pollution, social justice, maritime activities, privatization, globalization, capitalism ontologies’ to revisit our established thought regimes. 

Course Outcome

CO1: ? Appreciate and interpret the ocean in the light of Blue Humanities

CO2: ? Analyze and understand the changing relationships between societies and the ocean through the cinematic representations

CO3: ? Rethink and initiate action towards oceanic thinking and sustainability

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Knowing the Ocean: Re-visiting History and Origins
 

The unit will provide an alternative reading of our established understanding of ‘Origins’ with reference to the ocean – formation of the earth, the oceans, plants and animals and human beings. Destabilizing the pre-set reading of the formation of the world and prioritizing the land over the sea, the unit will help refocus the establishment of life in the Universe.

 

·       Excerpts from Rachel Carson, The Sea Around Us

·       Steve Mentz, “Two Origins: Alien or Core?”

·       Philip E. Steinberg and Kimberley Peters, “Wet Ontologies, Fluid Spaces: Giving Depth to Volume Through Oceanic Thinking”

 

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:13
Mapping the Ocean: Reading through Blue Humanities
 

The unit will throw light on the field of Ecocriticism with specific focus on Blue Humanities and its emerging engagement with the oceans around the world. The unit will help position the study of the oceans in the field of Humanities with specific reference to Cultural studies to frame the Blue Cultural Studies.

·       Excerpts from Sidney I. Dobrin, “Unearthing Ecocriticism”

·       John R.  Gillis – “The Blue Humanities”https://www.neh.gov/humanities/2013/mayjune/feature/the-blue-humanities

 

·       Helen M Rozwadowski, Oceans in three Paradoxes: Knowing the Blue through Humanities – Virtual Exhibition https://www.environmentandsociety.org/exhibitions/oceans-three-paradoxes

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Seeing the Ocean: Re-viewing the ocean through cinema
 

The unit will probe into pivotal aspects surrounding the construction of the ocean space through filmic representations of the ocean. The intent is to analyze through a range of issues informing the oceanic representations in films to unearth the pluri-focussed politics, both explicit and otherwise, manoeuvring through them - Maritime histories and activities, Aquatic world, Disasters, Conquests, Wars, Exploration, Adventure, Folk Tales and Myths, Colonialism and Postcolonialism, Gender, Race, Capitalism, International Relations, Globalization, Ecology and Medical Humanities.

·       James L. Smith and Steve Mentz - Learning an Inclusive Blue Humanities: Oceania and Academia through the Lens of Cinema

·       Stefan Helmreich, “Massive movie waves and the Anthropic Ocean”

·       Dilip M Menon, “Sea-Ing Malayalam Cinema”

·       Rie Karatsu, The Representation of the Sea and the Feminine in Takeshi Kitano's A Scene at the Sea (1991) and Sonatine (1993)” (SLA)

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carson, Rachel. The Sea Around Us. Canongate, 2021

Dobrin, Sidney I. Blue Ecocriticism and the Oceanic Imperative. Routledge, 2021.

Mentz, Steve. An Introduction to Blue Humanities. Routledge, 2023.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·       Blum, Hester. “Introduction: Oceanic Studies.” Atlantic Studies, vol. 10, no. 2, June 2013, pp. 151–55. 

·       Chen, Cecilia, Janine MacLeod, and Astrida Neimanis, editors. Thinking with Water. McGill-Queens Univ. Press, 2013. 

·       DeLoughrey, Elizabeth. “Toward a Critical Ocean Studies for the Anthropocene.” English Language Notes, vol. 57, no. 1, Apr. 2019, pp. 21–36.

·       Di Leo, Jeffrey R., editor. “Blue Humanities,” Symploke, vol. 27 no. 1, 2019, pp. 7-10· 

·       Gillis, John R. “The Blue Humanities.” HUMANITIES, vol. 34, no. 3, May/June 2013.

·       Jue, Melody. Wild Blue Media: Thinking through Seawater. Duke Univ. Press, 2020.

·       Mentz, Steve. “Toward a Blue Cultural Studies: The Sea, Maritime Culture, and Early Modern English Literature.” Literature Compass, vol. 6, no. 5, Sept. 2009, pp. 997–1013. 

·       Mentz, Steve. Ocean. Bloomsbury Academic, 2020.

·       Mentz, Steve. Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization, 1550-1719. Univ. of Minnesota Press, 2016.

·       Raban, Jonathan, editor. The Oxford Book of the Sea. Oxford Univ. Press, 1993.

·       Roorda, Eric. The Ocean Reader: History, Culture, PoliticsDuke Univ. Press, 2020. 

·       Steinberg, Philip E. The Social Construction of the Ocean. Cambridge Univ. Press, 2001.

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

As the course is multidisciplinary, the assessments will be done periodically to gauge the student’s level of understanding and learning. Review writing, weaving together a scrapbook, review tests and photo essays will form part of the assessment.

 End semester evaluation will be based on students setting up an online archive. They shall create an online archive selecting topics and presenting them by blending texts, theory and research. The submission will also have a viva component.  

HIS141 - HISTORY AND CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course attempts to map out the connection between history and cinema. It aims to look at how cinema can be treated as a visual text and a source for understanding history. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To enhance and deepen the understanding of history through cinema.

CO2: To enable the students to develop their understanding and awareness of the rich possibilities of cinema and its connection with history.

CO3: To enhance the analytical skills of students and develop an understanding of how cinema engages with socio-cultural and political concerns, by placing the cinema in their historical context and engage with the current debates and future challenges with cinema as a medium.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 1
 

a)   History as a narrative – History and Truth Contested Notions –Ideology, Sources and Historian

b)   Multiple Identities and Histories – History as a point of reference – Issues of Legitimacy & Justification.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3
 

a)     Between History and Cinema:  The problem of linear narratives and flash back – questions of authenticity – definition of authenticity.

b)    Cinema as a political, social and historical text.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chapman, J. (2003). Cinemas of the World: Film and Society from 1895 to the Present. Reaktion Books.

Chapman, J., Glancy, M., & Harper, S. (Eds.). (2007). The new film history: sources, methods, approaches. Springer.

Ferro, M. (1988). Cinema and history. Wayne State University Press.

Chapman, J. (2005). Past and present: national identity and the British historical. London: IB Tauris.

Miskell, P. (2004). Historians and film. In Making History (pp. 253-264). Routledge.

Nowell-Smith, G. (Ed.). (1996). The Oxford history of world cinema. OUP Oxford.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). Seduced by the Familiar: Narration and Meaning in Indian Popular Cinema. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Chapman, J. (2013). Cinema, propaganda and national identity: British film and the Second World War. In British Cinema, Past and Present (pp. 213-226). Routledge.

Miskell, P. (2005). Seduced by the silver screen: Film addicts, critics and cinema regulation in Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. Business History47(3), 433-448.

Sedgwick, J., Miskell, P., & Nicoli, M. (2019). The market for films in postwar Italy: Evidence for both national and regional patterns of taste. Enterprise & Society20(1), 199-228.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2011). Bipolar identity: Region, nation, and the Kannada language film. Oxford University Press.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). The Politics of Hindi Cinema in the New Millennium: Bollywood and the Anglophone Indian Nation.

Sanyal, D. (2021). MK Raghavendra, “Locating World Cinema: Interpretations of Film as Culture” (Bloomsbury Academic India, 2020).

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  10 Marks            

CIA 2:  Mid Semester Examinations 25 Marks

CIA 3:  10 Marks

End semester examination: 50 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

LAW142 - RIGHT TO INFORMATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

There is no gainsaying the fact that knowledge is the paramount source of empowerment and empowerment enriches democracy. The attributes of democracy, viz. the government- of, by and for the people, can be realized successfully if the people are well informed and participate in decision making.

To achieve this goal, the Parliament has enacted the Right to Information Act, 2005, and the same has conferred, the most invaluable right to be informed, on the people. Hailed widely as a vaccine against corruption and a multi-vitamin for nourishment of democracy, law relating to Right to Information has become an indispensable weapon for the citizens.

Course Outcome

CO1: To comprehensively understand the legal framework regarding the Right to Information in India.

CO2: To contextualise Right to Information in the broader realm of public law along with allied concepts such as open governance, rule of law, accountability, transparency etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Historical background; Shift in attitudes- secrecy, privilege, open government; Citizens’ right to know; Campaign for freedom of information; Constitutional Provisions; Technological revolution – Information technology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Legal Framework
 

Right to information Act. 2005  –  Overview – Objectives and reasons – Scope of the Act and Overall Scheme of the Act – What concerned citizens will want to know – Definitions

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
OBLIGATIONS OF PUBLIC AUTHORITIES
 

Right to information; Obligations of public authorities; Public information officers; Request for information; Disposal of request

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
RIGHT TO INFORMATION ? EXEMPTIONS
 

Grounds for rejection to access in certain cases; Severability; Third party information; Statutory exemptions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
INFORMATION COMMISSIONS
 

Constitution of Central Information Commission; State information commission; Powers and functions of commission; Appeal and Penalties; Freedom of information in commercial disputes; Right to Privacy v Right to information

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Sudhir NaibThe Right to Information Act 2005: A Handbook (1st edition ed. 2011).
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. N. V. Paranjape, Right To Information Law In India (First Edition ed. 2014).
Evaluation Pattern

As per University norms

LAW145 - PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Parliament is the heart and soul of any parliamentary democracy which is envisaged to reflect the expectations and aspirations of the people. In fact, it is the chief law-making organ and it comprises of members from different backgrounds, so as to represent the varied expectations of the people. As such, it has an onerous responsibility of making laws in a manner which caters to the requirements of the society cutting across the party lines.

In twenty-first century, the age of technology and information, the role of Parliament has increased manyfold as the impressions of “We the People” have also undergone a sea change with respect to the quality of the law made. In this context, a fundamental knowledge of the law-making process and the requisites of the same is essential for the citizens. Hence this course is devised to introduce the students to the essentials of law-making process by the Parliament as well as the privileges conferred on the members of Parliament.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the Constitutional framework on Parliamentary Practice and Procedure in India

CO2: Analyse the Parliamentary Privileges in India

CO3: Examine the Law-making process and role of Parliamentary Committees in India

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
INDIAN PARLIAMENT AND POLITY
 

Structure, powers and functions of Houses of Parliament – Loksabha,  Rajya  Sabha, Joint Sessions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
CONSTITUTION OF HOUSES
 

Members and presiding officers, election, powers and functions, Powers of President in relation to Parliament

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
LAW-MAKING PROCESS
 

Classification of Bills, procedures relating to passing of Bills, presentation of Budget

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
RULES OF BUSINESS IN PARLIAMENT
 

Summoning, petitions, resolutions, motions, question-answers, matters of urgent public importance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
PARLIAMENTARY PRIVILEGES
 

Sources of Parliamentary privileges, immunities, procedure

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEES
 

Parliamentary Committees, Government Committee, Ad hoc Committees, Joint Committee

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Anoop Mishra (Ed.), Practice and Procedure of Parliament, Metropolitan Book Co. Ltd. New Delhi (2016)

Durga Das Basu, Introduction to the Constitution of India (2022), Lexis Nexis, Gurgaon

Lok Sabha Secretariate, Parliamentary Privileges (2019), New Delhi

Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs, Manual of Parliamentary Procedures in India (2018), New Delhi

 

Subhash Kashyap, Our Parliament, National Book Trust (2020), New Delhi

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Apoorva Shankar and Shreya Singh, Parliamentary Procedures: A Primer [Rajya Sabha] (2015), PRS Legislative Research, New Delhi

Lok Sabha Secretariate, Budgetary Process (2019), New Delhi

M.P. Jain, Indian Constitutional Law (8th Edn., 2018) Lexis Nexis, Gurgaon

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I : 25 Marks (25%)

CIA-II: 25 Marks (25%)

CIA-III: 50 Marks (50%) 

 

MED142 - AUDIO AND VIDEO PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course will introduce students to the basic principles and techniques of audio and video production. Students will learn how to use a range of equipment and software to produce high-quality audio and video content. This course is designed for non-media students who want to acquire basic skills in audio and video production.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to identify different types of media software and their uses in the media industry.

CO2: Students will be able to describe the features and functions of software tools used for media production, editing, and distribution.

CO3: Students will be able to use media software tools to create and edit media content.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Audio and Video Production
 

Introduction to Audio and Video Production (10 hours)

Basic principles of audio and video production

Overview of equipment used in audio and video production

Introduction to software tools used in audio and video production

 

Audio Production Techniques (10 hours)

Microphone selection and placement

Recording techniques and best practices

 

Mixing and mastering audio content

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Video Production Techniques
 

Video Production Techniques (10 hours)

Camera selection and setup

Lighting techniques and best practices

Shooting and capturing video footage

 

Editing Audio and Video Content (10hours)

Introduction to audio and video editing software

Editing and arranging audio and video content

 

Adding transitions and effects to audio and video content

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Advanced Audio and Video Production
 

Creating soundscapes and sound effects

Advanced camera techniques and shot composition

 

Motion graphics and visual effects

Text Books And Reference Books:

"The Filmmaker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age" by Steven Ascher and Edward Pincus.

"Audio Engineering 101: A Beginner's Guide to Music Production" by Tim Dittmar

"The Art of Digital Audio Recording: A Practical Guide for Home and Studio" by Steve Savage

"Video Production Handbook" by Gerald Millerson and Jim Owens

 

"Pro Tools 101: An Introduction to Pro Tools 11" by Frank D. Cook

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

"The Filmmaker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age" by Steven Ascher and Edward Pincus

"Audio Engineering 101: A Beginner's Guide to Music Production" by Tim Dittmar

"The Art of Digital Audio Recording: A Practical Guide for Home and Studio" by Steve Savage

"Video Production Handbook" by Gerald Millerson and Jim Owens

 

"Pro Tools 101: An Introduction to Pro Tools 11" by Frank D. Cook

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 – Interview Project - Students could work in groups to produce a video where they interview employees of a local business or organization. The video could showcase the company culture and highlight different aspects of the business. (15Marks)

CIA 2 – Product Demo Video Project - Students could work in groups to produce a video that showcases a product or service. The video would need to be engaging and informative, and would aim to persuade the viewer to purchase or use the product or service. (20 Marks)

CIA 3 – Educational Video Project - Students could work in groups to produce an educational video on a topic of their choice. The video would need to be informative and engaging, and could cover topics like science, history, or current events. (15 Marks)

All CIAs   – Department level only

MED143 - CELEBRITY PR (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course attempts to understand the nature, process and issues related to celebrity actors and their presence, which inadvertently contribute to the success of films.

Course Outcome

CO1: Will be able to understand the concept of celebrity PR

CO2: Will be able to understand the role of celebrity presence in the success of a film

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding PR as Strategic Communication
 

PR concept, role and relevance in selling goods/services; Brief history & evolution of PR. Competing forces for PR-Advertising, Publicity, Marketing/Sales. PR as distinct from spin, hype & exaggeration. Top Bollywood PR firms in India-Dale Bhagwagar PR, Raindrops, Spice PR, Aspire PR.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Celebrity PR and Bollywood
 

Bollywood and the need and emergence ofCelebrity PR, early beginnings, and present status. Acquiring and sustaining celebrity status through PR, Celebrity brand building & nurturing. PR in celebrity reputation management. Building the celebrity profile through analysis and research. Case Study-The making of Shilpa Shetty (UK's Big Brother Reality TV), Amitabh Bachchan and KBC, Aamir Khan and Satyameva Jayate

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Celebrity PR Responsibilities & Activities
 

Interviews, Press conferences,Rejoinders,Official comments/no comments. Organising events-Public 'meet and greet', Social events of significance, Public gatherings-award functions, airport meets.  Helping to manage crisis--damaging details from celebrity past, social media criticism and backlash, dealing with success and failure with grace and dignity, Helping deal with paparazzi encounter

Text Books And Reference Books:

Barron, Lee. (2015). Celebrity Cultures: An Introduction. SAGE Publications Ltd. Bräu, Marlena. (2013), Twitter Kills The Publicity Star? How social media is influencing the business of Celebrity PR. Grin Verlag Publishing, Germany. Jonas, C Priyanka. (2021). Unfinished: A Memoir. Penguin Viking.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Raju, J Jeetu. (2020). Escape the rat race. Google Books, Thames Publication. Stewart, B James and Abrams, Rachel. (2023). Unscripted: The Epic Battle for a Hollywood Media Empire. Penguin Books.

Evaluation Pattern

Single assessment of 50 marks

MED144 - HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will provide students the opportunity to apply a variety of interdisciplinary approaches on popular young adult narratives. Students will be exposed to the real -world culture and physical environment that produced, shaped, and continues to inform the Harry Potter series, giving students greater insight into the importance of textual awareness and analysis.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explore the socio-cultural, historical, and technological perspectives behind Harry Potter phenomenon.

CO2: Develop critical thinking skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History of wizards in cinema
 

History of wizards in cinema – P L Travers, Disney era, rise of Nanny McPhee, Arrival of Harry potter in bookstores, narrative development of book 1 – Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Deconstruction of characters, significance of four houses, potions, beasts and spells.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Hogwarts a world class school
 

Hogwarts a world class school – dynamics of homework, relationship, bullying, teachers, team spirits and opponents, wizards and other, Debates on Morality, Technology and Media in Potter world, Privacy concerns with magical objects, Cultural Hegemony, Case Study on Snape and Dumbledore

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Sociological perspective
 

Sociological perspective – idea of home, community, clan and society, class struggle and dynamics, Aurora and Azkaban, Representation of Gender, Idea of family and institution, construction of power structures

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Film Screening
 

Screening of First and Last Harry Potter films

Text Books And Reference Books:

Harry Potter and Sorcerer’s Stone, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0590353427)

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439064873)

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439136365)

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439139601)

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439358071)

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439785969)

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0545139700)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Whited, L A & Grimes, K. (2015). Critical Insights: The Harry Potter Series. Salem Books.

Bell, C E (2018). Inside the World of Harry Potter: Critical Essays on the Books and Films.McFarland Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignments will be done through Google Classroom

CIA -1 – Class Test– 20 marks

CIA 2 –  – 50 marks

CIA 3 – Group Assignment – 20 marks

End Semester - Project – 50 marks

PHY141 - FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of forensic science. Student will be introduced to the different analytical tool to analyse the results. They will also learn the physics behind investigative method used to gather evident. Finally, students will study emerging use of nanotechnology in forensic science.  

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the different technique to analyse the results.

CO2: Understand the basic science underlying the motion of bullets, collisions, explosion and blood dynamics.

CO3: Learn about the advantage of nanotechnology in forensic science.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Analytical instruments and techniques of forensic physics
 

Introduction, electromagnetic spectrum, sources of radiation, their utility and limitations, refractive index, interaction of light with matter, idea on instrumentation and results analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Forensic physics
 

Scope and significance of forensic physics, basic physics in solving crime, motion of bullet and other projectile, vehicular collisions, blood stain analysis using fluid mechanics, physics of explosions, development and identification of latent fingerprints using optics.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Nanotechnology in forensic science
 

Nanotechnology, utilization of nanotechnology in analysis of physical evidence, applications of nanotechnology in forensic evidence analysis, introduction to nanomaterials, types of nanomaterials. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. B.B. Nanda and R.K Tiwari, Forensic Science in India: A vision for the Twenty First Centrury, select publishers, New Delhi (2001)
  2. CM Hussain, D Rawtani, G Pandey, M Tharmavaram, Handbook of Analytical Techniques for Forensic Samples: Current and Emerging Developments, ISBN: 978-0-12-822300-0, Elsevier, 2020
  3. M.K Bhasin and S.Nath, Role of Forensic Science in the New Millenium, University of Delhi, Delhi(2002).
  4.  S.H James and J.J Nordby, Forensic Science :An introduction to scientific and Investigative Techniques, 2nd Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton(2005)
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. W.G. Eckert and R.K. Wright in Introduction to Forensic Sciiences, 2nd Edition, W.G. Eckert (ED), CRC Press, Boca Raton(1997).
  2. R. Saferstein, M.L. Hastrup and C.Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013)
  3. W.J. Tilstone, M.L. Hastrup and C.Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013)
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation will be based on presentations by each student and class work.

PHY142 - ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course on Basic Electronics and Gadgets is aimed at giving a feel of electronics to non science/core students. It helps them in knowing the fundamentals of various electronic gadgets they use in daily life and related technologies. The course covers  categories of consumer electronic systems, electronic audio systems, basic colour television and video systems, communication systems covering telephone , mobile phone fundamentals and basics of computerhardware. This programme also tries to create awareness about e-waste and its effective management.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand basics of electronic devices and circuits

CO2: Describe the working principles of audio , video and communication systems

CO3: Discuss the fundamentals of computer hardware and e-waste management.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Electronics
 

Electronics and its applications. Electronic components: Resistors, Capacitors, inductors- types, uses. Conductors, insulators, semiconductors- definitions. Semiconductor materials- Silicon, Germanium, semiconductor devices: Diode- working and application of diode as rectifier, Transistor- working, transistor as an amplifier, electronic switch. Electronic DC power supply- basic block diagram. Basics of measuring instruments- DMM and CRO. Hands on with tinkercad tool.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Fundamentals Of Electronic Communication Systems
 

Basic principle of electronic communication-. Basic operation of transmitter and receivers. AM and FM radio receivers- qualitative description. Frequency allotment. Basics of Microphone, Loud speakers Principle of TV transmission and reception, Colour TV principle,. Digital TV principle- set top converter box, Optical fiber cables- principle of operation, advantages. Fundamentals of cellular mobile phone- Cells, coverage area, roaming, operation (qualitative description). Latest trends in mobile phones, smart phones, generations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Basics of Computer Hardware and e waste management
 

Fundamentals of Digital computer, microprocessors, motherboards, power supply - SMPS,  mouse, keyboard, memory devices, Modems, monitors, printers, latest trends in computers, specifications. Internet fundamentals

Electronic waste- brief description, qualitative discussion of hazards of e-waste, the materials responsible, management of e-waste, Indian and global current scenario of e-waste and its management.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]. V K Mehta and Rohit Mehta (2011),Principles of Electronics, S Chand and Co, New Delhi.

[2]. B R Gupta (2008) Consumer Electronics, 4th Edition, Kataria &sons, New Delhi.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[3]. Bob Goodman (2002. ),How electronic things work, TMH

[4]. https://www.tinkercad.com 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation will be based on internal assessment components and a written exam at the end of the course.

Internal assesment : 50 marks

Written exam : 50 marks

POL143 - SUBALTERN STUDIES: NARRATIVES OF THE COMMUNITIES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Subaltern Studies emerged as an intellectual project to counter the elitism prevailing in dominant historical narratives. This project aimed at giving voice to the people’s autonomous agency and struggles against the dominant forces. They offered a new outlook to narratives of Peasant, Adivasi and Woman’s movements in history. Over time, subaltern perspective was adopted to understand several issues concerning India and it still holds significant relevance in shedding light on contemporary issues. This course aims to introduce the students to subaltern studies and cultivate a new standpoint to understand and interpret the world.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Demonstrate knowledge about subaltern studies, its foundations, relevance methodology, and critique

CO 2: Analyse various narratives of communities, avenues of their struggles against the dominance

CO 3: Develop a sensibility to view the world from a subaltern perspective

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Subaltern Studies
 

Foundation of Subaltern Studies Collective, Ranajit Guha, Need of subaltern studies, Resources, Subaltern life narratives

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Communities Countering the Dominance
 

State and subaltern citizens, Dominance without Hegemony, Peasant rebellions, Dalit and Adivasi Assertion, Indian Nationalism, Women’s question and the emergence of counter narratives

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Contemporary Avenues of subaltern struggles
 

Cricket and caste, Environmental movements, political and social mobilization of marginalized classes, public theatre and reclaiming dignity

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Subaltern Narratives in Film, Fiction and Folklore
 

-       Films: Laggan, Karnan, and The Discreet Charm of the Savarnas

-       Fiction: Subaltern in Mahasweta Devi’s stories (Jamunabati’s Mother, and Mother of 1084)

-       Folklore: Folktales from India, “So Many Words, So many sounds”: An Interview

-       People’s Archive of Rural India

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Critiquing the subaltern studies
 

- Exploring the Relevance and Irrelevance of subaltern studies

- Adding new locations? Or After subaltern studies?

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Guha, R. (1982). Preface. In R. Guha (Ed.), Subaltern Studies I (pp. vii–viii). Oxford University Press

Guha, R. (1982). On Some Aspects of the Historiography of Colonial India. In R. Guha (Ed.), Subaltern Studies I (pp. 1–8). Oxford University Press.

Kumar, R. (2021). Police Matters: The Everyday State and Caste Politics in South India, 1900–1975. Cornell University Press.

Guha, R. (2005). ‘The Moral that can be Safely Drawn from the Hindus’ Magnificent Victory’: Cricket, Caste and the Palwankar Brothers. In J. H. Mills (Ed.), Subaltern Sports: Politics and Sport in South Asia (pp. 83–106). Anthem Press.

        Ahuja, A. (2019). Mobilizing the Marginalized. Oxford University Press.

       Chatterjee, P. (2012). After subaltern studies. In Economic and Political Weekly (Vol. 47, Issue 35).

       Ramanujan, A. K. (2009). Folktales From India. Penguin India.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhadra, G. (1983). Two Frontier Uprisings in Mughal India. In R. Guha (Ed.), SS II (pp. 43–59). Oxford University Press.

Berg, D. E. (2021).Casteism and the Tsundur Atrocity. In Dynamics of Caste and Law (pp. 127–149). Cambridge University Press.

Chemmencheri, S. R. (2015). State, social policy and subaltern citizens in adivasi India. Citizenship Studies, 19(3–4), 436–449.

Das, A. N. (1983). Agrarian Change from Above and Below: Bihar 1947-78. In Ranajit Guha (Ed.), SS II (pp. 180–227). Oxford University Press.

Devi, M. (2005). Jamunabati’s Mother. In In the Name of the Mother. Seagull Books.

Devi, M. (2008). Mother of 1084. Seagull Books.

Guha, R. (1995). Review: Subaltern and Bhadralok Studies. Economic and Political Weekly, 30(33), 2056–2058.

Guha, R. (1996). The Small Voice of History. In  Amin & Chakrabarty (Ed.), SS IX (pp. 1–12). Oxford University Press.

“So Many Words, So many sounds”: An Interview. (2004). In Romtha. Seagull Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I-25 Marks

CIA II-25 Marks

CIA III-50 Marks

PSY143 - ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Artificial intelligence (AI) is the basis for all human-machine interfaces and learning, and it is the future of all complex decision-making across diverse sectors. Students will explore the concepts of HMI and AI and become aware of advances in Artificial Intelligence. Case studies and workshops will allow students to consider how human factors and design thinking are applied in designing an interface and the ethical issues and implications of preserving human values. Through discussion, analysis, and workshops, students move towards designing or modifying a user-centric interface considering any sustainable development goal.

Course objectives: 

  • To explain Human-Machine Interactions and Artificial Intelligence and their applications in daily life.
  • To identify the importance and application of human factors and design thinking in interface design. 
  • To evaluate a user-centric interface considering any sustainable development goal.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain Human-Machine Interactions and Artificial Intelligence and their applications in daily life.

CO2: Identify the importance and application of human factors and design thinking in interface design.

CO3: Evaluate a user-centric interface considering sustainable development goals.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to AI and HMI
 

Introduction to AI and HMI, Types of AI and HMI, Machine and Deep Learnings and their applications, Current trends and development.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Human factors & AI
 

Human factors - Sensation, Perception, Apperception, Working Memory, Decision-making, and Design Thinking.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Principles of interface Design and Application of AI
 

Schneiderman’s eight golden rules, Norman’s model of interaction, Neilson’s Heuristics, Designing for people across the lifespan, and the Application of AI in health, aviation, and the workplace.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dix, A., Dix, A. J., Finlay, J., Abowd, G. D., & Beale, R. (2003). Human-computer interaction. Pearson Education.

Tenner, E. (2015). The Design of Everyday Things by Donald Norman. Technology and Culture, 56(3), 785-787. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Burnett, B., & Evans, D. (2016). Designing your life: How to build a well-lived, joyful life. Knopf.

Gassmann, O., & Reepmeyer, G. (2008). Universal design–innovations for all ages. In The silver market phenomenon (pp. 125-140). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. 

Davenport, T., & Kalakota, R. (2019). The potential for artificial intelligence in healthcare. Future healthcare journal, 6(2), 94. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1 will be an individual assignment.

CIA2 will be a group assignment with individual components for evaluation. 

CIA3 will be a written exam for 2 hours and 50 Marks. CIA3 will have Section- A and Section - B.

Section A (Essay questions). 10 Marks X 3 Questions=30 Marks 

Section B (Case study). 20 Marks x 1Q= 20 Marks