CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
BA (Journalism and Digital Media, English/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA141B MARKETING AND SELLING SKILLS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141D TALENT MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
COM142 BRAND MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM143 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM145 CREATIVE ADVERTISEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
DMT143 INTRODUCTION TO ACTING Multidisciplinary Courses 2 3 100
DSC142 PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR DATA SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO144 GLOBALISATION AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG182-1 DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST101-1 LITERARY STUDIES: IDEAS AND GENRES Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
HIS141 HISTORY AND CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
JDM101-1 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISM Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
JDM161-1 JOURNALISTIC WRITING Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
LAW141 CYBER LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW145 PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY142 ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
POL142 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL143 SUBALTERN STUDIES: NARRATIVES OF THE COMMUNITIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY143 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY156 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY158 STRESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE141 THEATRE APPRECIATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
THE142 IMPROVISATION AND DEVISED THEATRE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
VJE181 REIMAGINING TECHNOLOGY TOOLS FOR DEMOCRACY - 2 0 100
VJE182 SOFT SKILLS FOR JOURNALISTS - 2 0 50
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA142A ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142G GROUP AND TEAM EFFECTIVENESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BLS144 PRINCIPLES OF AYURVEDA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CHE141 CHEMISTRY IN ACTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM149 INVESTMENTS AND TRADING STRATEGIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM151 DIGITAL MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC155 USER DESIGN EXPERIENCE (UX) Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO146 GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ENG182-2 DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - II Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST102-2 INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE STUDIES Major Core Courses-II 4 4 100
EST201-2 POETRY AND PROSE Major Core Courses-II 4 4 100
JDM101-2 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL CULTURE Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
JDM111-2 FUNDAMENTALS OF REPORTING Major Core Courses-I 2 2 100
JDM112-2 FUNDAMENTALS OF EDITING Major Core Courses-I 2 2 100
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION - 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW - 3 3 100
LAW146 LAW AND PRACTICE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
LAW148 LEGAL DIMENSIONS OF MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
PHY141A INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
POL143 POLITICS AND SOCIETY OF INDIA SINCE INDEPENDENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL144 INDIA AND THE WORLD Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
PSY144 BASICS OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY158 STRESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY160 UNDERSTANDING ADDICTION AND SUBSTANCE USE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC142 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SW141 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SW142 INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE144 ACTING FOR MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
VJE281 NEWS ANALYSIS AND PRODUCTION - 2 0 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

Currently, the field of journalism is experiencing a shift towards digital platforms such as the internet,

mobile devices, data journalism and other emerging technologies. This change is leading to a

transformation in how journalism is practiced and necessitating the development of new skills, techniques,

and approaches by practitioners. As a result, contemporary journalists must fulfill a variety of roles,

requiring not only a solid grasp of emerging social trends but also specialized expertise and knowledge. By

enrolling in this programme, aspiring digital journalists will gain a deeper understanding of the challenges

associated with journalism in the Digital Age, which will prepare them to succeed in the rapidly-evolving

media industry.

During the first and second semesters, the focus is on helping students understand the role of Journalism

within the broader context of social sciences such as political science, economics, and sociology. They will

receive training in writing and develop their skills in reporting and editing to be successful in the field of

written communication. In the third semester students are introduced to the nuances of the constitution and

politics. Special emphasis is given in the fourth semester to the field of multimedia production, on-field

experience and also the first hand understanding of social issues through service learning. The third year

provides the budding journalist with the knowledge of digital journalism, media research and so on. In the

final year, students will expose themselves to media psychology, solutions journalism and environmental

journalism along with independent research projects.

Practical elements such as lab journals, workshops, seminars, campaigns, or news productions are

incorporated to support each paper. Additionally, students will be required to gain skills in editing software.

The Journalism & Digital Media programme includes sixteen core papers that cover a diverse range of

topics in the field of journalism. There are skill enhancement courses related to writing and reporting.

Starting from the sixth semester, students will have the opportunity to choose three electives to specialize

in. In order to gain practical experience, an internship is mandatory for students at the end of the second

semester. The theory courses aim to provide students with a broad understanding of the field, while the

practical and skill-based courses will equip them for the job. Having a comprehensive knowledge of various

subjects helps journalists gain perspective and write intelligently in the proper context for the general

readership. The Department of Media Studies will leverage the expertise of professionals from different

fields to provide students with the best possible exposure. Experienced journalists will also be invited to

participate in events like "Feel the Beat" to share their knowledge and expertise. Students of journalism will

be expected to regularly produce lab journals and from the fourth semester onwards, they will be

responsible for creating a newspaper, television news bulletin, and digital publication.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Establish a coherent understanding and comprehensive knowledge of the fundamental theories and concepts in the discipline of Journalism & Digital Media

PO2: Analyze the contemporary world with critical and scientific awareness of the intersectionality of race, gender, class, sexuality, and regional, national and global history and media

PO3: Demonstrate skills in multimedia reporting, writing, editing, podcasting, video making, and media entrepreneurship

PO4: Design, conduct and communicate basic research following fundamental methods and ethical standards in Journalism and Media studies

PO5: Use the knowledge of Journalism & Digital Media to enhance self-awareness, well-being, interpersonal relationships, career-decision making, and social responsibility in personal and professional domains

Assesment Pattern

Assessment patterns are course-specific.

Examination And Assesments

The Programme has a variety of assessment patterns that test the knolwedge base, skill sets and the professional attitude of the students. It varis from course to course.

BBA141B - MARKETING AND SELLING SKILLS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This is the basic course in Marketing and Selling Skills where students will get the exposure of Marketing and sales. The subject gives them a vast and wide insight of the traditional and contemporary aspects in Marketing and sales. The input of basic fundamentals, coupled with the practical knowledge will be given to the students to help them in understanding and designing the sales & marketing tactics and strategies.

 

Course Objective:

      To understand and appreciate the concept of marketing & sales in theory and practice

      To evaluate the environment of marketing and develop a feasible marketing &selling plan 

      To understand and apply the STP of marketing (segmentation, targeting, positioning)

      To have an elementary knowledge of consumer behaviour its determinants and selling skills

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of marketing and sales principles, theories, and their practical applications (RBTL 2)

CO2: Identify the key elements of the marketing environment and their impact on marketing and selling activities. (RBTL 3)

CO3: Apply segmentation techniques to categorize target market segments effectively. (RBTL 3)

CO4: Demonstrate basic selling skills, such as effective communication and relationship building, through practical exercises and simulations. (RBTL 2)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Unit 1: An Introduction to Marketing
 

Introduction, genesis & evolution of marketing in society, Importance and Scope of Marketing, Elements of Marketing – Need, Want, Demand, Desire, Marketing Philosophies, Mccarthy’s 4P classification, Lauterborn’s 4C’s classification & 4A’s Framework of rural marketing, Product service continuum.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Marketing Environment ? An Understanding
 

Basics of Marketing Environment, Factors Affecting Marketing Environment, Environmental analysis – SWOT & PESTLE, Marketing Environment in India, Legal & regulatory framework in India, Marketing Mix (Four Ps of Marketing).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Unit 3: Segmentation, Targeting and Positioning
 

Market Segmentation, Basis of segmentation & its types - Demographic, Geographic, Psychographic and behavioral Segmentation etc, Targeting- Five Patterns of Target Market Selection, Positioning-Concept of Positioning, Perceptual Mapping.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 4: Product Life Cycle and Consumer Behaviour
 

Product Life Cycle concept, marketing implications of PLC stages, corresponding strategies, dealing with competition, Perceptual Mapping, Consumer Behaviour – Rational V/s Emotional, Consumer proposition & acquisition process, buying motives, its types, Consumer Behaviour process

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 5: Selling ? An Introduction
 

Nature, Meaning and Significance of Sales Management and Personal selling; Evolution of Sales Management, Role of Selling in Marketing, Characteristics of a successful Salesman; Types of Selling, Selling Functions, Sales Funnel; Process of Effective Selling: Sales strategies; Prospecting: Meaning, process & methods; Ways to approach a customer

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Unit 6: Effective Sales management and Sales Force Organisation
 

Sales presentation; Handling objections; Closing a sale; Current issues in sales management; Case lets and applications, Meaning of Sales Force Management; Determining the sales force and size of the sales force, Introduction to: Sales organization concepts; Sales territories

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books: 

  1. Kotler, P., & Keller, K. (2015). Marketing management 15th edition. Prentice Hall.
  2. Kotler, P. (2013). Marketing management: A south Asian perspective.  13th edition, Pearson Education India.
  3. Panda, T. K., & Sahadev, S. (2nd Edition, 2011). Sales and distribution management. Oxford Publication.
  4. Spiro, R. L., Rich, G. A., & Stanton, W. J. (12th Edition, 2008). Management of a sales force. McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Suggested Readings: 

  1. Ramaswami, S., Namakumari. S,(2013) marketing management–Global Perspective Indian Context, Macmillan Publishers India Ltd, 5th Edition
  2. Rajan Saxena, Marketing Management, (2009) 4th edition, Tata McGraw-Hill Education
  3. Etzel M.J., Walker B.J. and Stanton William J - Marketing concept & Cases special Indian 14th Edition Tata Mc Graw Hill.
  4. Czinkota, Kotabe, Marketing Management, II edition, Thomson Publications.
  5. Still, R. R., Cundiff, E. W., & Govoni, N. A. (1988). Sales management: decisions, strategies, and    cases, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.
  6. Coughlan, A. T., Anderson, E., Stern, L. W., & Adel, I. (2006). El-Ansary. Marketing Channels. Prentice-Hall.
  7. Jobber, D., & Lancaster, G. (2007). Selling and sales management. Painos. Harlow: Pearson Education.
  8. Cron, Decarlo T. E. (2016). Sales Management concepts and cases: Wiley India
  9. Pingali Venugopal (2008). Sales and Distribution Management, Sage Publication 
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 2: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 3: 50 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 25 MARKS)

Attendance 5 marks 

Total 50 marks 

BBA141D - TALENT MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Human Resource is considered as a valuable resource in every organization. The world class companies compete among themselves to attract the best talent across the globe.  They view talent as competitive differentiator and one where the acquisition, engagement, development and retention of talent is considered as a strategic priority of business.  This course exposes the students to methods and practices to acquire, engage and develop talent, focus on development of strategic leaders within an organization and also deals with how talent and knowledge can be managed effectively for the development of the organization

Course Outcome

CO 1: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts, principles and models related to talent and knowledge management

CO 2: 2. Evaluate the importance of talent management in developing organizations

CO 3: 3. Learn to apply the theories and concepts studied in the classroom to practical situations

CO 4: 4. Analyse the various talent and knowledge management practices and their value to organizations

CO 5: 5. Solve the issues pertaining to talent and knowledge management

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Talent Management
 

Meaning and concept of talent management, need and scope for talent management, Talent vs Knowledge, Talent management models: Process and Integrated model, Talent management initiatives, Techniques for potential appraisal, Talent management grid, Benefits of talent management.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Creating Talent Management Systems
 

Building blocks for talent management strategy, Developing and implementing Effective Talent Management System, Measuring the effectiveness of talent management, creating talent management system for organizational excellence.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Competency mapping and approaches to talent management
 

Competency Mapping- Meaning, Importance and Steps in competency mapping, Competency model, Role of leaders and HR in talent management, Talent Management Approaches, Mapping Business Strategies and Talent Management Strategies, Achieving competitive advantage, Best practices in talent management- Case studies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management
 

Introduction to knowledge management, types of knowledge, Benefits of Knowledge Management, Integrating talent management and knowledge management, Role of Information technology in talent and knowledge management.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Recent Trends and Best Practices in Talent Management
 

Introduction, Use of Technology in Talent Management, Use of AI in Talent Management, Talent Management using Design Thinking

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Project Work: Field study & Report Submission
 

Experiential Learning Activity: Identifying any one organization in the manufacturing or service sector- Interacting, observing and conducting interviews with their senior HR leaders to understand how they manage and retain talent in their organizations.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

       Lance A. Berger, Dorothy Berger (2017): Talent management handbook, McGraw Hill New York.

 

       Mohapatra.M & Dhir.S (2022); Talent Management-A contemporary perspective (2022), Sage Publications

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

       Mark Wilcox (2016), Effective Talent Management: Aligning strategy, people and performance, (1st ed.), Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.

       Marshal Gold Smith and Louis Carter (2018): Best practices in talent management, A Publication of the practice institute, Pfeiffer, A Wiley Imprint.

       Atheer Abdullah Mohammed (2019), Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management: Theory and practice, Lamber Publishing co.,

       Cappeli Peter: Talent on Demand –Managing Talent in an age of uncertainty, Harvard Business press.

Sphr Doris Sims, Sphr Matthew Gay(2007),Building Tomorrow’s Talent : A Practitioner’s Guide to Talent Management and Succession Planning, Author House

Evaluation Pattern

Component

 

Maximum marks

Weightage

Total Marks in Final Grade

CIA1

20

50%

10

CIA2

20

50%

10

CIA3

50

50%

25

Attendance

5

100 %

05

Total = 50

 

COM142 - BRAND MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Brand Management course will enable student to have a fundamental understanding of how to build, measure, and manage a brand.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate concepts, principles, techniques and application of contemporary branding management process.

CO2: Evaluate the taxonomy in designing brands.

CO3: Summarise the measures and manage brand-equity and extension.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Strategic Brand Management Process
 

Brands – Brands Vs Products – Different Product Levels - Things that can be branded

 Branding Challenges and Opportunities – Strategic Brand Management Process, PRACTICAL: SBM Process, Trends and innovations in brand management,  Emerging technologies and their impact on branding

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Branding identity, architecture and taxonomy
 

Brand Image, Developing a brand identity, Brand Identity – Kapferer’s Brand Identity Prism,  Creating a brand positioning statement,  Understanding the importance of brand consistency, Developing a brand architecture strategy, Managing brand portfolios, Brand extensions and sub-brands.  Criteria for choosing brand elements – Brand Names – Landor’s Brand Name Taxonomy – Brand Name Linguistic Characteristics – Trademark Issues and Concerning Names – PRACTICAL: Naming Hypothetical Brands 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Brand Messaging, Designing and Aesthetics
 

Developing a brand messaging strategy, Creating effective brand communications, Managing brand reputation, URLs – Logos and Symbols – Characters – Slogans and Jingles – Packaging and Signage – PRACTICAL: Creating Logos and Mascots for Hypothetical Brands. Impact of digital technologies on brand management, Developing digital branding strategies, Managing online brand reputation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Brand Equity & Brand Communication
 

Customer Based Brand Equity – CBBE Pyramid – PRACTICAL: Constructing CBBE Pyramid. Understanding the impact of consumer behavior on brand management, Consumer decision-making process, Building brand relationships with consumers, Understanding the role of advertising in brand management, Developing effective advertising campaigns, Measuring and analyzing advertising effectiveness

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Brand Extension & International Brand Management
 

Brand Extension - Merits and Demertis of Extension – Types of Brand Extension. Building brand loyalty, Measuring and analyzing brand equity and brand loyalty, Understanding the challenges of international brand management, Adapting branding strategies for international markets, Managing global brand portfolios

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.       Keller, M. (Latest Edition). Brand Management. Delhi: Pearson Education India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Rajagopal, M. (Latest Edition). Brand Management. New York: Nova Science Publisher

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I MCQ (5 Marks)

Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from unit 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

CIA 2 (a) Video Content Creation 10 marks

Every student shall for a group of four members and they need to identify a brand and prepare a 10 minutes video. Later a Google spread sheet of students list shall be sent to the students.  Within a week the students need to enter the name of the brand identified so as to avoid repetition in their selections and start preparing the video. The video shall discuss the history of the chosen brand and discuss the possibilities of changing different attributes of the brand for positive outcome. The video needs to describe and display the new brand. Any delay in submission without prior consent or approval shall lead to a penalty of marking the student ZERO in this component.   The video shall be assessed based on the following rubrics. Report submitted will be valued for 10 marks.

CIA 2(b) - Case Study (5 marks)

The same group formed for video assignment shall identify a case study related to brand extension. The group shall prepare a presentation regarding the case. They shall develop questions related to the case and also provide answers. The group also needs to provide references for their case study and Q&A.

CIA III Written Examination (25 marks)


Every student shall sit for a written examination of marks covering all the units. The students will be evaluated based on their understanding and learning about different concepts of branding. The higher order thinking is assessed by one case analysis included in the question paper. There will be 7 questions of 2 marks each and the case analysis will be of 6 marks.

COM143 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Entrepreneurship is not just about start-ups: it is a topic that is rapidly growing in importance in government policy and in the behaviour of established firms. The course provides students with an understanding of the role and personality of the entrepreneur, and a range of skills aimed at successful planning of entrepreneurial ventures. Material covered includes fostering creativity and open-mindedness, knowledge acquisition and management, innovation systems, screening and evaluating new venture concepts, market evaluation and developing a marketing plan, legal Issues Including intellectual property, preparation of venture budgets, and raising finance. The major piece of assessment is the writing of a comprehensive business plan for a new venture.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Discuss the fundamental concept and emerging trends of entrepreneurship.

CO 2: Elaborate the entrepreneurial process and classify the different styles of thinking.

CO 3: Develop and summarize the creative problem-solving technique and types of innovation.

CO 4: Compile the legal and regulatory framework and social responsibility relating to entrepreneur.

CO 5: Create a business model for a start-up.

CO 6: Build competence to identify the different sources of finance available for a start-up and relate their role in different stages of business.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Entrepreneurship
 

Evolution, Characteristics, Nature of Entrepreneurship, Types, Functions of Entrepreneur, Distinction between an Entrepreneur and a Manager, Concept, Growth of Entrepreneurship in India, Role of Entrepreneurship in Economic Development, Emerging trends of contemporary entrepreneurship – Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Globalisation, changing demands, unemployment, changing demographics, Institutional support, ease of entry in the informal sector

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
The Entrepreneurial Process
 

Steps in the Entrepreneurial Process: Generating Ideas, Opportunity Identification, Business concepts, Businessconcepts,Resources(Financial,PhysicalandHuman), Implementing and managing the venture, Harvesting the venture, Design Thinking, Systems Thinking, Agile thinking and Lean thinking Blue Ocean Strategy, Role and relevance of mentors, Incubation cell, Methods of brainstorming ideas.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Creativity and Innovation
 

Creativity, Principles of creativity, Source of New Idea, Ideas into Opportunities. CreativeProblemSolving:Heuristics,Brainstorming,Synectics, ValueAnalysisInnovationandEntrepreneurship: Profits and Innovation, Principles of Innovation, Disruptive, Incrementaland Open innovations, Nurturing and Managing Innovation, Globalization, Concept andModelsofInnovation, MethodsofprotectingInnovationandcreativity,SignificanceofIntellectualPropertyRights,Patents & Copy right, Business Model Canvas, and Lean Management. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Entrepreneurship Practice
 

EssentialsofBusinessOwnership:Typesofventures,RiskandBenefits,LegalandRegulatoryFramework,EthicsandSocialResponsibility,MarketResearch(ventureopportunityscreening), Feasibility Analysis, Introduction to the Business Plan, Developing the BusinessModel for starting a new venture, E-Commerce and Growing the Venture: The Internet andits impact on venture development

Approaches to E-Commerce, Strategies for E-CommerceSuccess,The nature of international entrepreneurship and their importance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Sources of raising capital
 

Different sources of financing for start-ups, stages of financing involve in start-ups, advantages and disadvantages of the different sources of financing, Mezzanine finance, Specific financial assistance from government and financial institutions to promote entrepreneurship, Venture Valuation Methods

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Allen,K.R.(2011), “LaunchingNewVentures:AnEntrepreneurialApproach”,6thEdition.Mason,Ohio: South-WesternCengage Learning.
  2. Kuratko,DonaldF.Entrepreneurship:(2010) Theory,Process,Practice9thEdition.Mason,Ohio: South-WesternCengage Learning
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Scarborough,N.M.(2011),“EssentialsofEntrepreneurshipandSmallBusinessManagement”,6thEdition. NewJersey:PrenticeHall.
  2. Verstraete,T.and Jouioson-Laffitte,E.(2012),“ABusinessModelforEntrepreneurship”,
  3. Cheltenham:EdwardElgarPublishingLtd.
  4. Poornima Charantimath,(2007) “EntrepreneurshipDevelopment-SmallBusinessEnterprise”,Pearson Education.
  5. RoberDHisrich,MichaelPPeters,DeanAShepherd,(2007), Entrepreneurship,(6ed.), The McGraw-Hillcompanies.
  6. RajivRoy,(2011),Entrepreneurship,(2ed.)OxfordUniversityPress
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I (a) Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ)

CIA I (b) Video Content Creation

 

CIA II Case Study Analysis

 

CIA III (a) Multiple Choice Questions(MCQ)

CIA III (b) Business Plan Creation + VIVA

 

CIA I (a): Week 1 & 2: MCQ (5 Marks)


Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. The date of examination is on or before 05-08-2023.  This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from unit 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

 

CIA I (b) Preparing a video interview of an Entrepreneur (Individual Assignment) 10 marks

Every student shall identify an entrepreneur and prepare a 15 minutes video interview on them.  Orientation about the video preparation shall be given by the respective faculty in the first week of the semester itself. Later a Google spreadsheet of students list shall be sent to the students.  Within a week the students need to enter the name of the entrepreneurs identified so as to avoid repetition in their selections and start preparing the interview. Once the entrepreneur is finalized, an orientation about plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty.  The last date of the video submission is 10-08-2023, before 06:00 PM.  Inability to submit the video on or before the due date should be priorly intimated to the faculty.  Any delay in submission without prior consent or approval shall lead to a penalty of marking the student ZERO in this component. 

 

The video shall be assessed based on the following rubrics. Report submitted will be valued for 10 marks.

More details of the report:

 

  1. The video should include genesis, growth, management contributions, challenges, how they overcome, achievements, major entrepreneurship inferences.
  2. References and sources should be mentioned as per APA 6th Edition, towards the end of the video.
  3. The video interview should be a minimum of 15 minutes.
  4. Last date for submission 10th August 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two marks. 

 

CIA II - Case Study (15 marks)

Group of not more than six members in a team will be formed randomly in the class based on the subject teacher’s discretion. Each group shall gather content and solve the assigned case study and submit a written report of the same. Report shall include the introduction to the case, highlights and objectives, conceptual definitions, detailed analysis, findings and suggestion, conclusion.  Groups are free to use all authentic sources to gather information. Once the case study is finalized, an orientation about case analysis, report writing, and plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty.  The last date of the case analysis report submission is 30-09-2022, before 06:00 PM.  The report can be supported with article reviews, statistical facts and examples and book references.


More Details of the Report:

1.      Case Study has to be based on growth of Entrepreneurship in India or Emerging trends of contemporary entrepreneurship.

 

  1. References as per APA 6th Edition, and Appendix.
  2. Detailed analysis of the problem and alternatives available should form part of the report.
  3. The written report should be a minimum of 6 pages.
  4. Last date for submission 30th September, 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two marks. 

 

CIA III (a): Week 15 & 16: MCQ (5 Marks)

 


Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. The date of examination is on or before 02-11-2023.  This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from Units 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

 

CIA III (b) Business Plan and viva-voce (10 marks)


The same group allotted for Case Study report shall continue. Once the idea for the business plan is finalized, an orientation about various components of the business plan, report writing, and plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty. However, every student shall contribute in the construction of a
creative and technical business plan in detail consisting details from idea to implementation stage. The report will be valued for 10 marks by a panel of three external reviewers. The assessment criteria shall be discussed and finalized before the final submission and in consonance with the inputs and suggestions 
of the reviewers identified.  This criterion shall also be presented and discussed with the students prior to the final submission.  Though this is a group assignment, the assessment of the contribution of each student would be done individually.

More Details of the Report:

§  The report shall include details on value proposition, business and revenue model, sustainability

§  The written report should be a minimum of 10 pages.

§  References as per APA 6th Edition, and Appendix.

Last date for submission 5th November 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two mark 

COM145 - CREATIVE ADVERTISEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:45
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The main objective of this course is to enable students to develop creative concepts for advertising of any product or service.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the critical role of creativity in advertising and develop creative strategies to be able to position the product/service.

CO2: To become familiar with the approaches and forms of advertising

CO3: To gain technical knowledge in the development of advertising for a company

CO 4: To learn to empathize with the client's needs and create content that meets the purpose in a creative manner.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Creativity and Aesthetics
 

Introduction to Creativity- The creativity process- Difference between a creative mind and non creative mind- Patterns of thoughts indicating creativity- How to bring out your creative genius- Philosophy of Aesthetics - Introduction to Creative works of the century

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
 
Syllabus Unit Mapping
1.Development Needs:Global,
2.Skill Focused:Employability,
3.Integration of Cross Cutting Issues:Environment,Professional Ethics,
Creativity and Aesthetics

 

Introduction to Creativity- The creativity process- Difference between a creative mind and non creative mind- Patterns of thoughts indicating creativity- How to bring out your creative genius- Philosophy of Aesthetics - Introduction to Creative works of the century

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Functions and Forms of Advertising
 

Types of advertisement, Ethics in advertisement, Position of Products/Services, Interplay of Branding and Advertising- Meaning of Advertising, Creative Ad makers and Advertising Agencies in India and World - Indian and Foreign creative advertisements, the controversial advertisements- The most memorable advertisements - Highly impactful and Creative advertisements.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
 
Syllabus Unit Mapping
1.Development Needs:Global,
2.Skill Focused:Employability,
3.Integration of Cross Cutting Issues:Professional Ethics,Environment,
Functions and Forms of Advertising

 

Types of advertisement, Ethics in advertisement, Position of Products/Services, Interplay of Branding and Advertising- Meaning of Advertising, Creative Ad makers and Advertising Agencies in India and World - Indian and Foreign creative advertisements, the controversial advertisements- The most memorable advertisements - Highly impactful and Creative advertisements.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Advertising and campaign Planning
 

 

Marketing strategy and situation analysis; Advertising plan; Advertising objectives; DAGMAR approach; Advertising campaign planning process. The art of copywriting; Advertising copy testing; Creativity in communication; motivational approaches; types of appeals used in advertising; Advertising budget process.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
 
Syllabus Unit Mapping
1.Development Needs:Global,
2.Skill Focused:Employability,
3.Integration of Cross Cutting Issues:Professional Ethics,Environment,
Elements and Principles of Design

Principles of Design- Lines, Scale, Color, Repetition, Negative Space, Symmetry,

 

Transparency, Texture, Balance, Hierarchy, Contrast, Framing, Grid, Randomness, Direction, Rules, Movement, Depth, Typography, Composition.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Elements and Principles of Design
 

Principles of Design- Lines, Scale, Color, Repetition, Negative Space, Symmetry,

 Transparency, Texture, Balance, Hierarchy, Contrast, Framing, Grid, Randomness, Direction, Rules, Movement, Depth, Typography, Composition.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
 
Syllabus Unit Mapping
1.Development Needs:Global,
2.Skill Focused:Employability,
3.Integration of Cross Cutting Issues:Professional Ethics,
Designing Advertisements

Creative brief - Value Questions -Research -Conceptual framework- Development of multiple ideas- Creative concept development process- creative brainstorming- creative differences- editing -refining creative concepts- concept presentation to the client- Appeals in advertising copy writing-print copy elements, headlines-body copy-slogans - Designing print ad- choosing –-choosing layout- -choosing Typefaces

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Designing Advertisements
 

Creative brief - Value Questions -Research -Conceptual framework- Development of multiple ideas- Creative concept development process- creative brainstorming- creative differences- editing -refining creative concepts- concept presentation to the client- Appeals in advertising copy writing-print copy elements, headlines-body copy-slogans - Designing print ad- choosing –-choosing layout- -choosing Typefaces

Text Books And Reference Books:

Batra, A. M. (2010). Advertising Management. Delhi: Pearson Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Chunawala, S .A.(2015). Advertising Management. Mumbai: Himalaya Publishers.

  • Moriarty, W. B. (2020). Advertising Principles and Practices. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India.

Evaluation Pattern

100 marks divided into 20 marks each assignment.

DMT143 - INTRODUCTION TO ACTING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This introductory course explores fundamental acting techniques, including character development, improvisation, and emotional expression. Engage in various acting exercises and scene work to enhance students' understanding of the craft. This course further develops confidence and creativity as the students delve into the art of storytelling through performance.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise and explain the basics of acting.

CO2: Demonstrate and interpret the interrelationship between speech, movement and text.

CO3: Relate and experiment with the interconnection between text and acting design.

CO4: Apprise and critique the role of the actor as a performing medium.

CO5: Design and develop original piece of work.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Voice and Speech
 

This unit delves into the artistry of vocal expression and its profound impact on theatrical performance. Through rigorous vocal exercises and comprehensive training, students will develop various vocal techniques, mastering the nuances of pitch, tone, resonance, and articulation. Emphasizing voice integration with the actor's body and emotions, this transformative learning experience empowers students to deliver compelling, authentic, and emotionally resonant performances on stage and beyond.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Actor and the Stage
 

This unit delves into the essence of captivating stage presence, refining students' gestures and body language skills. Participants will learn to create profound connections with their co-actors through immersive exercises, fostering authentic and compelling performances. Embark on a transformative journey, honing acting prowess and embracing the art of storytelling.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Actor and the Text
 

This unit delves into captivating interplay between the actor and the text. Explore the essence of character portrayal through an in-depth analysis of themes, situations, and scenes within various dramatic texts. Uncover the art of embodying diverse roles, harnessing emotional depth, and expressing emotions. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stanislavski, C. (1989). Actor Prepares. Taylor & Francis Group.

Chekhov, M. (1953). To the actor: On the technique of acting. Harper & Row.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Merlin, B. (2017). Acting: The Basics. Taylor & Francis Group.

Kahan, S. (1991). Introduction to acting (3rd ed.). Allyn and Bacon.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Mode of Assessment - Final Assessment

  • Performance Presentation - 100 Marks

DSC142 - PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR DATA SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the programming paradigms associated with Python. It provides a comprehensive understanding of Python data types, functions and modules with a focus on modular programming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply core programming concepts.

CO2: Demonstrate significant experience with python program development environment.

CO3: Design and implement fully-functional programs using commonly used modules and custom functions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
INTRODUCTION
 

INTRODUCING PYTHON

Introduction, Python Fundamentals, Features of Python, Components of a Python Program, Understanding the interpreter.

Python basics:

Identifiers, Basic Types, Operators, Precedence and Associativity, Decision Control Structures, Looping Structures, Console input, output.

Practical Exercises:

1.Implement Basic data types, Control structures and operators.

2.Exercise on console input and output.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Programming Fundamentals
 

PYTHON DATA TYPES

Strings,Lists:Accessingelements,Basic List operations, Built-in methods

Tuples: working with elements, Basic Tuple operation, Tuple methods and Type of Tuples 

Sets: Definition, Set Elements, Built-in methods, basic set operations, Mathematical Set operation, Variety of Sets.

Dictionaries: Defining a dictionary, accessing elements, basic operations, methods.

COMPREHENSIONS and FUNCTIONS

 Comprehensions:ListComprehensions, Set Comprehension, Dictionary Comprehension.

Functions: Defining a function, Types of arguments, unpacking arguments.

Recursive functions.Main module, built-in, custommodules, importing a module.

 

Practical Exercises:

    1. Implement Tuples

    2. Implement Dictionary

    3. Implement Set

    4.ImplementList, Set and Dictionary Comprehensions

    5.Implement Recursive function

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to NUMPY AND PANDAS
 

NUMPY 

Introduction to NumPy, Aggregations Computation on Arrays, Comparisons, Sorting Arrays.

PANDAS

Introduction to Pandas: Data indexing and Selection, Operating on Data, Handling Missing Data.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

[1]Martin Brown, Python:The Complete Reference,     McGraw Hill Publications,4th Edition March 2018.

[2]Yashavant Kanetkar,Aditya Kanetkar, Let Us Python, BPB Publications ,4th Edition 2022.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]Reema Thareja ,Python Programming using problem solving Approach , Oxford University, Higher Education Oxford University Press, 2017

[2]Zhang.Y      ,An      Introduction     to         Pythonand      Computer            Programming,Springer Publications,2015

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 100%

ECO143 - DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates on democracy and emerging issues in economies.  The course discusses how various socioeconomic factors act as constraints on economic growth and development. This basic framework allows a student to delve into the causes and consequences of various strategies/methods taken/applied by policymakers and practitioners and how it affects the overall objective of the state/economy through a trifocal analysis of the economy, society, and market keeping the central theme of ‘Democracy.’This course will introduce students to:

  • Growing crisis of wealth distribution and income inequality.
  •  Sectoral significance and state intervention in policy making.
  • Informal sector and labor market participation and rights.
  • Analyze corruption in emerging economies through various case studies.
  • Discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory, and measurement.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise the growing crisis of wealth and income inequality among the members of the economy.

CO2: Understand the economic crisis in different sectors and government interventions in practices.

CO3: Get familiar informal sector and labour market participation and rights.

CO4: Understand debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption.

CO5: Investigate issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing challenges in economies through the lens of democracy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratization and Society
 

Theories of Democratization; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratization; The Global Wave of Democratization; Causes and Dimensions of Democratization: The Political Economy of Democracy; Political Culture, Mass Beliefs and Value Change; Gender and Democratization; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratization Processes: Role, impact on policy reforms and cultural change.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratisation and Society
 

Theories of Democratisation; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratisation; The Global Wave of Democratisation; Causes and Dimensions of Democratisation: The Political Economy of Democracy: Political Culture, Mass Beliefs, and Value Change; Gender and Democratisation; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratisation Processes: Role, Impact on Policy Reforms and Cultural Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation;   Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratization; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation; Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratisation; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of political transitions: Choice of the economic and political regime; Theoretical extensions: growth, trade, political institutions; Democracy and the public sector; the state, the treat of expropriation and the possibility of development: Social and economic wellbeing and policy reforms.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of Political Transitions: Choice of Economic and Political Regime; Theoretical Extensions: Growth, Trade, Political Institutions; Democracy and the Public Sector; the State, the Threat of Expropriation and the Possibility of Development: Social and Economic Wellbeing and Policy Reforms

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development
 

A Marxian theory of democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development
 

A Marxian Theory of Democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; The Case Study of India; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development Indian Experience
 

India’s Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality, and Public Reasoning; A case study on Gujarat experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome; Kerala experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development: Indian Experience
 

India's Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality and Public Reasoning, A Case Study on Gujarat's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome; Kerala's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhagwati, J. N., & Panagariya, A. (2012). India's Tryst with Destiny: Debunking Myths that Undermine Progress and Addressing New Challenges. HarperCollins Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Boix, C. (2003). Democracy and Redistribution. Cambridge University Press.

Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2015). An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions. Economics Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 20 Marks

CIA 3: 45 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

ECO144 - GLOBALISATION AND DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Liberalisation policies being pursued by most national economies in the world today, including India creates the need to acquire knowledge and comprehension of Globalisation as ideology along with its practical dynamics. The course intends to provide a sound understanding about the various components, and issues of this ideology at an introductory level. The methodology will be learning centered and so will be one of intensive facilitation by faculty of the reading to be done by students.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe the various facets of globalisation.

CO2: Explain the various challenges of globalisation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Globalisation: Brief History – The Marrakesh Meet – Globalisation as a contested concept – Debate of Globalisation as a new phenomenon

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Political Economy of Globalisation
 

Political Economy Debate of Comparative Advantage versus Imperialism – Introduction to Globalisation and the Political Economy of the External Sector.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Dimensions of Globalisation
 

The Economics Dimension – The Political Dimension – The Cultural Dimension

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Ideology
 

The Ideological Dimension of Globalisation – Challenges to Globalism – Assessing the Future of Globalisation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Manfred Steger ‘Globalisation the new Market Ideology’.

2. Joseph Stiglitz ‘Discontents of Gloablisaton’

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Justin Ervin, Zachary A Smith "Globalisation: A Reference Hand Book."

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 25 Marks

CIA II - 25 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

ENG182-1 - DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Academic Skills are a blend of theoretical ability to recognize the nuances of language aspects and hands-on training to exercise the acquired knowledge in reasoning, reading and writing. Academic Skills focus on developing research skills through careful reading and critical writing that are considered foundational and crucial in textual scholarship and knowledge production. The participants of this course will determine their areas of interest in conceptualizing their seminal work and constructing a reasoned argument. This course prompts the participants to take their learning-receptive skills and productive skills in a purpose-driven and practice-oriented mode on a contextual basis.

The course deals with receptive skills (reading) and productive skills (writing). In fact listening and speaking skills are not directly involved but act as a higher cognitive process. This course facilitates the participants with varied practices, tasks, exemplars, sample papers to practice with context-driven reading material. It runs for one full academic year with specific learning outcomes which are two-fold – conceptual grasp and textual application. The whole course and its structure involve Bloom’s taxonomy of knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, evaluation and synthesis.

Objectives

To enable the learner

       acquire higher order receptive and productive skills

       develop reading skills at the higher education level

       be aware of functional grammar to improve research writing skills

       grasp and apply the mechanics in academic writing skills

       use study skills for research-based knowledge dissemination (writing a paper or presentation)

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Different approaches to knowledge, critical and creative bent of mind, that leads to content-based investigation. Integration of problem-based learning and need-based learning

CO2: Working knowledge of different purposes of writing, especially persuasive (argumentative), analytical, and informative writings paves the way for research-based reading and writing.

CO3: Application of functional grammar and mechanics that enhance conceptual clarity, communicative style, and style of writing. Experiential learning through participatory learning and service learning

CO4: Hands-on experience in a research culture which is discipline-specific in nature

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Basic skills
 

To enable learners to fine tune their expressions through better choice of words and sentence structures with clarity of idea.

Introduction to the course Developing Academic Skills

Vocabulary nuances (verb and noun forms)

Subject-verb agreement

Literary devices

Figures of speech

 

Concept mapping

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Reading skills
 

To enable students to develop appropriate reading comprehension skills through nuanced understanding of reading techniques.

Previewing

Reading for Main Ideas

Active and Passive reading

 

Skimming/Scanning for Details

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Study Skills
 

To enable students to use basic study skills to organize knowledge received and to streamline their ideas into appropriate academic discourse.

Annotation

Outlining

Summarising

 

Paraphrasing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Listening skills
 

to enable students to understand and appreciate different kinds of literature and express their understanding in the form of short paragraphs or essays

Approaches to LS

Features of LS

Importance of LS at university level education

 

Practical sessions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Language Skills
 

To enable students to listen to lectures and take notes and organize these to discuss or write about concepts or show application of knowledge

Note taking types

Note making

Introduction to Mnemonics

 

Types of mnemonics

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Critical Reading
 

To enable students to develop the art of critical reading through close reading formulas

Finding oppositions

Critical Appreciation

 

Developing an argument

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:1
portfolio organisation
 

Set of hours for application

Exemplars

(Self Study Learning, Portfolio Building, teaching on Formative and Summative assessment mode, Problem Based Learning modules and project Submission)

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Langan, J. (1995). English Skills With Reading (3rd Ed.). McGraw Hill. New York.

2.      Osmond, A. (2013). Academic Writing and Grammar for Students. Sage. Los Angeles.

3.      Robitaille, J. and Connelly, R. (2002).  Writer’s Resource: From Paragraph to Essay. Thomson Heinle. Australia.

Please note that the teacher in charge will also be bringing in authentic material to the class apart from the books mentioned in the reference.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Please note that the teacher in charge will also be bringing in authentic material to the class apart from the books mentioned in the reference. (through google classroom) 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I – 20 MARKS- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit I

CIA II- 50 Marks- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit I and II

CIA III- 20 Marks- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit III

ESE Portfolio Submission

 

EST101-1 - LITERARY STUDIES: IDEAS AND GENRES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course offers an understanding to literary movements and genres. The focus is on form, structure and terminologies in literature. It enables students to interpret and critique texts and to understand that literature is representational. This course also examines texts in their socio-political context to engage with the historical context and cultural production of literature.

Course Objectives: This course aims to 

1.    offer a comprehensive understanding of the text and the contexts. 

2.     develop analytical and critical reading strategies

3.     enhance students to understand texts from multiple perspectives.

4.     develop analytical writing skills and to understand methods of interpretation

5.     acquire a literary vocabulary to read and write academic essays

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able - to articulate and analyze literary texts critically

CO2: to apply multiple interpretative methods

CO3: to analyze texts from different perspectives

CO4: to write academic essays using the acquired literary vocabulary

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Classical and Medieval Literature
 

Evolution from myths and folk tales

Ovid Metamorphoses (Book I excerpts)

Caedmon’s Hymn (Excerpts)

Geoffrey Chaucer – Prologue to Canterbury Tales (excerpts)

Thomas Malory - Morte Darthur (excerpts)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Literary Renaissance
 

The Revival of Learning and Bible Translations

Johannes Gutenberg and the Print Culture

William Caxton and the English Press

Mystery, miracle and morality plays (festival of Corpus Christi)

Emergence of tragedies and comedies – from translations to English plays

Thomas More- Utopia (excerpts)

Francis Bacon - Essays, or Counsels Civil and Moral (excerpts)

William Shakespeare – King Lear

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
The Enlightenment Period
 

Voltaire’s - Letters on the English (excerpts)

Rousseau – Discourse on Inequality (excerpts)

Thomas Paine – Rights of Man (excerpts)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
The Romantic Period/ American Transcendentalism
 

Preface to Lyrical Ballads (excerpts)

Maria Edgeworth -  Letters for Literary Ladies (excerpts)

Shelley – To Skylark

R W Emerson – Self- reliance

Nathaniel Hawthorne – The Scarlett Letter

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Modernism
 

William Faulkner - The Sound and The Fury

Virginia Woolf - A Room of One’s Own

T.S Eliot – Ash Wednesday

Text Books And Reference Books:

Ovid Metamorphoses (Book I excerpts)

Caedmon’s Hymn (Excerpts)

Geoffrey Chaucer – Prologue to Canterbury Tales (excerpts)

Thomas Malory - Morte Darthur (excerpts)

Thomas More- Utopia (excerpts)

Francis Bacon - Essays, or Counsels Civil and Moral (excerpts)

William Shakespeare – King Lear

Voltaire’s - Letters on the English (excerpts)

Rousseau – Discourse on Inequality (excerpts)

Thomas Paine – Rights of Man (excerpts)

Preface to Lyrical Ballads (excerpts)

Maria Edgeworth -  Letters for Literary Ladies (excerpts)

Shelley – To Skylark

R W Emerson – Self- reliance

Nathaniel Hawthorne – The Scarlett Letter

William Faulkner - The Sound and The Fury

Virginia Woolf - A Room of One’s Own

T.S Eliot – Ash Wednesday

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

M. H. A. Abrams, A Glossary of Literary Terms, 7th edition (1999) 

The Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory, 4th edition (1999)

The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 5th edition

An Outline History of English Literature, William Henry Hudson (1999)

Evaluation Pattern

Examination & Assessment

CIA I - 20 Marks 

1. A class test based on the text

2. Essay on concepts and its application

3. A book/film/media review

CIA III - 20 Marks, the students can be asked

1. To prepare group presentations on topics relevant to the units

2. To put up an exhibition/display of

 

MSE - 50 Marks - Centralized Exam

(5 out of 7) x 10=50 Marks

 

ESE - 50 Marks - Centralized Exam

(5 out of 7) x 10=50 Marks 

 

 

 

 

HIS141 - HISTORY AND CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course attempts to map out the connection between history and cinema. It aims to look at how cinema can be treated as a visual text and a source for understanding history. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To enhance and deepen the understanding of history through cinema.

CO2: To enable the students to develop their understanding and awareness of the rich possibilities of cinema and its connection with history.

CO3: To enhance the analytical skills of students and develop an understanding of how cinema engages with socio-cultural and political concerns, by placing the cinema in their historical context and engage with the current debates and future challenges with cinema as a medium.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 1
 

a)   History as a narrative – History and Truth Contested Notions –Ideology, Sources and Historian

b)   Multiple Identities and Histories – History as a point of reference – Issues of Legitimacy & Justification.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3
 

a)     Between History and Cinema:  The problem of linear narratives and flash back – questions of authenticity – definition of authenticity.

b)    Cinema as a political, social and historical text.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chapman, J. (2003). Cinemas of the World: Film and Society from 1895 to the Present. Reaktion Books.

Chapman, J., Glancy, M., & Harper, S. (Eds.). (2007). The new film history: sources, methods, approaches. Springer.

Ferro, M. (1988). Cinema and history. Wayne State University Press.

Chapman, J. (2005). Past and present: national identity and the British historical. London: IB Tauris.

Miskell, P. (2004). Historians and film. In Making History (pp. 253-264). Routledge.

Nowell-Smith, G. (Ed.). (1996). The Oxford history of world cinema. OUP Oxford.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). Seduced by the Familiar: Narration and Meaning in Indian Popular Cinema. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Chapman, J. (2013). Cinema, propaganda and national identity: British film and the Second World War. In British Cinema, Past and Present (pp. 213-226). Routledge.

Miskell, P. (2005). Seduced by the silver screen: Film addicts, critics and cinema regulation in Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. Business History47(3), 433-448.

Sedgwick, J., Miskell, P., & Nicoli, M. (2019). The market for films in postwar Italy: Evidence for both national and regional patterns of taste. Enterprise & Society20(1), 199-228.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2011). Bipolar identity: Region, nation, and the Kannada language film. Oxford University Press.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). The Politics of Hindi Cinema in the New Millennium: Bollywood and the Anglophone Indian Nation.

Sanyal, D. (2021). MK Raghavendra, “Locating World Cinema: Interpretations of Film as Culture” (Bloomsbury Academic India, 2020).

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  10 Marks            

CIA 2:  Mid Semester Examinations 25 Marks

CIA 3:  10 Marks

End semester examination: 50 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

JDM101-1 - INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISM (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is an introductory course that provides a broad overview of the field of communication and journalism. The course is aimed at introducing the student to the historical growth of media, the relevance of ancillary areas and the scope of the said field. The course will enable students understand how communication works and their(student's) role in the field of journalism

Course Outcome

CO1: Show familiarity with terms, jargons & phrases intrinsic to the field of media/journalism

CO2: Exhibit knowledge about the field of communication & journalism

CO3: Apply theories to understand contemporary communication/media phenomena

CO4: Participate in discussions pertaining to media issues/debates

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Prelude to Communication
 

What is communication- definitions; nature and process of communication; Types/levels of communication- Intra-personal, interpersonal, group and mass communication; Purpose of communication; Communication and change; Communication and society

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Theories & Models of Communication
 

Communication models; channels of communication; feedback, role of audience; Barriers to communication-Noise; Effective communication; Powerful Effects Theory-Magic Bullet Theory, Limited Effects Theory-Two-step Flow Theory

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Prelude to Journalism
 

Brief history of journalism, meaning and scope; Functions and principles of journalism; Advent of printing; Newssheets in Europe; British and American streams of journalism.  Journalism in India: James Augustus Hickey and the early newspapers of Calcutta, Bombay and Madras; Growth of Indian language press- Special emphasis to Kannada Journalism; Indian press during pre-independence years; Role of press in freedom struggle; Press after independence; Press during Emergency; Present issues and problems facing the press.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Role of Press in a Democracy
 

Freedom Of the Press (FOP) concept; Constitutional guarantee of FOP, Art 19(1)(a) and Art 19(2); Normative theories of press; Modern press theories; FOP and social responsibility.

Text Books And Reference Books:

·       Baran, Stanley J and Dennis K Davis (1999). Mass Communication and Man - Mass Communication Theory (2nd Edition). Thomson/Wadsworth, USA.

·       Mehta, D.S. (1982). Mass Communication and Journalism in India. Allied Publications, New Delhi. 

Parthasarthy, Rangaswami. (1989). Journalism in India. Sterling Publications Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·       Jeffery, Robin. (2000). India’s Newspaper Revolution. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.

·       MacBride, Sean (Ed). (1982). Many Voices, One World. Oxford &IBH Publishing Co., New Delhi.

·       Siebert, Peterson and Schramm. (1978). Four Theories of the Press. University of Illinois Press, USA.

Siebert, Peterson and Schramm. (1978). Four Theories of the Press. University of Illinois Press, USA

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: The students will be evaluated on their understanding of the basic concepts of both communication and journalism. Continuous internal assessment will test their knowledge and ability to analyse the present media situation. The end semester may have a written exam of 2 hours to check their grasp of the course content and analytical skills.

CIA1: Written assignment/objective test-multiple choice questions (10)

CIA2: Mid-Sem exam: (25)-Department level

CIA3: Flip-Class-Student presentations in groups of 5 (10)

End-semester exam: (50)-2 hrs- Department level

JDM161-1 - JOURNALISTIC WRITING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Writing is a fundamental skill for a student of Journalism. This course is meant for those journalism students who have a reasonable command over their writing in English, and need guidance and support for a reflective and journalism-specific writing process. The course is designed to address the cognitive aspects of writing, matching to different journalistic demands.

Course Outcome

CO1:: Demonstrate the purpose of writing and follow the prewriting process

CO2:: Write grammatically correct and journalistically structured articles

CO3:: Choose and deploy the type of writing that matches different journalistic contexts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding Writing
 

Distinguishing Journalistic Writing from other forms of Writing; Understanding Context and Audience; The Prewriting Process: Source Identification, Search Engine Optimisation, Diversifying sources, Eliminating Irrelevant and Misleading Sources, identifying key points, choosing style, organising ideas

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Ensuring Grammatical Precision
 

Punctuation, Preposition, Tenses, Correctness of Usage, Factual Accuracy; Fairness; Clarity; Right Attribution

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Writing Leads
 

Types of Leads: Straight Leads, Question Leads, Punch Leads, Direct Quotation Lead, Contrast Lead, Freak Lead, Descriptive Lead, Bullet Lead; Organising Paragraphs, Working on Transitions, Reviewing, Re-Writing, Writing Headlines, Upstyle, Downstyle, Types of Headlines: Banner Headlines, End-to-End Headlines, Hammers, Kickers, Tripods, Side Saddles

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Types of Writing
 

Descriptive, Narrative, Argumentative, Persuasive; Pitfalls to avoid: Contempt of Court, Trespassing, Sedition, Libel, Invasion of Privacy, Breach of Contract, Plagiarism, Fabrication, Lapses in Ethics, Bias, Bad Taste, Blunders and Bloopers

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Writing across journalistic platforms
 

Newspaper, Magazine, Online, Mobile

Text Books And Reference Books:

● Bighow Online Journalism Handbook | Bighow news. (n.d.).

Www.Bighow.Com. Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://bighow.com/journalism

● Hamp-Lyons, Liz, and Ben Heasley (2006). Study Writing: A Course in Writing Skills for Academic Purposes. Cambridge: Cambridge UP. Print.

● Knight, Robert M.(2010). Journalistic Writing: Building the Skills, Honing the Craft. Portland, Or.: Marion Street. Print.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The Hindu | The Deccan Herald |The New Indian Express | Scroll.in | Article-14.com | The Print | The Wire | The Quint | Mojo | The Frontline | The Guardian | Washington Post | Al Jazeera | Huffington Post | Twitter

Evaluation Pattern

CIA OVerall (50)

ESE (50 Marks)

50 + 50 = 100

LAW141 - CYBER LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Cyber law has emerged as a medium for growth with immense potential for solving many new and interesting challenges.  The course aims at appreciating one of the important emerging areas of law and the nitty-gritty involved in it. This introduces the students to the underlying philosophy of the subject and its relation to other areas focusing on human rights.

UNIT 1 is designed to introduce students to the role of law in technology, especially the internet and is designed to give a brief overview of the historical aspects of the internet. UNIT 2 acquaints the students with the regulation of cyberspace. UNIT 3 deals with digital contracts and information technology, while UNIT 4 deals entirely on cyber crimes which are rampant in the digital era.  UNIT 5 issues in E-commerce. Unit 6 deals with IPR issues in cyberspace and UNIT 7 deals with international regulation of cyberspace.

Course Outcome

CO1: Gain an understanding of the underlying philosophy of cyber law and its relation to information technology.

CO2: Facilitate an overall understanding on needs for regulation of information technology in India

CO3: Impart basic idea of information technology and its relation with digital signature

CO4: Acquaint with legal challenges arising out of privacy issues awareness about the various kinds of cyber crimes and legal issues and cases

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
UNIT 1 FUNDAMENTALS OF CYBER LAW
 

An overview of cyber world – Jurisprudence of cyber law – Scope of cyber law – Introduction to Indian cyber law

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 2 CYBERSPACE
 

Meaning, nature and emergence of cyberspace – Attributes of cyberspace – Classification of cyberspace – Legal framework for cyberspace

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 3 DIGITAL CONTRACTS
 

Law of digital contracts – Functions of digital signature – Electronic and digital signature – procedural and functional issues – Legal issues of digital signatures – Certifying authority – Regulatory framework of digital signatures

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 4 CYBER CRIMES
 

Salient features – Cyber crime and related concepts – Types of crimes – Regulation of cyber crime – International perspective

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 5 E-COMMERCE
 

Emerging significant of – e-Commerce – Transactions and Technology of e-Commerce – e-Commerce Contracts – Legal Issues of e-Commerce and Case Laws – e-Commerce Legislations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 6 IPR ISSUES
 

IPR - An overview – Copyright issues in Cyberspace – Trademark issues in Cyberspace – Computer software and related IPR issues – Domain names and related issues

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 7 INTERNATIONAL SCENARIO IN CYBER LAWS
 

European convention of Cyber Crimes – UNCITRAL Model Law on e-commerce 1996 – International Legal Regime relating to IPR – Berne Convention, Rome Convention, WIPO Copyright, UDRP, OECD Convention on Database Protection – Domestic legal regime – Information Technology Act , 2000. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Seth Karnika, Computers Internet and New Technology Laws. Gurgaon: Lexis Nexis, 2013

Cyber Security & Cyber Laws - by Nilakshi Jain & Ramesh Menon, Wiley 2020

Cyber Crimes & Law - by Dr Vishwanath Paranjepe, 2nd Edtn 2019, Central Law Agency

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cyber Crimes & Law - by Dr Vishwanath Paranjepe, 2nd Edtn 2019, Central Law Agency

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I:   Assessment Description: Class test for 20 marks on assessing the understanding of the fundamentals of Cyber law. It is a class room test. 2 questions for 25 marks each carrying 12.5 marks.

CIA-II: Oral Presentation, shall be accompanied by PPT by a group of 5 students for maximum of 15 minutes on any Cyber  law issues.

CIA-III: Students will be given a specific topic or case law. They are required to identify the research issues and find an answer to it by analysing the available literature.

LAW142 - RIGHT TO INFORMATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

There is no gainsaying the fact that knowledge is the paramount source of empowerment and empowerment enriches democracy. The attributes of democracy, viz. the government- of, by and for the people, can be realized successfully if the people are well informed and participate in decision making.

To achieve this goal, the Parliament has enacted the Right to Information Act, 2005, and the same has conferred, the most invaluable right to be informed, on the people. Hailed widely as a vaccine against corruption and a multi-vitamin for nourishment of democracy, law relating to Right to Information has become an indispensable weapon for the citizens.

Course Outcome

CO1: To comprehensively understand the legal framework regarding the Right to Information in India.

CO2: To contextualise Right to Information in the broader realm of public law along with allied concepts such as open governance, rule of law, accountability, transparency etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Historical background; Shift in attitudes- secrecy, privilege, open government; Citizens’ right to know; Campaign for freedom of information; Constitutional Provisions; Technological revolution – Information technology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Legal Framework
 

Right to information Act. 2005  –  Overview – Objectives and reasons – Scope of the Act and Overall Scheme of the Act – What concerned citizens will want to know – Definitions

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
OBLIGATIONS OF PUBLIC AUTHORITIES
 

Right to information; Obligations of public authorities; Public information officers; Request for information; Disposal of request

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
RIGHT TO INFORMATION ? EXEMPTIONS
 

Grounds for rejection to access in certain cases; Severability; Third party information; Statutory exemptions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
INFORMATION COMMISSIONS
 

Constitution of Central Information Commission; State information commission; Powers and functions of commission; Appeal and Penalties; Freedom of information in commercial disputes; Right to Privacy v Right to information

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Sudhir NaibThe Right to Information Act 2005: A Handbook (1st edition ed. 2011).
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. N. V. Paranjape, Right To Information Law In India (First Edition ed. 2014).
Evaluation Pattern

As per University norms

LAW144 - ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The present decline in environmental quality calls for a stricter enforcement of laws relating to protection of environment. The objective of this course is to give an insight into various legislations that has been enacted in our country for protection of environment and also to create awareness among the citizens of the country about the duties cast on them under various legislations in relation to protection of environment.

 

Course Objectives:

  • To impart an in-depth knowledge of environmental legislations to students from diverse backgrounds.
  • To interpret, analyse and make a critique of the legislations and Case laws relating to environment
  • To provide a brief understanding of various developments that has taken place at international level to check various environmental harms.

Course Outcome

CO1: learn about environmental law

C02: make students environmentally conscious

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
INTRODUCTION
 

INTRODUCTION

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIRONMENT
 

INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIRONMENT

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
JUDICIAL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES AVAILABLE FOR ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION
 

JUDICIAL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES AVAILABLE FOR ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986
 

ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986
 

ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT 1974
 

WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT 1974

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
FORESTS AND CONSERVATION LAWS
 

FORESTS AND CONSERVATION LAWS

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
WILD LIFE PROTECTION AND THE LAW
 

 WILD LIFE PROTECTION AND THE LAW

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT
 

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT

Text Books And Reference Books:

MC Mehta Enviromental Law Book

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

MC Mehta Enviromental Law Book

Evaluation Pattern

Class Discussion: 50 Marks

MCQ exam: 50 Marks

LAW145 - PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Parliament is the heart and soul of any parliamentary democracy which is envisaged to reflect the expectations and aspirations of the people. In fact, it is the chief law-making organ and it comprises of members from different backgrounds, so as to represent the varied expectations of the people. As such, it has an onerous responsibility of making laws in a manner which caters to the requirements of the society cutting across the party lines.

In twenty-first century, the age of technology and information, the role of Parliament has increased manyfold as the impressions of “We the People” have also undergone a sea change with respect to the quality of the law made. In this context, a fundamental knowledge of the law-making process and the requisites of the same is essential for the citizens. Hence this course is devised to introduce the students to the essentials of law-making process by the Parliament as well as the privileges conferred on the members of Parliament.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the Constitutional framework on Parliamentary Practice and Procedure in India

CO2: Analyse the Parliamentary Privileges in India

CO3: Examine the Law-making process and role of Parliamentary Committees in India

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
INDIAN PARLIAMENT AND POLITY
 

Structure, powers and functions of Houses of Parliament – Loksabha,  Rajya  Sabha, Joint Sessions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
CONSTITUTION OF HOUSES
 

Members and presiding officers, election, powers and functions, Powers of President in relation to Parliament

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
LAW-MAKING PROCESS
 

Classification of Bills, procedures relating to passing of Bills, presentation of Budget

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
RULES OF BUSINESS IN PARLIAMENT
 

Summoning, petitions, resolutions, motions, question-answers, matters of urgent public importance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
PARLIAMENTARY PRIVILEGES
 

Sources of Parliamentary privileges, immunities, procedure

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEES
 

Parliamentary Committees, Government Committee, Ad hoc Committees, Joint Committee

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Anoop Mishra (Ed.), Practice and Procedure of Parliament, Metropolitan Book Co. Ltd. New Delhi (2016)

Durga Das Basu, Introduction to the Constitution of India (2022), Lexis Nexis, Gurgaon

Lok Sabha Secretariate, Parliamentary Privileges (2019), New Delhi

Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs, Manual of Parliamentary Procedures in India (2018), New Delhi

 

Subhash Kashyap, Our Parliament, National Book Trust (2020), New Delhi

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Apoorva Shankar and Shreya Singh, Parliamentary Procedures: A Primer [Rajya Sabha] (2015), PRS Legislative Research, New Delhi

Lok Sabha Secretariate, Budgetary Process (2019), New Delhi

M.P. Jain, Indian Constitutional Law (8th Edn., 2018) Lexis Nexis, Gurgaon

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I : 25 Marks (25%)

CIA-II: 25 Marks (25%)

CIA-III: 50 Marks (50%) 

 

PHY142 - ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course on Basic Electronics and Gadgets is aimed at giving a feel of electronics to non science/core students. It helps them in knowing the fundamentals of various electronic gadgets they use in daily life and related technologies. The course covers  categories of consumer electronic systems, electronic audio systems, basic colour television and video systems, communication systems covering telephone , mobile phone fundamentals and basics of computerhardware. This programme also tries to create awareness about e-waste and its effective management.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand basics of electronic devices and circuits

CO2: Describe the working principles of audio , video and communication systems

CO3: Discuss the fundamentals of computer hardware and e-waste management.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Electronics
 

Electronics and its applications. Electronic components: Resistors, Capacitors, inductors- types, uses. Conductors, insulators, semiconductors- definitions. Semiconductor materials- Silicon, Germanium, semiconductor devices: Diode- working and application of diode as rectifier, Transistor- working, transistor as an amplifier, electronic switch. Electronic DC power supply- basic block diagram. Basics of measuring instruments- DMM and CRO. Hands on with tinkercad tool.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Fundamentals Of Electronic Communication Systems
 

Basic principle of electronic communication-. Basic operation of transmitter and receivers. AM and FM radio receivers- qualitative description. Frequency allotment. Basics of Microphone, Loud speakers Principle of TV transmission and reception, Colour TV principle,. Digital TV principle- set top converter box, Optical fiber cables- principle of operation, advantages. Fundamentals of cellular mobile phone- Cells, coverage area, roaming, operation (qualitative description). Latest trends in mobile phones, smart phones, generations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Basics of Computer Hardware and e waste management
 

Fundamentals of Digital computer, microprocessors, motherboards, power supply - SMPS,  mouse, keyboard, memory devices, Modems, monitors, printers, latest trends in computers, specifications. Internet fundamentals

Electronic waste- brief description, qualitative discussion of hazards of e-waste, the materials responsible, management of e-waste, Indian and global current scenario of e-waste and its management.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]. V K Mehta and Rohit Mehta (2011),Principles of Electronics, S Chand and Co, New Delhi.

[2]. B R Gupta (2008) Consumer Electronics, 4th Edition, Kataria &sons, New Delhi.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[3]. Bob Goodman (2002. ),How electronic things work, TMH

[4]. https://www.tinkercad.com 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation will be based on internal assessment components and a written exam at the end of the course.

Internal assesment : 50 marks

Written exam : 50 marks

POL141 - DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized to introduce and discuss the moral foundations of democracy in principle, and democratic institutions, in particular. The students are initiated to various types of moral discourses in political philosophy. Further, this course looks at the development of democracy, in the global as well as the national realm. Democracy as an ideal gets fructified in the form of a government, which in turn is based on the principles of justice, freedom, equality, and fraternity. Ethics acts as the premise on which a successful democracy rests.

Course Outcome

CO1: By the end of the course the learner should be able to: Demonstrate civic and political consciousness

CO2: To have a dedicated and empathetic band of students who would act as agents of change in society.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS: AN INTRODUCTION
 
  1. Democracy
    1. Conceptual development of Democracy
    2. Principles of Democracy: Freedom, Equality and Fraternity
  2. Ethics
    1. Concept of Values, Morals and Ethics
  3. Democracy vis-a-vis Ethics
    1. Government by Consent
    2. Constitutional Government and Rule of Law
    3. Democracy and Human Rights
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS: AN INTRODUCTION
 
  1. Democracy
    1. Conceptual development of Democracy
    2. Principles of Democracy: Freedom, Equality and Fraternity
  2. Ethics
    1. Concept of Values, Morals and Ethics
  3. Democracy vis-a-vis Ethics
    1. Government by Consent
    2. Constitutional Government and Rule of Law
    3. Democracy and Human Rights
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PERSPECTIVES ON ETHICS
 
  1. Western Thought
    1. Duty Ethic
    2. Utilitarianism
  2. Indian Thought                                                                  

a.     Hindu Tradition: Dharma and Karma, Purusharthas

b.     Buddhist Tradition: Four Noble Truths and Eight-fold Path

c.     Indian syncretic traditions-Ashoka, Kabir and Akbar

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PERSPECTIVES ON ETHICS
 
  1. Western Thought
    1. Duty Ethic
    2. Utilitarianism
  2. Indian Thought                                                                  

a.     Hindu Tradition: Dharma and Karma, Purusharthas

b.     Buddhist Tradition: Four Noble Truths and Eight-fold Path

c.     Indian syncretic traditions-Ashoka, Kabir and Akbar

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
CHALLENGES TO INDIAN DEMOCRACY
 
  1. Institutional
    1. Free and fair elections
    2. Ethical Code of Conduct for Politicians
    3. Character record of members of the legislature
    4. Ethical use of majority in parliament
    5. Avoidance of ‘floor crossing’ and defection
    6. Alliance of political parties to form brittle governments
    7. Independence of judiciary and media
    8. Safeguard national history and avoid distortion
    9. Political neutrality in educational institutions.
    10. Judicious allocation of central funds to states
    11. Freedom of Press
  2. Citizen Centric
    1. Free speech and Expression
    2. Right to dissent
    3. Preventive detention and Sedition 
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
CHALLENGES TO INDIAN DEMOCRACY
 
  1. Institutional
    1. Free and fair elections
    2. Ethical Code of Conduct for Politicians
    3. Character record of members of the legislature
    4. Ethical use of majority in parliament
    5. Avoidance of ‘floor crossing’ and defection
    6. Alliance of political parties to form brittle governments
    7. Independence of judiciary and media
    8. Safeguard national history and avoid distortion
    9. Political neutrality in educational institutions.
    10. Judicious allocation of central funds to states
    11. Freedom of Press
  2. Citizen Centric
    1. Free speech and Expression
    2. Right to dissent
    3. Preventive detention and Sedition 
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Christiano, Thomas, ed., Philosophy and Democracy, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.
  2. Dewey, John, “Philosophy and Democracy” [1919] and “The Ethics of Democracy” [1888] in The Political Writings, ed. D. Morris, I. Shapiro, Indianapolis: Hackett, 1993.
  3. Finnis, John. Fundamentals of Ethics. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983.
  4. Gandhi, M. K. An Autobiography or The Story of My Experiments with Truth. Ahmedabad: Navajivan Mudranalaya, 1927.
  5. Granville, Austin, The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2000.
  6. Jain, Subhash, The Constitution of India: Select Issues and Perceptions. New Delhi: Taxmann, 2000.
  7. Walzer, Michael, “Philosophy and Democracy”, Political Theory, Vol.9, No.3, 1981, 379-399.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Locke, John, Second Treatise on Civil Government, (1690), ed. C. B. MacPherson, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett, 1980.
  2. Kant, Immanuel. Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. trans. Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril, 1959.
  3. Kant, Immanuel, Critique of Practical Reason, trans. Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril, 1956.
  4. Machiavelli, The Prince [1513], ed. Q. Skinner, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1988.
  5. Plato, The Republic, revised/trans. by Desmond Lee, Harmondsworth, UK: Penguin Books, 1974.
  6. Rawls, John, Political Liberalism, New York: Columbia University Press, 1996
  1. Sandel, Michael (ed.), Justice—A Reader, Oxford University Press, 2007.
  2. Singer, Peter, Democracy and Disobedience, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1973.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-25

CIA 2-25

CIA 3-50

POL142 - SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The main objectives of the course are to:

      Present an overview of the major concepts, debates, and historical facets of STI in IR.

      Create a foundation for the students to pursue further research in various aspects of STI in IR, and provide a systemic understanding of its impact on the economy, politics, culture, society, and foreign relations of India and other countries.

Providing an academic understanding in the current context of emerging technologies, its impact and influences in the society, as well as create avenues for interdisciplinary understanding and research.

Course Outcome

CO1: - Understand the nature, scope and significance of STI in International Relations (IR). - Understand the concepts, ideas, and debates in Science, Technology and Innovation vis-a-vis International Relations.

CO2: - Learn to use conceptual tools to understand new developments which of Science, Technology and Innovation in International Relations. - Analyze the major theories/approaches of Science, Technol-ogy and Innovation. - Develop a critical perspective on the major international regimes/ issues in STI in International Relations.

CO3: - Develop a thorough understanding on the scientific, technological and innovation-related process in major powers and national economies, especially India. - Explore the ways and Science, Technology and Innovation issues confronted by the world from a foreign policy perspective.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction
 

Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) in International Relations;

History and Evolution of STI in International Relations;

STI and Globalization;

STI and Diplomacy;

State, non-State actors and Stakeholders;

STI and International Institutions;

International Scientific Relations (ISR)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Basic Concepts and Theories:
 

Digital Westphalia,

Technonationalism,

Cyberspace and related facets of sovereignty, warfare, security, espionage, terrorism, and crime;

Data sovereignty, Technocolonialism; Digital imperialism,

Security v Privacy debate,

STI and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Global STI Landscape
 

History and Evolution of Global STI Landscape;

Fourth Industrial Revolution;

Knowledge Economy;

STI and Human Capital;

International Political Economy of STI

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
India:
 

India’s STI Policies: history, evolution, implementation and challenges;

Spin-offs: civilian, military;

Research and Development (R&D);

Political Economy of India’s STI Ecosystem;

Institutions and Organisations

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Case Studies:
 

STI landscape in countries: Emergent Technologies and Institutions, Internet of Things; Artificial Intelligence; Big Data; Blockchain

Text Books And Reference Books:

Aghion, P., David, P.A. and Foray, D. (2008). Science, Technology and Innovation for Economic Growth: Linking Policy Research and Practice in 'Stig Systems'. Research Policy 38(4): 681-693.

Del Canto Viterale, F. (2021). International Scientific Relations: Science, Technology and Innovation in the International System of the 21st Century. Anthem Press.

Ogburn, W.F. (1949). Technology and international relations. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Colglazier, E.W. and Montgomery, K. (2022). Opportunities and Challenges for Science Diplomacy. Science & Diplomacy.

Hieronymi, O. (1987). Technology and International Relations. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Leijten, J. Innovation policy and international relations: directions for EU diplomacy. Eur J Futures Res 7, 4 (2019).

M. Mayer, M. Carpes, & R. Knoblich. (eds.). (2014). The Global Politics of Science and Technology - Vol. 1. Springer Berlin, Heidelberg.

Ruffini, P.-B. (2017). Science and Diplomacy: A New Dimension of International Relations. Paris: Springer International Publishing AG.

 

Klein, U. (2020). Technoscience in History: Prussia, 1750-1850. MIT: The MIT Press.

McIlwain, C.H. (1933). A Fragment on Sovereignty. Political Science Quarterly, Vol. 48(1), pp. 94-106.

Negroponte, N. (1995). Being Digital. Hodder and Stoughton: Great Britain.

Reghunadhan, R. (2022). Cyber Technological Paradigms and Threat Landscape in India. First Edition., Palgrave Macmillan, Springer Singapore, ISBN: 978-981-1691-27-0.

Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR). (2017a). Findings of The Investigation into China’s Acts, Policies, and Practices Related to Technology Transfer, Intellectual Property, and Innovation Under Section 301 of The Trade Act of 1974. https://ustr.gov/sites/default/files/Section%20301%20FINAL.PDF: 3-18 

Schmidt, J.C. (2021). Philosophy of Interdisciplinarity: Studies in Science, Society and Sustainability. History and Philosophy of Technoscience. Oxford: Routledge.

Schultz, T.W. (1961). Investment in Human Capital. The American Economic Review 51(1): 1-17.

Trencher, G. (2018). Towards the smart city 2.0: Empirical evidence of using smartness as a tool for tackling social challenges, Technological Forecasting and Social Change 142: 117-128.

Suttmeier, R.P., Cao, C. and Simon, D.F. (2006). China’s Innovation Challenge and the Remaking of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Innovations: Technology, Governance, Globalization 1(3d): 78-97.

Landes, D. (2006). Why Europe and the West? Why Not China? The Journal of Economic Perspectives 20(2): 3-22.

M. Z. Taylor. (2016). The Politics of Innovation: Why Some Countries Are Better Than Others at Science and Technology. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Villa-Henriksen, A., Edwards, G.T.C., Pesonen, L.A., Green, O. and Sørensen, C.A.G. (2020). Internet of Things in arable farming: implementation, applications, challenges and potential. Biosys. Eng. 191: 60–84

Zhang, W. (2019). Constitutional Governance in India and China and Its Impact on National Innovation. In Liu, K-C. and Racheria, U. (eds.). Innovation, Economic Development, and Intellectual Property in India and China. ARCIALA Series on Intellectual Assets and Law in Asia. Springer Singapore: Singapore: 39-67.

Department of Science and Technology (DST). (2020). Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy. Government of India. https://dst.gov.in/sites/default/files/STIP_Doc_1.4_Dec2020.pdf

Reghunadhan, R. (2022). Cyber Technological Paradigms and Threat Landscape in India. First Edition., Palgrave Macmillan, Springer Singapore, ISBN: 978-981-1691-27-0.

Kharbanda and Ashok Jain. (eds.). Science and Technology Strategies: for Development in India and China. New Delhi: Har-Anand Publications Pvt Ltd: 93-134.

P.K. Pattnaik et al. (eds). IoT and Analytics for Agriculture, Volume 3. Studies in Big Data, vol 99, Singapore: Springer, pp. 201-225, ISBN: 978-981-16-6210-2.

Krishnan Saravanan et al. (eds.). Handbook of Research on Blockchain Technology, London: Academic Press (Elsevier), pp. 1-34, ISBN: 9780128198162.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Department of Science and Technology (DST). (2020). Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy. Government of India. https://dst.gov.in/sites/default/files/STIP_Doc_1.4_Dec2020.pdf

Reghunadhan, R. (2022). Cyber Technological Paradigms and Threat Landscape in India. First Edition., Palgrave Macmillan, Springer Singapore, ISBN: 978-981-1691-27-0.

Kharbanda and Ashok Jain. (eds.). Science and Technology Strategies: for Development in India and China. New Delhi: Har-Anand Publications Pvt Ltd: 93-134.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Written analyses in about 800-1500 words submitted 

Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs) covering wide range of facets that focus on knowledge, skill and attitude of the student and their understanding on the topic.

 Subjective type question(s): Understanding the emerging complexities and dynamics in the region

Application of the understanding to the situation

Solutions to the problems given

POL143 - SUBALTERN STUDIES: NARRATIVES OF THE COMMUNITIES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Subaltern Studies emerged as an intellectual project to counter the elitism prevailing in dominant historical narratives. This project aimed at giving voice to the people’s autonomous agency and struggles against the dominant forces. They offered a new outlook to narratives of Peasant, Adivasi and Woman’s movements in history. Over time, subaltern perspective was adopted to understand several issues concerning India and it still holds significant relevance in shedding light on contemporary issues. This course aims to introduce the students to subaltern studies and cultivate a new standpoint to understand and interpret the world.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Demonstrate knowledge about subaltern studies, its foundations, relevance methodology, and critique

CO 2: Analyse various narratives of communities, avenues of their struggles against the dominance

CO 3: Develop a sensibility to view the world from a subaltern perspective

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Subaltern Studies
 

Foundation of Subaltern Studies Collective, Ranajit Guha, Need of subaltern studies, Resources, Subaltern life narratives

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Communities Countering the Dominance
 

State and subaltern citizens, Dominance without Hegemony, Peasant rebellions, Dalit and Adivasi Assertion, Indian Nationalism, Women’s question and the emergence of counter narratives

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Contemporary Avenues of subaltern struggles
 

Cricket and caste, Environmental movements, political and social mobilization of marginalized classes, public theatre and reclaiming dignity

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Subaltern Narratives in Film, Fiction and Folklore
 

-       Films: Laggan, Karnan, and The Discreet Charm of the Savarnas

-       Fiction: Subaltern in Mahasweta Devi’s stories (Jamunabati’s Mother, and Mother of 1084)

-       Folklore: Folktales from India, “So Many Words, So many sounds”: An Interview

-       People’s Archive of Rural India

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Critiquing the subaltern studies
 

- Exploring the Relevance and Irrelevance of subaltern studies

- Adding new locations? Or After subaltern studies?

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Guha, R. (1982). Preface. In R. Guha (Ed.), Subaltern Studies I (pp. vii–viii). Oxford University Press

Guha, R. (1982). On Some Aspects of the Historiography of Colonial India. In R. Guha (Ed.), Subaltern Studies I (pp. 1–8). Oxford University Press.

Kumar, R. (2021). Police Matters: The Everyday State and Caste Politics in South India, 1900–1975. Cornell University Press.

Guha, R. (2005). ‘The Moral that can be Safely Drawn from the Hindus’ Magnificent Victory’: Cricket, Caste and the Palwankar Brothers. In J. H. Mills (Ed.), Subaltern Sports: Politics and Sport in South Asia (pp. 83–106). Anthem Press.

        Ahuja, A. (2019). Mobilizing the Marginalized. Oxford University Press.

       Chatterjee, P. (2012). After subaltern studies. In Economic and Political Weekly (Vol. 47, Issue 35).

       Ramanujan, A. K. (2009). Folktales From India. Penguin India.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhadra, G. (1983). Two Frontier Uprisings in Mughal India. In R. Guha (Ed.), SS II (pp. 43–59). Oxford University Press.

Berg, D. E. (2021).Casteism and the Tsundur Atrocity. In Dynamics of Caste and Law (pp. 127–149). Cambridge University Press.

Chemmencheri, S. R. (2015). State, social policy and subaltern citizens in adivasi India. Citizenship Studies, 19(3–4), 436–449.

Das, A. N. (1983). Agrarian Change from Above and Below: Bihar 1947-78. In Ranajit Guha (Ed.), SS II (pp. 180–227). Oxford University Press.

Devi, M. (2005). Jamunabati’s Mother. In In the Name of the Mother. Seagull Books.

Devi, M. (2008). Mother of 1084. Seagull Books.

Guha, R. (1995). Review: Subaltern and Bhadralok Studies. Economic and Political Weekly, 30(33), 2056–2058.

Guha, R. (1996). The Small Voice of History. In  Amin & Chakrabarty (Ed.), SS IX (pp. 1–12). Oxford University Press.

“So Many Words, So many sounds”: An Interview. (2004). In Romtha. Seagull Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I-25 Marks

CIA II-25 Marks

CIA III-50 Marks

PSY143 - ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Artificial intelligence (AI) is the basis for all human-machine interfaces and learning, and it is the future of all complex decision-making across diverse sectors. Students will explore the concepts of HMI and AI and become aware of advances in Artificial Intelligence. Case studies and workshops will allow students to consider how human factors and design thinking are applied in designing an interface and the ethical issues and implications of preserving human values. Through discussion, analysis, and workshops, students move towards designing or modifying a user-centric interface considering any sustainable development goal.

Course objectives: 

  • To explain Human-Machine Interactions and Artificial Intelligence and their applications in daily life.
  • To identify the importance and application of human factors and design thinking in interface design. 
  • To evaluate a user-centric interface considering any sustainable development goal.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain Human-Machine Interactions and Artificial Intelligence and their applications in daily life.

CO2: Identify the importance and application of human factors and design thinking in interface design.

CO3: Evaluate a user-centric interface considering sustainable development goals.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to AI and HMI
 

Introduction to AI and HMI, Types of AI and HMI, Machine and Deep Learnings and their applications, Current trends and development.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Human factors & AI
 

Human factors - Sensation, Perception, Apperception, Working Memory, Decision-making, and Design Thinking.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Principles of interface Design and Application of AI
 

Schneiderman’s eight golden rules, Norman’s model of interaction, Neilson’s Heuristics, Designing for people across the lifespan, and the Application of AI in health, aviation, and the workplace.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dix, A., Dix, A. J., Finlay, J., Abowd, G. D., & Beale, R. (2003). Human-computer interaction. Pearson Education.

Tenner, E. (2015). The Design of Everyday Things by Donald Norman. Technology and Culture, 56(3), 785-787. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Burnett, B., & Evans, D. (2016). Designing your life: How to build a well-lived, joyful life. Knopf.

Gassmann, O., & Reepmeyer, G. (2008). Universal design–innovations for all ages. In The silver market phenomenon (pp. 125-140). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. 

Davenport, T., & Kalakota, R. (2019). The potential for artificial intelligence in healthcare. Future healthcare journal, 6(2), 94. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1 will be an individual assignment.

CIA2 will be a group assignment with individual components for evaluation. 

CIA3 will be a written exam for 2 hours and 50 Marks. CIA3 will have Section- A and Section - B.

Section A (Essay questions). 10 Marks X 3 Questions=30 Marks 

Section B (Case study). 20 Marks x 1Q= 20 Marks

PSY155 - PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized to help learners in delving into the conversation between gender and psychology. Through the lens of socio-historico location of an individual an attempt will be made to locate gender, cognize the spaces of performing, reproducing and perpetuating gender. Looking through psychological and feminist theoretical lenses, the course will analyze the connection of the psychology of gender to the discourse of power and socio-political economical structures. Learners are encouraged to evaluate and envision possible new grounds for a better world, considering the changing cultural diversity in the present Indian society, therefore, reinforcing them to approach gendered issues through cultural, social constructionist and post-structuralist lens to analyze its implications.

Course Outcome

1: Examine the accounts of the production, reproduction and perpetuation of gendered and sexual identities, spaces and subjectivities and related psychological concepts.

2: Discuss gender roles and intersectional nature of identity in everyday life and experience, using psychological, feminist and post-feminist lenses.

3: Demonstrate psychological literacy and problem-solving abilities by suggesting possible counters to the critical gendered issues in personal, interpersonal, social, emotional, cultural, political and professional domains in a multicultural context

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Describing the spectrum and gender-diverse identities. 

Classical 

psychoanalytic theories on masculinity and 

feminity, analyses 

through feminist, queer and trans readings of psychoanalytic 

theories. 

Feminist theories 

Male gender role stress Gender and space - 

secondarity, 

performativity, 

multiplicity, trans 

community and mental health. 

Body, identity and 

subjectivity - 

psychological and 

philosophical readIngs

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Describing the spectrum and gender-diverse identities. Classical psychoanalytic theories on masculinity and feminity, are Analyses through feminist, queer and trans readings of psychoanalytic theories. Feminist theories Male gender role stress Gender and space - secondarity, performativity, multiplicity, trans-community and mental health. Body, identity and subjectivity - psychological and philosophical readings

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Theories
 

Queer and trans theories, Political Economy of Sex Gender and life-space- psychology, feminism, architecture, history & philosophy.

Gender and Bodies; Gender and Violence; Gender and Media

Gender and Work; Gender and Parenthood; Gender and Mental Health

Gender and Indian Law: LGBTQIA+ RightS

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Queer and trans theories, Political Economy of Sex; Gender and life-space psychology, feminism, architecture, history & philosophy. Gender and Bodies; Gender and Violence; Gender and Media; Gender and Work; Gender and Parenthood; Gender and Mental Health; Gender and Indian Law: LGBTQIA+ Rights

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Project Work
 

Project-work: 

Examine various sites of the performance and perpetuation of gender and Gendered 

discrimination– 

Through field work, that shows its 

Production in everyday spaces and at the 

Intersections of social, cultural, politcal  Location marked 

Discourses of gender.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 3
 

Project-work: Examine various sites of the performance and perpetuation of gender and Gendered discrimination– Through fieldwork,

that shows its Production in everyday spaces and at the Intersections of social, cultural, political. Location marked. Discourses of gender

Text Books And Reference Books:

RUDMAN, L. A. (2021). Social Psychology of gender: How Power and Intimacy Shape Gender Relations (2nd ed.). GUILFORD.

Matlin, M. (2011). Potential Problems and Biases in Current Research in The Psychology of Women (pp. 20-27). Nelson Education.

Fine, C. (2010). Delusions of gender: How our minds, society, and neurosexism create difference. WW Norton & Company.

Matlin, M. (2011).The Psychology of Women. Nelson Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Webb, D. (2023). LGBTQ rights in India. AEA Randomized Controlled Trials. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.10953-1.0

Irigaray(1995)-The Question of the Other Foucault(1976)-The Will to Knowledge: History of Sexuality (Vol 1)

Kristeva (1980) - Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection; Tans. (1992) by L. S. Roudiez.

Gayle (1975). “The Traffic in Women: Notes on a Political Economy of Sex.” In Rayna R. Reiter (ed.), Toward an Anthropology of Women. Monthly Review Press. pp. 157--210

(1975)

Stryker (2004) - Transgender Studies: Queer Theories Evil Twin.

Nagoshi et al. (2010)- Transgender Theories: Embodying Research & Practice Fieldwork and Project-based learning

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline: 

 

CIA 1 and CIA 2 is a 20 mark assignment 

CIA 3 is a 50 mark complex assignment

PSY156 - PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Understanding close relationships is among the central goals of social psychology. Close relationships range from family ties to friendships to romantic and sexual relationships. Our main purpose will be on learning about the life cycle of adult intimate (i.e., romantic) relationships, ranging from stages of initial attraction and relationship initiation to growth and maintenance of the relationship, and in some cases, dissolution. Although other close relationships such as close friendships, family, and work relationships will also be addressed and integrated into the course, they will be of secondary importance. Class meetings will consist mainly of facilitated discussions and student-led presentations on topics such as the biological bases of attraction and love, commitment and interdependence, relationship cognition, attachment, communication, sexuality, relational interaction patterns, relationship satisfaction, and the social context of relationships (e.g., the influence of others) conflict, relationship dissolution, and relationship maintenance.

CO1: Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.

CO2: Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.

CO3: Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.

CO2: Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.

C03: Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.
 

Introduction to key theories and concepts in relationship psychology (attachment theory, social exchange theory, equity theory, interdependence theory, etc.), theories of attraction (evolutionary, social, and cognitive perspectives), historical perspectives on the study of relationships, Ethical considerations in relationships.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.
 

Different types of relationship: childhood relationship (parent, teacher, caregiver), adult relationship, friendship and workplace relationships, emerging trends in relationships such as virtual relationship, long distance relationship, cohabitation, post- divorce relationship, friendships and social networks – benefits, types and maintenance. Social media and its influence on relationship formation and maintenance

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships
 

Effective communication strategies,

Active listening skills and empathetic communication,

Conflict resolution techniques and managing relationship disagreements, developing self-awareness, empathy, emotional intelligence, and applying psychological principles to real-life relationship scenarios.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baron, R.A., Byrne, D. & Bhardwaj, G. (2010). Social Psychology (12th Ed.). New Delhi: Pearson.

Miller, Chapter 1: The Building Blocks of Relationships Reis, H. T. (2012).

A history of relationship research in social psychology. In A.W. Kruglanski & W Stroebe (Eds.), Handbook of the history of social psychology (pp. 213- 232). New York: Psychology Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Graziano, W. G., & Bruce, J. W. (2008). Attraction and the initiation of relationships: A review of the empirical literature. In S. Sprecher, A. Wenzel, & J. Harvey (Eds), Handbook of relationship initiation, pp. 269-295. New York: Psychology Press.

Cameron, J. J., Stinson, D. A., & Wood, J. V. (2013). The bold and the bashful: Selfesteem, gender, and relationship initiation. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4, 685-692. https://doi.org/10.10 02/9780470939338

Finkel, E.J., Eastwick, P.W., Karney, B.R., Reis, H. T., & Sprecher, S. (2012). Online dating: A critical analysis from the perspective of psychological science. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 13, 3– 66.

Emery, L. F., Muise, A., Dix, E. L., & Le, B. (2014). Can you tell that I’m in a relationship? Attachment and relationship visibility on Facebook. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 40, 1466–1479.

Vanden Abeele, M., Schouten, A. P., & Antheunis, M. L. (2017). Personal, editable, and always accessible: An affordance approach to the relationship between adolescents’ mobile messaging behavior and their friendship quality. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships.

Sbarra, D. A., & Beck, C. J. A. (2013). Divorce and close relationships: Findings, themes, and future directions. In J. A. Simpson & L. Campbell (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 795-822). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Lewandowski, G. W., Aron, A., Bassis, S. & Kunak, J. (2006). Losing a selfexpanding relationship: Implications for the selfconcept. Personal Relationships, 13, 317-331

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:Individual assignment – Video presentations

The students are required to make individual video presentations on the basis of the topics that will be given to them. Submission will be based on one of the different topics through a Video PPT (The feature is available in PPT software) Topics: Example: theories of relationship psychology; theories of attraction Number of Slides: Maximum 9 slides (excluding the Title slide) Duration: 3 minutes

Test details: ● Total Marks: 20 marks ● Date of Submission: 31st August

Evaluation Criteria:  Organization of the content  Quality of the information  Research citations   Creativity   Personal Learnings 

CIA 2: Group Presentation (with viva)

This is a group assignment and the groups will be divided into groups of five. The faculty in charge will be giving each group a movie (based on relationships). Each group will be given one movie/short film to watch and a week long time shall be given for the same. In the following Thursday, 2 hours shall be given to the group to prepare a presentation (5 Slides in 5 Minutes) on the basis of guiding questions and will have to present the same in 5 mins in the next class. Individually group members shall answer facilitator’s questions. Post the presentation each member of the group will write a reflective note on their experience working on the topics and submit the same on moodle. Students can be creative in making their ppts and adding audio-visuals etc but should be able to cover within the specified time limit. PPT submission pre presentation mandatory and individual reflective notes submission post presentation is mandatory. The presentation might primarily include :  Different types of relationships portrayed in the film  Their own perception as to whether the relationships has been portrayed accurately in the film or not.  Conflict resolution strategies in relationships that were used in the film vs what they would have used.

Details: Total marks: 20 ● Date of Allotment of their Movie/Documentary: 12th September ● Date of Group Discussion/Planning: 21st September ● Date of Presentation – 28th September 

Evaluation Criteria:

Pre- Presentation: ● 1. Timely Submission 

Individual contribution: ● a. Organization and Flow of the content ● b. Relevance of the content  ● c. Reference 

Presentation: ● 3. Delivery and presentation of information  ● 4. Organization of the slides  5. Group effort and team spirit  6. Time Management  7. Q & A (one question to per person) 

Post Presentation 8. Depth of Individual Reflections / Learnings

CIA 3: In class written exam

This will be an in class written exam. It will consist of two parts – Part A and Part B. Part-A is for a total of 30 marks. Part A will consist of five 10-mark questions. Out of five, students will answer three questions (each question carries ten marks). Part - B is for 20 marks. It is a compulsory case study that the students need to answer. There is no choice. Total marks: 50 marks Date of examination: 26th October An Assessment scheme will be created for the paper

PSY157 - SCIENCE OF WELLBEING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course will focus on those aspects that help individuals thrive. The course sheds its light on well-being and its components and also clears all the misconceptions revolving around it. The students will be exposed to certain theories, concepts and practice procedures of well-being and its components. This programme will help the students to reflect on their life experiences on these dimensions and to know how to improve them and flourish in their life. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the concept of well-being and its components

CO2: Analyze the role of happiness and emotions in enhancing well-being using relevant theories

CO3: Apply various concepts of well-being on the life experiences of students

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being
 

Well-being - components of well-being: subjective happiness and life satisfaction

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being - components of well-being
 

subjective happiness and life satisfaction

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Happiness & Emotion
 

Happiness - Definition, Significance Misconceptions, types and interventions  Emotion - types, emotion regulation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Happiness
 

Definition, Significance Misconceptions, types and interventions Emotion - types, emotion regulation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Mindfulness- components
 

Mindfulness- components: gratitude, forgiveness, kindness-compassion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Mindfulness components
 

Gratitude, forgiveness, kindness-compassion

Text Books And Reference Books:

·       Carr, A. (2004). Positive Psychology. New York: Routldge.

·       Hupper, F. A., Baylis, N., & Keverne, B. (2005). The science of well-being. Oxford Scholarship.

·       Hupper, F. A., Baylis, N., & Keverne, B. (2005). The science of well-being. Oxford Scholarship.

·       Ivtzan, I. & Lomas, T.(Ed.) (2016) Mindfulness in Positive Psychology. New York: Routldge.

·       Kabat-Zinn, J. (2012). Mindfulness for beginners: reclaiming the present moment—and your life. Boulder, CO, Sounds True.

·       Linley, P. A., & Joseph, S. (Eds.). (2004). Positive psychology in practice. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. https://doi.org/10.10 02/9780470939338

 

·       Maddux, J. E. (2018). Subjective Wellbeing and Life Satisfaction. New York: Routldge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

CIA1

CIA2

CIA3

Class attendance & Participation

20 marks

20 marks

50 marks

10

PSY158 - STRESS MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Stress is a common word used today in everyday walks of life. This course is designed to enable students to understand the nature of stress and stressors at theoretical and Practical level. to understand the impact of stress on health and wellbeing and To analyse the maladaptive and adaptive coping strategies in developing a self-plan to manage stress effectively in a life long process.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the nature of stress, long-term effects and illnesses that can result from stressors at physiological, Psychological and behavioural levels

CO2: Evaluate personal stressors at various domains of life

CO3: Use various stress management techniques to achieve and maintain well-being.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding the Meaning and Nature of Stress
 

Explain the nature of stress, long-term effects and illnesses that  can result  from stressors at physiological, Psychological and behavioural levels

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding the Meaning and Nature of Stress: (15 hours)
 

Types and Sources of Stress,

Theories and Models of Stress,

Stressors at the workplace,

Stressors unique to age and gender.

Stress and Health: Life style diseases Psychological - Irritability, Depression,

 

Anxiety, Eating disorders, Insomnia

 

Behavioural - Maladaptive, risky

behaviours.

related to stress –

Cardiovascular Disorder, Allergies,

Digestive System Disorder, Recurrent

 

Head ache and Cancer.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Coping Strategies
 

Evaluate personal stressors at various domains of life

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Coping Strategies (10 hours) Styles of Coping
 

Maladaptive Coping Behaviors,

Maladaptive Cognitive Coping - addiction, abuse, violence, irrational thought process.

Individual differences in Coping

Adaptive Coping

Assessment of stress and wellbeing;

self-reflection

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Stress Management Approaches
 

Use various stress management techniquesto achieve and maintain well-being.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Stress Management Approaches (20 hrs)
 

Breathing Exercise;

Systematic Desensitization;

Progressive Muscle Relaxation Techniques;

Meditation;

Mindfulness, yoga.

Care of the Self:

Nutrition and Other Lifestyle Issues

Develop a personal stress management plan;

suggest stress

management

techniques for various

contexts like academic,

workplace etc

Text Books And Reference Books:

Health Psychology by Taylor; Control your Stress by Piperopoulus Dutta, P,K, (2010) Stress management Himalaya, Himalaya Publishing House Baron .L & Feist.J (2000) Health Psychology 4th edition, USA Brooks/Cole

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The Stress Management Handbook by Selhub Olpin, M. & Hesson, M. (2015). Stress Management for Life:

 

A Research-Based Experiential Approach. 4th edition. Wadsworth Publishing. Cooper,C,& Palmer,S, (2000)Conquer Your tress, London: Institute of personal development Universities Press. Dutta, P,K, (2010) Stress management Himalaya, Himalaya Publishing House. Lee, K. (2014). Reset: Make the Most of Your Stress: Your 24-7 Plan for Well-being. Universe Publishing.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attn+CP

20 marks

20 marks

50 marks

10 marks

SOC141 - WOMEN'S ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at enabling the student to study and understand the problems and issues relating to women in Indian society in the context of wider social forces. This course will sensitize students on the issues of subjugation of and oppression prevalent against women in Indian society and enhance their understanding of the various social problems that women face in the society.

Course objectives :

●        To introduce the students to social issues relating to women

●        To explore gender relations from an interdisciplinary perspective 

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Sociological Understanding of Social Problem with a Gender Perspective
 
  1. Conceptualization of a social problem                                         
  2. Structural and functional perspective, cultural roots, and critical analysis of social issues under power, ideology, and hegemony.
  3.  Understanding Gender and subjugation of gender.
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Sociological Understanding of Social Problem with a Gender Perspective
 
  1. Conceptualization of a social problem                                         
  2. Structural and functional perspective, cultural roots, and critical analysis of social issues under power, ideology, and hegemony.
  3.  Understanding Gender and subjugation of gender.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit II: Problems of Inequality
 
  1. Poverty - Concept of poverty, its multidimensional manifestations, Feminization of Poverty.
  2. Caste Inequality - Concept of caste, nature of inequality and position of women within it.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit II: Problems of Inequality
 
  1. Poverty - Concept of poverty, its multidimensional manifestations, Feminization of Poverty.
  2. Caste Inequality - Concept of caste, nature of inequality and position of women within it.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Problems of Violence and Discrimination
 
  1. Violence against Women: Cultural setting, Dowry, acid attacks, physical and sexual abuse, Global Sex Market.
  2. Missing Millions- Skewed sex ratio, son preference
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Problems of Violence and Discrimination
 
  1. Violence against Women: Cultural setting, Dowry, acid attacks, physical and sexual abuse, Global Sex Market.
  2. Missing Millions- Skewed sex ratio, son preference
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV: Problem of Personal Well-being
 
  1. Women and Health : Reproductive health
  2. Aging and women
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV: Problem of Personal Well-being
 
  1. Women and Health : Reproductive health
  2. Aging and women
Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhasin, K. (1994). What is Patriarchy? New Delhi: Kali for Women.

Beteille, A. (1990). Race, Caste and Gender. Man, 25(3), 489–504. https://doi.org/10.2307/2803715

John, Mary E. (2008). Women’s Studies in India: A Reader. New Delhi:Penguin Books.

Krishnaraj, M. (2007). Understanding Violence against Women. Economic and Political Weekly, 42(44), 90–91. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40276750

Kotiswaran, P. (2008). Born Unto Brothels: Toward a Legal Ethnography of Sex Work in an Indian Red-Light Area. Law & Social Inquiry, 33(3), 579–629. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20108776

KUMAR, A. K. S. (2013). The Neglect of Health, Women and Justice. Economic and Political Weekly, 48(23), 25–27. http://www.jstor.org/stable/23527205

 

Karkal, M. (1999). Ageing and Women in India. Economic and Political Weekly, 34(44), WS54–WS56. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4408566

 

Merton, R and Nisbet. (1966). Contemporary Social Problems, New York: Harcourt, Brace and World.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhasin, K. (1994). What is Patriarchy? New Delhi: Kali for Women.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment:

CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )- Class Presentations

CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )- Article Review

CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) - Prferably an exam

Attendance 5 marks 

 

SOC143 - SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will begin with a session on the Sociology of Cinema and the tools and techniques necessary to analyze the films that will be used in this course as a vehicle to examine society sociologically. This course introduces the student to the discipline of Sociology through cinema from India and elsewhere. It aims to allow students to critically examine society through cinema and its representation.

Course objectives:

  • To enable students to view cinema as a text for sociological analysis
  •  To gain an introduction to the discipline of sociology through cinema

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Sociology
 
  1. Sociology as a discipline
  2. Sociological Imagination
  3. Theoretical perspectives
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Sociology
 
  1. Sociology as a discipline
  2. Sociological Imagination
  3. Theoretical perspectives
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Social Structure
 
  1. Community, Association and Institution  
  2. Status and role
  3. Power and authority

Films: Dor (2006), Prem Rog (1982), Roja (1992)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Social Structure
 
  1. Community, Association and Institution  
  2. Status and role
  3. Power and authority

Films: Dor (2006), Prem Rog (1982), Roja (1992)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Culture and Socialization
 
  1. Culture
  2. Socialization
  3. Conformity and Deviance

Films: Taare Zameen Par (2007)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Culture and Socialization
 
  1. Culture
  2. Socialization
  3. Conformity and Deviance

Films: Taare Zameen Par (2007)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Stratification
 
  1. Sex and gender
  2. Race and Ethnicity
  3. Caste and Class 

 Films: Lajja (2001), India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart (2007)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Stratification
 
  1. Sex and gender
  2. Race and Ethnicity
  3. Caste and Class 

 Films: Lajja (2001), India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart (2007)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Burton, E. (1988 ). Sociology and the feature film. Teaching Sociology 16: 263-271.

Dudrah, R K. (2006).  Bollywood: Sociology goes to the Movies. New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Prendergast, C. (1986 ). Cinema Sociology: Cultivating the Sociological Imagination through Popular Film. Teaching Sociology 14: 243-248.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Mills, C. W. (2023). The sociological imagination. In Social Work (pp. 105-108). Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern
CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) 
 
Attendance 5 marks 

THE141 - THEATRE APPRECIATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is a participatory practice course, which makes Theatre appreciation applicable to all. It includes different Theoretical, Interactive and Participatory sessions from experts in the cultural industry. It also envisages witnessing live performances and digital performances to enhance the knowledge of the domain, which supports learning with clarity.

This course deals with five strands; Plays, Players, Places, Playgoers, and Performance practice.

Course Outcome

CO1: Able to appreciate the Theatre Art form as a whole.

CO2: Able to analyse and understand the aesthetics of the Theatre Performances.

CO3: Able to appreciate the performer's practices and the audience's reception.

CO4: Able to critically review live and digital Theatre performances.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Plays
 

Focus on Author and Texts.

Theatre Plays, Theatre text, What is Plays, Play style, Author, Dramatic text, Play text.

So, here is Talk, Play Reading 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Players
 

Focus on Acting practices and training.

How the plays can be played by players-who are the Players-Players are nothing but Actors/Performers, all Players are Directors cum Practitioners.

How these players Enact, Perform, Prepare, and how these Players are subjected to Acting training.

Players' concept -Acting, Directing, Design.

Players are playing a play.

So here is a workshop model planning.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Places
 

Focus Design concept.

What are the places where the Act happens -different stages, different Theatre, practice, live, video.

How places interact, Act happens, Events take place, What are the different Stage places, and how places connect with the significant aspects of the design; in this liveness, the video presentation will be there to make them understand different kinds of places and events. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Playgoers
 

Focus on Audience appreciation and participation of the audience.

Devising plays, Theatre dimension, Performance Devise, Analyse the Process.

How Playgoers or the Audience appreciate, involve, interact and immersively participate in the Theatre practice.

So there we devise practices. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Performance practice
 

Focus on Theatre practice and performance.

Where a play or Devised Theatre performance will be done with the Students/ Participants.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Theatre: The Lively Art11th Edition​ By Edwin Wilson and Alvin Goldfarb,2022

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Theatre, Brief13th Edition​,By Robert Cohen, Donovan Sherman and Michelle Liu Carriger​,2023

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation CIAs :2 Hrs

Writing assignments, Live performance watching, and review writing.

Evaluation ESE :3 Hrs

End Semester Exam will be a performance and submission of journals.

THE142 - IMPROVISATION AND DEVISED THEATRE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

l  To gain an understanding of principles and techniques of improvisation.

l  Develop skills in collaborative script development and performance.

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply an understanding of practical proficiency in executing the fundamental principles of a variety of devising techniques and improvised scene work in rehearsals and project development

CO2: Students will showcase acquired skills through practical performances of devised and improvised live theatre

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Rules of Comedy
 

Application of comedy rules through scene work, theatre sports, monologues, and play development

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Short Form Improvisation
 

Concepts of endowment, justification, plot progression, and ensemble/group mind are explored through short form stage scenarios

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Sketch Writing
 

Concept mining, plot structures, collaborative scripts, and using improvisation as a writing tool within a performance ensemble

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Long Form Improvisation
 

Students will explore case studies and history of long form improvised performance and practice rehearsing and performing “The Harold” for test audiences 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Devised Theatre Companies and Practices
 

Case studies of historic and contemporary devised theatre companies, paired with practical experiments in devising through imagery, text, and movement solutions 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:15
Devised Performance Scripts
 

Research, story development, and improvisation will result in a devised theatrical performance for a public audience that will showcase the tools and skills employed in the previous units

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.           Lynn, Bill. Improvisation for Actors and Writers: A Guidebook for Improv Lessons in Comedy. Colorado Springs: Meriwether Publishing, 2004. Print 

2.           Halpern, Charna and Del Close. Truth in Comedy: The Manual of Improvisation. Colorado Springs: Meriwether Publishing, 1994. Print

3. Playscripts selected by instructor and actors for case study projects 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.           Spolin, Viola. Improvisation for the Theater. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press, 1999. Print 

 

2.           Halpern, Charna. Art by Committee: A Guide to Advanced Improvisation. Colorado Springs: Meriwether Publishing, 2004. Print

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: Conducted internally at the departmental level

 

Assignment 1:  Quiz on Comedy Rules & Theatre Sports Practical Performance

Assignment 2:  Script Submission & Performance of Collaborative Comedy Sketch

Assignment 3:  Presentation & Student-Led Training Session from Historic Theatre Collectives

Assignment 4:  Actor Showcase Through Live Performances of Original Devised Theatre Pieces

VJE181 - REIMAGINING TECHNOLOGY TOOLS FOR DEMOCRACY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is a course that enables participants to create solutions using technology. There will be a design process to address problems related to democratic processes.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify a real world problem in the democratic process

CO2: Explain the problems through existing theories

CO3: Use design thinking process to modify and develop technology tools to address the identified problem

CO4: Write a paper that can be published

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction to Course and Principles of Democracy
 

Objective: Understand the foundations of democracy, its functioning, and its inherent

challenges.

Topics:

1. Introduction to the course

2. Principles of democracy

3. The role of journalism in democracy

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:2
Understanding Technology and Its Role in Democracy
 

 

Objective: Explore how technology tools have been used in democracy, both as a

facilitator and a challenge.

Topics:

1. The role of technology in modern democracy

2. Social media, misinformation, and democracy

Assignment: Case study analysis on technology's role in a selected democratic event.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:2
Current Technology Tools: An Overview
 

 

Objective: An overview of current technology tools used in democratic processes.

Topics:

1. Social media platforms

2. Online polling and voting systems

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:2
Journalism and Technology: Bridging the Gap
 

 

Objective: Explore how journalism can leverage technology tools to enhance

democracy.

Topics:

1. Data journalism: An overview

2. The role of AI and ML in journalism

Assignment: Propose a way to leverage a current technology tool to improve

journalistic practices. Test. Demonstrate.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
Design Thinking and Technology Redesign
 

 

Objective: Introduction to design thinking and its application to redesign technology

tools.

Topics:

1. Introduction to design thinking

2. The design thinking process: Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype, Test

Assignment: Identify a technology tool to redesign using the design thinking process.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Workshop: Redesigning Technology Tools
 

 

Objective: Hands-on experience in redesigning a selected technology tool.

Topics:

 

1. Apply design thinking to redesign selected technology tools

2. Share redesign proposals

Assignment: Continue work on redesign proposal.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
Workshop: Pitching and Improving Your Design
 

 

Objective: Learn to pitch a redesign and take constructive feedback.

Topics:

1. The art of pitching a technology tool

2. Feedback and improvement cycle

Assignment: Implement feedback and finalize redesign proposal.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:12
Final Presentations and Course Wrap-Up
 

 

Objective: Present final redesign proposal and reflection on the course.

Topics:

1. Final presentations

2. Reflection on course learning

3. The future of technology in journalism and democracy

Assignment: Final redesign proposal and reflection paper on the course.

Text Books And Reference Books:

News articles in the form of case studies, conceptually oriented book chapters and journal articles will be shared in class. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

News articles in the form of case studies, conceptually oriented book chapters and journal articles will be shared in class. 

Evaluation Pattern

Final redesign proposal and reflection paper on the course.

Course Evaluation:

 Participation & Engagement: 30%

 Assignments: 30%

 Final Project: 40%

VJE182 - SOFT SKILLS FOR JOURNALISTS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course has been conceptualised in order to equip students with the required soft skills as budding journalists. 

 

SL NO 

DESCRIPTION 

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to

REVISED BLOOM’S  

TAXONOMY (RBT) LEVEL

Understand how various soft skills will help them in their journalistic career

L1

Identify best practices undertaken by journalists in various cases discussed in the classroom

L2

Analyse how journalists make decisions during ethical dilemmas

L3

Evaluate how to apply various journalistic skills in the profession

L4

Create media content by utilising the journalistic values learnt throughout the course

L5

Apply knowledge gained during the course in using page-making software and design news pages

L6

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand how various soft skills will help them in their journalistic career

CO2: Identify best practices undertaken by journalists in various cases discussed in the classroom

CO3: Analyse how journalists make decisions during ethical dilemmas

CO4: Evaluate how to apply various journalistic skills in the profession

CO5: Create media content by utilising the journalistic values learnt throughout the course

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding Journalism 101
 

We will be watching movies and series to understanding journalistic values.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding how human values impact storytelling
 

We will be looking at case studies to understand how values drive better storytelling and how to act in difficult scenarios.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Entrepreneurship in journalism
 

We will be looking at how one can become a media producer in the creator economy.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Ethical dilemmas - Case studies

All the president's men

Frost vs Nixon

Spotlight

The Post

Newsroom

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ethical dilemmas - Case studies

All the president's men

Frost vs Nixon

Spotlight

The Post

Newsroom

Evaluation Pattern

Reflections on material watched/read

BBA142A - ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION TECHNIQUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims at imparting knowledge on Marketing Management from the perspective of Marketing Communications.Great marketing strategies can be powerful. Every year companies spend approximately $200 billion promoting their products and services – and that’s just in the United States alone! Explore how marketing campaigns, ads, and commercials are brought to life which will lead the exploration of various aspects of Advertising and sales promotion techniques which includes its objectives, classification, creative aspect and functions.

 

 This course introduces students to the concepts and processes of marketing and takes them deeper into the world of marketing.

 

Course Objectives: This course intends

  Describe the history of the advertising industry and its relation to today’s marketplace.

   List the roles and responsibilities of various advertising, marketing, and promotions professionals.

Develop students’ understanding and skill in development of communication strategy of a firm, particularly with advertising and sales promotions.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand fundamental concepts of Advertisement and Sales promotion

CO2: Understand importance of Integrated Marketing Communications strategies

CO3: Explain about creative Process in Advertisement ans Sales Promotion.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Marketing Communication
 

Meaning, elements, structure, and role of marketing communications. Theories of marketing communication: hierarchy of effects of communication, information processing theories, Marketing Communication Process,communication and attitude formation and change. Key communication terminologies. Miscommunication issues.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Marketing Communication Strategy
 

Marketing communication mix. Integrated marketing communication. Formulation of marketing communication strategy. Marketing communication barriers. Communication budgeting issues and methods. Promotion campaign planning and management.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Advertising
 

Meaning, elements,Functions, objectives and role of advertising. Evolution of advertising. Types of advertising. Social, ethical and legal issues of advertising.Role of Advertising in 21st Century.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Creative Process and Methods in Advertising
 

Creative process and methods. Visualization process and visualizer qualities. Message design: message theme, models, considerations. Message strategies: cognitive, affective, conative, and brand strategies. Advertising appeals. Essentials of a good appeal. Execution frameworks. Use of color in advertising.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Advertisement Development
 

Print advertising media: types of media and media choice. Copywriting for print media: types of ad copies. Ad copy objectives and requisites of a good copy. Print copy development process. Print copy elements: choice of headline, sub-heads, body copy, slogan and signature. Layout: functions, qualities of a good layout, layout principles.Television advertising:  nature, pros and cons. TVC development: script writing, story board, air-time buying and other considerations. Radio advertising: nature, pros and cons. Producing radio advertisements. Emerging advertisements: internet advertising and ambient advertising. Product placement strategies

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Sales Promotions
 

Scope and role of sales promotions. Reasons for the increased use of sales promotions. Consumer-oriented sales promotion methods: objectives and tools of consumer promotions. Trade-oriented sales promotions: objectives,tools and techniques to boost sales.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Core Text:

 

  1. Belch George and Michael Belch, Advertising and Promotion, Tata McGraw Hill.
  2. William Wells, John Burnet, and Sandra Moriarty, Adverting Principles and Practice, Prentice Hall of India.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

 

  1. Jaishri Jethwaney and Shruti Jain, Advertising Management, Oxford University Press.
  2. K. D. Koirala, Marketing Communications, Buddha Publications.
  3. Advertising, Sales and Promotion Management, S.A.Chunawalla, Himalaya.
  4. Advertising Management, Jethwaney, Jain, Oxford.
Evaluation Pattern

Assessment:

 

Components of assessment

Components

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

Marks

20

20

50

5

Weightage

50%

50%

50%

100%

Total

10

10

25

5

BBA142G - GROUP AND TEAM EFFECTIVENESS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The success of organizations is predominantly determined by the effectiveness of their people resources. To succeed in this global competition, organizations must build high-performing teams. The core of building high-performing teams is to understand team dynamics and build collaboration within teams, between teams and work as a team of teams. The course will enable the students to understand the nuances of team dynamics, experience the power of synergy working as a team and collaborate effectively for the benefit of personal, organizational and societal growth. 

 The course aim at 

  • To facilitate a better understanding of the group and the phase of group development 
  • To provide a deeper understanding of team dynamics and qualities of being a good team player. 
  • To learn to resolve team conflicts and build synergy. 
  • Build trust, offer constructive feedback, coach and mentor others. 
  • To inculcate the spirit of working as a team player.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Define the concept of groups and stages of group development.

CO2: List the nuances of working as a team and the qualities of a good team player.

CO3: Build teams, achieve synergy and resolve team conflicts.

CO4: Analyze and offer constructive feedback, coaching and mentoring.

CO5: Choose to collaborate effectively and work as a team

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Understanding Group Dynamics
 

Concept of Groups, Types of Groups, Reasons People Join Groups, Phases of Group Development, Group Cohesiveness, Group Think, Group Decision Making, Techniques.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Managing Teams
 

Concept of Team, the Significance of working as a Team, the Difference between Work Groups and Work Teams, Types of Teams, Team Effectiveness, Qualities of a good Team Player, and Self-Managed Teams

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Team Building
 

Concept of Team Building, Barriers to Team Building, Resolving Team Conflicts, Achieving Synergy through Teamwork.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
High Performing Teams
 

Building Trust and Credibility, Constructive Feedback, Coaching and Mentoring.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Experiential Learning
 

Bonding, Team Building, Trust Building, Team Competitive Games, Group Dynamics, Identifying High Performing Teams and Achieving Team Effectiveness

Text Books And Reference Books:

·       Robbins, P.S. (2022) Organizational Behavior: International Version. 19th Edition, Pearson Higher Education.

·       Leadership: Enhancing the lessons of experience by Hughes, R.L., Ginnett, R.C., & Curphy, G.J. (2019), 9th Edition, McGraw Hill Education, Chennai, India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·       https://hbr.org/2016/06/the-secrets-of-great-teamwork

·       https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbeshumanresourcescouncil/2020/09/16/14-characteristics-of-high-performing-teams/?sh=4708d51316c6

https://hbr.org/2021/10/5-things-high-performing-teams-do-differently

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 20 Marks

CIA 2 20 Marks

CIA 3 50 Marks 

Marks for attendance will be addedd as per University policy.

BLS144 - PRINCIPLES OF AYURVEDA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine. The course covers topics such as the history and philosophy of Ayurveda, principles of Ayurvedic diagnosis and treatment, and the use of Ayurveda in maintaining health and preventing disease. Students will also learn about the role of Ayurveda in contemporary medicine and the current state of Ayurvedic research.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the history and philosophy of Ayurveda.

CO2: Identify the basic principles of Ayurvedic diagnosis and treatment

CO3: Apply Ayurvedic principles in maintaining health and preventing disease

CO4: Evaluate the role of Ayurveda in contemporary medicine

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Ayurveda
 
  • History and philosophy of Ayurveda
  • Basic principles of Ayurveda
  • Doshas and their functions
  • The importance of digestion in Ayurveda
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Ayurvedic Diagnosis and Treatment
 
  • Pulse diagnosis in Ayurveda
  • Ayurvedic herbs and their uses
  • Ayurvedic therapies, including Panchakarma
  • Yoga and Ayurveda
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:11
Ayurveda for Health and Wellness
 
  • Ayurvedic diet and nutrition
  • Ayurvedic lifestyle practices
  • Ayurvedic approaches to mental health
  • Ayurveda and women's health
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Ayurveda in Contemporary Medicine
 
  • The role of Ayurveda in integrative medicine
  • The regulation of Ayurvedic products and practices
  • The current state of Ayurvedic research
  • The future of Ayurveda
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Lad, V. (1998). The complete book of Ayurvedic home remedies. Harmony.
  2. Frawley, D., & Ranade, S. (2001). Ayurveda, nature's medicine. Lotus Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Sharma, H. (2011). Ayurvedic healing: A comprehensive guide. Singing Dragon.
  2. Svoboda, R. (1999). Prakriti: Your Ayurvedic constitution. Lotus Press.
Evaluation Pattern

·        Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

·        Midterm Examination- 30%

·        Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

·        Seminar presentation – 10%

·        Final Examination - 30%

CHE141 - CHEMISTRY IN ACTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course deals with the abundance of elements on earth and in biological systems and their inevitable role in the functioning of the living systems and the universe

This course highlights the chemistry in action in drug usage, detection of disease, infection, drunken drive, in metal extraction process, in working principle of home appliances, in recreation, in archaeology, and in human system

This course deals with the application of chemistry in forensics

This course emphasis the need for sustainable energy and environment.

This course is intended to

Evoke an understanding on the inevitable role of chemistry in biological system as well as the environment

Make students appreciate chemistry in action in different fields of application and in daily life

Create an awareness regarding need for sustainable energy and environment.

Course Outcome

CO1: Gains understanding on the inevitable chemistry in action in biological system

CO2: Gains understanding on the abundance of different elements and their action in biological system and in the universe

CO3: Able to practice the principles of sustainable chemistry and proper usage of energy in daily life

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Distribution of elements on Earth and in living systems
 

Natural abundance of elements, Elemental composition of human body.

Sodium chloride a common and important ionic compound- hydrated salts and their applications (cement).

 

Eg.Alums, plaster of paris- 1 hr (asynchronous)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Carbon atom: The building block of life
 

Carbon based molecules in Biological systems-proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, fats. Carbon cycle,

Changes in carbon cycle. Allotropes of carbon-2 hr (asynchronous)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Design in molecules
 

Molecules and perception- the molecular basis of smell and taste.

The design in light and

Fire- (synchronous)

 

The versatile molecule: water.

The design in oxygen-

 

(asynchronous)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Common drugs including drugs of abuse
 

Classification of drugs and their effects.

1. Paracetamol

2. Ibuprofen

 

3. botox

4. chloramphenicol (synchronous)

 

 

5. cocaine, 6. Cannabis (asynchronous)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Chemistry of Atmosphere
 

Phenomena in the outer layers of atmosphere, Depletion of ozone in the stratosphere,

volcanoes, The greenhouse effect, Photochemical smog (synchronous)

 

 Acid rain, Indoor pollution(asynchronous)

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Out of Oxygen
 

Industrial, commercial, medical and scientific applications of oxygen-Steel making, in rocket

engines, water and waste treatment processes.

 

Oxygen crisis-Does the earth run out of oxygen. Burning oil, coal, gas, wood or other organic materials, the O2 we breathe, to break carbon-hydrogen bonds and release energy. Combustion, carbon dioxide. The concept of oxygen bar- (synchronous)

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Chemistry in Daily Life
 

Breath analyser, metals from sea, microwave ovens-dipole moments at work. Ice skating,

desalination-reverse osmosis. Determining the age of artifacts.

(synchronous)

 

Haemoglobin, pH of blood.

antacids and pH balance in stomach. How an egg shell is made ?- (asynchronous)

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:2
Chemical Mysteries
 

Who killed Napolean-Arsenic poisoning, Marsh test for arsenic.

Gold finger printing by mass spectrometry 

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
Future Chemistry
 

What is in store for the near future, Energy and environment Energy production and energy

utilization.

 

The nature of energy and types of energy. (synchronous)

Radioactivity-Demand for energy (asynchronous)

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:5
Green Chemistry
 

Waste minimization, design of safer and more efficient processes for waste management.

waste management (synchronous).

 

Sustainable Chemistry. (asynchronous)

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Nina Morgan Chemistry in Action: The Molecules of Everyday Life, 1 st ed, Oxford

University Press, 1995.

 

[2] John T. Moore Chemistry for Dummies 1 st ed. For Dummies, 2002.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[3] Raymond Chang, Chemistry. 8 th ed, Mc Graw Hill, 2002..

[4] Kirpal Singh Chemistry in Daily Life, 2 nd ed Prentice-Hall of India Private

 

Limited, 2008.

Evaluation Pattern

1.  CIA -1 ……………………….                           25Marks

2.  Mid-term Test (CIA-2)………………………   25 Marks

3.  End-semester examination …………………    50 Marks

       

                                TOTAL                              100 Marks

COM149 - INVESTMENTS AND TRADING STRATEGIES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course provides basic knowledge of investment alternatives available for individuals and outlines the functioning of primary and secondary markets. It also focuses on giving exposure to students on stock market trading and strategies.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the various investment options available to investor.

CO2: Apply various techniques used by professionals for analyzing and valuing investment options.

CO3: Make a good investment plan.

CO4: Analyze past price movement of securities and predict future price movement.

CO5: Understand the trading strategies in both stock and derivatives segments of trading

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Investment
 

Investment meaning- definitions- Investment v/s speculation- Investment process- investment categories- characteristics of investments- objectives of investments- types of investors- Hedging- Financial instruments – Risk and Return – Introduction to Portfolio Management

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Capital Market in India
 

Indian Market-overview – players-participants and stock exchanges – Primary and Secondary market – SEBI and its functions - Functioning of stock exchange in India – stock market index

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Trading in Secondary market
 

Terms relating to trading in cash market – stock market indices – stock symbols - Types of order – market order – limit order – stop loss order – stop limit order – trailing stop order - Method of placing an order- Inter day and intraday trading in cash market

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Fundamental Analysis
 

EIC analysis- Economic analysis- tools for economic analysis- Industry analysis- standard industrial classification- tools for industry analysis- quantitative industry analysis- company analysis- tools for company analysis.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Technical Analysis
 

Meaning of Technical analysis and basic principles of technical analysis- Trends and Chart patterns -Eliot wave theory - Dow Theory, support and resistance level - different types of Charts - Mathematical indicators and Market indicators. Fundamental Vs technical analysis.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Derivatives market
 

Introduction to Derivatives Trading – Terms relating to Derivatives – Types of Derivatives – Forward – Future – Option – Swap – Derivative markets in India – stock exchanges trading derivative instruments. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Punithavathy Pandian (2021). Security analysis and portfolio management Vikas publishing house Pvt Ltd.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Bhalla, V. (20188). Investment Management. New Delhi: Sultan Chand Publications
  2. John C Hull, (2018), Options, future & Other Derivatives, Pearson edition
  3. websites - bseindia.com; nseindia.com; moneycontrol.com etc.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Component

Description

Weightage

CIA I

Google class room  MCQs

One-hour duration. Units 1 and 2.

 

20%

CIA II

Group Assignment/Project

25%

CIA III

Online Exam - ESE

MCQ test based on Case study analysis - 

conducted online using google classroom 

50%

 

Attendance

5%

 

Total

100%

 

COM151 - DIGITAL MARKETING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This Course aims to help learners build Online business strategies through Digital Marketing. The course provides conceptual knowledge on basics of marketing, fundamentals of Digital Marketing, subject related jargons and application of marketing in an online platform; it also enables an understanding of optimization a website through SEO; and attraction traffic through Google AdWords campaigns as well as social media campaigns. The course ensures to provide working knowledge of tools such as Google AdSense; Google Ad creation; Blog creation, embed Google Analytics in a webpage or in a blog to understand the performance of the online business, its ads, its traffic and to plan online business strategies.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recall the concepts of Digital marketings

CO2: Apply digital marketing tools and gain insights on analytical tools

CO3: Evaluate different marketing strategies

CO4: Design marketing strategies for customized goods and services

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Unit 1: Basics of Digital marketing
 

Introduction to basics of marketing - Marketing v/s Sales - Marketing Mix – Strategic Flow for Marketing Activities - Digital Marketing Fundamentals – subject related jargons of Digital Marketing, Future of Digital Marketing-Trends and innovations in digital marketing,

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit 2: Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and Search Engine Marketing
 

Search Results & Positioning, Benefits of Search Position, Stakeholders in Search, Mechanics of Search, On-Page Optimization -The SEO Process - Keyword Research and analysis, Research Tools & Selection of keyword - Content Updates based on the keyword,. On-page and off-page optimization techniques, Local SEO strategies, Overview of search engine marketing, Creating effective ad copy and landing pages, Measuring and analyzing campaign performance. Introduction to Content Marketing, Developing a content marketing strategy,  Creating high-quality and engaging content, Measuring and analyzing content marketing performance

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Unit 3: Implementing and managing advertisement campaign through Google AdSense
 

Introduction to online advertisement – various types of online advertisement – creation of Google Ad step by step through Google AdSense - Meaning and introduction to PPC, Strengths of Pay Per Click - Landing Pages, Campaign Management- Conversion Tracking- Conversion Metrics - CPA, CTR.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Unit 4: Social Media Marketing
 

Introduction to social media, role of social media in marketing success, Sentimental analysis, Hash-tags, Face book Campaign, LinkedIn Campaign, YouTube advertising, Managing social media accounts and pages, Paid advertising on social media platforms, Measuring and analyzing social media performance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Unit 5: Data driven decision making using analytics and insights
 

Introduction to analytics and tools such as Google Analytics and Adobe’s site catalyst, Measuring and analyzing campaign performance,  Role of analytics in marketing campaigns. Developing reports and presenting insights to stakeholders

Text Books And Reference Books:

Kingsnorth, S. (2022). Digital Marketing Strategy: An integrated approach to online marketing. Kogan Page

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Nargundkar, R., & Sainy, R. Digital Marketing: Cases from India. Notion Press.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: OBJECTIVE TYPE TEST: The first CIA involves an MCQ test in the Google Classroom consisting of questions from the first two units. The exam duration will be of twenty minutes.

CIA II: CASE STUDY ASSIGNMENT: A case study will be assigned related to the topics covered in the second and third units of the syllabus.

CIA III: WRITTEN EXAMINATION 

CSC155 - USER DESIGN EXPERIENCE (UX) (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The UXD course provides insight details about user experience design. In this course, students will learn the core principles of visual design, including building storyboards, choosing color schemes, and visualizing the ideal user interface to improve the user experience. This course will help to create intuitive and great-looking software products.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe design principles.

CO2: Demonstrate impactful visual design and color concepts.

CO3: Apply design principles and skills for design prototypes.

CO4: Design an intuitive design for software products.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

HCI-Human computer Interaction-Fundamentals of Design-people and design-Visual Design-overview -the difference between visual & UI/UX, UI design trends, Roles of a UI designer, UI UX process-UX- UX terminologies-elements-layers-roles-user centered vs. value-centered design-usertypes.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Principles
 

 

Visual Communication- Design principles- Design elements- Color theory- Graphic Design- Layouts- Mockups- Typography.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
User Experience Design (UXD)
 

User Experience Design-Charts  and User Pathway -Information Architecture-Wireframes-Prototype-User Research-Scenarios

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Voice user experience design
 

Introduction- a brief history of VUIs- What is VUI design? -Chatbots.Basic Voice user experience design principles-Designing for mobile devices versus IVR systems-Conversational Design-Error Handling-Personas, Avatars, Actors and video games-Speech Recognition Technology-Advanced Voice User Interface Design-User testing for VUI.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Case Studies
 

Case studies- Web-Mobile-product interaction-Mock-ups-Designing Wireframes-Learn through cheat-sheets

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  DonaldChesnut,KevinPNichols,“UXforDummies”,JohnWileyandSons,2014

[2]     Jodie Moule, “KILLER UX Design”, Site point, Shroff Publishers, 2015 ISBN: 978:93:5213:175-4

[3]   CathyPearl, “Designing Voice User Interfaces”, O’Reilly Media Inc, 2017, ISBN: 978- 93-5213-526-4

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]   DonaldA.Norman,BasicBooks,"TheDesignofEverydayThings",Inc.NewYork,NY,

USA ©2002 ISBN: 9780465067107

[2]    Krug, Steve, Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: a Common Sense Approach to Web Usability”, [Berkeley, Calif.] : New Riders, 2014.Print

[3]    William Lidwell, Kritina Holden, Jill Butler, “Universal Principles of Design”, Rockport Publishers, 2010, ISBN-13: 978-1-592453-587-3,ISBN-10:1-59253-587-9.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 50%

ESE - 50%

ECO146 - GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to provide knowledge of the fundamental differences between genders from economic, biological, political, , psychological and feminist perspectives. It also provides the necessary analytical tools to analyze differences in bargaining positions of men and women within households alongside explaining consequences of marriage , women’s education, health, career choices and wellbeing.  The course also examines developmental outcomes from a gendered lens.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the various disciplinary perspectives from which gender differences could be analysed such as the biological, the economic, the psychological or the feminist perspectives

CO2: To understand different gender inequality index

CO3: Critically evaluate ways by which women could be empowered with a focus on public policy

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Gender and Development
 

Basic concepts and subject matters. Gender statistics and System of gender inequality- - Impact of Economic Growth on Gender Equality -Gender Differences in Incomes, education, health and labour market- Women’s Contribution to GDP - Estimation of Women’s Unpaid Work. . Impact of Globalization on Gender Status- Globalization of the World Economy and Gender Status

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Economic Growth and Gender Equality
 

Gender Equity Index - Gender Inequality Index of UNDP - Gender Status Index - Gender in Human Development - Gender Development Index - Gender Empowerment Measure - Gender in Social Development Indicators - the OECD Social Institutions and Gender Index (SIGI).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Gender Development and Mainstreaming Initiatives in India
 

Women’s Empowerment in India-Gender Inclusive Planning -Role of Institutions in Gender Mainstreaming  - Gender Sensitization of institutions and policies - Mainstreaming Gender into Development Policies - Rights Based Approach to Gender Development.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1) Eswaran, M (2014), Why Gender Matters in Economics, Princeton University, Princeton and Oxford

2) Joyce P. Jacobsen (2020), Advanced Introduction to Feminist Economics, Edward Elagar Publishing

3) Time use survey report 2019, Government of India

4) Agarwal, B., & Bina, A. (1994). A field of one's own: Gender and land rights in South Asia (No. 58).Cambridge UniversityPress.

5) Klasen S. (2006) UNDP’s Gender-Related Measures: Some Conceptual Problems and Possible Solutions, Journal of Human Development and Capabilities 7 (2), pp.243-74

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Klasen S. (2006) UNDP’s Gender-Related Measures: Some Conceptual Problems and Possible Solutions, Journal of Human Development and Capabilities 7 (2), pp.243-74

2.Book chapter: Kabeer Naila, Benevolent Dictators, Maternal Altruists and Patriarchal Contracts: Gender and Household Economics, Chapter 5 in Reversed Realities: Gender Hierarchies in Development Thought

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 A and B for 30 marks

CIA 2 A and B  for 20 marks

ENG182-2 - DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - II (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course introduces the learners to six important areas: Principles of Writing, Features of Writing, Essay Organization, Précis Writing, Academic Presentation and Research Writing. The course design gives more weightage to productive skills based on their rudimentary receptive skill acquisition occurred in semester one. The participants of this course will exercise their textual scholarship and translate their areas of interest into meaningful writing. This course directs the learners to produce basic academic presentations which should be career-oriented and of social relevance. Bloom’s taxonomy of knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, evaluation and synthesis becomes the substructure of this course instruction.

 

 

 

Objectives

 

 

 

       To acquire critical and creative thinking

 

       To develop the taste for theory of knowledge

 

       To be aware of professional and research driven presentation skills

 

       To apply the mechanics in academic writing skills

 

       To use research skills to take a position in writing (writing a paper or presentation)