CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES

School of Arts and Humanities

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (English Honours)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BENG331 CANON AND ITS CONTESTATIONS Core Courses 5 5 100
BENG332 LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY Core Courses 4 4 100
BENG333 LANGUAGE, MIND AND MACHINE Core Courses 4 4 100
BENG334 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS Core Courses 4 4 100
BENG341A AMERICAN LITERATURE-I Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BENG341B SOCIOLINGUISTICS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BENG341C VISUAL CULTURE: AN INTRODUCTION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BENG361 BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES Generic Elective Courses 4 4 100
BENG381 INTERNSHIP Skill Enhancement Courses 0 2 100
SDEN311 SKILL DEVELOPMENT Skill Enhancement Courses 2 0 50
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BENG431 THE CONSTRUCTION OF MEANINGS: PRAGMATICS, SEMANTICS AND SEMIOTICS - 5 5 100
BENG432 RESEARCH WRITING - 5 5 100
BENG433 LITERARY AND CULTURAL THEORY - 5 5 100
BENG441A AMERICAN LITERATURE-II - 4 4 100
BENG441B FOLKLORE: TRADITION AND RECONFIGURATION - 4 4 100
BENG441C INTRODUCTION TO DISCOURSE ANALYSIS - 4 4 100
BENG461 CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100
SDEN411 SKILL DEVELOPMENT - 2 0 50
5 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BENG531 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES Core Courses 15 5 100
BENG532 LANGUAGE, CLASSROOM, AND PEDAGOGY Core Courses 15 5 100
BENG533 DISCOURSES IN ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES Core Courses 15 5 100
BENG541A INDIAN LITERATURES: PROBLEMS AND PERSPECTIVES Discipline Specific Elective Courses 15 4 100
BENG542A TRANSLATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE Discipline Specific Elective Courses 15 4 100
BENG542B CULTURAL LINGUISTICS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 15 4 100
BENG543A READING GRAPHIC NARRATIVES Discipline Specific Elective Courses 15 4 100
BENG543B INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES Discipline Specific Elective Courses 15 4 100
BENG581 INTERNSHIP Skill Enhancement Courses 0 2 100
SDEN511 SKILL DEVELOPMENT Skill Enhancement Courses 2 0 50
6 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BENG631 UNDERSTANDING GENDER - 5 5 100
BENG632 CASTE AND MARGINALITY - 5 5 100
BENG633 SEMINAR IN MULTILINGUALISM - 5 5 100
BENG641A NARRATIVE APPROACHES TO TRAUMA - 4 4 100
BENG641B LITERARY DISABILITY STUDIES - 4 4 100
BENG642A POPULAR CULTURE: THE POLITICS OF THE EVERYDAY - 4 4 100
BENG642B ENGAGING WITH CINEMA - 4 4 100
BENG642C HORROR NARRATIVES - 4 4 100
BENG681 DISSERTATION - 2 2 100
SDEN611 SKILL DEVELOPMENT - 2 0 50

BENG331 - CANON AND ITS CONTESTATIONS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized to break the age-old notions of the classics as the best. It attempts to familiarize students with the debates of high culture and low culture; problematize their understanding of literature itself which had begun in the previous semester. It will enable students to understand and contest the hierarchies established within literary and academic circles; relook at their own assumptions in judging literature as good and bad. It will enable them to engage with literature as a text, in context.

This course aims to enable the student to:

• Understand the concept of canon

• Interrogate notions of the canon

• Debate on notions of high and low culture

• Critically engage with literature

• Questions the notions of ‘authority’ and

• Understand that all classifications are arbitrary constructions.

Course Outcome

CO1: Distinguish between a canonical and non-canonical work through reading classical and non-classical texts and writing assignments.

CO2: Critically evaluate and debate the politics behind the construction of canons through assignments and written examinations.

CO3: Demonstrate an informed understanding of high and low culture through varied classroom engagements and presentations.

CO4: Compile knowledge around questions of value judgement in literature through assignments and written examinations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to the Canon
 

 

Unit details: Description: This section will deal with discussion on student’s understanding of literature and its functions. The prescribed sections will merge with the initial discussions and introduce the students to the idea of a hierarchy/canon which has been unwittingly following faithfully all these years. The critical reading of the texts included in this unit is intended to sensitise students about the local, regional and national preferences existed in the construction of canon. It will make the students realise how far the notions of gender, race and nationality played a role in traditional contexts in promoting literary works.

14. Canon of Literature.” A Glossary of Literary Terms, by M. H. Abrams, Cengage Learning, 2015.

15. Leavis, F. R. “Introduction.” The Great Tradition, Penguin, 1972.

16. Arnold, Matthew. “The Study of Poetry by Matthew Arnold.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, www.poetryfoundation.org/articles/69374/the-study-of-poetry.

17. Johnson, Samuel. Preface to Shakespeare. Blurb, 2021.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Contestations to the Canon
 

 This section will problematize students’ knowledge of the classics and their judgments of literature as good and bad. It will enable them to understand how their notions of literature have been conditioned by certain operational power structures in regional and global contexts. The notions about the significance of cultural tradition discussed in the texts in the unit will make students realise the systems of value formation in different historical and cultural contexts.

16. Sacks, Sam. “Canon Fodder: Denouncing the Classics.” The New Yorker, 23 May 2013, www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/canon-fodder-denouncing-the-classics.

17. Nelson, Camilla. “Friday Essay: The Literary Canon Is Exhilarating and Disturbing and We Need to Read It.” The Conversation, 7 Dec. 2021, theconversation.com/friday-essay-the-literary-canon-is-exhilarating-and-disturbing-and-we-need-to-read-it-56610.

18. Howe, Irving. “Why You Absolutely Should Read the Canon in College.” The New Republic, 1 Mar. 2022, newrepublic.com/article/119442/irving-howe-value-canon-essay-literature-and-education.

19. Waugh, Patricia. “Value: criticism, canons, and evaluation.” Literary Theory and Criticism, Oxford University Press, 2006.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Reading the Canon and its ?Other?
 

This unit will introduce students to literature that is considered canonical and some of its contestations. This will enable students to question the givens and make better-equipped critiques. The students will also be introduced to the idea of the writing back. The unit will make students aware of the notions on language and culture formed in different historical contexts in global and regional contexts.

5. “Learning to Curse: Aspects of Linguistic Colonialism in the Sixteenth Century.” Learning to Curse: Essays in Early Modern Culture, by Stephen Greenblatt, Routledge, 2016.

(Choose any TWO pairs from the given three pairs.)

6. Pair I:

Shakespeare, William. The Tempest. The Arden Shakespeare, 2022.

Cesaire, Aime. A Tempest. 1st ed., Theatre Communications Group Inc.,U.S., 2002.

7. Pair II:

Austen, Jane. Emma. Fingerprint! Publishing, 2014.

Ohja, Rajashree, director. Aisha. PVR Pictures, 2010.

8. Pair III:

Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. Amazing Reads, 2017.

Rhys, Jean. Wide Sargasso Sea. Penguin Books, 2019.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
The ?Not So Popular?
 

This section will introduce students to writer’s and texts that are marginalised to understand the complexities of constructions of good and bad literature and the politics of representation. The section will also conclude the basic arguments made in the course and enable students to voice their opinions.

18. Forman, Simon, and J. O. Halliwell-Phillipps. The Autobiography and Personal Diary of Dr. Simon Forman: The Celebrated Astrologer, from A.D. 1552, to A.D. 1602, from the Unpublished Manuscripts in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. For Private Circulation Only, Richards, Printer, 1849.

19. Maria Edgeworth: Excerpts from her Letter

20. Edgeworth, Maria. The Life and Letters of Maria Edgeworth. Kessinger Pub.

21. Bama. Karukku. Oxford University Press, 2014.

22. Marlene Nourbese Phillips: “Brown Sugar”

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
The Concept of Canon in the Contemporary Literary Context
 

The unit aims to make students understand the changing concepts of canon in the context of new literary theories and new approaches towards popular literature

6. Conflicts between New Literary Theories and the Concept of Canon: Deconstruction, Cultural Materialism, etc: Derrida: A Very Short Introduction, Culture and Materialism by Raymond Willaims

7. New Approaches in the Reading and Evaluation of Popular Literature: The Uses of Literacy by Richard Hoggart.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

All the prescribed texts in the syllabus.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abrams, M H and Geoffrey Gart Harpham. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 11the Edn. Cengage Learning, 2015.

Day, Gary. The British Critical Tradition: A Re-evaluation. Palgrave, 1992.

Bourdieu, Pierre. The Field of Cultural Production: Essays on Art and Literature. Polity Press, 1993.

Waxler, Robert P. The Risk of Reading: How Literature Helps us to Understand Ourselves and the World. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2010

Eagleton, Terry. The Idea of Culture. Wiley, Free, Margaret and Harriette Taylor Treadwell. Reading Literature. Bibliobaazar, 2010.

Waxler, Robert P. The Risk of Reading: How Literature Helps us to Understand Ourselves and the World. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2010.

Mukerji, Chandra and Michael Schudson. Rethinking Popular Culture: Contempory Perspectives in Cultural Studies. University of California Press, 1991.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 20 Marks

MSE - 50 Marks

CIA3 - 20 Marks

ESE- 50 Marks

BENG332 - LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course will serve as a detailed introduction to the major approaches in western Literary theory and Criticism. It will familiarise the students with different modes of analysis too. The course will help them to have a thorough understanding of the various dimensions of literary works

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge of key concepts, theoretical frameworks, and discourses in literary criticism and theory through classroom discussions

CO2: Explain the development of theoretical ideas across ages through class discussions, written assignments

CO3: Interpret literary texts by employing relevant theoretical frameworks in their written assignments and assessments.

CO4: Analyze the narratives in the folk, regional, national and transnational contexts and provide meaningful interpretations through close reading and research.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Ancient Greek Criticism and Neoclassical Criticism
 

This unit will closely look into some of the earliest debates pertaining to art and society, through the works of Plato and Aristotle, as well its continuities that can be traced through the works of Sir Philip Sidney, John Dryden and Samuel Johnson.

18. Plato

19. Aristotle

20. Sir Philip Sidney

21. John Dryden

22. Samuel Johnson

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The Enlightenment and Romanticism
 

This unit closely studies some of the prominent ideas put forth by crucial Enlightenment era thinkers and their impact on literary criticism on a global scale. Subsequently, this unit will also investigate its continuities as well as crucial instances of ideological departure with the literary movement of Romanticism, the values of which are often considered to be antithetical to that of Enlightenment.

1. Jean-Jacques Rousseau

2. Immanuel Kant

3. William Wordsworth

4. Samuel Taylor Coleridge

5. Ralph Waldo Emerson

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
New Criticism and Modernism
 

This unit will focus on the roots of New Criticism as well as Modernism. The unit will begin by tracing the early conceptualisation of some of the foundational theories of new criticism through the 1919 essay “Tradition and Individual Talent” written by the Modernist poet and critic, T.S. Eliot.

23. T. S. Eliot

24. W.K. Wimsatt and I.A. Richards

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Psychoanalysis
 

This unit will closely study psychoanalysis; its origins, key thinkers, their impact on a global scale, and the influence of their work on literary criticism and theory.

8. Sigmund Freud

9. C.G. Jung

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Feminism and Marxism
 

This unit will explore feminist literary criticism and Marxist literary criticism. Beginning with Mary Wollstonecraft, this unit shall also closely study the possibilities of intersectionalities between gender and class within the global context.

1. Mary Wollstonecraft

2. Virginia Woolf

3. Elaine Showalter

4. Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels

5. Antonio Gramsci

Text Books And Reference Books:

As mentioned in the unit details.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 8th ed. Wardworth, 2005.

Ahmand, Aijaz. In Theory: Classes, Nations, Literatures. Oxford University Press, 2006.

Culler, Jonathan. The Pursuit of Signs: Semiotics, Literature, Deconstruction. Routledge, 2001.

Devy, G.N. Indian Literary Criticism: Theory and Interpretation. Orient Longman, 2007.

Eagleton, Terry. Literary Theory: An Introduction. 2nd ed. Blackwell, 2008.

---. The Function of Criticism. Verso, 2005.

Gurrin, Wilfred L, et al. A Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature. 5th ed. Oxford University Press, 2005.

Habib, M.A.R. A History of Literary Criticism and Theory: From Plato to the Present. Blackwell, 2008.

John, Eileen, and Dominic McIver Lopes, editors. Philosophy of Literature: Contemporary and Classic Readings. Blackwell, 2004.

Kapoor, Kapil. Literary Theory: Indian Conceptual Framework. Affiliated East-West Press, 1998.

Klages, Mary. Literary Theory: A Guide for the Perplexed. Continuum, 2006.

Leitch, Vincent B., ed. The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. W W Norton, 2001.

Rice, Philip, and Patricia Waugh. Modern Literary Theory. 4th ed. Hodder Arnold, 2001.

Rivkin, Julie and Michael Ryan, editors. Literary Theory: An Introduction. Blackwell, 2003.

Rooney, Ellen. Feminist Literary Theory. Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Waugh, Patricia. Literary Theory and Criticism: An Oxford Guide. Oxford University Press, 2006

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

MSE-50

CIA3= 20

ESE-50

BENG333 - LANGUAGE, MIND AND MACHINE (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized in order to expose students to research enterprises that seek to discover the underlying structure of language and cognition. The traditional approach towards the rules of language is both problematic and, on many fronts, inadequate when it comes to the application of the explanatory adequacy approach towards the language. Linguistics is the study of human language, its nature, structure, origin and its uses. Linguists (those who study language) have devised various methodologies which can be used to study language, not as a set of rules of the system but as the rules which unravel human cognition. In this course, the approach towards the linguistic system would be to ask the question of why the language is the way it is rather than just describing the phenomenon. This course will give students an overview of the field of modern linguistics and will enable them with the basic tools, methodologies, rules, etc. The course develops an understanding of the various subsystems of languages including Phonology, Morphology, Syntax, and Semantics as generative systems. It also directs towards the objectivity of languages in order to think of language as an independent system. The course aims to provide enough basics/working knowledge of the discipline that can be further enhanced in order to develop skills like data analysis, data mining, text mining, POS tagging, corpus understanding, etc., for the students wishing to have a career in language data analysis in Google, Amazon, Meta, and other AI startups. Its objective is to see language as a generative mechanism from the cognitive and computational perspectives. Further, how can this knowledge be translated to understand the relationship between language, mind and machine?

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge of key concepts, rules and frameworks, and systems in the field of Linguistics through classroom discussions, presentations and workshops.

CO2: Develop linguistics skills like transcribing, POS tagging, text mining, phonological-morphological analysis, disambiguation, intent analysis, linguistics mapping and normalization through lectures, workshops and seminars.

CO3: Apply critical thinking in order to find the abstracted form of language to build an association between natural language and machine through data analysis and practice in the class and workshops.

CO4: Employ analytical skills, various linguistics rules, techniques and notions to understand the system or grammar of a particular language as well as universal.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Phonetics and Phonology
 

Phonology is the scientific study of the sound system in a language. Phonetics is the study of the physical properties of sound. This unit tries to provide basic working knowledge in the field. Students would be familiarized with IPA (International Phonetic Association) symbols. A detailed discussion with practice would be provided on the organs of speech (speech production, transmission and reception). The section tries to uphold the point that languages have a systematic rule pattern which allows the (im)/possibility of certain sound combinations in a language from optimality theory. The unit provides skills like the working knowledge of sound analyzing software in order to do intent, accent and prosodic analysis which are employable skills.

The unit imparts linguistics skills like accent analysis, software uses to capture and analyse sounds that will lead towards employability

Teaching learning strategies: Lecture, discussion, presentation, workshop, training, group work

1. Phonetics: Accents, Syllables, non-segmental phonology and identity analysis

2. PRAAT, Phon, Audacity

3. Phonological rules and system

4. Grammar and phonology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Morphology: Grammar of words
 

Morphology is the study of the internal structure of the word. As the term suggests, the section is devoted to studying the forms and functions of words. The goal would be to identify the underlying system of a certain pattern through the surface realization of the forms. The study of morphology was central in the reconstruction of Indo-European (language family), particularly when structuralism was in its prime between 1940 and 1960. Though there are many theories and models to be explored in morphology, our focus would be to see the generative account of morphology. The unit imparts skills so that students would be able to do morphological analysis, can understand software like morphological analyzer, can do POS tagging, parsing, lemmatization, text generation, word retrieval, and understand the various kinds of normalization processing in linguistics. The unit will equip students to understand the system of generating words in a language, this is done by skilling them with theoretical and practical (machine/software) knowledge available in the field. These skills would further help them to seek careers in NLP, AI and other such platforms.

Unit details: Description (Include LRNG, Employability, and Cross-cutting issues)

20. Lexemes and Lego – Key words/ search word / word search

21. Inflectional and derivational morphology

22. Morphological typology

23. Word formation process and the parts of speech (morpho-syntactic properties)

24. POS tagging and morphological analyser

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Syntax: Grammar of Sentence
 

Syntax is the study of the structure of a sentence. In this unit, we will try to explore the various concerns in the domain of syntax like constituent, phrase, and constituent tests, valency, arguments, PRO, passivisation, text normalization, etc. In modern linguistics, the syntax has occupied the central position in the study of language. Moreover, its direct application in understanding human cognition and machines made it both popular and appealing. In this unit, it has been tried to make students understand how phrases are put together and make meaning. The unit attempts to impart skills like POS tagging, parsing, making rules of grammar, predicting wrong utterances, etc., which will enable students to get employment in the field of AI and NLP.

Unit details: Description (Include LRNG, Employability, and Cross-cutting issues)

9. Reintroducing parts of speech and reconsidering POS tagging

10. Understanding constituents and learning the tests

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Semantics: Grammar of Meaning
 

Semantics is the study of meaning. In this section, we have tried to introduce a few concepts which are fundamental to studying the meaning of words and sentences. The study of semantics concerns the relation of linguistic forms to non-linguistic concepts and mental representations of things in order to explain the possibility of successful communication. The unit talks about the various models of meaning-making, it also touches upon the computational models of concept.

Unit Topics:

25. Lexical semantics

26. Language and thought

27. Theories and models of meaning making

28. Models of concepts (computational)

Text Books And Reference Books:

As per the unit details

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Fromkin, Victoria, Robert Rodman, and Nina Hyams. An Introduction to Language (w/MLA9E Updates). Cengage Learning, 2018.

Balasubramanian, T. A textbook of English phonetics for Indian students. Macmillan, 1981.

Collins, Beverley, and Inger M. Mees. Practical phonetics and phonology: A resource book for students. Routledge, 2013.

Hayes, Bruce. Introductory phonology. Vol. 7. John Wiley & Sons, 2008.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

MSE=50

CIA3= 20

ESE = 50

BENG334 - INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of Linguistics. Students will learn the basic concepts and methods used by linguists in the scientific study of human language. The course will examine the material, accessible properties of language (the sounds, the words, the phrases...) to get an understanding of its non-material, abstract ones. Given that language is intimately connected to our cognitive and social experience, an understanding of linguistic structure can help illuminate aspects of these domains as well. While many key aspects will be illustrated using evidence derived primarily from English and Indian languages. The course will discuss evidence from a variety of languages in order to better demonstrate the richness of linguistic diversity. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse and articulate general themes about the nature of human language, and how languages work.

CO2: Discuss fundamental processes common to all languages related to the domains of morphology, phonetics, phonology, writing systems, and language in society.

CO3: Apply findings from linguistic research to address real world issues, and be able to discuss language issues in an informed way both to linguists and non-linguists.

CO4: Analyse how language varies across speakers, over time, and across dialectal regions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Language and Evolution
 

The unit will familiarise the students with the term language and its evolution. The unit also introduce to the human language vs animal communication. Citing examples from both global and national contexts, the unit will briefly look into language family trees and on the studies related to it. The unit deals with human values and sustainability.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The sounds and gesture of Language
 

 This unit provides a basic introduction to the phonetics and phonology of human languages. Phonetics is the study of how the sounds of the world’s languages are produced and perceived. In this unit, we will begin with an introduction of how to describe and identify different speech sounds by their acoustic and articulatory properties. Through the unit, the students will identify/ work with a diverse sample of the world’s languages. The unit deals with professional ethics and sustainability.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Morphology
 

 What is a word? Do the things we put spaces around when we write correspond to anything in our mental grammars? How are new words formed in a language and what are their structures. This unit aims to answer these questions by examining morphological phenomena from across the world’s languages, including English as well as Indian languages. The unit deals with professional ethics.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Language acquisition and use
 

Variation and change are basic properties of language: All languages show variation in form across geographic space and between social groups, and languages are always changing. The unit will introduce the students to some of the basic concepts and cases on language variation and change among groups and sub-groups both in global and national context. Further the unit will also look into the human language acquisition and the theories related to it. The unit will focus on the human values and professional ethics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Yule, George. The study of language. George Yule. Ed. 7 New York: Cambridge University Press,2020. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Fromkin, Victoria, et al. An Introduction to Language. Centage Learning, 2018. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1= 20

CIA 2= 50

CIA 3 = 20

ESE =50

BENG341A - AMERICAN LITERATURE-I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

each era will be analysed in detail to give the student first-hand experience of the texts. To familiarize students with some of the range and diversity of early American literature; to introduce students to major movements in the history of American literature; to deepen students’ interpretative and critical skills, both by discussing literary critical practice and by engaging in it; to improve students’ verbal skills of argumentation and articulation of ideas through large and small group discussion; to improve students’ skills of written argumentation through writing and revising essays

The course aims to

• To familiarise the beginnings of American literary and cultural context

• To be aware of the political history and its influence on literature of America.

• To familiarize students with some of the most important thinkers of the period

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge of key concepts, theoretical frameworks, and discourses in the field of American Literature through written exams, class discussions and argumentative essays.

CO2: Formulate critical and analytical arguments about the various socio-political contexts through written assignments.

CO3: Develop interpretive claims about a variety of texts through class room discussions and group projects.

CO4: Explore critically the literary and cultural history of America through group assignments, class discussions and critical writing.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Literature of the New World: 1492-1620
 

This chapter explores the early American literature from the period of exploration and settlement. These two texts will reflect and reveal evolving American experience and character.

Key topics: New world, Columbian exchange, colonialism, Indigenous Americans, transatlantic maritime expedition, conquests of America,

Excerpts from

23. Columbus, Christopher. The Four Voyages of Christopher Columbus. Penguin UK, 2004.

24. Smith, John. “The New Land.” Capt. John Smith: Of Willoughby by Alford, Lincolnshire; President of Virginia, and Admiral of New England. Works. L608-1631. 1895

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Literature of Colonial America: 1620-1776
 

This unit covers colonial exploration, resistance, conquest, all taking place in the realm of the “new” land. Texts selected for this unit aim at orienting the students to reflect the cultures of America at various points in its history prior to 18th Century.

Key topics: America History, Colonialism, Independence, Resistance, American identity, American Revolution, nationalism

25. Franklin, Benjamin. Rules by Which a Great Empire May Be Reduced to a Small One. (1773) CreateSpace, 2014.

26. Jefferson, Thomas. Declaration of Independence Thomas Jefferson. (1776) Independent Publishing Platform, 2017.

27. Wheatley, Phillis. “To S. M. A Young African Painter, On Seeing His Works.” Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/52519/to-s-m-a-young-african-painter-on-seeing-his-works.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Literature of the New Republic:1777-1836
 

This unit explores the early literary works which contributed to the development of American literature, culture, and ideals after the colonial period to the era of American Romanticism.

Topic: American Romanticism, abolitionism, slavery, frontier literature, race, Civil War, revolutionary age

15. Twain, Mark. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. (1884) Courier Corporation, 1994.

16. Paine, Thomas. The American Crisis. Sherwin, 1817.

17. Cooper, James Fenimore. The Last of the Mohicans. Penguin Classics, 1986.

18. Morton, Sarah Wentworth. “Stanzas to a Husband Recently United.” The Norton Anthology of American Literature: Eighth Edition, W. W. Norton & Company, 2011, p. 717.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Literature of the American Renaissance: 1836-1865
 

This unit engages with American Literary Renaissance and how it occurred at a time in which the United States was experiencing not only extraordinary growth but also redefining itself as a nation, both in theory and in practice.

Topic: American Renaissance, American Literary Renaissance, Self-Reliance, Dark Romanticism, Race, American identity, spirituality

34. Emerson, Ralph Waldo. “Self-Reliance.” American Transcendentalism Web, 1841, https://archive.vcu.edu/english/engweb/transcendentalism/authors/emerson/essays/selfreliance.html.

35. Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. “Longfellow: A Gleam of Sunshine, The Belfry of Bruges and Other Poems.” Maine Historical Society, https://www.hwlongfellow.org/poems_poem.php?pid=82.

36. Thoreau, Henry. Where I Lived, and What I Lived For. (1924) Penguin UK, 2005.

37. Poe, Edgar Allan. “The Raven.” Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/48860/the-raven.

38. Excerpts from Uncle Tom's Cabin, Chapters I, III, VII

39. Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Uncle Tom’s Cabin. (1852) Cosimo, Inc., 2009.

40. Douglass, Frederick. “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July? Extract from an Oration, at Rochester, July 5, 1852.” Lit2Go ETC, https://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/45/my-bondage-and-my-freedom/1517/what-to-the-slave-is-the-fourth-of-july-extract-from-an-oration-at-rochester-july-5-1852/.

41. Lincoln, Abraham. The Gettysburg Address. 19 Nov. 1863, Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg. Speech.

Text Books And Reference Books:

As mentioned in unit details.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Baym, Nina. The Norton Anthology of American Literature: Eighth Edition, W. W. Norton & Company, 2011.

Abel, Darrel. American Literature: Vol. 2 Literature of the Atlantic Culture. Barron’s Educational Series Inc, 1963.

Spiller, Robert Ernest, et al. Literary History of the United States. Macmillan, 1974.

Graham, Maryemma, and Jerry W. Ward Jr. The Cambridge History of African American Literature. Cambridge University Press, 2011.

McQuade, Donald. The Harper Single Volume American Literature. Longman Publishing Group, 1999.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1= 20

MSE= 50

CIA 3-20

ESE =50

BENG341B - SOCIOLINGUISTICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course investigates the interactions between language and society. This course brings the sociolinguistic issues, including the relationship between linguistic variation and social factors like identity, class and power, the development of pidgins and creoles, code choices in bi-dialectal and bilingual communities, and language change. Students will also draw connections with research methods and approaches to data analysis used in other areas of linguistics, and examine attitudes toward language and culture and their social and political consequences. The course emphasizes the insights into the use of language in society provided by a generative linguistics approach to natural language. The course will enable the understanding of intersection of language and gender, language and social class, language and social change. The learning of course can help the students to acquire the skills to analyse the language change alongwith the social factors and can enable them to get employed in language planning and policy making.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge of language and its practice within social structures by delving into factors like identity, class and power through class discussion and assignments.

CO2: Explain language workings in society and the development of linguistic communities through term paper writing.

CO3: Demonstrate correlation between linguistic and social structure through mapping of correspondence in CIAs, class work and class discussion.

CO4: Understand linguistic and communicative competences and use this for pragmatic of communication through presentation and practical sessions (viva/in-class dialogue session).

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Sociolinguistics
 

The unit explores the introductory aspect of sociolinguistics – interaction between language and society.

Nikolas Coupland and Adam Jaworski - “Introduction: What is Sociolinguistics?” from Sociolinguistics: A Reader and Coursebook

Ronald Wardhaugh and Janet M. Fuller - “Introduction.” An Introduction to Sociolinguistics

Ronald Wardhaugh and Janet M. Fuller - “Languages in Contact: Multilingual Societies and Multilingual Discourse.”

Roland Wardhaugh and Janet M. Fuller - “Contact Languages: Structural Consequences of Social Factors; Pidgin and Creole”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Methods in Sociolinguistics
 

This unit explores the relevant methodologies in the discipline. It engages with basics of sociolinguistics- how to look for linguistics and social variable.

N. Coupland et. Al. - “Methods in Sociolinguistics”

Field methods in the Study of Social Dialects

Dialect/Regional identity: What is it?

John J Gumperz - "Dialect differences and social stratification in a North Indian Village 1."

William Laboy - The Social Stratification of English in New York City.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Socioeconomic class
 

The unit engages with the interaction between language and class/ caste. Language is shaped by the socio-economics markers. Language as symbolic capital.

Peter Trudgill - "Sex, covert prestige and linguistic change in the urban British English of Norwich."

Kalyanamalini Sahoo - "Linguistic and socio-cultural implications of gendered structures in Oriya."

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Language and Social Change
 

The unit explores how change in language reflects social attitude of a particular community. Students engage with case studies and practical issues to understand the relation between the language and social attitude.

Ronald Wardhaugh and Janet M. Fuller. "Language, Gender and Sexuality.”

Penelope Eckert - "The whole woman: Sex and gender differences in variation."

Deborah Cameron - "Performing gender identity: young men’s talk and the construction of heterosexual masculinity (1997)."

Rita Kothari - "Caste in a Casteless Language? English as a Language of 'Dalit' Expression."

Text Books And Reference Books:

As mentioned in the unit details.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Wardhaugh, Ronald, and Janet M. Fuller. An Introduction to Sociolinguistics. John Wiley & Sons, 2021.

Tagliamonte, Sali A. Analysing Sociolinguistic Variation. Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Eckert, Penelope, and John R. Rickford. Style and Sociolinguistic Variation. Cambridge University Press, 2001.

Eckert, Penelope. “Gender and Sociolinguistic Variation.” Language and Gender: A Reader, Wiley-Blackwell, 1998, pp. 64–75.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1= 20

MSE=50

CIA 3 =20

ESE =50

BENG341C - VISUAL CULTURE: AN INTRODUCTION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

the questions of construction, mainly, how we see, what we see and don't see will be addressed through critical analysis and interpretation of various images, how they function in terms of identity and help us to identify and categorize cultural ideas. Exploring identity, power, representation and intentionality, the course will help students to critically approach the questions of gender, values, ethics, race, and other identities. The course discusses texts and contexts which are relevant in the regionally, nationally and globally. The course will enable students to develop critical skills, and analytical skills.

The course aims to help students

• to Identify and assess through different theoretical lenses relevant visual elements from one’s surroundings and the way these elements are influencing the experience of life.

• To Investigate the ways that forms of visual culture function in society and how these are linked to race, class, and gender as well as politics and economics

• To Critically evaluate the domain of visual culture in terms of both production and consumption, and recognize its influence on making and maintaining certain positions, experiences, practices, privileges, assumptions, aesthetics, and power relations in one’s local, national and global contexts.

• To Develop lateral thinking, critical reading skills, and analytical and interpretative skills of the medium.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop a broad understanding of the power of visual images through semiotic interpretation carried out by students in their written assignments.

CO2: Examine one?s surroundings and the many different ways we are affected by images and visuality through written projects, group presentations and workshops.

CO3: Utilize and critically evaluate visual culture in daily lives by using semiotic analysis as a strategy in their written projects and workshop assignment.

CO4: Recognise the dynamics of reality constructed through visual semiotics in their written projects and group presentations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Semiotics of Visual Art: An Introduction
 

Introducing visual art as texts to explore the meaning within it using semiotic tools available. The texts selected focus mainly on the method of reading visuals. The unit also entails methodological analysis of visual texts like films, You Tube videos, video blogs etc from across the world. The unit will enable students to develop their interpretive and critical skills and will enable them to understand the role and significance of visual culture in conversing and contesting the existing power structures in the society.

Teaching learning strategies: Lectures, classroom discussions, group discussions, presentations, film screenings, and analysis of visual texts

1. Introducing Visual Culture

2. The politics of Visuals

3. Visuals as Language

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Exploring Representation
 

This unit deliberates over the representative aspects and the problem spaces in from across the world. Apart from the texts mentioned, the unit provides space for semiotic analysis of visual constructs available in contemporary space like news videos, advertisements and propaganda videos. The problem space found in the representative spheres such as gender, caste, race etc in regional, national and global contexts are further subjected to deliberation based on the peripheral voices which the texts try to present or hide. Besides the theoretical deliberations available in the texts recommended, the unit also involves critical analysis of cultural constructs which employ different strategies of ‘othering’ as it is seen in visual representations of the marginalized.

1. Visuals and Caste

2. Visuals and Gender

3. Visuals and Race

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Visuality & Power
 

This unit intends to look deeply in to the politics of visual texts and the sense of agency working within. It also looks at visuality in the context of culture, history, power and knowledge. This unit will help students to understand the role visual plays disseminating and contesting agency in global as well as national contexts. The unit also addresses issues related to human values, gender, ecology and visuality. These discussions will enable them to develop their critical reading skills and interpretative skills.

1. Visual Culture and Power

2. Visual Culture and Memory

3. Visual Culture and Trauma

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Popular Visual Culture
 

The unit looks at various trends in contrast with the problems of representation as discussed in the previous two sections. The unit expands to different variants of visual representations existing in popular culture like music videos, amateur videos available through online applications. This unit is enabling students to have a distinct idea of presence and absence in popular visual culture in regional, national and global contexts. The unit is partly practical in approach, since it urges the students to ideate their notions on human values, gender, identity politics, and ecology in texts available in popular culture.

• Wall art, Street art, Graffiti,

• Popular Games and Music Videos

• Cartoons, Memes, and Popular Visual Culture

Text Books And Reference Books:

As per the unit details.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Boylan, Alexis L.. Visual Culture. United States, MIT Press, 2020.

Dikovitskaya, Margarita. Visual culture : the study of the visual after the cultural turn. Cambridge, Mass., 2005.

Evans, Hall. Visual Culture: The Reader. India, SAGE Publications, 1999.

Negreiros, Joaquim, and Howells, Richard. Visual Culture. United Kingdom, Wiley, 2012.

Smith, Marquard, and Joanne Morra. Visual Culture: Experiences in visual culture. United Kingdom, Routledge, 2006.

Smith, Marquard, Visual Culture: What is visual culture studies?. Norway, Routledge, 2006.

Berger, Martin A. “The Lost Images of Civil Rights.”. Seeing through Race: A Reinterpretation of Civil Rights Photography. University of California Press, 2011.

Carroll, Noël. “The Image of Women in Film: A Defense of a Paradigm.” The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, vol. 48, no. 4, 1990, pp. 349–60. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.2307/431572. Accessed 5 Mar. 2023.

Doyle, Jennifer, and Amelia Jones. “Introduction: New Feminist Theories of Visual Culture.” Signs, vol. 31, no. 3, 2006, pp. 607–15. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.1086/499288. Accessed 5 Mar. 2023.

Guidetti, Fabio, and Katherina Meinecke. A Globalised Visual Culture? Towards a Geography of Late Antique Art. United Kingdom, Oxbow Books, 2020.

Jenks, Chris. Visual Culture. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2002.

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. An Introduction to Visual Culture. United Kingdom, Routledge, 1999.

Walker, Michael. “EXHIBITIONISM / VOYEURISM / THE LOOK.” Hitchcock’s Motifs, Amsterdam University Press, 2005, pp. 164–78. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46mtpf.22. Accessed 5 Mar. 2023.

Chute, Hillary. Maus Now: Selected Writing. United Kingdom, Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2022.

Essig, Simon. The Animal Metaphor in Art Spiegelman's "Maus". Germany, GRIN Verlag, 2014.

Magilow, Daniel H., and Silverman, Lisa. Holocaust Representations in History: An Introduction. United Kingdom, Bloomsbury Publishing, 2015.

Mirbakhtyar, Shahla. Iranian Cinema and the Islamic Revolution. United States, McFarland, Incorporated, Publishers, 2015.

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. The Right to Look: A Counterhistory of Visuality. United Kingdom, Duke University Press, 2011.

Mitchell, W. J. T. “Seeing ‘Do the Right Thing.’” Critical Inquiry, vol. 17, no. 3, 1991, pp. 596–608. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/1343801. Accessed 5 Mar. 2023.

Rahbaran, Shiva. Iranian Cinema Uncensored: Contemporary Film-makers Since the Islamic Revolution. United Kingdom, Bloomsbury Publishing, 2015.

Sinha, Gayatri. Art and Visual Culture in India, 1857-2007. India, Marg Publications, 2009.

Spiegelman, Art. MetaMaus: A Look Inside a Modern Classic, Maus. United Kingdom, Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2011.

Zelizer, Barbie. Remembering to Forget: Holocaust Memory Through the Camera's Eye. United States, University of Chicago Press, 2000.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1= 20

MSE = 50

CIA 3 = 20

ESE=50

BENG361 - BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Basic psychological processes offer an introduction and overview of the field of psychology. The course encompasses the subject matter of general psychology. This course is designed to familiarize the student with the basic concepts of Psychology. 

 

 

Course Objectives: This course aims to

      Understand issues and debates in contemporary psychology.

      Understand and apply the principles of psychology in day-to-day life for a better understanding of themselves and others.

      Understand and apply the principles of psychology in various areas like human development, personality, learning, language, memory and so on.

  • Familiarize with the symptoms of major psychological disorders

Course Outcome

CO1: To explain various perspectives in psychology and take positions based on their understanding

CO2: To demonstrate fundamental processes underlying human behavior through experiments, role play, etc.

CO3: To apply their understanding in coming up with new ideas, concepts, etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to the psychological science
 

                                                                               

Definitionandgoalsofpsychology.Historyandschoolsofpsychology:structuralism;functionalism; psychodynamic; behavioral; cognitive; humanistic Movement, Trends in the 21stcentury,Psychologyandthescientificmethod,Methods,Major  philosophical  issues  inpsychology:freewillanddeterminism;brainandmind; natureand nurture;empiricismandrationality.

EssentialReadings:

Feldman,R.S.(2011).UnderstandingPsychology,10thedition, Delhi:Tata-McGrawHill.

Morgan,C.T,King,R.A.,Weisz,J.R.,andSchopler,J.(2004).IntroductiontoPsychology,7thEdition,24threprint.NewDelhi:TataMcGraw-Hill

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Learning, Memory and Language
 

Classicalconditioning;Operantconditioning;Cognitivelearning:latentlearning;observationallearning;insightlearning.Memory;Informationprocessingmodel;OrganizationandMnemonictechniquestoimprovememory;Forgetting:decay;interferenceandretrievalfailure.Humanlanguage:Languageacquisitionanddevelopment;criticalperiodhypothesis.Theoriesoflanguagedevelopment– SkinnerandChomsky. Psycholinguistics

EssentialReadings:

Feldman,R.S.(2011 ).UnderstandingPsychology,10thedition,Delhi:Tata-McGrawHill.

Morgan,C.T,King,R.A.,Weisz,J.R.,andSchopler,J.(2004).IntroductiontoPsychology,7thEdition,24threprint.NewDelhi:TataMcGraw-Hill

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Consciousness and Individual differences
 

Levelsofconsciousness;dream,sleep,alteredstatesofconsciousness.Personality;definition;approaches:Freud’sPsychoanalytic;Roger’sApproach;TraitTheories–TheBigFivePersonalityFactors;also:Gordon Allport,RaymondCattell, &16PF;Bandura’sSocialCognitiveTheorySelf-Efficacy.Cognitiveintelligence;EmotionalIntelligence;Socialintelligence;MeasurementofIntelligence

EssentialReadings:

Feldman,R.S.(2011 ).UnderstandingPsychology,10thedition,Delhi:Tata-McGraw Hill.Morgan,C.T,King,R.A.,Weisz,J.R.,andSchopler,J.(2004).IntroductiontoPsychology,7thEdition,24threprint.NewDelhi:TataMcGraw-Hill

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Human development and social processes
 

Growthanddevelopment:aspects,principles,andperiods;Psychosocialdevelopment:ErikErikson’sPsychosocialStagesofDevelopment;Cognitivedevelopment:JeanPiaget’stheoryofcognitivedevelopment;Moraldevelopment:Kohlberg’stheoryofmoraldevelopment;Socioculturaldevelopment:LevVygotsky’stheoryofsocioculturaldevelopment;Self;Communication:Processandtypes;Effectivecommunicationtraining;Socialinfluence;Prosocialbehavior;Interpersonalrelationship

EssentialReadings:

Feldman,R.S.(2011 ).UnderstandingPsychology,10thedition,Delhi:Tata-McGrawHill.Morgan,C.T,King,R.A.,Weisz,J.R.,andSchopler,J.(2004).IntroductiontoPsychology,7thEdition,24threprint.NewDelhi:TataMcGraw-Hill

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Psychological disorders
 

 

AbnormalBehavior;AnxietyandSomaticsymptomDisorders;Bipolarandrelateddisorders;DepressivedisordersandSchizophrenia; PersonalityDisorders.

 EssentialReadings:

 

Feldman,R.S.(2011 ).UnderstandingPsychology,10thedition,Delhi:Tata-McGrawHill.Morgan,C.T,King,R.A.,Weisz,J.R.,andSchopler,J.(2004).IntroductiontoPsychology,7thEdition,24threprint.NewDelhi:TataMcGraw-Hill

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Feldman, R.S. (2011 ). Understanding Psychology, 10thedition.Delhi : Tata- McGraw Hill.
  2. Morgan,C.T, King,R.A., Weisz,J.R., and Schopler,J. (2004). Introduction to Psychology, 7th Edition, 24threprint. NewDelhi: TataMcGraw-Hill
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Baron,R.A..(1995). Psychology 3rd edition. Delhi:Prentice Hall.
  2. Munn,N.L.,Fernald,L.D., & Fernald,P.S.( 1997 ) Introduction to Psychology. Delhi: Houghton Mifflin.
  3. Smith,E.E., Hoeksman,S,N.,Fredrickson,B.,andLoftus,G.R.(2003) .Atkinson’s & Hilgard’s Introduction to Psychology.FirstReprint.Delhi Thomson Wadsworth.
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation pattern:

 

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attd

ESE

20

25

20

05

30

 

 

CIA 1: Individual Assignments (Psychologicaal movie review)

 

 

CIA 2: Mid-Semester Examination(Written Examination)

Pattern:  Section A    3 x 10 = 30 marks (out of 4)

               Section B     1 x 20 = 20 marks (Compulsory)

An open book exam with four essay type questions. Question number 2 & 3 shall have internal choice.

 

CIA 3: Group Assignments (Social experiment)

 

 

ESE: End Semester Examination (Written Examination)

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

BENG381 - INTERNSHIP (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:0
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

English Honours students have to undertake an internship of not less than 30 working days at a social service organization of their choice in any area where the student will work in the field of these organizations. The aim of the internship is to expose students to the industry climate and familiarise them with the kind of skills that they require. It also is an attempt to build professional skills in our students. 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the implication of social and experiential learning with classroom practices in their internship reports.

CO2: Decide a suitable career based on the experience of internship based on their own reflections and feedback duly mentioned in the reports.

CO3: Examine collaborations made and learning acquired with communities outside university space.

CO4: Utilize the skills acquired during the internship for providing feedback on the curriculum to strengthen it based.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
Internship
 

Internship for 30 days 

Text Books And Reference Books:

NONE

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NONE

Evaluation Pattern

Faculty members who are offering courses to BA and MA English and Cultural Studies Programs may choose their assessments from the following list: 

Internship/apprenticeship: Service learning, community engagement, and discipline-based professional development. 

Skills to be tested: leadership, professional ethics, academic integrity, cultural and social sensitivity, teamwork, and networking skills. 

 

Weekly report 

Draft submission 

VIVA 

SDEN311 - SKILL DEVELOPMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been designed to enable the students to acquire skills that would help them in the process of knowledge acquisition. Through this engagement, it will revisit and question different notions of knowledge and how it is constructed, created, disseminated, and acquired. The course would also enable the students to understand various research practices that are the focal point of the discipline. Also central to the course is an inquiry on the process and role of critical thinking in the discipline and in the larger context of society and nation.

Course Objectives

The course is designed to:

  • enhance skills required for knowledge acquisition
  • develop a comprehensive knowledge of the variety of research practices in the discipline
  • hone and nurture their critical thinking abilities

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate critical reading abilities in multiple contexts

CO2: Recognize the politics of knowledge production and dissemination

CO3: Apply various research methods introduced in the course in their areas of interest

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Data Interpretation "Show Me the Data"- Quantitative
 

This unit is primarily invested in the study of quantitative data. The unit will focus on the various ways in which data is elicited and analyzed. It will also give a brief idea about how quantitative data, which is highly monotonous in nature can be presented in an interesting way. Taking examples from the field of English, History, and Political Science, this unit will identify the sub-fields related to these disciplines which deal with large data sets.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Data Interpretation "Show Me the Data"-Qualitative
 

Data Interpretation Module will cover Qualitative Research Methods in Language Studies. This module will give students the opportunity to explore the different types of qualitative research methodologies used within applied linguistics, linguistics and language and culture research. This will be focused on to an examination of what counts as evidence within a qualitative research framework and how qualitative research evidence can be evaluated. Students will examine a range of qualitative research methodologies, such as case study, ethnography, participant observation, interviews, questionnaires, discourse analysis. Students will apply this knowledge to a personal research interest.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Critical Thinking: "To Think or Not to?"- Multiple Intelligences
 

The unit would primarily engage with the question of what it means to think and revisit some of the notions that are related to the act of thinking and the notion of intelligence. Focussing on the concept of multiple intelligence put forward by Gardener, the unit aims to provide a platform for the students to discuss and deliberate on intelligence and the possibility of exploring multiple intelligence.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Critical Thinking: "To Think or Not to" - Deferential thinking
 

Drawing from an informed understanding of the concept of multiple intelligence, this unit will explore the need to look at thinking as a multi-layered process. The aim here is to make students aware of the need to think differently than attempting to fit into what is normative.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Continuous Learning - The Holy Cycle: Unlearn, Learn and Relearn?
 

Continuing with the questions of thinking and intelligence, this unit focuses on the process of learning and assessing what it means to be a learner in the contemporary era. This unit aims to impart the skills which will make learners value and practice dynamicity and acknowledge the need for appreciating multiple perspectives.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Social Awareness: "Know Thy Neighbour"- Know Your Regime
 

Social awareness provides an individual the ability to understand and respond to the needs of others. This course focuses on social awareness - the ability to understand and respond to the needs of others. This is the third of the domains of emotional intelligence proposed by Daniel Goleman. Research indicates that emotional intelligence can be learned and be measurable differences directly associated with professional and personal success. Furthermore, it may be responsible for up to 80% of the success we experience in life. The course focuses on the basic areas of emotional intelligence namely self-awareness, self-management; empathy/social awareness and relationship management. Students will be able to comprehend how self-awareness reflects understanding, personal acceptance & an overall understanding of personal psychology.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Social Awareness "Know Thy Neighbour": " In Short - Of Reading"
 

This module will help students learn and understand the fundamental motivations for reading. The module will introduce students to the various aspects of reading and writing and will help focus on the need to read with a sense of social awareness, responsibility and ethical action towards reading. This module aims to help students acquire the cognitive domain-related skills in helping them to appraise, develop, value, critique and defend their acts of reading. The module will include introduction to thinkers like Borges, Scholes, Booth, Fish and others who have written about reading and its responsibilities.

Text Books And Reference Books:

_

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

_

Evaluation Pattern

General Evaluation Pattern: Unit-Wise Continuous Evaluation

 The evaluation will be based on the assessments formulated by the PTC student-instructors who facilitate each unit in the class. A continuous evaluation pattern will be followed whereby after the completion of each unit, an assignment will follow. The assessment will be done based on predefined rubrics and the score sheet needs to be tabulated. The cumulative score sheet is to be prepared at the end of the semester and the final Skill Development Score is to be computed.

BENG431 - THE CONSTRUCTION OF MEANINGS: PRAGMATICS, SEMANTICS AND SEMIOTICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Meaning making is a complex process and has been a point of global interest or investigation for a range of academic disciplines the most prominent among which are Philosophy, Psychology, Neurology, and Linguistics. While a linguist is always interested to find out the logic behind the construction of meanings to the factors that obstruct the same, a psychologist tries to understand, position and negotiate the idea of self in relation to others in the process of construction of meanings. While a philosopher is busy deciphering why something means what it means, a neurologist’s chief focus is on the function of neurons in the construction of meanings. The very act of meaning-making is therefore highly interDisciplinaryglobal learning; and, even when considered from a chiefly linguistic perspective (which is the focus of this course), the process of meaning-making can’t be positioned in the domain of either Semantics or Pragmatics or Semiotics; it is rather a by-product of all the fields. While Semantics is the systematic study of meanings which to a great extent is scientific, Pragmatics and Semiotics are concerned with the ways in which context contributes to meaning. Just like a work of art can’t be studied out of the context (sorry! New Criticism), an utterance produced at any point in time can’t be analysed out of the sociocultural context of its origin. The chief entailment arising from the proposition therefore is - this course aims to provide learners with an understanding of the basic principles in Linguistics mostly in the domain of Semantics, Pragmatics, and Semiotics which are directly involved with the process of meaning-making. That in turn helps in the development of critical and analytical skills, as learners will be required to analyse and understand the complex process of meaning-making. Through the course, learners will also develop global learning skills in interpreting and contextualizing the meaning of language, which can be useful in various day-to-day environments and fields such as communication, marketing, and language translation, and will also enhance the employability of the participants. Additionally, the interDisciplinaryapproach of the course can help in the development of interDisciplinaryskills and the ability to think outside of Disciplinaryboundaries and will give participants a global perspective and a new understanding of human values.

Course Outcome

CO1: Acquire the technical vocabulary and theoretical tools of the field, necessary to read, publish, and engage in higher education through class lecture, discussion and note-taking.

CO2: Demonstrate the skill of collecting, organizing and analysing linguistic data from diverse languages through workshops, fieldwork, and class engagements.

CO3: Apply the basic concepts from the domain of Semantics, Pragmatics, and Semiotics to a range of contexts to engage with the process of meaning-making through introspection, observation and data elicitation.

CO4: Demonstrate the complexity of language as a tool of communication through discourse analysis, cross-cultural linguistic artefacts analysis, presentation and discussion.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Introduction to Meaning-Making: Exploring Semantics, Pragmatics, and Semiotics in Everyday Life 
 

Description: The introductory unit will focus on the process of meaning-making by exposing learners to a range of texts both linguistic and non-linguistic in nature and will provide a global learning perspective of basic principles of meaning-making. The learners would be expected to provide their interpretation of the objects of study which can be a movie clip, a news broadcast, a painting, a photograph, or even a meme! This will enhance learners' critical and analytical skills as they analyse the object of study, and make them think at a global level, outside of their cultural and social strataPost the interpretation session, the learners will be introduced to the basic concepts of meaning-making:  Pragmatics, Semantics, and Semiotics. Students will acquaint themselves with the practical applicability of each of the fields to real-world environments and situations such as public speeches, hashtags, photography, advertisements, etc., and understand the object of study under the light of human values, culture, gender, etc. The modes of application indicated here are highly indicative as the modes in which these fields find application are diverse and hence, the instructor is free to choose any mode/s of their choice. 

  1. Multiple approaches to the study of meanings i.e., Philosophy, Psychology, Neurology, Semiotics, Linguistics.  

  1. The linguistic study of meaning in languages. 

  1. Linguistic, paralinguistic, and non-linguistic communication and the process of meaning-making. 

  1. Literal meaning, irony, implicature, and difficult sentences (the multi-linguistic repertoire available in the classroom to be exhaustively used in this context). 

  1. Pragmatics, history of pragmatics, schools of thoughts in Pragmatics. (Application and practice: multiple forms of public speech i.e., political speeches, slogans, etc. taken out of contexts/doctored to incite a form of narrative to be used to understand the importance of Pragmatics). 

  1. Semantics, history of semantics, schools of thoughts in Semantics. (Application and practice: Semantic study of photography and hashtags). 

  1. Semiotics, history of semiotics, schools of thoughts in Semiotics. (Application and practice: multiple advertisements to be analysed to understand the correlation between the sign, signifier and signified).  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Key Issues in Semantics
 

Description: A theoretically motivated unit, it introduces learners to the basic concepts which seek familiarization in the field of Semantics. Mostly concerned with words and meaning and the ways in which words acquire meanings, this unit introduces learners to Lexical Semantics and Logical Relations in the domain of languages. This unit helps learners to build analytical skills related to semantics. Learners also get exposure to global learning, a different perspective of words under different linguistic environments, and different human values as they try to dive deep into semantics. 

  1.  Sense Relations; synonymy, antonymy, meronymy, homonymy, polysemy. 

  1. Reference, non-referring expression 

  1. Denotational theory of meaning; connotation. 

  1. Arguments and predicates. 

  1. Sentence, statement, utterance and proposition. 

  1. Logical relations between sentences: entailment, equivalence, contrariety, contradiction, interdependence. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Key Issues in Pragmatics
 

Unit details: A theoretically motivated unit, it introduces learners to the basic concepts which seek familiarization in the field of Pragmatics. It introduces the learners to the dominant theories in the field of Pragmatics and provides a chance to review the analysis of practical situations they conducted earlier in the course. By studying the use of language in different social and cultural contexts, learners can develop a deeper understanding of the nuances of language use. This can help learners to better communicate with people from diverse backgrounds and to appreciate different cultural perspectives. And can help a lot in the workspace making them more employable and prepared for global needs. By analysing language use in various contexts, learners can also develop critical thinking and analytical skills. Additionally, learners can become more aware of the impact of language use on human values such as respect, inclusivity, and social justice. 

  1. Speech Acts 

  1. Deixis 

  1. Relevance Theory 

  1. Politeness Theory

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit IV: Key Issues in Semiotics 
 

Unit details 

Description: This is a theoretically motivated unit which introduces learners to the basic concepts and dominant theories which seek familiarization in the field of Semiotics and are of global relevance. Understanding of these theories will help students to explore how knowledge of semiotics can help them enhance their analytical skills by providing them a basis to analyse multiple themes that concerns one in everyday life in the following unit. 

  1. Basic Sign Theory. 

  1. Iconicity, Indexicality, Symbolism, Semiosphere. 

  1. Non-verbal Semiotics, Signals, Facial expressions, Eye-contact, Body-language, Touch, Gesture, Dancing 

  1. Visual Signs, Colour, Visual Representations, Maps, Visual Arts, Cinema etc. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Pinker, Steven. The Language Instinct: How the Mind Creates Language. Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2000.

Vendler, Zeno. Linguistics in Philosophy. Cornell University Press, 1967.

Mead, George Herbert. Mind, Self, and Society: From the Standpoint of a Social Behaviorist. University of Chicago Press, 1934.

Saussure, Ferdinand de. Course in General Linguistics. McGraw-Hill, 1916.

Zimmermann, Thomas Ede, and Wolfgang Sternefeld. Introduction to Semantics an Essential Guide to the Composition of

Meaning. De Gruyter Mouton, 2013.

Mey, Jacob L. Pragmatics: An Introduction. 2nd ed., Blackwell, 2001.

Levinson, Stephen C. "Deixis." International Encyclopedia of Linguistics, edited by William Frawley, vol. 2, Oxford University

Press, 2003, pp. 198-200.

Sperber, Dan, and Wilson, Deirdre. Relevance: Communication and Cognition. 2nd ed., Blackwell Publishers, 1995.

Brown, Penelope, and Levinson, Stephen C. Politeness: Some Universals in Language Usage. Cambridge University Press, 1987.

Danesi, Marcel. Messages, Signs, and Meanings: A Basic Textbook in Semiotics and Communication. Canadian Scholars' Press.

2006.

Forceville, C. Visual and Multimodal Metaphor in Advertising: Cultural Perspectives. Routledge. 2017.

Kress, G., & Van Leeuwen, T. Reading Images: The Grammar of Visual Design. Routledge. 2006.

Berger, John. Ways of Seeing. Penguin, 1972.

Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly, and Eugene Rochberg-Halton. The Meaning of Things: Domestic Symbols and the Self. Cambridge

University Press, 1981.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Zimmermann, Thomas Ede, and Wolfgang Sternefeld. Introduction to Semantics an Essential Guide to the Composition of

Meaning. De Gruyter Mouton, 2013.

Johansen, Jrgen Dines, and Svend Erik Larsen. Signs in Use an Introduction to Semiotics. Taylor & Francis e-Library, 2005

Huang, Yan, ed. The Oxford handbook of pragmatics. Oxford University Press, 2017

Bach, Kent. "The Top 10 Things You Don't Know About Meaning." Topoi, vol. 28, no. 1, 2009, pp. 3-8.

Empson, William. Seven Types of Ambiguity. Read Books Ltd., 2016.

Grice, H. Paul. "Logic and Conversation." Syntax and Semantics, vol. 3, Speech Acts, edited by Peter Cole and Jerry Morgan,

Academic Press, 1975, pp. 41-58.

Cobley, Paul. The Routledge Companion to Semiotics and Linguistics. Routledge, 2001.

Giora, Rachel. "Understanding Figurative and Literal Language: The Graded Salience Hypothesis." Cognitive Linguistics, vol. 8,

no. 3, 1997, pp. 183-206.

Barthes, Roland. Mythologies. Hill and Wang, 1972.

Kaiser, Susan B. The Social Psychology of Clothing and Personal Adornment. Macmillan, 1979.

Korsmeyer, Carolyn. Making Sense of Taste: Food and Philosophy. Cornell University Press, 1999.

Knobel, Michele, and Colin Lankshear. "Online Memes, Affinities, and Cultural Production." New Literacies: Everyday Practices

and Social Learning, vol. 2, no. 1, 2000, pp. 45-60.

Rapoport, Amos. House Form and Culture. Prentice-Hall, 1969.

Chandler, D. (2017). Semiotics: The Basics. Routledge

Peirce, Charles Sanders. "Logic as Semiotic: The Theory of Signs." Philosophical Writings of Peirce, edited by Justus Buchler,

Dover, 1955, pp. 98-119.

Sebeok, T. A. (1976). Contributions to the Doctrine of Signs. Indiana University Press.

Bach, Kent. "Speech Acts and Pragmatics." Philosophy of Science, vol. 39, no. 2, 1972, pp. 147-169.

Haugh, Michael. IM/Politeness Implicatures. De Gruyter Mouton, 2015.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks 

The students can be tested through the writing of argumentative essays, critical analysis of essays, class presentations, group discussions, creative writing, creative visualizations either as individual or group work.  

CIA 2: MSE – 50 Marks  

Pattern  

 

Section A: 2x10=20  

Section B: 1x15=15 

Section C: 1x15=15 

 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts 

 
 

CIA 3: 20 marks 

The students can be evaluated through exhibitions, visual essays or visual stories, mini-documentaries, performances, creating social media content and promotions, cumulative portfolios, docudramas and other modes of creative evaluation suitable for the course.  

 
 

ESE: 50 marks  

Pattern  

Section A: 2x10=20  

Section B: 1x15=15 

Section C: 1x15=15 

 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

BENG432 - RESEARCH WRITING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course, in accordance with global standards and ethical considerations, aims to equip undergraduate students in the humanities and social sciences with the necessary skills to conduct research, produce academic papers, and effectively communicate their ideas. The course covers the fundamentals of academic research, including formulating research questions, creating research methodologies, and locating and evaluating sources. Additionally, students will learn how to integrate data from multiple sources to support their arguments and critically analyse scholarly literature. Throughout the semester, ethical academic writing practices, such as proper citation styles, the responsible use of sources, decorum while doing primary research, etc., will be emphasised through ongoing discussions. 

 

Course Objectives: 

By the end of the course, student will: 

  • Develop research skills that adhere to global standards and enable students to critically assess and analyse academic materials, using evidence to support claims. 

  • Cultivate research skills that align with global standards and enable students to find, evaluate, and synthesise sources while utilisingappropriate citation styles. 

  • Enhance employability through the development of research skills aligned with global standards, enabling students to create well-organized and scholarly academic papers. 

  • Foster ethical research practices by emphasising the importance of proper citation and referencing to avoid plagiarism and demonstrate academic integrity. 

  • Develop effective communication and collaboration skills through peer review sessions and group presentations, aligned with global standards for academic and professional settings. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Illustrate the principles of academic research by identifying and explaining key concepts and terminologies in their written assignments, class discussion, debates, and presentations.

CO2: Analyse and evaluate scholarly texts by comparing, contrasting, and synthesising information from multiple sources to develop a deeper understanding of the subject matter pertaining to various socio-cultural discourses through written assignments, MCQs, and class discussions.

CO3: Apply research skills by devising a research design for a chosen topic and evaluating the suitability of the chosen design through peer reviews, presentations, and written assignments.

CO4: Create original and well-crafted academic papers by applying research and writing skills to develop a cohesive argument, organise ideas effectively, and use appropriate citation styles.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Introduction to Academic Research
 

Unit details: The unit provides an overview of the essential concepts and principles of academic research.Ethical practices that is on par with global standards, including avoiding plagiarism and properly citing sources, are emphasised in this unit to ensure the integrity of the research process.  

  1.  What is research? Importance of research 

  1.  Types of Research: Primary Vs Secondary; Descriptive (Ex post facto research) Vs Analytical; Applied Vs Fundamental; Conceptual vs Empirical. 

  1.  Plagiarism and other questions on ethics. 

  1. Engaging with MLA and APA stylesheets: Annotated Bibliography, Summarizing & Paraphrasing, Citations. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Choosing and Developing a Research Topic
 

Unit details: This unit teaches how to identify a good research topic, refine ideas, and express it as clear research questions, aims, and objectives. This unit also covers how to conduct a critical literature review, including planning and undertaking searches, evaluating the relevance and sufficiency of the literature, and referencing it accurately. It also covers how to apply this knowledge to draft a review for your research project, avoiding plagiarism, and the systematic review process. Thus, the unit helps establishthe fundamental skills pertaining to research and simultaneously through light on various Local, Regional, National, and Global concerns that must be taken into consideration while choosing a topic.  

  1.   Generating and refining research topic ideas: Relevance tree, Brainstorming, Delphi Technique; formulating a proposal/abstract 

  1.   Developing your research proposal: Hypothesis, Thesis Statement, The Golden Thread (Research Aim, Objectives, Questions) 

  1.  Review of Literature: Strategies & Approaches.  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Research Philosophy and Approaches to Theory Development
 

Unit details: This unit aims to enable students to define ontology, epistemology, and axiology, and understand their relevance to research. Additionally, the unit explores research paradigms, philosophical positions, and theory development approaches, while encouraging students to reflect on their own philosophical stance towards their research, all in accordance with established global standards. 

  1. Research Assumptions: Ontology, Epistemology, and Axiology 

  1. Research Philosophies: Positivism, Critical Realism, Interpretivism, Postmodernism, & Pragmatism 

  1. Theory Development: Inductive, Deductive, and Abductive Reasoning.  

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit IV: Methods and Methodology
 

Unit details: This unit emphasises the significance of methodological coherence in research design, selectingappropriate research strategies, consideringtime frames, ethical concerns, and the constraints of the researcher's role, all in accordance with global standards.  

  1.  Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed-method Approaches 

  1.  Research Strategies: Experiment, Survey, Archival and documentary research, Case study, Ethnography, Action Research, Grounded Theory, Narrative Inquiry. 

  1. Data Collection: Ethical Questions, Quantitative Data Collection, Qualitative Data Collection   

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Unit V: Data Collection, Analysis, and Drafting the Paper
 

Unit details:   This unit provides a comprehensive guide on the essential considerations when preparing and analysing data and the strategies employed to infer the results. The unit also focuses on enabling the students to structure and draft a research paper of global standards. 

  1.  Data Analysis: Quantitative Techniques, Qualitative Techniques 

  1.  Results: Investigating the data, drawing inference, assessing limitations. 

  1. Research Paper: Structuring the draft, adhering to conventions, writing for different audience. 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

MLA Handbook. 9th ed. Modern Language Association, 2021. 

Bailey, Stephen. Academic Writing: A Handbook for International Students. Routledge, 2006. 

Griffin, Gabriele, ed. Research Methods for English Studies. Rawat Publications, 2007. 

Kundu, Abhijit, et al. The Humanities: Methodology and Perspectives. Pearson Education, 2014. 

 

Pickering, Michael eds. Research Methods for Cultural Studies. Rawat Publications, 2016. 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bailey, Stephen. Academic Writing: A Handbook for International Students. Routledge, 2006. 

Harvey, Michael. The Nuts & Bolts of College Writing. Hackett Publishing, 2003. 

Lipson, Charles. How to Write a BA Thesis: A Practical Guide from Your First Ideas to Your Finished Paper. U of Chicago Press, 2005. 

Woolf, Judith. Writing about Literature. Routledge, 2005. 

Evaluation Pattern

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

CIA PART I 45 Marks 

 
 
 
 

CIA PART II-50 Marks 

 
 
 
 

ATTENDANCE- 5 marks  

 
 
 
 

Cumulative CIA 95+ Attendance 5 = 100 hours 

 
 
 
 

Submission 

 
 

Submission 

 
 

Submission 

 
 

 

 

BENG433 - LITERARY AND CULTURAL THEORY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The paper initiates the students to unlearn some of their conventional notions about what is literature; introduces them to a varied school of literary and cultural theory; and equips them to frame their own sense of 'literature' and 'theory’ and ‘society’.The course aims to equip students to ask the right kind of questions about events around them in the local, regional, national and international contexts; to understand the nature of the societies and cultures that one is part of; recognise one’s subjectivities and ideological positionings; to conceptualise and evaluate one’s positions vis-à-vis the problematics of race, caste, class, gender, environment, the digital and technology. 

Course Outcome

CO1: CO1: Understand a variety of cultural and theoretical concepts and engage with them through textual analysis, class discussion, written and creative interpretations.

CO2: CO2: Demonstrate knowledge of the concepts discussed from structuralism to postmodernism and its determinants through writing critical essays, class presentations, class discussions and creative assignments.

CO3: CO3: Analyse and evaluate sociocultural, economic, and political contexts that influence the production dissemination, reception and consumption of texts through class discussions, written and creative assignments.

CO4: CO4: Create ethically and politically conscious work and positions recognising one?s ideologies and subjecthoods through critical and analytical writings.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Structuralism and Poststructuralism 
 

Unit Description:  This unit will equip students with concepts and problematics that surround structuralist and poststructuralist view-points. It will engage students through discussions and lectures on the nature and position of language at the turn of the twentieth century and the implications for the our national and global identities and subjectivities. It will examine the condition of the human in the matrices of power and knowledge that came to denote an era.   

  1. The linguistic turn   

  1.  Formalism vs structuralism  

  1. Difference and arbitrariness 

  1. Langue and Parole 

  1. Binomial nature of the sign 

  1. Nature and politics of Meaning 

  1. Key theorists: Ferdinand de Saussure, Michel Foucault, Claude Levi-Strauss, Roland Barthes, Jacques Derrida and Jacques Lacan 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Neo-Marxisms, Cultural Materialism and New Historicism
 

Unit Description: This unit will equip students with skills to examine and evaluate contemporary Marxisms and interventions that have marked the practices of production, dissemination and consumption within national and global contexts. It will examine the politics that are operational within our regular cultural consumptions in terms ideology, hegemony and other power structures that rupture our easy meaning making within society.  

  1.  ISAs and RSAs 

  1. New Historicism 

  1. Cultural Materialism 

  1. Culture Industry 

  1. The Cultural Studies turn  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Theories of Gender and Sexualities
 

Description: This unit will equip the students with basic theoretical concepts relating to gender and its intersections to read and examine the literary and the cultural in the everyday in contexts of the local, regional, national and the global. It aims to equip students to question social media activism and critically examine their own ideological conditionings and politics of identity creation and formation  

  1. Poststructuralist Feminisms  

  1.  Queer theory 

  1. Masculinities 

  1. Gendered Subjectivities  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit IV: Postcolonialism/s: Nations and Nationalisms
 

Description: This unit will enable students to discuss and debates on concepts relating to colonialism and postcolonialism and the problematics of its narrativization within global and universalising contexts.   

  1. Imperialism vs Colonialism  

  1. The psychopathology of colonialism  

  1. Orientalism 

  1. Hybridity 

  1. Nation and Nationhood 

  1. Diasporic Identities 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Unit V: Posthumanism and Ecocriticism
 

Unit Description: This unit will enable students to analyse and evaluate with the intersections of the human and technology and problematise the anthropocentric view of the environment to understand the local, regional, national and global contexts and contestations.  

  1. Posthumanism   

  1. Technology and Culture  

  1. Ecocriticism  

  1. Ecofeminism  

  1. Transhumanism  

Text Books And Reference Books:

Nayar, Pramod K. Contemporary Literary and Cultural Theory: From Structuralism to Ecocriticism, Pearson Education, pp. 1-32.  

Mahon, Peter. “Introduction: Posthumanism—A Dialogue of Sorts” In Posthumanism (Guides for the Perplexed). Bloomsbury Academic. 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.5040/9781474236829. Accessed on March 3, 2023

OECD. “What are Masculinities?” In Man Enough? Measuring Masculine Norms to Promote Women’s Empowerment, Social Institutions and Gender Index, OECD Publishing, 2021. https://doi.org/10.1787/6ffd1936-en. Accessed on 3 March 2023.  

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

de Saussure, Ferdinand. “Nature of the Linguistic Sign”, The Mutability and Immutability of the Sign” and “Linguistic Value” In A Course in General Linguistics, translated by Wade Baskin, edited by CharlesBallyand Albert Sechehaye, Forgotten Books, 2016, pp. 65-78, 111-121.  

Lacan, Jacques. “The Agency of the Letter in the Unconscious or Reason Since Freud”. In Ecrits: A Selection, Routledge, 2001, pp. 1-31.  

Foucault, Michel“What is an Author?”.The Open University, 1969. https://www.open.edu/openlearn/pluginfile.php/624849/mod_resource/content/1/a840_1_michel_foucault.pdf. Accessed on 3 March 2023.  

Barthes, Roland. "From Work to Text."  Image Music Text. Translated by Stephen Heath, Fontana Press, 1977, pp. 155-64. 

Barthes, Roland. “The Death of the Author”.Image Music Text. Translated by Stephen Heath, Fontana Press, 1977. pp. 142-48. 

Levi-Strauss, Claude. Myth and Meaning. 1978. Routledge, 2001 

Derrida, Jacques. ““Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences”. In Writing and Difference (1970), translated by Alan Bass, Routledge, 2001,  pp.  

Eagleton, Terry. Literary Theory: An Introduction. 2nd ed. Blackwell, 2008. 

Klages, Mary. Literary Theory: A Guide for the Perplexed. Continuum, 2006.  

Leitch, Vincent B., ed. The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. W W Norton, 2001. 

Rice, Philip, and Patricia Waugh. Modern Literary Theory. 4th ed. Hodder Arnold, 2001.  

Rivkin, Julie, Michael Ryan, eds. Literary Theory: An Introduction. Rev ed. Blackwell, 2003.

Althusser, Louis. “Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses”. In Lenin and Philosophy and Other Essays, Monthly Review Press, 2001.  

Williams, Raymond. Marxism and Literature. Oxford UP, 1986.  

Rooney, Ellen ed. Feminist Literary Theory. Cambridge UP, 2006.  

Waugh, Patricia. Literary Theory and Criticism: An Oxford Guide. Oxford UP, 2006.  

 Kang, Miliann, Donovan Lessard, Laura Heston, and Sonny Nordmarken. Introduction to Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies. U of Massachusets

Mahon, Peter. Posthumanism (Guides for the Perplexed). Bloomsbury Academic, London, 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.5040/9781474236829. Accessed on March 3, 2023. 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks 

The students can be tested through the writing of argumentative essays, critical analysis of essays, class presentations, group discussions, creative writing, creative visualizations either as individual or group work.  

CIA 2: MSE – 50 Marks  

Pattern  

 

Section A: 2x10=20  

Section B: 1x15=15 

Section C: 1x15=15 

 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts 

 
 

CIA 3: 20 marks 

The students can be evaluated through exhibitions, visual essays or visual stories, mini-documentaries, performances, creating social media content and promotions, cumulative portfolios, docudramas and other modes of creative evaluation suitable for the course.  

 
 

ESE: 50 marks  

Pattern  

Section A: 2x10=20  

Section B: 1x15=15 

Section C: 1x15=15 

 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

BENG441A - AMERICAN LITERATURE-II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course engages with the movements and debates that defined twentieth century and the early years of twenty first century American literature and culture. The course is divided into three units following the division that one could find in most American literature compendiums of the twentieth century. In this course, the contemporary era, which covers the latter half of the previous century, is divided into two units with the later unit examining the early decade of the twenty-first century as well. Through textual analysis, the course will trace cultural, political and social developments in the US; the political controversies, race and gender debates and movements and the burgeoning new trends in entertainment and music industry.  
 

The critical and creative engagements with the texts through class discussions, individual and group assignments, the course aims to develop critical and analytical skills along with a wider understanding of the regional (here in the American context) issues and their global repercussions.  
 

Course Outcome

CO1: Introduce various genres, themes and cultural tropes found in American life and literature through various texts in the course.

CO2: Create an awareness and understanding of the socio-political and cultural contexts of literary and visual narratives in the American literature and culture.

CO3: Develop an understanding of the various historical events that contributed to literary and cultural productions through discussions, lectures and written assignments.

CO4: Develop critical and analytical skills through argumentative essays and discussions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1: The Literature of Modernism: 1912-1940
 

The unit engages with the Modernist literature and the various artistic movements designated under the term “Modernism”, drawing on the critical perspectives most common in modernist studies: the New Criticism, Cultural Studies, and various forms of analysis. 

 

Key Topics: Modernism, expressionism, realism, imperialism, power, race 

  1. O'Neill, Eugene. The Emperor Jones. Vintage books, 1972. 

  1. Fitzgerald, F. Scott. Bernice Bobs Her Hair: And Other Stories. Dover Publications, 2009. 

  1. Frost, Robert. “Mending Wall by Robert Frost.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44266/mending-wall. 

  1. Sandburg, Carl. “At a Window by Carl Sandburg.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poems/12844/at-a-window. 

  1. Hughes, Langston. “Daybreak in Alabama by Langston Hughes.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/150974/daybreak-in-alabama. 

  1. Hemingway, Ernest, et al. A Farewell to Arms. Vintage Books, 2013. 

  1. “Marianne Moore.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/marianne-moore. 

  1. “An Immorality by Ezra Pound.” Famous Poems, Famous Poets. - All Poetry, https://allpoetry.com/An-Immorality. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Post War America: 1940 onwards
 

This unit explores American Literary movement of disillusionment; the portrayal of lost generation and its aftermath.  

 

Topics: confessional poetry, World War II, Imperialism, capitalism, memory play, American dream 

“I Have a Dream’ - Speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. 1963-08-26.” "I Have A Dream" - Speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. 1963-08-26, https://www.ihaveadreamspeech.us/. 

“The Nobel Prize in Literature 1949.” NobelPrize.org, https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/literature/1949/faulkner/speech/. 

Plath, Sylvia. “Lady Lazarus by Sylvia Plath.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation,  https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/49000/lady-lazarus. 

Death of a Salesman. Flinders University Library, Special Collections., 2004. 

Williams, Tennessee. The glass menagerie. New Directions Publishing, 2011. 

Walker, Alice. The Color Purple. Orion Publishing Group, 2014. 

Morrison, Toni. The Bluest Eye. Alfred A. Knopf, 2020. 

Barth, John. Lost in the Funhouse. Anchor Books, 1988. 

Buck, Pearl S. Letter from Peking. Pocket Books, 1969. 

Hayden, Robert. “Those Winter Sundays by Robert Hayden.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/46461/those-winter-sundays. 

“The Death of Emmett till: The Official Bob Dylan Site.” The Death of Emmett Till | The Official Bob Dylan Site, https://www.bobdylan.com/songs/death-emmett-till/. 

McCullers, Carson. The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter. Penguin Books, 2016. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Contemporary American Writings
 

The main objective of this unit is to expose students to a range of recent North American writings, with a focus on the heterogeneity of the current literary scene. In order to make sense of the diversity of texts we read, we will examine them through the critical lenses offered by concepts such as postmodernism, ethnic American literature, gender and multicultural literature.  
 

Topics: American identity, multiculturalism, Vietnam War, 9/11, post-modern technique, graphic narrative, holocaust 

Obama, Barack. Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance. Canongate, 2021. 

 

Spiegelman, Art. Maus. Rowohlt-Taschenbuch-Verl., 2004. 

 

Lahiri, Jhumpa. “Mrs. Sen’s”.Interpreter of Maladies. Harper Collins Publishers India, 2017. 

 

DeLillo, Don. Falling man. Simon and Schuster, 2007. 

 

Teaching learning strategies: Lectures, PPTs, Videos, Q&As, faculty-led discussions and guided tasks for experiential learning. 

 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit IV: Voices from the Margin
 

This unit will sample the diverse strands and strains of American literature in the contemporary times. 

 

Topics: Marginality, in-between, migration, disability, queer, gender, intersectionality 

 

Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi. “The Arrangers of Marriage”.The Thing around Your Neck, Anchor Books, New York, 2010. 

 

Vuong, Ocean. Night Sky with Exit Wounds. Copper Canyon Press, 2019.  

 

Kaminsky, Ilya. Deaf Republic: Poems. Graywolf Press, 2019. 

 

Gorman, Amanda. “The Hill We Climb”. JM Meulenhoff, 2021. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. O'Neill, Eugene. The Emperor Jones. Vintage books, 1972. 

  1. Fitzgerald, F. Scott. Bernice Bobs Her Hair: And Other Stories. Dover Publications, 2009. 

  1. Frost, Robert. “Mending Wall by Robert Frost.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44266/mending-wall. 

  1. Sandburg, Carl. “At a Window by Carl Sandburg.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poems/12844/at-a-window. 

  1. Hughes, Langston. “Daybreak in Alabama by Langston Hughes.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/150974/daybreak-in-alabama. 

  1. Hemingway, Ernest, et al. A Farewell to Arms. Vintage Books, 2013. 

  1. “Marianne Moore.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/marianne-moore. 

  1. “An Immorality by Ezra Pound.” Famous Poems, Famous Poets. - All Poetry, https://allpoetry.com/An-Immorality. 

  2. Topics: confessional poetry, World War II, Imperialism, capitalism, memory play, American dream 

    “I Have a Dream’ - Speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. 1963-08-26.” "I Have A Dream" - Speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. 1963-08-26, https://www.ihaveadreamspeech.us/. 

    “The Nobel Prize in Literature 1949.” NobelPrize.org, https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/literature/1949/faulkner/speech/. 

    Plath, Sylvia. “Lady Lazarus by Sylvia Plath.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation,  https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/49000/lady-lazarus. 

    Death of a Salesman. Flinders University Library, Special Collections., 2004. 

    Williams, Tennessee. The glass menagerie. New Directions Publishing, 2011. 

    Walker, Alice. The Color Purple. Orion Publishing Group, 2014. 

    Morrison, Toni. The Bluest Eye. Alfred A. Knopf, 2020. 

    Barth, John. Lost in the Funhouse. Anchor Books, 1988. 

    Buck, Pearl S. Letter from Peking. Pocket Books, 1969. 

    Hayden, Robert. “Those Winter Sundays by Robert Hayden.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/46461/those-winter-sundays. 

    “The Death of Emmett till: The Official Bob Dylan Site.” The Death of Emmett Till | The Official Bob Dylan Site, https://www.bobdylan.com/songs/death-emmett-till/. 

    McCullers, Carson. The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter. Penguin Books, 2016. 

    Obama, Barack. Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance. Canongate, 2021. 

     Spiegelman, Art. Maus. Rowohlt-Taschenbuch-Verl., 2004. 

     Lahiri, Jhumpa. “Mrs. Sen’s”.Interpreter of Maladies. Harper Collins Publishers India, 2017. 

     DeLillo, Don. Falling man. Simon and Schuster, 2007.

    Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi. “The Arrangers of Marriage”.The Thing around Your Neck, Anchor Books, New York, 2010. 

     Vuong, Ocean. Night Sky with Exit Wounds. Copper Canyon Press, 2019.  

     Kaminsky, Ilya. Deaf Republic: Poems. Graywolf Press, 2019. 

     Gorman, Amanda. “The Hill We Climb”. JM Meulenhoff, 2021.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abel, Darrel, ed. American Literature: Literature of the Atlantic Culture, Vol 2.Barron's Educational Series Inc, 1963.  

 

Baym, Nina. The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vol A, B, C, D.Norton and Company, 2012. 

Graham, Maryemma and Jerry Washington Ward, Jr. The Cambridge History of African American Literature. CUP, 2011.  

 Spiller, Ernest, Willard Thorp, Thomas Herbert Johnson, Henry Seidel Canby. Eds. Literary History of the United States. Macmillan, 1974. 

 

 McQuade, Donald, Robert Atwan, Martha Banta.Eds. The Harper Single Volume American ofEnglish Literature. Longman, 1999. 

Spiller, Ernest, Willard Thorp, Thomas Herbert Johnson, Henry Seidel Canby. Eds. Literary History of the United States. Macmillan, 1974.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks 

The students can be tested through the writing of argumentative essays, critical analysis of essays, class presentations, group discussions, creative writing, creative visualizations either as individual or group work.  

CIA 2: MSE – 50 Marks  

Pattern  

 

Section A: 2x10=20  

Section B: 1x15=15 

Section C: 1x15=15 

 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts 

 
 

CIA 3: 20 marks 

The students can be evaluated through exhibitions, visual essays or visual stories, mini-documentaries, performances, creating social media content and promotions, cumulative portfolios, docudramas and other modes of creative evaluation suitable for the course.  

 
 

ESE: 50 marks  

Pattern  

Section A: 2x10=20  

Section B: 1x15=15 

Section C: 1x15=15 

 

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

BENG441B - FOLKLORE: TRADITION AND RECONFIGURATION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims to delve into the fascinating world of folklore and the manner in which it has developed into an academic field. It will orient students to the concepts and theories of folklore studies and help them understand how various genres of folklore act as symbolic representations of socio-cultural history and reality. Beginning with the issues in the definition of folklore the students will be directed to the analysis of folktales, myths, and fairy tales. They will be made aware of the fact that the evolving of folklore is a continuous process and in rural and urban lives new folk beliefs and customs continue to form. From certain overarching themes that bring together cultures to motifs that can be radically specific, this course will attempt to evaluate the complex dynamics of folklore and the role it plays in contemporary lives. The students will be exposed to aspects of urban folklore, folklorism and applied folklore. They will also be introduced to the techniques and skills of a folklorist such as documenting, archiving and research pertinent to the preservation and transmission of folklore. 

Course Outcome

CO1: CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the key concepts, theories and genres of folklore through written assignments and class discussions.

CO2: CO2: Analyse the socio-cultural messages that are encoded in and disseminated through folklore at local, regional, national, and global levels through close reading and class discussion.

CO3: CO3: Interpret and understand their understanding of the modes of functioning of folklore in contemporary cultural and commercial contexts through class presentations and written assignments.

CO4: CO4: Create folklore archives through identifying folk narratives pertaining to their own cultural contexts and preserving the same through field work, documentation, introspection, and class discussion.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1: Defining Folklore and Folk Genres
 

Description: Introduction to the key ideas in folklore essential for the study of culture and tradition. By defining the theoretical perspective of the discipline of folklore, the unit will provide conceptual clarity on regional and local practices and contexts, folkloristics, and folk genres. 

  1. Definition of folklore 

  1. Folk concepts  

  1. Folk narratives 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Folklore and Literature 
 

Description: The varied ways of use of folklore in literature. Familiarising with all branches of folk literature, rituals and customs for the meaningful understanding and analysis of literature and creating an awareness of values and ethics perpetuated in specific ethnographic contexts. 

 

  1.  Orality and literacy 

  1.  Folklore in literature 

  1.  Folk tradition to classical tradition 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III : Folk Narratives in Popular Culture
 

Unit Description: The unit aims to trace the role of folk literature within varied platforms of contemporary popular culture such as television, movies, art, music and print media. It touches upon the representation of gender, race and other aspects underlying the reading practices.  

  1.  The concept of