CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF LIFE SCIENCES

School of Sciences

Syllabus for
BSc (Biotechnology, Chemistry/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA141B MARKETING AND SELLING SKILLS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BLS161A-1 MUSHROOM CULTIVATION TECHNIQUES Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
BLS161B-1 ALGAL TECHNOLOGY Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 50
BOT121-1 BIODIVERSITY - I Allied Core Courses 3 3 100
BTY101-1 FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
BTY111-1 FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY LAB Major Core Courses-I 2 1 50
CHE101-1 GENERAL CHEMISTRY Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
CHE111-1 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS I Major Core Courses-I 2 1 100
CHE161A-1 COSMETIC CHEMISTRY Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
CHE161B-1 TECHNICAL JAPANESE FOR CHEMISTS Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
COM143 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM144 FINANCIAL LITERACY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 03 100
DMT142 INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DSC142 PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR DATA SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO145 ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG181-1 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST141 TRAVEL AND TRAVEL NARRATIVES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST142 READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST143 STORYTELLING, GAMES AND ETHICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST145 POETICS , POLITICS AND PIVOTAL PEOPLE OF ROCK N ROLL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST146 FOOD AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST148 THE OCEANS IN CINEMA: A BLUE HUMANITIES READING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW143 LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW145 PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED143 CELEBRITY PR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
MED144 HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MED145 SOCIAL MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
PHY141 FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY142 ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
POL142 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL143 SUBALTERN STUDIES: NARRATIVES OF THE COMMUNITIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY143 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY156 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY158 STRESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC142 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE142 IMPROVISATION AND DEVISED THEATRE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA142F FINANCIAL EDUCATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BTY102-2 FUNDAMENTALS OF CELL BIOLOGY Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
BTY103-2 BIOCHEMISTRY Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
BTY112-2 FUNDAMENTALS OF CELL BIOLOGY LAB Major Core Courses-I 2 1 50
BTY113-2 BIOCHEMISTRY LAB Major Core Courses-I 2 1 50
CHE101-2 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY-I: COORDINATION COMPOUNDS AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY Major Core Courses-II 3 3 100
CHE102-2 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY-I: FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS Major Core Courses-II 3 3 100
CHE111-2 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS-II Major Core Courses-II 2 2 50
CHE112-2 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS-III Major Core Courses-II 2 2 50
COM147 E-COMMERCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC153 INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (DBMS) Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC154 INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON PROGRAMMING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO146 GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ECO147 THINKING THROUGH THE ENVIRONMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ENG181-2 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 2 100
EST149 INTRODUCTION TO WRITING TAMIL MODERN POETRY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
EST151 COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY: DARSANA AND PHILOSOPHY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
EST153 PARTITION NARRATIVES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST154 LITERATURE FROM THE NORTHEAST Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST155 FORENSIC LINGUISTICS THROUGH CASE STUDIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST156 RETELLING OF EPICS IN INDIAN LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW - 3 3 100
LAW146 LAW AND PRACTICE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
LAW149 LEGAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
LAW150C CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MAT143 MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY141A INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY141B RENEWABLE ENERGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
POL143 POLITICS AND SOCIETY OF INDIA SINCE INDEPENDENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY160 UNDERSTANDING ADDICTION AND SUBSTANCE USE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SW142 INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE144 ACTING FOR MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

 The programme is offered to students opting for a BSc degree with the combinations of Biotechnology and Chemistry and BSc (Biotechnology Honours/Honours with Research) or BSc (Chemistry Honours/Honours with Research). The courses in BSc (Biotechnology, Chemistry/Honors/Honors with Research) provide students with vital core science concepts and an application-oriented undergraduate education. Biotechnology courses aim to prepare students for jobs in the vitally important and rapidly growing biotechnology sector. Additionally, Students acquire foundational knowledge and skill sets covering fundamental sciences and technology. Given the need to improve undergraduate instruction that encourages interdisciplinary training and teamwork, this programme develops adaptable students with a strong foundation in competencies relevant to the evolving biotechnology industry. It gives the students hands-on instruction in biotechnology skills and methods. During the study of this programme, students will be trained to use an experimental learning strategy to integrate the program's laboratory and lecture components. This programme combines cutting-edge biotechnology research with instruction practically and uniquely. The programme leads the students to higher learning in biological, and chemical sciences and contribute to the welfare of the society. It is designed to help the students to understand the importance and judicious use of technology for the sustainable growth of mankind in synergy with nature.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Understand and apply the fundamental principles, concepts and methods in key areas of science and multidisciplinary fields

PO2: Understand the professional, ethical and social responsibilities

PO3: Develop logical and analytical skills in chemical sciences.

PO4: Exhibit professional skills to lead a successful career

PO5: Analyse the impact of chemicals in societal and environmental contexts.

PO6: Understand and analyse the concepts of Chemistry and apply them to real-world situations

PO7: imbibe ethical, moral and social values in personal and social life leading to a highly cultured and civilized personality and developing various communication skills such as reading, listening, speaking, etc., which will help in expressing ideas and views clearly and effectively

PO8: utilize the theoretical and practical knowledge of basic concepts of science to apply in various branches of biotechnology

PO9: exhibit deeper understanding of the fundamental and applied concepts of biotechnology subjects in entrepreneurial sectors and sustainable environmental management

Assesment Pattern

 

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

 

Examination And Assesments

Continuous internal assessment (CIA) forms 50% and the end semester examination forms the other 50% of the marks in both theory and practical. CIA marks are awarded based on their performance in assignments (written material to be submitted and valued), mid-semester test (MST), and class assignments (Quiz, presentations, problem solving etc.) The mid-semester examination and the end semester examination for each theory course will be for two and three hours duration respectively. The CIA for practical sessions is done on a day to day basis depending on their performance in the pre-lab, the conduct of the experiment, and presentation of lab reports. Only those students who qualify with minimum required attendance and CIA will be allowed to appear for the end semester examination.

BBA141B - MARKETING AND SELLING SKILLS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This is the basic course in Marketing and Selling Skills where students will get the exposure of Marketing and sales. The subject gives them a vast and wide insight of the traditional and contemporary aspects in Marketing and sales. The input of basic fundamentals, coupled with the practical knowledge will be given to the students to help them in understanding and designing the sales & marketing tactics and strategies.

 

Course Objective:

      To understand and appreciate the concept of marketing & sales in theory and practice

      To evaluate the environment of marketing and develop a feasible marketing &selling plan 

      To understand and apply the STP of marketing (segmentation, targeting, positioning)

      To have an elementary knowledge of consumer behaviour its determinants and selling skills

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of marketing and sales principles, theories, and their practical applications (RBTL 2)

CO2: Identify the key elements of the marketing environment and their impact on marketing and selling activities. (RBTL 3)

CO3: Apply segmentation techniques to categorize target market segments effectively. (RBTL 3)

CO4: Demonstrate basic selling skills, such as effective communication and relationship building, through practical exercises and simulations. (RBTL 2)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Unit 1: An Introduction to Marketing
 

Introduction, genesis & evolution of marketing in society, Importance and Scope of Marketing, Elements of Marketing – Need, Want, Demand, Desire, Marketing Philosophies, Mccarthy’s 4P classification, Lauterborn’s 4C’s classification & 4A’s Framework of rural marketing, Product service continuum.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Marketing Environment ? An Understanding
 

Basics of Marketing Environment, Factors Affecting Marketing Environment, Environmental analysis – SWOT & PESTLE, Marketing Environment in India, Legal & regulatory framework in India, Marketing Mix (Four Ps of Marketing).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Unit 3: Segmentation, Targeting and Positioning
 

Market Segmentation, Basis of segmentation & its types - Demographic, Geographic, Psychographic and behavioral Segmentation etc, Targeting- Five Patterns of Target Market Selection, Positioning-Concept of Positioning, Perceptual Mapping.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 4: Product Life Cycle and Consumer Behaviour
 

Product Life Cycle concept, marketing implications of PLC stages, corresponding strategies, dealing with competition, Perceptual Mapping, Consumer Behaviour – Rational V/s Emotional, Consumer proposition & acquisition process, buying motives, its types, Consumer Behaviour process

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 5: Selling ? An Introduction
 

Nature, Meaning and Significance of Sales Management and Personal selling; Evolution of Sales Management, Role of Selling in Marketing, Characteristics of a successful Salesman; Types of Selling, Selling Functions, Sales Funnel; Process of Effective Selling: Sales strategies; Prospecting: Meaning, process & methods; Ways to approach a customer

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Unit 6: Effective Sales management and Sales Force Organisation
 

Sales presentation; Handling objections; Closing a sale; Current issues in sales management; Case lets and applications, Meaning of Sales Force Management; Determining the sales force and size of the sales force, Introduction to: Sales organization concepts; Sales territories

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books: 

  1. Kotler, P., & Keller, K. (2015). Marketing management 15th edition. Prentice Hall.
  2. Kotler, P. (2013). Marketing management: A south Asian perspective.  13th edition, Pearson Education India.
  3. Panda, T. K., & Sahadev, S. (2nd Edition, 2011). Sales and distribution management. Oxford Publication.
  4. Spiro, R. L., Rich, G. A., & Stanton, W. J. (12th Edition, 2008). Management of a sales force. McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Suggested Readings: 

  1. Ramaswami, S., Namakumari. S,(2013) marketing management–Global Perspective Indian Context, Macmillan Publishers India Ltd, 5th Edition
  2. Rajan Saxena, Marketing Management, (2009) 4th edition, Tata McGraw-Hill Education
  3. Etzel M.J., Walker B.J. and Stanton William J - Marketing concept & Cases special Indian 14th Edition Tata Mc Graw Hill.
  4. Czinkota, Kotabe, Marketing Management, II edition, Thomson Publications.
  5. Still, R. R., Cundiff, E. W., & Govoni, N. A. (1988). Sales management: decisions, strategies, and    cases, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.
  6. Coughlan, A. T., Anderson, E., Stern, L. W., & Adel, I. (2006). El-Ansary. Marketing Channels. Prentice-Hall.
  7. Jobber, D., & Lancaster, G. (2007). Selling and sales management. Painos. Harlow: Pearson Education.
  8. Cron, Decarlo T. E. (2016). Sales Management concepts and cases: Wiley India
  9. Pingali Venugopal (2008). Sales and Distribution Management, Sage Publication 
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 2: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 3: 50 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 25 MARKS)

Attendance 5 marks 

Total 50 marks 

BLS161A-1 - MUSHROOM CULTIVATION TECHNIQUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Mushroom cultivation offers the students theoretical and practical knowledge on mushroom farming.  Course provides the necessary skill sets for the students to identify the mushrooms at species level and will enable the students to differentiate poisonous and edible mushrooms. Prospects and the scope of mushroom cultivation will be detailed in the course. The course introduces methods of growing edible mushrooms, including culture maintenance, basic mushroom substrate selection process. Course also covers an important aspect of pest management and disease control strategy.

Course Outcome

CO1: The post-harvest technology provides insights into different approaches employed to preserve and process the mushrooms.

CO2: Take measures to control the various diseases/infections that may affect the productivity of the mushroom

CO3: Know the different mushroom cultivation practices.

CO4: Overcome problems faced while introducing different species of mushrooms.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Mushroom cultivation
 

Introduction - Present scenario and prospects for Mushroom Cultivation; Nutritional and medicinal value of edible mushrooms; Brief description of Poisonous mushrooms; Types of edible mushrooms available in India - Volvariella volvacea, Pleurotus citrinopileatus, Agaricus bisporus; mushroom growing room and environmental growing systems, sterile techniques, an overview of techniques for mushroom cultivation, strain selection and improvement

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Cultivation Technology of mushrooms
 

Cultivation Technology of mushrooms: Infrastructure, substrates (locally available), Polythene bag, vessels, Inoculation hook, inoculation loop, low-cost stove, sieves, culture rack, mushroom unit (Thatched house), water sprayer, tray, small polythene bag. Pure culture: Medium, sterilization, preparation of spawn, multiplication. Mushroom bed preparation - paddy straw, sugarcane trash, maize straw, banana leaves. Factors affecting the mushroom bed preparation- Low-cost technology, composting technology in mushroom production -Role of composting in Mushroom cultivation, Appropriate materials to prepare different types of compost, Methods of composting – preparation and pasteurization, Determination of quality of compost, Hazards & risks associated with composting.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Disease control and pest Management:
 

Disease control and pest Management: diseases of mushrooms, inspection of Mushroom bags or beds for early detection of pests and diseases, sterilized casing to control nematodes, Spraying fungicide after casing to check dry bubbles, Spraying insecticide for control of mites, Use of caustic chemicals to keep rodents away

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Storage and nutrition
 

Short-term storage (Refrigeration – up to 24 hours), Long-term Storage (canning, pickles, papads), drying, and storage in salt solutions, preservation of mushrooms. Nutrition - Proteins - amino acids, mineral elements nutrition - Carbohydrates, Crude fibre content - Vitamins.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Mushroom Packaging:
 

Packaging, storing and grading of Mushroom & post-harvest procedures: Sorting the Mushrooms on size and quality, Packaging Mushrooms with labels containing the month and year of harvesting, quantity and type of Mushroom etc, Management of spent substrates and waste disposal of various mushrooms.Use of spent Mushrooms in vermi-composting and organic farming, Preparation of value-added products of Mushroom

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Mushroom Foods
 

Food Preparation: Types of foods prepared from the mushroom. Research Centres - National level and Regional level. Cost-benefit ratio - Marketing in India and abroad, Export Value.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Field visit
 

Field Visit & Interaction with Mushroom cultivators and other Support Agencies

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Paul Stamets, J.S. and Chilton, J.S. 2004. Mushroom cultivation A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home, Agarikon Press.

2. Tewan and Pankaj Kapoor S.C. 1993. Mushroom cultivation. Mittal Publication. Delhi.

3. Marimuth et al., 1991. Oyster Mushrooms. Dept. of Plant pathology, TNAU, Coimbatore.

 4. Shu Fing Chang, Philip G. Miles and Chang, S.T. 2004. Mushrooms Cultivation, nutritional value, medicinal effect and environmental impact. 2nd ed., CRC press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Nita Bahl (1984-1988) Hand book of Mushrooms, II Edition, Vol. I & Vol. II.

 2.      Kumar, N., 1997, Introduction to Horticulture, Rajalakshmi Publications, Nagercoil.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

 CIAI – Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 CIAII – Midsemester exam – 25%

 CIAIII - Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 Attendance – 5%

 End Semester Theory Exam – 50%

BLS161B-1 - ALGAL TECHNOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the basic science and technology of algae cultivation. It provides students with the skills required to work in the algae cultivation (algaculture) industry or create their own algal culture business. Students will learn the controlled environment requirements for successfully cultivating various algae species. The program emphasizes training in algal cultivation technologies, including algal culture extension training. Knowledge acquired will prepare students for jobs as Greenhouse/Agricultural Workers, Plant Technicians, Plant Managers, Laboratory Technicians, Sales Managers, Public Relations and Outreach, Extension Service and/or Business Owners/Managers

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the standard cultivation methods of microalgae, including photobioreactors and open ponds

CO2: Analyze the significant cultivation methods of seaweeds, along with detailed life history of selected high-value seaweed species from India

CO3: Examine the cultivation and optimization strategies of biofuel production and carbon capture and sequestration using algae

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to algae and their significance
 

Algal taxonomy and classification, Algal life cycle and growth requirements, Algal biochemistry and metabolism, Algal ecology and distribution.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Cultivation Methods for Microalgae
 

Lab scale culture, Photo-bioreactors: types and optimization, Open systems: Ponds, Organic Spirulina cultivation, Strategies to increase biomass in algal culture systems.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Cultivation Methods for Seaweeds
 

Life history of major commercially important seaweed species of India (Including Kappaphycus, Sargassum, Ulva, Porphyra), Nursery rearing of Zoids of seaweed species, Commercial mariculture methods of seaweeds, Floating raft method, semi-floating raft method, off-bottom method and bottom planting method, Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Production of Biofuel
 

Major algal species for biofuel research, advantageous for using algae for biofuel production in comparison with terrestrial plants like Jatropha, strategies to increase the oil content of algae, downstream processing for the biofuel production.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Carbon Capture and Sequestration with algae
 

Introduction to Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS), CCS as mitigation for climate change, CCS through algae, strategies to increase carbon sequestration levels, Major algal species as candidates for CCS.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Algal Applications in Wastewater Treatment
 

 

Algae-based wastewater treatment systems, Nutrient removal and recovery using algae, Algal-bacterial symbiotic systems

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Field Visit and Practical Applications and Case Studies
 

 

Visit to algal cultivation centers, Hands-on experience in algal biomass production, Algal harvesting and processing techniques, Analyzing algal samples and evaluating productivity.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Hoek, C. Van D et al (2009) Algae: An Introduction to Phycology. Cambridge University Press

 

2. Bast, F. (2014). An Illustrated Review on Cultivation and Life History of Agronomically Important Sea plants. In Seaweed: Mineral Composition, Nutritional and Antioxidant Benefits and Agricultural Uses, EdsVitor Hugo Pomin, 39-70. Nova Publishers, New York ISBN: 978-1-63117-571-8

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Kumar, H.D. (1999). Introductory Phycology. Affiliated East-West Press, Delhi

2. Sahoo, D. (2000). Farming the ocean: seaweed cultivation and utilization. Aravali International, New Delhi.

3. Bast, F (2014). Seaweeds: Ancestors of land plants with rich diversity. Resonance, 19(2) 1032-1043 ISSN: 0971-8044

4. Chisti, Y. (2013). Constraints to commercialization of algal fuels. Journal of Biotechnology, 167(3), 201-214.

5. Grossman, A. R., & Bhaya, D. (2014). Algal genomics: exploring the diversity of algal genomes. Genomics of Cyanobacteria, Chloroplasts, and Mitochondria, 339-363.

6. Huesemann, M. H., & Benemann, J. R. (2012). Biofuels from microalgae: a review of technologies for production, processing, and extractions of biofuels and co-products. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 16(1), 431-454.

 7. Schnurr, P. J., & Espie, G. S. (2016). Photosynthesis in the marine green alga Ulva: impacts of light and salinity stress on electron flow to oxygen. Journal of Phycology, 52(2), 297-309.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

 CIAI – Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 CIAII – Midsemester exam – 25%

 CIAIII - Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 Attendance – 5%

 End Semester Theory Exam – 50%

BOT121-1 - BIODIVERSITY - I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 The present course deals with the study of microbes, fungi and algae and the diseases caused in plants. The units of Phycology and Mycology deals with the general characters, thallus organization, morphology and life cycles of different algae and fungi. It also discusses the diseases caused in plants and evaluates the symptoms, causal agents and control measures of infected plants and other microbial diseases.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to understand and identify the diversity of microbes, fungi and algae

CO2: Students will be able to analyse the microscopic characters of microbes, fungi and algae

CO3: Students will be able to evaluate the significance of microbes, fungi and algae in the society

CO4: Students will be able to create awareness and disseminate the knowledge about the different types of microbial and fungal diseases

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction to microbial world and to study its diversity
 

Basic introduction about the microbial diversity

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Viruses
 

 Discovery; Physiochemical and biological characteristics; Classification (including Baltimore’s); Replication, Lytic and Lysogenic cycle; Structure of DNA virus (bacteriophage T4), RNA virus (TMV), Oncogenic virus (HIV); Symptoms, transmission and management of diseases caused by viruses in plants and in animals-with special reference to Mosaics and Vein clearing; and Dengue and AIDS 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Prokaryotes
 

Discovery of bacteria; Ecology and distribution; General structure; Comparison of Archaea and Eubacteria; Wall-less forms (L-forms, Mycoplasma, Protoplasts and Sphaeroplasts) Nutrition; Reproduction–vegetative, asexual and recombination; Economic importance; Symptoms, transmission and management of diseases caused by bacteria and mycoplasma on plants; Detailed study of two diseases each on plants (with special reference to: Crown gall and Citrus canker), and on animals (with special reference to: Tuberculosis and Cholera).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Algae
 

 General characteristics; Ecology and distribution (with reference to distribution in Indian peninsula); Range of thallus organization and reproduction; Basic criteria used in classification (Fritsch, 1945); Important classes in relation to Applied Phycology listed below Cyanophyceae- Nostoc Chlorophyceae- Chlamydomonas, Volvox, ChlorellaBacillariophyceae-Diatoms Phaeophyceae- Sargassum and Rhodophyceae- Gracilaria

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Fungi and their allies
 

 General characteristics; Ecology and distribution; Range of thallus organization; Cell structure; Wall composition; Nutrition; Growth; Reproduction and spores; Heterokaryosis and parasexuality; Basic criteria used in classification. Myxomycetes: General characteristics; Ecology and significance (Physarum as an experimental tool); Oomycetes: General characteristics; Ecology and significance; Thallus organization, Reproduction; Life cycle of Albugo. Life cycle of Rhizopus (Zygomycetes), Peziza (Ascomycetes) Puccinia, (Basidiomycetes) and Alternaria (Deuteromycetes), Symptoms, transmission and management of fungal diseases on plants; Two diseases each on plants (with special reference to Rust of wheat and Early blight of potato), and on humans (with special reference to Candidiasis and Dermatophytes to be studied in detail). Associations of Fungi: Lichens: General account; Reproduction; Mycorrhizae: General account and its significance.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Sharma, OP (2002) Textbook of Thallophytes, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. New Delhi.

2. Prescott's Microbiology by Willey, Joanne; Sherwood, Linda; Woolverton, Chris, 8th edition (2011) McGraw Hill.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Tortora, G.J, Funke, B.R, Case, C.L. (2010). 10th edition Microbiology: An Introduction,

Pearson.

2. Sharma, PD (2005). Fungi and Allied Organisms, Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi.

3. Alexopoulos, C.J., Mims, C.W. and Blackwell, M. (1996) Introductory Mycology, John

Wiley & Sons, Inc. USA.

4. Webster J. and Weber, R.W.S; (2007) Introduction to Fungi (3rd Edition) Cambridge Univ.

Paress, U.K.

5. Fritsch F.E. 1935, 45 (Vol. I & II) The structure and reproduction of the Algae. Vikas

Publishing House Ltd. Delhi

6. Sahoo Dinabandhu. 2000. Farming the ocean Aravali International, Delhi

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1: 20%

CIA2: 50%

CI3: 20%

Attendance: 10%

End Semester Exam: 100%

BTY101-1 - FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course introduces the students to the world of microbes discussing their salient features and importance. It discusses the fundamental principles and procedures of microbiology research and highlights GLP. The course further covers the basics of biostatistics essential for dealing with the analytical part of biological research. It surveys bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa, as well as their growth characteristics and morphology. This course guides the students to learn appropriate microbiology.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the fundamentals of microbial culture and microscopy

CO2: To learn the biology of bacteria, viruses and fungi.

CO3: To make the students adept in microbial physiology and biochemistry.

CO4: To learn pathogenesis of major human diseases and the problem of antimicrobial resistance.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:13
Introductory Microbiology
 

 

History and scope of Microbiology, Microscopy – Light, Phase contrast, Fluorescence & Electron microscopy: Stains and staining techniques - Gram’s, acid fast, capsular, flagellar and endospore staining. Physical and Chemical control of microorganisms. Methods of Sterilization, Methods for  isolation of pure culture, Culture and Media preparation – Solid and Liquid – Types of Media – Synthetic and Complex, Enriched, Enrichment, Selective and Differential media  Anaerobic culture technique – Candle Jar method, Wright‟s tube, Roll tube, Mclntoshfilde‟s jar method. Methods for enumeration of bacteria, Characters used for classification of microbes.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Bacteria
 

 

Structure of bacteria, classification based on shape and arrangement of cells, flagella – structure & function, Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial cell wall structural features, endospore formation, Functions of pili and capsule,  Antibiotics - history, mode of action, antibiotic resistance- types, causes, Superbugs

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Virus
 

 

Viruses – Structure and classification, Plant Viruses – TMV, CaMV, Animal viruses – HIV, Hepatitis B, Herpes Simplex Virus,  Phages- types, plaque assay, life cycle of bacteriophage  Lambda.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:3
Fungi and Algae
 

 

Fungi- Salient features, classification and reproduction of fungi, beneficial and harmful fungi, Life Cycle of Rhizopus, Mycorrhizae and lichens- types and significance, Algae - classification, uses of algae.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Physiology and Biochemistry of Microbes
 

 

Nutritional classification of microbes, Effect of physical factors on bacterial growth, Association of microorganisms (Parasitism, Saprophytism, Mutualism and Symbiosis, Commensalism, Respiration: EMP, HMP and ED Pathways, Bacterial photosynthesis, Nitrogen metabolism (nitrogen fixation), Bioluminescence.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Pathogenic Microorganisms
 

 

Epidemic, endemic and pandemic, Bacterial diseases of man – Tetanus, Tuberculosis, Pneumonia and Cholera, Viral diseases: AIDS – Life cycle of HIV, Parasites: Life cycle of Entamoeba and Plasmodium. Zoonosis, Emerging and reemerging diseases (Ebola, Nipah, Corona). 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1) Joanne Willey and Kathleen Sandman and Dorothy Wood, (2020).Prescott‟s Microbiology 11thEd. Mc Graw Hill Book

2) M. J. Pelczar Jr, E. C. S. Chan and N. R. Krieg, Microbiology, 5 th ed. New Delhi: Tata McGgraw Hill Education Pvt Ltd., 2004.

3) R. C. Dubey and D. K. Maheswari, Microbiology, New Delhi: S. Chand & Company Ltd., 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1) M. T. Madigan. J. M. Martinko. D. Stahl. D. P. Clark, USA: Brock's Biology of Microorganisms 13 ed. Benjamin Cummings. 2010.

2) G. J. Tortora, B. R. Funke, and C. L. Case, An Introduction to Microbiology, 11 th ed. USA: Benjamin Cummings, 2012.

3) R. Ananthanarayan and C. K. J. Paniker, Ananthanarayan and Paniker’s Textbook of Microbiology 8 thed. Universities Press. 2009.

4) Gerard J. Tortora, Berdell R. Funke & Christine L. Case,(2013). Microbiology – An Introduction 11thEd. Pearson

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

 CIAI – Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 CIAII – Midsemester exam – 25%

 CIAIII - Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 Attendance – 5%

 End Semester Theory Exam – 50%

BTY111-1 - FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY LAB (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The paper introduces the students with the fundamental principles and practices of microbiology and provides hands-on experience in working with microbes. All these are of immense application in medical, industrial and agricultural fields. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To investigate and gain hands on experience in the different techniques in the field of microbiology

CO2: To inspect techniques to culture and differentiate microorganisms.

CO3: To illustrate various methods of sterilization employed in microbiology lab.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Name of the experiment
 

1. Safety measures in microbiology laboratory

2. Instrumentation

3. Cleaning and Sterilization of Glasswares and preparation of Cotton plug

4. Preparation of Culture Media

5. Isolation of Microorganisms from environment

6. Study of Colony Characteristics of Bacteria

7. Pure culture techniques

8. Simple staining of bacteria

9. Gram staining

10. Motility testing of bacteria

11. Endospore staining

12. Sensitivity of bacteria to antibiotics

13. Biochemical tests (IMViC & Catalase)

14. Study of fungi

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. T. R. Johnson and C. L. Case, Laboratory Experiments in Microbiology, 10 th ed.: San Fransisc: Benjamin Cummings, 2012.

2. Joanne Willey and Kathleen Sandman and Dorothy Wood, (2020).Prescott‟s Microbiology 11thEd. Mc Graw Hill Book.

3. M. J. Pelczar Jr, E. C. S. Chan and N. R. Krieg, Microbiology, 5 th ed. New Delhi: Tata McGgraw Hill Education Pvt Ltd., 2004.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. N. Kannan, Laboratory manual in General Microbiology, New Delhi: Panima Publishing Corporation, 2002.

2. R. Ananthanarayan and C. K. J. Paniker, Ananthanarayan and Paniker’s Textbook of Microbiology 8 thed. Universities Press. 2009.

3. Gerard J. Tortora, Berdell R. Funke & Christine L. Case,(2013). Microbiology – An Introduction 11thEd. Pearson

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA-I – Performance – 20 Marks

CIA-II- Mid Semester Practical Examination – 20 Marks

CIA-III – Record – 10 Marks

 ESE - 50 Marks

CHE101-1 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In this introductory paper, the students acquire knowledge of the basic concepts of Physical, Organic, and Inorganic Chemistry. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Recall the fundamentals of structure and bonding.

CO2: Predict the chemical bonding in simple molecules.

CO3: Interpret the properties of organic molecules and reaction mechanisms.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Atomic Structure
 

Prelearning topics: Bohr’s theory and its limitations, Black body radiation, dual behaviour of matter and radiation, de Broglie’s relation, Heisenberg Uncertainty principle. Hydrogen atom spectra. Need of a new approach to Atomic structure.

 

 

Quantum mechanics: Postulates of quantum mechanics, Introduction, time independent Schrodinger equation and meaning of various terms in it. Significance of ψ and ψ2, Schrödinger equation for hydrogen atom. Radial and angular parts of the hydrogenic wave functions (atomic orbitals) and their variations for 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p and 3d orbitals (Only graphical representation). Radial and angular nodes and their significance. Radial distribution functions and the concept of the most probable distance with special reference to 1s and 2s atomic orbitals. Significance of quantum numbers, orbital angular momentum and quantum numbers ml and ms. Shapes of s, p and d atomic orbitals, nodal planes. Discovery of spin, spin quantum number (s) and magnetic spin quantum number (ms). Effective nuclear charge. Slater's Rules. *Stability of half-filled and completely filled orbitals,*concept of exchange energy. Relative energies of atomic orbitals, Anomalous electronic configurations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure
 

Ionic Bonding: General characteristics of ionic bonding. #Energy considerations in ionic bonding, lattice energy and solvation energy and their importance in the context of stability and solubility of ionic compounds. Statement of Born-Landé equation for calculation of lattice energy, Born-Haber cycle and its applications, polarizing power and polarizability. Fajan’s rules, ionic character in covalent compounds, bond moment, dipole moment and percentage ionic character.

Covalent bonding: VB Approach: Shapes of some inorganic molecules and ions on the basis of VSEPR and hybridization with suitable examples of linear, trigonal planar, square planar, tetrahedral, trigonal bipyramidal and octahedral arrangements. Concept of resonance and resonating structures in various inorganic compounds.

 

MO Approach: Rules for the LCAO method, bonding and antibonding MOs and their characteristics for s-s, s-p and p-p combinations of atomic orbitals, nonbonding combination of orbitals, MO treatment of homonuclear diatomic molecules (O2, N2) of 1st and 2nd periods (including idea of s-p mixing) and heteronuclear diatomic molecules such as CO, NO and NO+. Comparison of VB and MO approaches.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
 

Prelearning topics: Hybridizations, bond lengths, bond angles, bond energy. Localized and delocalized chemical bond, polarity of bonds, types of chemical reactions

 

 

Electronic Displacements: Inductive Effect, Electromeric Effect, Resonance, Hyperconjugation and steric effect. Effect of the above on strength of organic acids and bases: Comparative study with emphasis on factors affecting pK values. Cleavage of Bonds: Homolysis and Heterolysis. Nucleophiles and electrophiles. Reactive Intermediates: Carbocations, Carbanions, free radicals and carbenes - Structure, shape and reactivity of organic intermediates. Types of organic reactions: Addition, elimination, substitution, rearrangement and redox reactions (definition and one example each). 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Aliphatic Hydrocarbons
 

Prelearning topics: Classification, Nomenclature and sources of organic compounds.

 

Alkanes: (Upto 5 Carbons)

Preparation: Catalytic hydrogenation, from Grignard reagent. Reactions: Free radical Substitution: Halogenation. Selectivity and reactivity. (Mechanisms)

Cycloalkanes-Relative stabilities-Baeyer’s strain theory-Sache-Mohr theory of strainless rings.

Alkenes: (Upto 5 Carbons)

Preparation: Elimination reactions: Dehydration of alkenes and dehydrohalogenation of alkyl halides (Saytzeff’s rule); cis alkenes (Partial catalytic hydrogenation) and trans alkenes (Birch reduction). Mention stereoselective and regioselective reactions. Reactions: cis addition (alk. KMnO4) and trans-addition (bromine), Addition of HX (Markownikoff’s and anti-Markownikoff’s addition with mechanisms), Hydration, Ozonolysis, Hydroboration-oxidation.

Alkynes: (Upto 5 Carbons)                                                                                          

Prelearning topics: geminal and vicinal dihalides, basic concepts of addition and oxidation reactions.  Preparation: Acetylene from CaC2 and conversion into higher alkynes; by dehalogenation of tetra halides and dehydrohalogenation of vicinal-dihalides.

 

Reactions: formation of metal acetylides, addition of bromine and alkaline KMnO4, ozonolysis and oxidation with hot alkaline KMnO4.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  B.R. Puri, L.R. Sharma and K.C. Kalia, Principles of Inorganic Chemistry, 31st Edition, Milestone Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi, 2013.

[2]  Bahl, A. &Bahl, B.S. Advanced Organic Chemistry, S. Chand, 2010.

[3]  B. Mehta, M. Mehta, Organic Chemistry, PHI Learning Private Limited, 2017.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  J.A. Lee, Scientific Endeavour, Addison Wesley Longman

[2]  D.A. Skoog, D.M. West, F.J. Holler and S.R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 8th Edition, Brooks/Cole, Thomson Learning, Inc., USA, 2004.

[3]  J. D. Lee, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 5th ed., Blackwell Science, London, 2010.

[4]  Satya Prakash, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, Volume 1, 5th Edition, S. Chand and Sons, New Delhi, 2012.

[5]  R.K. Prasad, Quantum Chemistry, New Age International, 2001

[6]  McQuarrie, J. D. Simon, Physical Chemistry – A molecular Approach, Viva Books.

[7]  I. N. Levine, Physical Chemistry, Tata McGraw Hill,

[8]  ManasChanda, Atomic structure and Chemical bonding in Molecular Spectroscopy” Tata McGraw Hill.

[9]  J. D. Lee, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 5th edn., Blackwell Science, London.

[10]   B. R. Puri, L. R. Sharma, Kalia, Principles of Inorganic Chemistry, Milestone Publishers, New Delhi.

[11]   F. A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson and P. L. Gaus, Basic Inorganic Chemistry, 3rd ed., John Wiley.

[12]   B. Douglas, D. Mc Daniel, J. Alexander, Concepts and models in Inorganic Chemistry.

[13]   R. Gopalan, Inorganic Chemistry for Undergraduates, Universities Press, Hyderabad, 2009.

[14]   Jain and Sharma Modern Organic Chemistry 3rd edition, Vishal Publishing Company, 2009.

[15]   R. T Morrison, and R. N. Boyd. Organic Chemistry.  7thed. New Delhi: Prentice-Hall of India (P) Ltd., 2010.

[16]   S.M. Mukherji, S. P. Singh, and R. P. Kapoor. Organic Chemistry. 3rd, 12th Reprint, New Delhi: New Age International (P) Ltd. Publishers, 2009.

 

[17]   I. L Finar, Organic Chemistry Vol. II, 5thed. New Delhi: ELBS and Longman Ltd., reprint 2008.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3, 

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

CHE111-1 - CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is intended to impart basic analytical skills with an emphasis on volumetric analysis. It also emphasizes the importance of organized and systematic approach in carrying out experiments.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the physical parameters of liquids or solutions.

CO2: Perform the volumetric techniques for the quantitative analysis of various samples.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
Chemistry Practicals I
 

1.     Calibration of glassware.

2.     Determination of the surface tension of a liquid or a dilute solution using a stalagmometer.

3.     Study of the variation of surface tension of a detergent solution with concentration.

4.     Determination of viscosity of a liquid.

5.     Estimation of oxalic acid by titrating it with KMnO4.

6.     Estimation of water of crystallization in Mohr’s salt by titrating with KMnO4.

7.     Estimation of Fe (II) ions by titrating it with K2Cr2O7 using internal indicator.

8.     Estimation of Fe (II) ions by titrating it with K2Cr2O7 using external indicator.

9.     Estimation of Cu (II) ions iodometrically using Na2S2O3.

10.  Estimation of total alkalinity of water samples (CO32-, HCO3-) using double titration method.

 

11.  Measurement of chlorides in water samples by titrimetry (AgNO3 and potassium chromate)

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  Svehla, G. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Pearson Education, 2012.

 

[2]  Mendham, J. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Pearson, 2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  Svehla, G. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Pearson Education, 2012.

 

[2]  Mendham, J. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Pearson, 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

Scheme of assessment

 

1.  Continuous internal assessment of Practicals …………            20 Marks

2.  Mid-Sem practical Test …………………………………         20 Marks

3.  Record assessment ………………………………………         10 Marks

4.  End-semester Practical examination …………………..           50 Marks

  (Viva voce –10 marks; Performing experiment –  40 marks)      

                                        

                                 TOTAL                                                100 Marks

CHE161A-1 - COSMETIC CHEMISTRY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at creating awareness among the undergraduate students about the role of chemistry in day- to- day life. To learn more about cosmetics, their ingredients and other common chemicals used in daily life. This will help in selecting the appropriate products from the wide range available in the market. This will also develop in them, a sense of judicious use of cosmetics and other chemicals and also enhancement of self-esteem through proper grooming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recall the various components present in cosmetics and their properties.

CO2: Understand the working of soaps, detergents and cleaners.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Introduction to cosmetic chemistry
 

Introduction to cosmetic chemistry

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Skin creams and lotions
 

Composition and property: Demonstration of Preparation of cold creams and vanishing cream

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Deodorants and antiperspirants
 

Composition and how they work       

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Tooth pastes, mouth wash and tooth powder
 

Ccomposition and cleansing action, Demonstration of Preparation of a mouthwash, tooth powder and tooth paste                  

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Perfumes, colognes and aftershaves
 

Composition and properties Demonstration of Preparation of an aftershave lotion and shaving cream

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Shampoos, hair colouring and hair removers
 

Composition and their action Demonstration of Preparation of shampoos

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:3
Nail polish, Face powder, pansticks, foundation and face masks
 

Composition and function Demonstration of  Preparation of face powders          

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1].  Raymond Chang Chemistry, 8th Ed. Tata Mc Graw-Hill 2002

[2].  John Suchocki Conceptual Chemistry, 2nd Ed.Pearson Education. Inc. 2003

 

[3].John W. Hill, Doris K. Kolb Chemistry for changing times, 9th Ed. 2004

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1].  Raymond Chang Chemistry, 8th Ed. Tata Mc Graw-Hill 2002

[2].  John Suchocki Conceptual Chemistry, 2nd Ed.Pearson Education. Inc. 2003

 

[3].John W. Hill, Doris K. Kolb Chemistry for changing times, 9th Ed. 2004

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3, 

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

CHE161B-1 - TECHNICAL JAPANESE FOR CHEMISTS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

It enables the students to understand the Japanese language essential for the translation of scientific literature which enhances the employment opportunities for the students.

Course Outcome

CO1: understand the writing system in Japanese scientific literature.

CO2: understand the basics of Japanese language used in scientific literature.

CO3: interpret the Japanese research papers and patents.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction
 

Sentence structure.Writing systems; Hiragana, Katakana, Kanji (On and Kun readings).Numbers, exercises

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Particles
 

, , ,,,,, , , , , etc.  Exercises.                                   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Adjectives, Adverbs and Verbs
 

-adjectives and -adjectives, past tense of adjectives. Adverbs. いちだ verbs, ごだ verbs and irregular verbs. Past forms, connective forms, conjunctive forms, passive forms and causative forms of verbs.

 

Transitive-Intransitive verb pairs. Examples and Exercises.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Conditional forms, Comparative and Superlative Expressions
 

Conditional sentences with ,ければ,なら,たら, かった forms.Comparative expressions using ぐら, and ほど.Words implying a comparison (以上,以下,以外,以内,以前,以後).

 

Superlative expressions using一番 and最も.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Miscellaneous Expressions
 

Construction with to, ,とす,とい, とよ,同時に,とき. Interrogative words with particles,.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Chemical Nomenclature and Chemistry Vocabulary
 

Nomenclature of elements, binary compounds, bases, acids, salts, coordination compounds, organic compounds and biochemical compounds. Chemistry vocabulary.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:3
Mathematical terminology
 

Numbers, units and counters. Numbers with prefixes and suffixes. Some mathematical expressions.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]   Edward E.Daub, R.Byron Bird and Nobuo Inoue, Basic Technical

      Japanese, University of Wisconsin Press.

 

[2]   Different online resources available on internet.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]   Edward E.Daub, R.Byron Bird and Nobuo Inoue, Basic Technical

      Japanese, University of Wisconsin Press.

 

[2]   Different online resources available on internet.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3, 

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

COM143 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Entrepreneurship is not just about start-ups: it is a topic that is rapidly growing in importance in government policy and in the behaviour of established firms. The course provides students with an understanding of the role and personality of the entrepreneur, and a range of skills aimed at successful planning of entrepreneurial ventures. Material covered includes fostering creativity and open-mindedness, knowledge acquisition and management, innovation systems, screening and evaluating new venture concepts, market evaluation and developing a marketing plan, legal Issues Including intellectual property, preparation of venture budgets, and raising finance. The major piece of assessment is the writing of a comprehensive business plan for a new venture.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Discuss the fundamental concept and emerging trends of entrepreneurship.

CO 2: Elaborate the entrepreneurial process and classify the different styles of thinking.

CO 3: Develop and summarize the creative problem-solving technique and types of innovation.

CO 4: Compile the legal and regulatory framework and social responsibility relating to entrepreneur.

CO 5: Create a business model for a start-up.

CO 6: Build competence to identify the different sources of finance available for a start-up and relate their role in different stages of business.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Entrepreneurship
 

Evolution, Characteristics, Nature of Entrepreneurship, Types, Functions of Entrepreneur, Distinction between an Entrepreneur and a Manager, Concept, Growth of Entrepreneurship in India, Role of Entrepreneurship in Economic Development, Emerging trends of contemporary entrepreneurship – Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Globalisation, changing demands, unemployment, changing demographics, Institutional support, ease of entry in the informal sector

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
The Entrepreneurial Process
 

Steps in the Entrepreneurial Process: Generating Ideas, Opportunity Identification, Business concepts, Businessconcepts,Resources(Financial,PhysicalandHuman), Implementing and managing the venture, Harvesting the venture, Design Thinking, Systems Thinking, Agile thinking and Lean thinking Blue Ocean Strategy, Role and relevance of mentors, Incubation cell, Methods of brainstorming ideas.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Creativity and Innovation
 

Creativity, Principles of creativity, Source of New Idea, Ideas into Opportunities. CreativeProblemSolving:Heuristics,Brainstorming,Synectics, ValueAnalysisInnovationandEntrepreneurship: Profits and Innovation, Principles of Innovation, Disruptive, Incrementaland Open innovations, Nurturing and Managing Innovation, Globalization, Concept andModelsofInnovation, MethodsofprotectingInnovationandcreativity,SignificanceofIntellectualPropertyRights,Patents & Copy right, Business Model Canvas, and Lean Management. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Entrepreneurship Practice
 

EssentialsofBusinessOwnership:Typesofventures,RiskandBenefits,LegalandRegulatoryFramework,EthicsandSocialResponsibility,MarketResearch(ventureopportunityscreening), Feasibility Analysis, Introduction to the Business Plan, Developing the BusinessModel for starting a new venture, E-Commerce and Growing the Venture: The Internet andits impact on venture development

Approaches to E-Commerce, Strategies for E-CommerceSuccess,The nature of international entrepreneurship and their importance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Sources of raising capital
 

Different sources of financing for start-ups, stages of financing involve in start-ups, advantages and disadvantages of the different sources of financing, Mezzanine finance, Specific financial assistance from government and financial institutions to promote entrepreneurship, Venture Valuation Methods

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Allen,K.R.(2011), “LaunchingNewVentures:AnEntrepreneurialApproach”,6thEdition.Mason,Ohio: South-WesternCengage Learning.
  2. Kuratko,DonaldF.Entrepreneurship:(2010) Theory,Process,Practice9thEdition.Mason,Ohio: South-WesternCengage Learning
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Scarborough,N.M.(2011),“EssentialsofEntrepreneurshipandSmallBusinessManagement”,6thEdition. NewJersey:PrenticeHall.
  2. Verstraete,T.and Jouioson-Laffitte,E.(2012),“ABusinessModelforEntrepreneurship”,
  3. Cheltenham:EdwardElgarPublishingLtd.
  4. Poornima Charantimath,(2007) “EntrepreneurshipDevelopment-SmallBusinessEnterprise”,Pearson Education.
  5. RoberDHisrich,MichaelPPeters,DeanAShepherd,(2007), Entrepreneurship,(6ed.), The McGraw-Hillcompanies.
  6. RajivRoy,(2011),Entrepreneurship,(2ed.)OxfordUniversityPress
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I (a) Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ)

CIA I (b) Video Content Creation

 

CIA II Case Study Analysis

 

CIA III (a) Multiple Choice Questions(MCQ)

CIA III (b) Business Plan Creation + VIVA

 

CIA I (a): Week 1 & 2: MCQ (5 Marks)


Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. The date of examination is on or before 05-08-2023.  This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from unit 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

 

CIA I (b) Preparing a video interview of an Entrepreneur (Individual Assignment) 10 marks

Every student shall identify an entrepreneur and prepare a 15 minutes video interview on them.  Orientation about the video preparation shall be given by the respective faculty in the first week of the semester itself. Later a Google spreadsheet of students list shall be sent to the students.  Within a week the students need to enter the name of the entrepreneurs identified so as to avoid repetition in their selections and start preparing the interview. Once the entrepreneur is finalized, an orientation about plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty.  The last date of the video submission is 10-08-2023, before 06:00 PM.  Inability to submit the video on or before the due date should be priorly intimated to the faculty.  Any delay in submission without prior consent or approval shall lead to a penalty of marking the student ZERO in this component. 

 

The video shall be assessed based on the following rubrics. Report submitted will be valued for 10 marks.

More details of the report:

 

  1. The video should include genesis, growth, management contributions, challenges, how they overcome, achievements, major entrepreneurship inferences.
  2. References and sources should be mentioned as per APA 6th Edition, towards the end of the video.
  3. The video interview should be a minimum of 15 minutes.
  4. Last date for submission 10th August 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two marks. 

 

CIA II - Case Study (15 marks)

Group of not more than six members in a team will be formed randomly in the class based on the subject teacher’s discretion. Each group shall gather content and solve the assigned case study and submit a written report of the same. Report shall include the introduction to the case, highlights and objectives, conceptual definitions, detailed analysis, findings and suggestion, conclusion.  Groups are free to use all authentic sources to gather information. Once the case study is finalized, an orientation about case analysis, report writing, and plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty.  The last date of the case analysis report submission is 30-09-2022, before 06:00 PM.  The report can be supported with article reviews, statistical facts and examples and book references.


More Details of the Report:

1.      Case Study has to be based on growth of Entrepreneurship in India or Emerging trends of contemporary entrepreneurship.

 

  1. References as per APA 6th Edition, and Appendix.
  2. Detailed analysis of the problem and alternatives available should form part of the report.
  3. The written report should be a minimum of 6 pages.
  4. Last date for submission 30th September, 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two marks. 

 

CIA III (a): Week 15 & 16: MCQ (5 Marks)

 


Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. The date of examination is on or before 02-11-2023.  This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from Units 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

 

CIA III (b) Business Plan and viva-voce (10 marks)


The same group allotted for Case Study report shall continue. Once the idea for the business plan is finalized, an orientation about various components of the business plan, report writing, and plagiarism policies shall be given by the faculty. However, every student shall contribute in the construction of a
creative and technical business plan in detail consisting details from idea to implementation stage. The report will be valued for 10 marks by a panel of three external reviewers. The assessment criteria shall be discussed and finalized before the final submission and in consonance with the inputs and suggestions 
of the reviewers identified.  This criterion shall also be presented and discussed with the students prior to the final submission.  Though this is a group assignment, the assessment of the contribution of each student would be done individually.

More Details of the Report:

§  The report shall include details on value proposition, business and revenue model, sustainability

§  The written report should be a minimum of 10 pages.

§  References as per APA 6th Edition, and Appendix.

Last date for submission 5th November 2023, late submission within two days of the scheduled date, will carry a penalty deduction of two mark 

COM144 - FINANCIAL LITERACY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims at enhancing their financial skills as well as training the students to be financial educators with family and friends. There is a need for students to effectively plan and monitor their spending. The course aims at effectively training students and equipping them with the knowledge and tools to manage their finances and also teach others the same.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the basic concepts of financial literacy.

CO2: Apply financial planning and budgeting decisions on a personal and professional front.

CO3: Understand the purpose and functions of the Banking system.

CO4: Understand the role and importance of financial instruments and insurance products.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Financial Literacy
 

Introduction, Evolution, Meaning and importance of -  Income, Expenses, Savings, Budget, Money, Currency, Bank account, savings investment, JAM-balance sheet – purpose features, format – Technology in finance – FinTech, TechFin, Regtech, sandox, Mobile-based Banking – post offices – Savings vs investments – Power of Compounding – risk and Return-Time Value of Money- Simple Interest-Compound Interest-

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Planning and Budgeting
 

Introduction to Financial Planning - Analysing the resources of the person - Concepts in Financial Planning:The time value of money, Diversification - 'spreading risk', Investment Timing - Financial Products for Savers: Financial Products options for savers, personal budget – family budget – financial planning procedure.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Banking Products and Services
 

Introduction and evolution of Banking – Banking in India – RBI – Role of RBI in India– Savings and Deposits – Deposits, Accounts, KYC,e/v KYC Types of Deposits - Saving Bank Accounts, Fixed Deposit Accounts, Recurring Deposit Account, Special Term Deposit Schemes, Loans and Types of loan advanced by Banks and Other secondary functions of Bank – PAN, NSDL: PAN, Meaning of Cheque and types of cheques – CTS_MICR-IFSC – e- Banking – ATM, Debit, Credit, Smart Card, UPI, e-Wallets, Payment Banks-NPCI: Products and role in regulating the online payments, CIBIL – Banking complaints and Banking Ombudsman. Mutual Funds_ Types of Mutual Funds-NAV. Digital Currency-Bitcoin- NFO

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Post Office Products, Retirement planning and Investment Avenues
 

Post Office Savings Account(SB)​​​​​, National Savings Recurring Deposit Account (RD)​​, ​National Savings Time Deposit Account (TD), National Savings Monthly Income Account (MIS), Senior Citizens Savings Scheme Account (SCSS)​, Public Provident Fund Account (PPF)​, Sukanya Samriddhi Account (SSA)​, National Savings Certificates (VIIIth Issue) (NSC), Kisan Vikas Patra (KVP), PM CARES for Children Scheme, 2021, Interest rates (New)​, How to avail services, Schedule of Fee – IPBS – KYC. Employees Provident Fund (EPF) - Public Provident Fund (PPF), Superannuation Fund, Gratuity, Other Pension Plan, and Post-retire Counselling-National Pension Scheme(NPS)

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Life Insurance and Related Services
 

Life Insurance Policies: Life Insurance, Term Life Insurance, Pension Policies, ULIP, Health Insurance, Endowment Policies, Property Insurance: Policies offered by various general insurance companies. Post office life Insurance Schemes: Postal Life Insurance and Rural Postal Life Insurance (PLI/RPLI). Housing Loans: Institutions providing housing loans, loans under Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana – Rural and Urban-Atal Pension Yojana (APS),

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Chandra, P. (2012). Investment Game: How to Win. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill Education
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Mittra, S., Rai, S. K., Sahu, A. P., & Starn, H. J. (2015). Financial Planning. New Delhi: Sage Publications India Pvt. Ltd.
  2. https://rbidocs.rbi.org.in/rdocs/content/pdfs/GUIDE310113_F.pdf

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1 25 marks

CIA2  25 marks 

ESE  50 marks 

DMT142 - INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introduction to Carnatic music focus on the basic fundamentals of Carnatic music. This course helps to improve the vocal quality as the lessons works as voice culture to the begginner.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to render the Swara-s in three speeds

CO2: Ability to identify and render the 7 Swara-s

CO3: Ability to render Sarala, Janta, Dhatu, Tarasthayi, and Alankara-s in three speeds.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Svaravali varisas and Janti varisas
 

Lessons in three speeds

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Tarasthayi and Dhattu varisas
 

All the lessons in to three speeds

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Alankaras and Geethams
 

Sapta tala alankaras and any for geethams

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carnatic music reader by Panchapakesha Iyer

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ganamrutha Bodhini

Evaluation Pattern

Final assessment for 100 Marks

DSC142 - PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR DATA SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the programming paradigms associated with Python. It provides a comprehensive understanding of Python data types, functions and modules with a focus on modular programming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply core programming concepts.

CO2: Demonstrate significant experience with python program development environment.

CO3: Design and implement fully-functional programs using commonly used modules and custom functions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
INTRODUCTION
 

INTRODUCING PYTHON

Introduction, Python Fundamentals, Features of Python, Components of a Python Program, Understanding the interpreter.

Python basics:

Identifiers, Basic Types, Operators, Precedence and Associativity, Decision Control Structures, Looping Structures, Console input, output.

Practical Exercises:

1.Implement Basic data types, Control structures and operators.

2.Exercise on console input and output.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Programming Fundamentals
 

PYTHON DATA TYPES

Strings,Lists:Accessingelements,Basic List operations, Built-in methods

Tuples: working with elements, Basic Tuple operation, Tuple methods and Type of Tuples 

Sets: Definition, Set Elements, Built-in methods, basic set operations, Mathematical Set operation, Variety of Sets.

Dictionaries: Defining a dictionary, accessing elements, basic operations, methods.

COMPREHENSIONS and FUNCTIONS

 Comprehensions:ListComprehensions, Set Comprehension, Dictionary Comprehension.

Functions: Defining a function, Types of arguments, unpacking arguments.

Recursive functions.Main module, built-in, custommodules, importing a module.

 

Practical Exercises:

    1. Implement Tuples

    2. Implement Dictionary

    3. Implement Set

    4.ImplementList, Set and Dictionary Comprehensions

    5.Implement Recursive function

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to NUMPY AND PANDAS
 

NUMPY 

Introduction to NumPy, Aggregations Computation on Arrays, Comparisons, Sorting Arrays.

PANDAS

Introduction to Pandas: Data indexing and Selection, Operating on Data, Handling Missing Data.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

[1]Martin Brown, Python:The Complete Reference,     McGraw Hill Publications,4th Edition March 2018.

[2]Yashavant Kanetkar,Aditya Kanetkar, Let Us Python, BPB Publications ,4th Edition 2022.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]Reema Thareja ,Python Programming using problem solving Approach , Oxford University, Higher Education Oxford University Press, 2017

[2]Zhang.Y      ,An      Introduction     to         Pythonand      Computer            Programming,Springer Publications,2015

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 100%

ECO145 - ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to provide a holistic and a deeper understanding of the trade-off between ecology and development. Through an inter-disciplinary lens an organic approach is adopted to understand the trade-off. This course, therefore, seeks to cultivate not only the moral and ethical thinking of the ecology but also it tries to put forth an action plan from a policy front. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To evoke a sense of deep ecology and social justice.

CO2: To familiarize the students with the development paradigms and how it affects the ecology.

CO3: To examine the problems behind value designations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Value
 

The Value Problem in Ecological Economics- Values in Ecological Value Analysis: What Should We Be Learning from Contingent Valuation Studies? - Natural Capital in Ecological Economics-Entropy in Ecological Economics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Development
 

The environmental impact of land development-Development of water resources-Development and changing air quality- Urban development and environmental change-Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?- Power Inequality and the Environment.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecofeminism and Ecocriticism
 

Gender and environment; Ecofeminism; androcentrism; Deep ecology – ecofeminism debate; Ecocriticism; Nature writings; Thinking like a mountain; The forgetting and remembering of the air - The Varna Trophic System An Ecological Theory of Caste Formation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Action Plans
 

Reading Ecology, Reinventing Democracy-Scientists or Spies?- Revisiting the Debates on Man-Nature Relation- Lecture of Medha Patkar- Ecological Fiscal Transfers and State-level Budgetary Spending in India- -Bourgeois Environmentalism, the State, the Judiciary, Urban Poor, Significance of Silent Valley- Silent Valley: A controversy that focused global attention on a rainforest 40 years ago- Equity and Justice

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      1.Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

2.Daly & Farley. (2011). Ecological Economics (Principles and Applications). Island Press

3.Pepper, D. (2002). Eco-socialism: from deep ecology to social justice. Routledge

1.      4.Gupta, Avijit. (1998).Ecology and Development in Third World. Routledge

4. Patel, S. (1997). Ecology and Development. Economic and Political Weekly, 2388-2391.

5. Sankar, U. (ed.) (2000). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press

6. Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

7.Venkatachalam, L. (2007). Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?. Ecological economics, 61(2-3), 550-558.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.    1. Plumwood, V. (1993).  Feminism and the Mastery of Nature. London: Routledge

2. Warren, K.J. (ed), (1994).  Ecological Feminism. London: Routledge.

3.Shiva, V. (2016). Staying alive: Women, ecology, and development. North Atlantic Books.

4.Kavoori, P. S. (2002). The Varna Trophic system: an ecological theory of caste formation. Economic and Political Weekly, 1156-1164. 

5.Gill, K. (2009). Bourgeois environmentalism’, the State, the Judiciary, and the ‘urban poor’: The political mobilization of a scheduled caste market. Of Poverty and Plastic (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2010), 209.

6. Kaur, A., Mohanty, R. K., Chakraborty, L., & Rangan, D. (2021). Ecological fiscal transfers and state-level budgetary spending in India: Analyzing the flypaper effects. Levy Economics Institute, Working Papers Series July.

7.Parameswaran, M. P. (1979). Significance of Silent Valley. Economic and Political Weekly, 1117-1119.

8. Lewis, M. (2002). Scientists or spies? Ecology in a climate of Cold War suspicion. Economic and Political Weekly, 2323-2332.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 25 Marks

CIA 2- 25 Marks

CIA 3- 50 Marks 

ENG181-1 - ENGLISH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities, and politics and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO2: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO3: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare
 
  • 1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde
  • 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors  Just a minute talk, cubing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer
 

 Why We Travel-Pico Iyer 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
1. Thinking Like a Mountain By Aldo Leopold
 

Thinking Like a Mountain  By Aldo Leopold

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article
 

 

Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
1. My Story- Nicole DeFreece
 

 

 My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Casey at the Bat- Ernest Lawrence Thayer
 
  • Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer
Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Additional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20 

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks

EST141 - TRAVEL AND TRAVEL NARRATIVES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Travel Literature is one of the most popular areas of study and research today. Theoretical and practical understanding of travel and Travel Literature has evolved a lot in its journey to the present. We discuss journeys at multiple levels; physical, philosophical, psychological, religious, internal, external etc. The involvement of multidisciplinary perspectives has enriched the whole understanding of travel. Questions like why people travel and what happens when one sets out on a journey becomes so pertinent to the whole discipline. This course will try to engage with the ideas of travel and writing on travel from a chronological and historical perspective. This course will also provide students with a modern and comprehensive way of understanding the world of travel and travel narratives.

 

Course Objective: This course is aimed at providing a comprehensive introduction and survey on the contemporary world of travel and travel narratives. The course is aimed at providing students a direct engagement with the modern theoretical understanding of the travel narratives.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to understand the history and development of travel literature

CO2: Students will be able to get an idea of Travel narratives in India

CO3: This will provide an introductory peek into the theory of Travel and Travel writing

CO4: Students will Will be able to critically and academically engage with travel writings

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
What is Travel ? A Basic introduction
 

Travel is the buzz word of the day. In the fast-changing modern world travel plays a vital role in shaping up thoughts and aspirations of people. People travel for multiple reasons like to enjoy, to study, as a profession, etc and the theoretical understanding of travel needs to be taken into account at the beginning itself. Understanding travel in the light of modern socio-political and economic scenario is also very important in today’s global scenario. These basic positions of the course would enable students to look at travel in a broader context to create a better world with diversity and inclusivity.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Travel Writing: An Overview
 

This unit is intended to give students an over view of the evolution of the genre of Travel Writing. Some important theories of travel writing will be introduced in this module along with the evolution of travel narratives in India.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Indian Travel Narratives
 

This module focuses on the evolution of Indian Travel Narratives.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Women and Travel Writing in India
 

This unit is trying to look at the rise and development of women travellers historically and sociologically. This will enable students to critically evaluate the Indian scenario of travel narratives.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Unit I: What is Travel – Basic introduction

1.     Pratt, Mary Louise. Imperial Eyes: Studies in Travel Writing and Transculturation.Routledge, 1992.

2.     Lislie, Debbie. The Global Politics of Contemporary Travel Writing, Cambridge University Press, 2009 Print.

Unit II: Travel Writing: An Overview

1)    Hulme, Peter, and Tim Youngs, eds., 2002. The Cambridge Companion to Travel Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.

2)    Said, Edward (1983). ‘Traveling Theory.’ The World, the Text, and the Critic. [1982]. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP. 226–47.

Unit III: Indian Travel Narratives

1)    Bhattacharji, Shobhana(ed). 2008. Travel Writing in India, Sahitya Academy, New Delhi.

        2)    Mandal, Somadatta.  Indian Travel Narratives, Rawat Publications, New Delhi. 2010. 

Unit IV: Women and Travel Writing in India

1.     Ghose, Indira. Women Travellers in Colonial India: The Power of the Female Gaze OUP Delhi 1998 Print. Pp.1-19

2.     Nath, Shivya. The Shooting Star: A girl, her backpack and the World, Penguin 2017.

      

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1)    Pratt, Mary louis. 1992. Imperial Eyes, Travel Writing and Transculturation, London: Routledge.

2)    Tagore, Rabindranath. 1962. Diary of a Westward Voyage. Asia Publishing House.

3)    Dalrymple, William. Nine Lives: In Search of the Sacred in Modern India. Bloomsbury, New Delhi.2010.

1.                 4)    Jung, Anees. Unveiling India: A Woman’s Journey, Penguin India,1986.

 5) Bohls, E. A. (1995). Women travel writers and the language of aesthetics, 1716-1818 (No. 13). Cambridge University Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Examination and Assessment

Assessment Pattern    

 

20 (CIA 1)

20 (CIA 3)

50 (CIA 2)

50 (End Semester)

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of a travel narrative analysis of a popular writer of contemporary time, debates or seminar/panel discussions.

Mid semester exam – A written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks. Section A will have questions (6x5 =30 marks). Section B will have 2 analytical questions (10 marks each) to assess conceptual clarity and understanding of the domain.

End-semester exam – Two sections: Section A (30 marks) will have 3 questions (10 marks each) testing the knowledge on the evolution of the genre. Section B (20 Marks)will have 2 conceptual/Analytical question (10 marks each).

EST142 - READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:3
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Reading Sports and Literature

Course Description: The Sports and Literature course aims to explore the relationship between sports and literature through the analysis of various literary works. By examining texts that center around sports themes, this course will delve into the cultural, social, and personal aspects of sports as portrayed in literature. Students will develop critical thinking, analytical, and communication skills as they engage with a diverse range of texts, including novels, short stories, poems, and essays. Through class discussions, readings, and written assignments, students will gain a deeper understanding of the literary representation of sports and its significance in society.

Course Objectives:

To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

 

To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Course Outcome

CO1: To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

CO2: To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

CO3: To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

CO4: To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

CO5: To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Sports and Literature
 

Defining the relationship between sports and literature

Historical perspectives on sports in literature

 

The role of sports in society and culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The Heroic Athlete
 

 

Exploring the archetype of the hero in sports literature

Analysis of sports heroes and their portrayal in literary works

 

Themes of triumph, perseverance, and sacrifice

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Gender and Sports
 

 

Gender representation in sports literature

Examination of gender roles and expectations in athletic contexts

 

Sports as a means of empowerment and resistance

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Identity
 

 

Sports as a vehicle for personal and collective identity

Intersectionality and the portrayal of race, ethnicity, and class in sports literature

 

The relationship between sports and national identity

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Sports and Coming-of-Age
 

 

Analysis of sports as a backdrop for personal growth and maturation

The challenges and conflicts faced by young athletes in literature

 

Themes of ambition, dreams, and disillusionment

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Society
 

Unit 6: Sports and Society

Critical examination of the social issues depicted in sports literature

Sports as a reflection of broader societal dynamics

 

Ethics, values, and controversies in the world of sports

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. "The Natural" by Bernard Malamud
  2. "Friday Night Lights" by H.G. Bissinger
  3. "The Art of Fielding" by Chad Harbach
  4. "Seabiscuit: An American Legend" by Laura Hillenbrand
  5. "The Contender" by Robert Lipsyte
  6. "The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner" by Alan Sillitoe
  7. "A Fan's Notes" by Frederick Exley
  8. "The Boys of Summer" by Roger Kahn
  9. "The Sportswriter" by Richard Ford
  10. "Open" by Andre Agassi
  11. "Fever Pitch" by Nick Hornby
  12. "The Crossover" by Kwame Alexander (young adult literature)
  13. "The Runner" by Cynthia Voigt (young adult literature)
  14. "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" by Sherman Alexie (young adult literature)
  15. "The Fighter" by Michael Farris Smith
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. "The Boxer" by Joyce Carol Oates
  2. "The Runner" by Don DeLillo
  3. "Blindside" by Michael Lewis
  4. "The Tennis Partner" by Abraham Verghese
  5. "Basketball" by John Updike
  6. "The Chariot" by Ray Bradbury
  7. "The Trophy" by Alberto Alvaro Ríos
  8. "The Catch" by W.P. Kinsella
  9. "In the Ring" by Andre Dubus
  10. "Roller Derby Queen" by Margot Livesey
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-20

CIA 2- MSE 50

CIA 3- 30

ESE- 50

EST143 - STORYTELLING, GAMES AND ETHICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: In the last 20-25 years the field of game studies has evolved significantly. It is globally recognised. Video games have been studied using inter, multi and transdisciplinary methods to understand culture, identity, media, narration and communication. The course will provide a historical, social, cultural and critical foundation about games, digitality, storytelling and its moral and ethical world. This will enable students to understand the connection between identities, moralities and our current engagement with the gaming world. This will help in broadening the interdisciplinary focus and assessment of storytelling in diverse forms and connect it with the ethical issues of the contemporary world.

 

Course Objectives: The course will survey the evolution of ideas connecting storytelling, gaming and ethics and morality. It will introduce the latest research in gaming and ethics as evidenced in the globalised world. It will provide a methodology for students to assess and critically evaluate the meaning, content, intent, narration (compared to other broader media), ideology and ethical implications of gaming in the contemporary world.

Course Outcome

CO1: ? will be able to understand the narrative conventions of gaming, their uses and ideological effects

CO2: ?will evaluate how narrative choices reflect ethical contextualisation

CO3: ?will be able to analyse and evaluate contemporary social, cultural and political issues and perspectives reflected in games

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: What is gaming ? Basic introduction
 

While gaming has been popular, studying games with its historical, social and cultural context requires a foundation in history of games. Locating games within cultures of social transactions and strategic implications will provide the required base to begin the course.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Gaming, Society and Narration
 

This unit is divided into three smaller subunits. The students will be divided into smaller groups in class and asked to explore the following blog to choose any one area of interest within the subcategories mentioned. The class will progress accordingly. They have to choose between games and colonialism, games and gender, games and philosophy (utopia/dystopia).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Games and Ethics
 

This unit is focussed on ethical framework of games.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Unit IV: Storyboard ? design a game (basic story line)
 

The students are expected to narrate and design a basic concept for a game to respond to the questions raised in the course.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Unit I: What is gaming – Basic introduction                                                         (10 hours)

While gaming has been popular, studying games with its historical, social and cultural context requires a foundation in history of games. Locating games within cultures of social transactions and strategic implications will provide the required base to begin the course.

1.     Roberts, J. M., Arth, M. J., & Bush, R. R. (1959). Games in culture. American anthropologist61(4), 597-605.

2.     Chapter 1 from Grace, L. D. (2019). Doing things with games: Social impact through play. CRC Press.

Unit II: Gaming, Society and Narration                                                                (15 hours)

This unit is divided into three smaller subunits. The students will be divided into smaller groups in class and asked to explore the following blog to choose any one area of interest within the subcategories mentioned. The class will progress accordingly. They have to choose between games and colonialism, games and gender, games and philosophy (utopia/dystopia).

https://coe-gamecult.org/

Reading: Shaw, A. (2010). What is video game culture? Cultural studies and game studies. Games and culture5(4), 403-424.

Salter, A., & Blodgett, B. (2017).  Toxic Geek Masculinity: Sexism, Trolling, and Identity Policing (Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2017), 73-99.

Case study: Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice

Unit III: Games and Ethics                                                                                      (15 hours)

Kowert, R., & Quandt, T. (Eds.). (2015). The video game debate: Unravelling the physical, social, and psychological effects of video games. Routledge. (Chapter 2/4/5).

Gotterbarn, D. The ethics of video games: Mayhem, death, and the training of the next generation. Inf Syst Front 12, 369–377 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10796-009-9204-x

Schrier, K. (2015). EPIC: A framework for using video games in ethics education. Journal of Moral Education44(4), 393-424.

Sicart, M. (2015). Playing the good life: Gamification and ethics. The gameful world: Approaches, issues, applications, 225-244.

Unit IV: Storyboard – design a game (basic story line)

The students are expected to narrate and design a basic concept for a game to respond to the questions raised in the course.

1.     Workshop by gaming planner/designer

2.     https://www.pluralsight.com/blog/film-games/creating-game-concept-first-step-getting-game-ground

3.     https://uxdesign.cc/a-board-game-design-process-a-game-is-a-system-5469dfa4536

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended readings:

Bolter, J. et al. (1999). Remediation. Understanding New Media. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 20-52; 88-102.

Burrill, D. A. (2008). Die tryin': videogames, masculinity, culture (Vol. 18). Peter Lang. (13-44).

Mukherjee, S. (2017). Videogames and Postcolonialism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 1-52. (Rise of the Tomb Raider).

Schrier, K. (2017). Designing role-playing video games for ethical thinking. Educational Technology Research and Development65(4), 831-868.

Sicart, M. (2013). Beyond choices: The design of ethical gameplay. MIT Press.

Zhang, Y. (2009). Ian Bogost, Persuasive Games: The Expressive Power of Videogames.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Examination and Assessment

Assessment Pattern    

20 (CIA 1)

20 (CIA 3)

50 (CIA 2)

50 (End Semester)

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of an author, book review, narrative analysis of a dominant idea of the contemporary time, debates or seminar/panel discussions.

Mid semester exam (class test) – A written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks. Section A (10 marks) will have objective questions (20, ½ marks each). Section B will have 4 questions (10 marks each) to assess conceptual clarity. Section B will have one compulsory question which will be analytical.

End-semester exam (class test) – Three sections: Section A (10 marks) will have objective questions (20, ½ marks each). Section B will have 1 conceptual question (10 marks each). They will be conceptual. Section C (15 marks each) will be having two case studies - one purely based on identification of features, styles, and narrative devices, and second question will be evaluative and analytical.

Consolidated marks will be sent after the final examination.

EST145 - POETICS , POLITICS AND PIVOTAL PEOPLE OF ROCK N ROLL (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

 Rock Music is a sound and dissonance rich discourse with its own socio-cultural practices and aesthetics. This course is an academic introduction to this space and its role in the identity formation of a generation, of a people and a Nation in motion.

 

Course Objectives

 

  • To engage with popular music as aural texts 
  • To study the popular music practitioner as an activist and artist
  • To appreciate the significance of  social critique and a counter cultural aesthetic

Course Outcome

CO1: ? To critically appreciate characteristics and concerns of popular music

CO2: To read popular music as cultural artefact and socio-political entities

CO3: ? To regard popular music as the voice and identity of a generation and locate its historical trajectory

CO4: ? To engage with artists and performances as cultural texts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
A brief history of Popular Music before the Beatles
 

Tin Pan Alley and song pluggers, World War II

Sheet Music

Swing and ragtime

Vaudeville

Frank Sinatra: My Way. Strangers in The Night, New York, New York

Nashville, Music Row, Elvis Presley

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Birth of a Genre (From Gospel to Rock)
 

 Bill Haley 

Chuck Berry

  Buddy Holly   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Classic Rock and the British Invasion
 

The Beatles and Beatlemania

Establishing an aesthetic of Mod

  TV and bands 

The Rolling Stones  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Art Rock and the Album Era: Concept Albums and Album Art
 

 

Bands as Artists                                                                                                                 

Beatles / Sgt Pepper’s  

Pink Floyd /The Wall

The Who / Tommy

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
The Politics of Rock n Roll Folk rock: People power; Guerrilla Minstrels Folksong as Protest
 

 

Counter Culture: Vietnam, Draft, Gender, the Mystic East, Woodstock, Ban the Bomb   

Woody Guthrie

Bob Dylan

Joan Baez

Janis Joplin

Simon and Garfunkel

Jimi Hendrix

Pearl Jam

Riot bands

Text Books And Reference Books:

Whats that sound? An introduction to Rock and its history .

 

Jon CovachUniversity of Rochester

and the Eastman School of Music

Andrew Flory

Carleton College

 

W. W. NORTON AND COMPANY

NEW YORK • LONDON

fifth Edition

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Baugh, Bruce. “Prolegomena to Any Aesthetics of Rock Music”. The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 51, No. 1 (Winter, 1993): 23-29. JSTOR. The American Society for Aesthetics. Web. 26Jul, 2016. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/431967>

Camilleri, Lelio. “Shaping Sounds, Shaping Spaces”.  Popular Music, Vol. 29, No. 2 (May 2010): 199-211. JSTOR.  Cambridge University Press. Web. 16August, 2016. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/40926918>

Chrysalis, Thanos. “Spatio-Aural Terrains”. Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 16, Noises Off: Sound Beyond Music (2006):40-42. JSTOR. The MIT Press. Web. 29 April, 2015. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4540592

Denisoff R.S. The Sounds of Social Change: Studies in Popular USA Culture. 1972. Rand Mcnally& Co.

Denisoff, R. S.  Great Day Coming.  1991. Ann Arbor, MI: U-M-I Out-of-Print Books on Demand.

Denisoff, R. S. "Sing a Song of Social Significance": Political Consciousness and the Song of Persuasion.  1972.  Ohio: Bowling Green State University Popular Press.

Denisoff, R. S. Solid Gold Popular Record Industry.  1975. New Brunswick, New Jersey Transactions Inc

Ewen, D. Great Men of American Popular Song: The History of the American Popular Song told through the Lives, Careers, Achievements, and Personalities of its Foremost Composers and Lyricists--from William Billings of the Revolutionary War through Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Burt Bacharach.  1972. Englewood Cliffs, NJ, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

Forcucci, S. L. A Folk Song History of America: America through its Songs.  1984. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall

Fox, Aaron A.. “The Jukebox of History: Narratives of Loss and Desire in the Discourse of Country Music”. Popular Music, Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan,1992): 53-72. JSTOR, Cambridge University Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/853227 >

Ganchrow, Raviv. “Perspectives on Sound-Space: The Story of Acoustic Defense”. Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 19, Our Crowd—Four Composers Pick Composers (2009): 71-75. JSTOR. The MIT Press. Web. 29April, 2015. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/40926354>

Hamm, C.  Music in the New World. 1983. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Hampton, W. Guerrilla Minstrels.  1986. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Kingman, D.  American Music: A Panorama. 1979. New York: Schirmer books.

Klonsky, M. “Down in The Village: A Discourse on Hip”. New American Review, 13. 1971. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Kostelanetz, Richard. “Text-Sound Art: A Survey (Concluded)”. Performing Arts Journal, Vol. 2, No. 3 (Winter, 1978): 71-84. JSTOR. Performing Arts Journal, Inc. Web. 16 August,2016. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/3245364 >

 

Kramer, Lawrence. “Music, Metaphor and Metaphysics”.  The Musical Times, Vol. 145, No. 1888 (Autumn, 2004): 5-18. JSTOR.  Musical Times Publications Ltd. Web. 26 March,2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/4149109>

Kun, Josh D. “The Aural Border”. Theatre Journal, Vol. 52, No. 1, Latino Performance (March. 2000): 1-21. The John Hopkins University Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/25068738 >

Poulin, A. The American Folk Scene: Dimensions of the Folksong Revival.  1967. New York: Dell Pub. Co.

Qureshi, Regula Burckhardt. “Music Anthropologies and Music Histories: A Preface and an Agenda”. Journal of the American Musicology Society, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Autumn 1995): 331-342. JSTOR. University of California Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/3519830 >

 

Račić, Ladislav. “On the Aesthetics of Rock Music”. International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music, Vol. 12, No. 2 (Dec.1981): 199-202. JSTOR. Croatian Musicological Society. Web. 1Dec., 2017. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/836562>

Ricks, C.  The Force of Poetry. 1995. Oxford University Press.

Rodnitzky, J. L.  Minstrels of the Dawn: The Folk-Protest Singer as a Cultural Hero. 1976. Chicago: Nelson-Hall.

Tagg, Philip. “Analyzing popular music: theory, method and practice.” Popular Music 1 (1979): 68-70. Web.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment: (20 marks).

Choose a song that has been an effective anthem for a cause or genre and analyse it in about 500-750 words.  

CIA II: (Mid Sem 50 marks) Choose a pivotal figure from Rock history and trace their career and impact on society. Consider image and sound in the construction of this image.

CIA III:(20marks) The class in groups of 5-6 will anthologise a series of songs, artists and their work.

 

Archiving:

End Semester:

 Identify a Bangalore based band or genre of popular music with approval of your course instructor . Conduct a study of their work and evolution and impact on the city and vice versa. Use data beyond library sources and provide due evidence. Your archive entry must include a 750-1000word reflective essay that validates your choice of artist, understanding of the form and significance of the work. You must also identify, interview and record these interactions. Provide clips from concerts duly cited. Include memorabilia like tickets, album art, newspaper or magazine clips  

 

EST146 - FOOD AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

 

This course offers an interdisciplinary exploration of the connections between food and literature, focusing on how food has been represented in literary works from different cultures and time periods. In addition, the course will provide an overview of the history and evolution of food culture, as well as the politics and economics of food production and consumption. By examining culinary themes in literary works, students will gain a deeper understanding of how food functions as a powerful symbol and narrative device in literature, reflecting social, cultural, and historical contexts. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the rich connections between food and literature, fostering critical thinking, cultural awareness, and personal reflection.

 

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

 

 

 

1.     To enhance the ability to identify and interpret the symbolic, metaphorical, and cultural significance of food within literary works.

 

2.     To help explore how food reflects and shapes social, historical, and cultural aspects of different societies and communities, shaping individual and collective identities and reflect social hierarchies and inequalities.

 

3.     To develop the ability to craft vivid and evocative descriptions by learning techniques for using sensory details, imagery, and figurative language to bring culinary experiences to life in their own writing.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will develop a deeper understanding of the cultural context of food and its representation in literature and its portrayal journalistic genres.

CO2: Students will be able to appreciate the influence of food on individual and collective identities.

CO3: They will understand how food can reinforce or challenge social hierarchies and inequalities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Unit I- Introduction to Food and Literature
 

Definition and scope; cultural, historical, and social significance of food; overview of how literature incorporates culinary themes

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

Anton Chekhov: "Gooseberries"

 

Margaret Atwood: "Bread"

 

Borden Deal: “The Taste of Watermelon"

 

Mona Gardner: "The Dinner Party"

 

Shobha Narayan: “First Foods”Excerpt from Monsoon Diary: A Memoir with Recipes

 

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Poetry
 

Li-Young Lee: "Eating Together"

 

Gwendolyn Brooks: "Kitchenette Building"

 

Seamus Heaney: "At a Potato Digging "

 

Risa Potters: "In My Mother’s Things"

 

Choman Hardi: “My Mother’s Kitchen”

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Essays
 

Ligaya Mishan: What We Write About When We Write About Food (NY Times, 2022)

 

Roland Barthes: Wine and Milk

 

Jackie Varriano: “How Female Food writers penned their way out of the home kitchen” 

 

Nimisha Sinha: “Delicious Fictions: Reading Food in Literature”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

§  Chekhov, Anton. Gooseberries. United Kingdom, Penguin Books Limited, 2015.

 

§  Atwood, Margaret. “Bread.Women on War: An International Anthology of Women's Writings from Antiquity to the Present. United States, Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 2003.

 

§  Deal, Bordan “The Taste of Watermelon”. 1979

 

§  Gardner, Mona. “The Dinner Party.” The Saturday Review of Literature. 1941.

 

§  Narayan, Shoba. Monsoon Diar:  A Memoir with Recipes. India, Penguin Group, 2004.

 

§  Lee, Young- Li. “Eating Together” Poetry Foundation.< https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43015/eating-together-56d221af2bf26> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Brooks, Gwendolyn. “kitchenette building” Poetry Foundation. < https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43308/kitchenette-building> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Heaney, Seamus. “At a Potato Digging” < https://genius.com/Seamus-heaney-at-a-potato-digging-annotated> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Potters, Risa. “In My Mother’s Things”Rattle. https://www.rattle.com/in-my-mothers-things-by-risa-potters/ Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Hardi, Choman. “My Mother’s Kitchen” Poetry Archive. < https://poetryarchive.org/poem/my-mothers-kitchen/> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Mishan, Ligaya. “What We Write About When We Write About Food” The new York Time Style Magazine. 18 February 2022. < https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/18/t-magazine/food-writing-journalism-criticism.html> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Varriano, Jackie. “How Female Food writers penned their way out of the home kitchen”  02 March 2022. < https://www.seattletimes.com/life/food-drink/how-women-food-writers-penned-their-way-out-of-the-home-kitchen/ > Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Barthes, Roland. “Wine and Milk.”Mythologies: The Complete Edition, in a New Translation. United States, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013.

 

§  Sinha, Nimisha.Delicious Fictions: Reading Food in Literature.” Caffe Dissensus. 28 January 2020. < https://cafedissensus.com/2020/01/28/delicious-fictions-reading-food-in-literature/> Accessed on 22 July 2023

 

§  Shahani, Gitanjali G. Food and Literature. United States, Cambridge University Press, 2018.

 

§  Fitzpatrick, Joan. 2012a. "Food and Literature: An Overview." The Routlege International Handbook of Food Studies. Edited by Ken Albala. Routledge International Handbooks. London. Routledge. pp. 122-34

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

§  Gilbert, Sandra M.. The Culinary Imagination: From Myth to Modernity. United States, W. W. Norton, 2014.

 

§  Hosking, Richard. Food and Language: Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium of Food and Cookery 2009. United Kingdom, Prospect Books, 2010.

 

§  Waxman, Barbara Frey. “Food Memoirs: What They Are, Why They Are Popular, and Why They Belong in the Literature Classroom.” College English, Vol. 70, No. 4, Special Focus: Food (Mar., 2008): 363-383

 

§  Ferrier, Peyton. “Food in Popular Literature.” Choices, Vol. 29, No. 1 (1st Quarter 2014): 1-6

 

§  Jones, Michael Owen . “Food Choice, Symbolism, and Identity: Bread-and-Butter Issues for Folkloristics and Nutrition Studies (American Folklore Society Presidential Address, October 2005)” The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 120, No. 476 (Spring, 2007), pp. 129-177

 

§  Daly. Suzanne, and Ross G. Forman. “Introduction: Cooking Culture: Situating Food and Drink in the Nineteenth Century.” Victorian Literature and Culture, Vol. 36, No. 2 (2008), pp. 363-373

 

§  Holtzman, Jon D. “Food and Memory.” Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 35 (2006), pp. 361-378

 

§  Tigner, Amy L., and Carruth, Allison. Literature and Food Studies. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2017.

 

§  Fisher, Mary Frances Kennedy. The Gastronomical Me. United States, World Publishing Company, 1948.

 

§  "Feast and Famine: Food Imagery and Class Identity in Victorian Literature" by Debra L. Gimlin (Victorian Literature and Culture)

 

§  Albala, Ken. Routledge International Handbook of Food Studies. United States, Taylor & Francis, 2013.The Routledge Companion to Literature and Food. United States, Taylor & Francis, 2018.

 

§  Counihan, Carole, and Penny Van Esterik. Food and Culture: A Reader. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print.

 

§  Humble, Nicola. The Literature of Food: An Introduction from 1830 to Present. India, Bloomsbury Publishing.

 

§  J. Michelle Coghlan. The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food. India, Cambridge University Press, 2020.

 

§  Fitzpatrick, Joan, and Boyce, Charlotte. A History of Food in Literature: From the Fourteenth Century to the Present. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2017.

 

§  Kara K. Keeling, Scott T. Pollard. Critical Approaches to Food in Children's Literature. N.p., Taylor & Francis, 2012. Print.

 

§  < https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/18/t-magazine/food-writing-journalism-criticism.html>

 

§  Julia Rappaport: “Take a bite out of food writing”

 

§  < https://www.writermag.com/improve-your-writing/nonfiction/take-bite-food-writing/>

 

§  < https://www.seattletimes.com/life/food-drink/how-women-food-writers-penned-their-way-out-of-the-home-kitchen/>

 

§  Ceillie Clark- Keane: “Women Writing Food” < https://blog.pshares.org/women-writing-food/>

 

§  Barthes, Rolan. “Wine and Mild.” Mythologies. New York: Hill and Wang, 195: 58-61. Print.

 

§  Kapla, David M. “Introduction: The Philosophy of Food.” The Philosophy of Food. University of California Press, 2012:1-23. <https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt7zw2cx.3 >

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: Presentation (20 Marks)

 

Create a character diary or character letter in the voice of a character from any chosen literary work.

 

 

 

Mid Semester: Research paper (50 Marks)

 

Analyze literary works (novel/ poem/short story/ play) for food-related social issue addressed in their narrative and write a research paper in 1000- 1500 words considering the broader social, political or cultural significance of these issues/ representations.

 

 

 

CIA 3: Photo Essay (20 Marks)

 

Create a photo essay on a particular cuisine, street food, or food markets in Bangalore focusing on any kind of its presentation.

 

 

 

End Semester: Food Narrative Project (50 Marks)

 

Create a food narrative project based on a specific food culture (local/regional) or a family/ community recipe. The foodscape should focus on these four aspects- recipe, anecdote, history and relevance, the transformative culinary experience and the rationale for the choice of recipe. Recall specific sensory details associated with your chosen theme or focus. Consider the taste, smell, texture, and appearance of the food. Reflect on the ambiance, sounds, and emotions evoked by the culinary experience. Conduct research to explore the cultural, historical, or social context to your food narrative. It should include photographs, videos, or any other visual or auditory elements.

 

EST148 - THE OCEANS IN CINEMA: A BLUE HUMANITIES READING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Moving from land to ocean marks a shift in our understanding with fluidity as the focal point. ‘Blue Humanities’ or ‘Blue Cultural Studies’ uses the ocean as the lens to foreground diverse historical, social, cultural, economic and political aspects. The expansive field of Blue Humanities adopts a multidisciplinary approach, weaving together insights from environmental studies, oceanography, marine studies, cultural studies, film studies, history, etc. The course specifically focuses on revisiting the cliched conceptualization of the ocean as vast, alien, terra nullis and ahistorical. The ‘Oceanic Turn’ transitions from the surface to the depths below to explore the three-dimensional ocean through socio-cultural representations. Reading the ocean and the sea through cinema from across the world will help understand how the ocean is portrayed in myriad ways ‘foregrounding and problematizing issues connected to gender, race, pollution, social justice, maritime activities, privatization, globalization, capitalism ontologies’ to revisit our established thought regimes. 

Course Outcome

CO1: ? Appreciate and interpret the ocean in the light of Blue Humanities

CO2: ? Analyze and understand the changing relationships between societies and the ocean through the cinematic representations

CO3: ? Rethink and initiate action towards oceanic thinking and sustainability

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Knowing the Ocean: Re-visiting History and Origins
 

The unit will provide an alternative reading of our established understanding of ‘Origins’ with reference to the ocean – formation of the earth, the oceans, plants and animals and human beings. Destabilizing the pre-set reading of the formation of the world and prioritizing the land over the sea, the unit will help refocus the establishment of life in the Universe.

 

·       Excerpts from Rachel Carson, The Sea Around Us

·       Steve Mentz, “Two Origins: Alien or Core?”

·       Philip E. Steinberg and Kimberley Peters, “Wet Ontologies, Fluid Spaces: Giving Depth to Volume Through Oceanic Thinking”

 

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:13
Mapping the Ocean: Reading through Blue Humanities
 

The unit will throw light on the field of Ecocriticism with specific focus on Blue Humanities and its emerging engagement with the oceans around the world. The unit will help position the study of the oceans in the field of Humanities with specific reference to Cultural studies to frame the Blue Cultural Studies.

·       Excerpts from Sidney I. Dobrin, “Unearthing Ecocriticism”

·       John R.  Gillis – “The Blue Humanities”https://www.neh.gov/humanities/2013/mayjune/feature/the-blue-humanities

 

·       Helen M Rozwadowski, Oceans in three Paradoxes: Knowing the Blue through Humanities – Virtual Exhibition https://www.environmentandsociety.org/exhibitions/oceans-three-paradoxes

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Seeing the Ocean: Re-viewing the ocean through cinema
 

The unit will probe into pivotal aspects surrounding the construction of the ocean space through filmic representations of the ocean. The intent is to analyze through a range of issues informing the oceanic representations in films to unearth the pluri-focussed politics, both explicit and otherwise, manoeuvring through them - Maritime histories and activities, Aquatic world, Disasters, Conquests, Wars, Exploration, Adventure, Folk Tales and Myths, Colonialism and Postcolonialism, Gender, Race, Capitalism, International Relations, Globalization, Ecology and Medical Humanities.

·       James L. Smith and Steve Mentz - Learning an Inclusive Blue Humanities: Oceania and Academia through the Lens of Cinema

·       Stefan Helmreich, “Massive movie waves and the Anthropic Ocean”

·       Dilip M Menon, “Sea-Ing Malayalam Cinema”

·       Rie Karatsu, The Representation of the Sea and the Feminine in Takeshi Kitano's A Scene at the Sea (1991) and Sonatine (1993)” (SLA)

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carson, Rachel. The Sea Around Us. Canongate, 2021

Dobrin, Sidney I. Blue Ecocriticism and the Oceanic Imperative. Routledge, 2021.

Mentz, Steve. An Introduction to Blue Humanities. Routledge, 2023.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·       Blum, Hester. “Introduction: Oceanic Studies.” Atlantic Studies, vol. 10, no. 2, June 2013, pp. 151–55. 

·       Chen, Cecilia, Janine MacLeod, and Astrida Neimanis, editors. Thinking with Water. McGill-Queens Univ. Press, 2013. 

·       DeLoughrey, Elizabeth. “Toward a Critical Ocean Studies for the Anthropocene.” English Language Notes, vol. 57, no. 1, Apr. 2019, pp. 21–36.

·       Di Leo, Jeffrey R., editor. “Blue Humanities,” Symploke, vol. 27 no. 1, 2019, pp. 7-10· 

·       Gillis, John R. “The Blue Humanities.” HUMANITIES, vol. 34, no. 3, May/June 2013.

·       Jue, Melody. Wild Blue Media: Thinking through Seawater. Duke Univ. Press, 2020.

·       Mentz, Steve. “Toward a Blue Cultural Studies: The Sea, Maritime Culture, and Early Modern English Literature.” Literature Compass, vol. 6, no. 5, Sept. 2009, pp. 997–1013. 

·       Mentz, Steve. Ocean. Bloomsbury Academic, 2020.

·       Mentz, Steve. Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization, 1550-1719. Univ. of Minnesota Press, 2016.

·       Raban, Jonathan, editor. The Oxford Book of the Sea. Oxford Univ. Press, 1993.

·       Roorda, Eric. The Ocean Reader: History, Culture, PoliticsDuke Univ. Press, 2020. 

·       Steinberg, Philip E. The Social Construction of the Ocean. Cambridge Univ. Press, 2001.

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

As the course is multidisciplinary, the assessments will be done periodically to gauge the student’s level of understanding and learning. Review writing, weaving together a scrapbook, review tests and photo essays will form part of the assessment.

 End semester evaluation will be based on students setting up an online archive. They shall create an online archive selecting topics and presenting them by blending texts, theory and research. The submission will also have a viva component.  

LAW143 - LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

It is a solitary principle of industrial relations that a happy and content labourer is an indispensable asset for any employer. However, labourers have not received their due on account of historical wrongs, and in this era of a market economy, labourers do not seem to get the minimum standards of social security. As a result, industrial peace and harmony have remained a distant dream. Hence, constant efforts are being made by the governments to ameliorate the working conditions of labour in order to ensure minimum welfare for the workers.

Course Outcome

CO 1 : Explain the general concept of labour social welfare and also the constitutional foundation of the same

CO 2 : Analyse the role of the International Labour Organisation in the protection of Labour Welfare

CO 3 : Describe existing provisions relating to the working conditions of Labourers

CO 4 : Describe the legal provisions relating to the health, safety, and welfare conditions of the employees.

CO 5 : Analyze the legal provisions relating to Maternity benefits in workplaces

CO 6: Describe the legal provisions relating to and regulation of Contractual employment in India

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION
 

Meaning and nature of social security; Public assistance v. Public insurance; Constitutional foundations and the role of ILO

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
HEALTH, SAFETY AND WELFARE OF WORKERS
 

Introduction; Manufacturing and hazardous processes; Health, safety and welfare in factories; Working hours and employment of young persons 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
EMPLOYEES' INSURANCE
 

Introduction; Important definitions; ESI Corporation; Various benefits

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
MATERNITY BENEFIT
 

Introduction; Employment of or work by women; Right to payment of maternity benefit; Dismissal and deduction of wages

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
CONTRACT LABOUR
 

Introduction: nature and meaning; Licensing of contractors; Regulation and abolition of Contract Labour

Text Books And Reference Books:

Industrial Jurisprudence: A Critical Commentary by Dr EM Rao., Lexis Nexis., Second Edition 2015 p. 14-21

Labour and Industrial Law by H.L.Kumar., Universal Law Publishing Co., 2 volumes 15th edition 2010.,p.2082-2125

P.L.Malik‟s Industrial Law 2 Volumes., Eastern Book Company., 23rd Edition 2011.,p.2398-2405 

Pai, G. B. Labour Law in India. New Delhi: Butterworth, 2001. Rao, E. M. Industrial Jurisprudence, New Delhi: LexisNexis (India), 2004.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Industrial Jurisprudence: A Critical Commentary by Dr EM Rao., Lexis Nexis., Second Edition 2015 p. 14-21

Labour and Industrial Law by H.L.Kumar., Universal Law Publishing Co., 2 volumes 15th edition 2010.,p.2082-2125

P.L.Malik‟s Industrial Law 2 Volumes., Eastern Book Company., 23rd Edition 2011.,p.2398-2405 

Pai, G. B. Labour Law in India. New Delhi: Butterworth, 2001. Rao, E. M. Industrial Jurisprudence, New Delhi: LexisNexis (India), 2004.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline: There are in all 3 components in the scheme of evaluation. Weightage for the components is indicated in percentage.

CIA I- Class Test carrying 25 marks

CIA II – Class Test carrying 25 marks

CIA III – Class Test carrying 50 marks

LAW145 - PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Parliament is the heart and soul of any parliamentary democracy which is envisaged to reflect the expectations and aspirations of the people. In fact, it is the chief law-making organ and it comprises of members from different backgrounds, so as to represent the varied expectations of the people. As such, it has an onerous responsibility of making laws in a manner which caters to the requirements of the society cutting across the party lines.

In twenty-first century, the age of technology and information, the role of Parliament has increased manyfold as the impressions of “We the People” have also undergone a sea change with respect to the quality of the law made. In this context, a fundamental knowledge of the law-making process and the requisites of the same is essential for the citizens. Hence this course is devised to introduce the students to the essentials of law-making process by the Parliament as well as the privileges conferred on the members of Parliament.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the Constitutional framework on Parliamentary Practice and Procedure in India

CO2: Analyse the Parliamentary Privileges in India

CO3: Examine the Law-making process and role of Parliamentary Committees in India

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
INDIAN PARLIAMENT AND POLITY
 

Structure, powers and functions of Houses of Parliament – Loksabha,  Rajya  Sabha, Joint Sessions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
CONSTITUTION OF HOUSES
 

Members and presiding officers, election, powers and functions, Powers of President in relation to Parliament

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
LAW-MAKING PROCESS
 

Classification of Bills, procedures relating to passing of Bills, presentation of Budget

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
RULES OF BUSINESS IN PARLIAMENT
 

Summoning, petitions, resolutions, motions, question-answers, matters of urgent public importance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
PARLIAMENTARY PRIVILEGES
 

Sources of Parliamentary privileges, immunities, procedure

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEES
 

Parliamentary Committees, Government Committee, Ad hoc Committees, Joint Committee

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Anoop Mishra (Ed.), Practice and Procedure of Parliament, Metropolitan Book Co. Ltd. New Delhi (2016)

Durga Das Basu, Introduction to the Constitution of India (2022), Lexis Nexis, Gurgaon

Lok Sabha Secretariate, Parliamentary Privileges (2019), New Delhi

Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs, Manual of Parliamentary Procedures in India (2018), New Delhi

 

Subhash Kashyap, Our Parliament, National Book Trust (2020), New Delhi

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Apoorva Shankar and Shreya Singh, Parliamentary Procedures: A Primer [Rajya Sabha] (2015), PRS Legislative Research, New Delhi

Lok Sabha Secretariate, Budgetary Process (2019), New Delhi

M.P. Jain, Indian Constitutional Law (8th Edn., 2018) Lexis Nexis, Gurgaon

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I : 25 Marks (25%)

CIA-II: 25 Marks (25%)

CIA-III: 50 Marks (50%) 

 

MED143 - CELEBRITY PR (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course attempts to understand the nature, process and issues related to celebrity actors and their presence, which inadvertently contribute to the success of films.

Course Outcome

CO1: Will be able to understand the concept of celebrity PR

CO2: Will be able to understand the role of celebrity presence in the success of a film

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding PR as Strategic Communication
 

PR concept, role and relevance in selling goods/services; Brief history & evolution of PR. Competing forces for PR-Advertising, Publicity, Marketing/Sales. PR as distinct from spin, hype & exaggeration. Top Bollywood PR firms in India-Dale Bhagwagar PR, Raindrops, Spice PR, Aspire PR.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Celebrity PR and Bollywood
 

Bollywood and the need and emergence ofCelebrity PR, early beginnings, and present status. Acquiring and sustaining celebrity status through PR, Celebrity brand building & nurturing. PR in celebrity reputation management. Building the celebrity profile through analysis and research. Case Study-The making of Shilpa Shetty (UK's Big Brother Reality TV), Amitabh Bachchan and KBC, Aamir Khan and Satyameva Jayate

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Celebrity PR Responsibilities & Activities
 

Interviews, Press conferences,Rejoinders,Official comments/no comments. Organising events-Public 'meet and greet', Social events of significance, Public gatherings-award functions, airport meets.  Helping to manage crisis--damaging details from celebrity past, social media criticism and backlash, dealing with success and failure with grace and dignity, Helping deal with paparazzi encounter

Text Books And Reference Books:

Barron, Lee. (2015). Celebrity Cultures: An Introduction. SAGE Publications Ltd. Bräu, Marlena. (2013), Twitter Kills The Publicity Star? How social media is influencing the business of Celebrity PR. Grin Verlag Publishing, Germany. Jonas, C Priyanka. (2021). Unfinished: A Memoir. Penguin Viking.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Raju, J Jeetu. (2020). Escape the rat race. Google Books, Thames Publication. Stewart, B James and Abrams, Rachel. (2023). Unscripted: The Epic Battle for a Hollywood Media Empire. Penguin Books.

Evaluation Pattern

Single assessment of 50 marks

MED144 - HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will provide students the opportunity to apply a variety of interdisciplinary approaches on popular young adult narratives. Students will be exposed to the real -world culture and physical environment that produced, shaped, and continues to inform the Harry Potter series, giving students greater insight into the importance of textual awareness and analysis.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explore the socio-cultural, historical, and technological perspectives behind Harry Potter phenomenon.

CO2: Develop critical thinking skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History of wizards in cinema
 

History of wizards in cinema – P L Travers, Disney era, rise of Nanny McPhee, Arrival of Harry potter in bookstores, narrative development of book 1 – Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Deconstruction of characters, significance of four houses, potions, beasts and spells.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Hogwarts a world class school
 

Hogwarts a world class school – dynamics of homework, relationship, bullying, teachers, team spirits and opponents, wizards and other, Debates on Morality, Technology and Media in Potter world, Privacy concerns with magical objects, Cultural Hegemony, Case Study on Snape and Dumbledore

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Sociological perspective
 

Sociological perspective – idea of home, community, clan and society, class struggle and dynamics, Aurora and Azkaban, Representation of Gender, Idea of family and institution, construction of power structures

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Film Screening
 

Screening of First and Last Harry Potter films

Text Books And Reference Books:

Harry Potter and Sorcerer’s Stone, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0590353427)

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439064873)

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439136365)

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439139601)

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439358071)

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439785969)

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0545139700)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Whited, L A & Grimes, K. (2015). Critical Insights: The Harry Potter Series. Salem Books.

Bell, C E (2018). Inside the World of Harry Potter: Critical Essays on the Books and Films.McFarland Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignments will be done through Google Classroom

CIA -1 – Class Test– 20 marks

CIA 2 –  – 50 marks

CIA 3 – Group Assignment – 20 marks

End Semester - Project – 50 marks

MED145 - SOCIAL MEDIA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The Social Media course is designed as an engaging and comprehensive undergraduate elective that explores the dynamic and influential world of social media. In this course, students will gain a critical understanding of the social media , their impact on society, and their role in shaping communication and democracy.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop a comprehensive critical understanding of social media.

CO2: Identify the strengths and weaknesses of social media platforms.

CO3: Critically create social media content.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Social Media
 

Definition and characteristics of social media

Evolution and historical context of social media for democracy

 

Key technological features and functionalities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Social media for democracy
 

Cultural implications of social media use

Social media's impact on political mobilization and activism

 

Utilizing social media for positive social change and advocacy

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Social media and individual
 

Agency and social media

Personal data and issues

 Identity and Social media

Text Books And Reference Books:

Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism Is Turning the Internet Against Democracy  by Robert W. McChesney

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The Social Media Reader by Michael Mandiber

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1 – Submission of social media platform introduction video (5 marks)

CIA 2 –Submission of 3 Instagram posts and reels based on the class discussions (15Marks)

CIA 3 – Submission of 3 Snaps based on a critical view of social media. (15 Marks)

CIA4- Submission of 3 Tweets, A Facebook post, and Instagram Live on social media & democracy (15 Marks)

All CIAs   – Department level only; All submissions.

PHY141 - FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of forensic science. Student will be introduced to the different analytical tool to analyse the results. They will also learn the physics behind investigative method used to gather evident. Finally, students will study emerging use of nanotechnology in forensic science.  

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the different technique to analyse the results.

CO2: Understand the basic science underlying the motion of bullets, collisions, explosion and blood dynamics.

CO3: Learn about the advantage of nanotechnology in forensic science.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Analytical instruments and techniques of forensic physics
 

Introduction, electromagnetic spectrum, sources of radiation, their utility and limitations, refractive index, interaction of light with matter, idea on instrumentation and results analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Forensic physics
 

Scope and significance of forensic physics, basic physics in solving crime, motion of bullet and other projectile, vehicular collisions, blood stain analysis using fluid mechanics, physics of explosions, development and identification of latent fingerprints using optics.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Nanotechnology in forensic science
 

Nanotechnology, utilization of nanotechnology in analysis of physical evidence, applications of nanotechnology in forensic evidence analysis, introduction to nanomaterials, types of nanomaterials. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. B.B. Nanda and R.K Tiwari, Forensic Science in India: A vision for the Twenty First Centrury, select publishers, New Delhi (2001)
  2. CM Hussain, D Rawtani, G Pandey, M Tharmavaram, Handbook of Analytical Techniques for Forensic Samples: Current and Emerging Developments, ISBN: 978-0-12-822300-0, Elsevier, 2020
  3. M.K Bhasin and S.Nath, Role of Forensic Science in the New Millenium, University of Delhi, Delhi(2002).
  4.  S.H James and J.J Nordby, Forensic Science :An introduction to scientific and Investigative Techniques, 2nd Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton(2005)
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. W.G. Eckert and R.K. Wright in Introduction to Forensic Sciiences, 2nd Edition, W.G. Eckert (ED), CRC Press, Boca Raton(1997).
  2. R. Saferstein, M.L. Hastrup and C.Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013)
  3. W.J. Tilstone, M.L. Hastrup and C.Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013)
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation will be based on presentations by each student and class work.

PHY142 - ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course on Basic Electronics and Gadgets is aimed at giving a feel of electronics to non science/core students. It helps them in knowing the fundamentals of various electronic gadgets they use in daily life and related technologies. The course covers  categories of consumer electronic systems, electronic audio systems, basic colour television and video systems, communication systems covering telephone , mobile phone fundamentals and basics of computerhardware. This programme also tries to create awareness about e-waste and its effective management.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand basics of electronic devices and circuits

CO2: Describe the working principles of audio , video and communication systems

CO3: Discuss the fundamentals of computer hardware and e-waste management.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Electronics
 

Electronics and its applications. Electronic components: Resistors, Capacitors, inductors- types, uses. Conductors, insulators, semiconductors- definitions. Semiconductor materials- Silicon, Germanium, semiconductor devices: Diode- working and application of diode as rectifier, Transistor- working, transistor as an amplifier, electronic switch. Electronic DC power supply- basic block diagram. Basics of measuring instruments- DMM and CRO. Hands on with tinkercad tool.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Fundamentals Of Electronic Communication Systems
 

Basic principle of electronic communication-. Basic operation of transmitter and receivers. AM and FM radio receivers- qualitative description. Frequency allotment. Basics of Microphone, Loud speakers Principle of TV transmission and reception, Colour TV principle,. Digital TV principle- set top converter box, Optical fiber cables- principle of operation, advantages. Fundamentals of cellular mobile phone- Cells, coverage area, roaming, operation (qualitative description). Latest trends in mobile phones, smart phones, generations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Basics of Computer Hardware and e waste management
 

Fundamentals of Digital computer, microprocessors, motherboards, power supply - SMPS,  mouse, keyboard, memory devices, Modems, monitors, printers, latest trends in computers, specifications. Internet fundamentals

Electronic waste- brief description, qualitative discussion of hazards of e-waste, the materials responsible, management of e-waste, Indian and global current scenario of e-waste and its management.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]. V K Mehta and Rohit Mehta (2011),Principles of Electronics, S Chand and Co, New Delhi.

[2]. B R Gupta (2008) Consumer Electronics, 4th Edition, Kataria &sons, New Delhi.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[3]. Bob Goodman (2002. ),How electronic things work, TMH

[4]. https://www.tinkercad.com 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation will be based on internal assessment components and a written exam at the end of the course.

Internal assesment : 50 marks

Written exam : 50 marks

POL142 - SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The main objectives of the course are to:

      Present an overview of the major concepts, debates, and historical facets of STI in IR.

      Create a foundation for the students to pursue further research in various aspects of STI in IR, and provide a systemic understanding of its impact on the economy, politics, culture, society, and foreign relations of India and other countries.

Providing an academic understanding in the current context of emerging technologies, its impact and influences in the society, as well as create avenues for interdisciplinary understanding and research.

Course Outcome

CO1: - Understand the nature, scope and significance of STI in International Relations (IR). - Understand the concepts, ideas, and debates in Science, Technology and Innovation vis-a-vis International Relations.

CO2: - Learn to use conceptual tools to understand new developments which of Science, Technology and Innovation in International Relations. - Analyze the major theories/approaches of Science, Technol-ogy and Innovation. - Develop a critical perspective on the major international regimes/ issues in STI in International Relations.

CO3: - Develop a thorough understanding on the scientific, technological and innovation-related process in major powers and national economies, especially India. - Explore the ways and Science, Technology and Innovation issues confronted by the world from a foreign policy perspective.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction
 

Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) in International Relations;

History and Evolution of STI in International Relations;

STI and Globalization;

STI and Diplomacy;

State, non-State actors and Stakeholders;

STI and International Institutions;

International Scientific Relations (ISR)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Basic Concepts and Theories:
 

Digital Westphalia,

Technonationalism,

Cyberspace and related facets of sovereignty, warfare, security, espionage, terrorism, and crime;

Data sovereignty, Technocolonialism; Digital imperialism,

Security v Privacy debate,

STI and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Global STI Landscape
 

History and Evolution of Global STI Landscape;

Fourth Industrial Revolution;

Knowledge Economy;

STI and Human Capital;

International Political Economy of STI

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
India:
 

India’s STI Policies: history, evolution, implementation and challenges;

Spin-offs: civilian, military;

Research and Development (R&D);

Political Economy of India’s STI Ecosystem;

Institutions and Organisations

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Case Studies:
 

STI landscape in countries: Emergent Technologies and Institutions, Internet of Things; Artificial Intelligence; Big Data; Blockchain

Text Books And Reference Books:

Aghion, P., David, P.A. and Foray, D. (2008). Science, Technology and Innovation for Economic Growth: Linking Policy Research and Practice in 'Stig Systems'. Research Policy 38(4): 681-693.

Del Canto Viterale, F. (2021). International Scientific Relations: Science, Technology and Innovation in the International System of the 21st Century. Anthem Press.

Ogburn, W.F. (1949). Technology and international relations. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Colglazier, E.W. and Montgomery, K. (2022). Opportunities and Challenges for Science Diplomacy. Science & Diplomacy.

Hieronymi, O. (1987). Technology and International Relations. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Leijten, J. Innovation policy and international relations: directions for EU diplomacy. Eur J Futures Res 7, 4 (2019).

M. Mayer, M. Carpes, & R. Knoblich. (eds.). (2014). The Global Politics of Science and Technology - Vol. 1. Springer Berlin, Heidelberg.

Ruffini, P.-B. (2017). Science and Diplomacy: A New Dimension of International Relations. Paris: Springer International Publishing AG.

 

Klein, U. (2020). Technoscience in History: Prussia, 1750-1850. MIT: The MIT Press.

McIlwain, C.H. (1933). A Fragment on Sovereignty. Political Science Quarterly, Vol. 48(1), pp. 94-106.

Negroponte, N. (1995). Being Digital. Hodder and Stoughton: Great Britain.

Reghunadhan, R. (2022). Cyber Technological Paradigms and Threat Landscape in India. First Edition., Palgrave Macmillan, Springer Singapore, ISBN: 978-981-1691-27-0.

Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR). (2017a). Findings of The Investigation into China’s Acts, Policies, and Practices Related to Technology Transfer, Intellectual Property, and Innovation Under Section 301 of The Trade Act of 1974. https://ustr.gov/sites/default/files/Section%20301%20FINAL.PDF: 3-18 

Schmidt, J.C. (2021). Philosophy of Interdisciplinarity: Studies in Science, Society and Sustainability. History and Philosophy of Technoscience. Oxford: Routledge.

Schultz, T.W. (1961). Investment in Human Capital. The American Economic Review 51(1): 1-17.

Trencher, G. (2018). Towards the smart city 2.0: Empirical evidence of using smartness as a tool for tackling social challenges, Technological Forecasting and Social Change 142: 117-128.

Suttmeier, R.P., Cao, C. and Simon, D.F. (2006). China’s Innovation Challenge and the Remaking of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Innovations: Technology, Governance, Globalization 1(3d): 78-97.

Landes, D. (2006). Why Europe and the West? Why Not China? The Journal of Economic Perspectives 20(2): 3-22.

M. Z. Taylor. (2016). The Politics of Innovation: Why Some Countries Are Better Than Others at Science and Technology. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Villa-Henriksen, A., Edwards, G.T.C., Pesonen, L.A., Green, O. and Sørensen, C.A.G. (2020). Internet of Things in arable farming: implementation, applications, challenges and potential. Biosys. Eng. 191: 60–84

Zhang, W. (2019). Constitutional Governance in India and China and Its Impact on National Innovation. In Liu, K-C. and Racheria, U. (eds.). Innovation, Economic Development, and Intellectual Property in India and China. ARCIALA Series on Intellectual Assets and Law in Asia. Springer Singapore: Singapore: 39-67.

Department of Science and Technology (DST). (2020). Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy. Government of India. https://dst.gov.in/sites/default/files/STIP_Doc_1.4_Dec2020.pdf

Reghunadhan, R. (2022). Cyber Technological Paradigms and Threat Landscape in India. First Edition., Palgrave Macmillan, Springer Singapore, ISBN: 978-981-1691-27-0.

Kharbanda and Ashok Jain. (eds.). Science and Technology Strategies: for Development in India and China. New Delhi: Har-Anand Publications Pvt Ltd: 93-134.

P.K. Pattnaik et al. (eds). IoT and Analytics for Agriculture, Volume 3. Studies in Big Data, vol 99, Singapore: Springer, pp. 201-225, ISBN: 978-981-16-6210-2.

Krishnan Saravanan et al. (eds.). Handbook of Research on Blockchain Technology, London: Academic Press (Elsevier), pp. 1-34, ISBN: 9780128198162.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Department of Science and Technology (DST). (2020). Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy. Government of India. https://dst.gov.in/sites/default/files/STIP_Doc_1.4_Dec2020.pdf

Reghunadhan, R. (2022). Cyber Technological Paradigms and Threat Landscape in India. First Edition., Palgrave Macmillan, Springer Singapore, ISBN: 978-981-1691-27-0.

Kharbanda and Ashok Jain. (eds.). Science and Technology Strategies: for Development in India and China. New Delhi: Har-Anand Publications Pvt Ltd: 93-134.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Written analyses in about 800-1500 words submitted 

Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs) covering wide range of facets that focus on knowledge, skill and attitude of the student and their understanding on the topic.

 Subjective type question(s): Understanding the emerging complexities and dynamics in the region

Application of the understanding to the situation

Solutions to the problems given

PSY143 - ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Artificial intelligence (AI) is the basis for all human-machine interfaces and learning, and it is the future of all complex decision-making across diverse sectors. Students will explore the concepts of HMI and AI and become aware of advances in Artificial Intelligence. Case studies and workshops will allow students to consider how human factors and design thinking are applied in designing an interface and the ethical issues and implications of preserving human values. Through discussion, analysis, and workshops, students move towards designing or modifying a user-centric interface considering any sustainable development goal.

Course objectives: 

  • To explain Human-Machine Interactions and Artificial Intelligence and their applications in daily life.
  • To identify the importance and application of human factors and design thinking in interface design. 
  • To evaluate a user-centric interface considering any sustainable development goal.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain Human-Machine Interactions and Artificial Intelligence and their applications in daily life.

CO2: Identify the importance and application of human factors and design thinking in interface design.

CO3: Evaluate a user-centric interface considering sustainable development goals.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to AI and HMI
 

Introduction to AI and HMI, Types of AI and HMI, Machine and Deep Learnings and their applications, Current trends and development.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Human factors & AI
 

Human factors - Sensation, Perception, Apperception, Working Memory, Decision-making, and Design Thinking.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Principles of interface Design and Application of AI
 

Schneiderman’s eight golden rules, Norman’s model of interaction, Neilson’s Heuristics, Designing for people across the lifespan, and the Application of AI in health, aviation, and the workplace.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dix, A., Dix, A. J., Finlay, J., Abowd, G. D., & Beale, R. (2003). Human-computer interaction. Pearson Education.

Tenner, E. (2015). The Design of Everyday Things by Donald Norman. Technology and Culture, 56(3), 785-787. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Burnett, B., & Evans, D. (2016). Designing your life: How to build a well-lived, joyful life. Knopf.

Gassmann, O., & Reepmeyer, G. (2008). Universal design–innovations for all ages. In The silver market phenomenon (pp. 125-140). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. 

Davenport, T., & Kalakota, R. (2019). The potential for artificial intelligence in healthcare. Future healthcare journal, 6(2), 94. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1 will be an individual assignment.

CIA2 will be a group assignment with individual components for evaluation. 

CIA3 will be a written exam for 2 hours and 50 Marks. CIA3 will have Section- A and Section - B.

Section A (Essay questions). 10 Marks X 3 Questions=30 Marks 

Section B (Case study). 20 Marks x 1Q= 20 Marks

PSY156 - PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Understanding close relationships is among the central goals of social psychology. Close relationships range from family ties to friendships to romantic and sexual relationships. Our main purpose will be on learning about the life cycle of adult intimate (i.e., romantic) relationships, ranging from stages of initial attraction and relationship initiation to growth and maintenance of the relationship, and in some cases, dissolution. Although other close relationships such as close friendships, family, and work relationships will also be addressed and integrated into the course, they will be of secondary importance. Class meetings will consist mainly of facilitated discussions and student-led presentations on topics such as the biological bases of attraction and love, commitment and interdependence, relationship cognition, attachment, communication, sexuality, relational interaction patterns, relationship satisfaction, and the social context of relationships (e.g., the influence of others) conflict, relationship dissolution, and relationship maintenance.

CO1: Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.

CO2: Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.

CO3: Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.

CO2: Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.

C03: Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.
 

Introduction to key theories and concepts in relationship psychology (attachment theory, social exchange theory, equity theory, interdependence theory, etc.), theories of attraction (evolutionary, social, and cognitive perspectives), historical perspectives on the study of relationships, Ethical considerations in relationships.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.
 

Different types of relationship: childhood relationship (parent, teacher, caregiver), adult relationship, friendship and workplace relationships, emerging trends in relationships such as virtual relationship, long distance relationship, cohabitation, post- divorce relationship, friendships and social networks – benefits, types and maintenance. Social media and its influence on relationship formation and maintenance

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships
 

Effective communication strategies,

Active listening skills and empathetic communication,

Conflict resolution techniques and managing relationship disagreements, developing self-awareness, empathy, emotional intelligence, and applying psychological principles to real-life relationship scenarios.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baron, R.A., Byrne, D. & Bhardwaj, G. (2010). Social Psychology (12th Ed.). New Delhi: Pearson.

Miller, Chapter 1: The Building Blocks of Relationships Reis, H. T. (2012).

A history of relationship research in social psychology. In A.W. Kruglanski & W Stroebe (Eds.), Handbook of the history of social psychology (pp. 213- 232). New York: Psychology Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Graziano, W. G., & Bruce, J. W. (2008). Attraction and the initiation of relationships: A review of the empirical literature. In S. Sprecher, A. Wenzel, & J. Harvey (Eds), Handbook of relationship initiation, pp. 269-295. New York: Psychology Press.

Cameron, J. J., Stinson, D. A., & Wood, J. V. (2013). The bold and the bashful: Selfesteem, gender, and relationship initiation. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4, 685-692. https://doi.org/10.10 02/9780470939338

Finkel, E.J., Eastwick, P.W., Karney, B.R., Reis, H. T., & Sprecher, S. (2012). Online dating: A critical analysis from the perspective of psychological science. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 13, 3– 66.

Emery, L. F., Muise, A., Dix, E. L., & Le, B. (2014). Can you tell that I’m in a relationship? Attachment and relationship visibility on Facebook. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 40, 1466–1479.

Vanden Abeele, M., Schouten, A. P., & Antheunis, M. L. (2017). Personal, editable, and always accessible: An affordance approach to the relationship between adolescents’ mobile messaging behavior and their friendship quality. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships.

Sbarra, D. A., & Beck, C. J. A. (2013). Divorce and close relationships: Findings, themes, and future directions. In J. A. Simpson & L. Campbell (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 795-822). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Lewandowski, G. W., Aron, A., Bassis, S. & Kunak, J. (2006). Losing a selfexpanding relationship: Implications for the selfconcept. Personal Relationships, 13, 317-331

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:Individual assignment – Video presentations

The students are required to make individual video presentations on the basis of the topics that will be given to them. Submission will be based on one of the different topics through a Video PPT (The feature is available in PPT software) Topics: Example: theories of relationship psychology; theories of attraction Number of Slides: Maximum 9 slides (excluding the Title slide) Duration: 3 minutes

Test details: ● Total Marks: 20 marks ● Date of Submission: 31st August

Evaluation Criteria:  Organization of the content  Quality of the information  Research citations   Creativity   Personal Learnings 

CIA 2: Group Presentation (with viva)

This is a group assignment and the groups will be divided into groups of five. The faculty in charge will be giving each group a movie (based on relationships). Each group will be given one movie/short film to watch and a week long time shall be given for the same. In the following Thursday, 2 hours shall be given to the group to prepare a presentation (5 Slides in 5 Minutes) on the basis of guiding questions and will have to present the same in 5 mins in the next class. Individually group members shall answer facilitator’s questions. Post the presentation each member of the group will write a reflective note on their experience working on the topics and submit the same on moodle. Students can be creative in making their ppts and adding audio-visuals etc but should be able to cover within the specified time limit. PPT submission pre presentation mandatory and individual reflective notes submission post presentation is mandatory. The presentation might primarily include :  Different types of relationships portrayed in the film  Their own perception as to whether the relationships has been portrayed accurately in the film or not.  Conflict resolution strategies in relationships that were used in the film vs what they would have used.

Details: Total marks: 20 ● Date of Allotment of their Movie/Documentary: 12th September ● Date of Group Discussion/Planning: 21st September ● Date of Presentation &nd