CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

School of Business and Management

Syllabus for
Master of Law (Intellectual Property and Trade Law)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LLM132IPL COMPARATIVE PUBLIC LAW Core Courses 4 4 100
LLM133IPL INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW Core Courses 4 3 100
LLM134IPL COMPETITION LAW Core Courses 4 3 100
LLM135IPL LAW OF E-COMMERCE Core Courses 4 4 100
LLM136IPL LAW OF COPYRIGHT Core Courses 4 3 100
LLM151IPL FOUNDATION COURSE Core Courses 4 2 100
LLM152IPL RESEARCH METHODS AND LEGAL WRITING - 4 4 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LLM231IPL GLOBALIZATION, LAW AND JUSTICE Core Courses 4 4 100
LLM232IPL INVESTMENT LAWS Core Courses 4 3 100
LLM233IPL LAW OF PATENTS AND DESIGNS Core Courses 4 3 100
LLM234IPL LAW OF TRADEMARKS AND GI Core Courses 4 3 100
LLM251IPL SEMINAR ON CONTEMPORARY ISSUES Core Courses 3 2 100
LLM252IPL TEACHING PRACTICE Core Courses 3 2 50
LLM281IPL DISSERTATION Core Courses 4 4 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The convergence of intellectual property and trade is prominent since the advent of the New International Economic Order. Both the disciplines are so intertwined that the appreciation of one becomes meaningless in the absence of the other. The objective of this course is to enable a student to analyse the linkages between intellectual property and international trade, in a wider socio-economic and political perspective, both nationally and internationally. The course is also intended to expose the students to various effects of intellectual property and trade that might undermine the vital interests pertaining to human rights, environment etc.


The course is designed with sufficient emphasis on the practical nuances that emerge out of the theoretical underpinnings of both international trade and intellectual property laws. This specialisation is devised to serve the interests of students who seek to practice an international career that addresses the real time issues relating to intellectual property and international trade.


As one of the top law schools in India, the School of Law of CHRIST (Deemed to be University) offers LLM program as per the UGC guidelines. This program incorporates a rich array of law courses, seminars, experiential learning opportunities, and special events. 

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Academic Expertise Academic Expertise

PO2: Critical Thinking, Legal Reasoning Critical Thinking, Legal Reasoning and Research Skills

PO3: Teaching Skills

PO4: Academic Integrity and Professional Ethics

PO5: Service Learning

Programme Specific Outcome:

PSO1: Acquire specialized knowledge in corporate and commercial laws

PSO2: Interpret and analyze the laws relating to corporate governance and respond to the regulatory challenges in corporate practice.

PSO3: Deliberate and engage in issues of regional, national and global importance, in the context of corporate and commercial laws.

Assesment Pattern

 

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation                – 10%

 

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                      – 25%

 

CIA III – Research Topic                                                         – 10%

 

Attendance                                                                                – 05%

 

End Semester Examination                                                    – 50%

 

TOTAL                                                                                       100%

 

 

 

Examination And Assesments

Continues internal assessments for theory course 50%, end semester examination 50%

LLM132IPL - COMPARATIVE PUBLIC LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES: The paper intends to undertake a comparative analysis of the growth of public law, structure of governments and polities, legislative process, fundamental rights and the role of the judiciary in USA, UK and France in order to have a better understanding and assessment of the public law principles, practices and institutional mechanisms that work the polity in India.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply the concept and principles of public law in order to assess the performance of governance structures.

CO2: Identify and distinguish between presidential, parliamentary and hybrid forms of government in order to understand the shortcomings and advocate changes.

CO3: Should be able to comprehend the federal, unitary and other structures of governance and advocate changes in governance processes. Analyse the legislative process through comparative study and suggest reforms.

CO4: Assess as to how the fundamental rights have evolved over a period of time in tune with socio, economic & political changes so that people lead a life free from discrimination and exploitation and propose policy changes in this regard.

CO5: To have a comprehensive understanding of the nature and organisation of the Higher judiciary and the process of tribunalisation with their roles and limitations under the constitution and propose reforms with respect to their rationale, structure and functioning.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Unit 1: Growth and nature of public law - comparative study
 

                            History and rationale for study of comparative public law -

                            Evolution of public law - ancient to modern - distinguished from Private law

                            Concepts of public law - Rule of law - Separation of powers - Sovereignty  

Accountability and liability of state - transparency - right to information - Sovereign immunity - restorative & compensatory justice

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit 2: Models of government - comparative study
 

Presidential, parliamentary and hybrid systems - distinctive features - comparison and advantages - powers of the president - Prime minister - the parliament - pattern of relationships - Comparative evaluation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Unit 3: Nature of distribution of powers - comparative study
 

Federal & Unitary form of state - characteristics, differences & advantages - Distribution of powers - legislative, administrative and financial - Legislative process – executive law making - The amendment process

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit 4: Role of Fundamental Rights in public law
 

Evolution of fundamental rights- civil rights legislations - equality provisions - approaches to affirmative action.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:16
Unit 5: Judicial organisation and process of judicial review - comparative study
 

Organisation of the judiciary - issues of judicial independence - appointment - terms of service and removal - Tribunalisation of justice – an evaluation - Ambit of judicial review - Enforcement of fundamental rights - Public interest litigation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. A.V.Dicey, Introduction to the Study of Constitution.

2. Brandt, E.M.; An Introduction to Constitutional Law; Oxford University Press

3. Bernard Schwartz Commentary on American Constitution

4. Bhagwan Vishnoo, Bhushan Vidya, World Constitutions

5. Cane, Peter; Administrative Law; Oxford University Press

6. Dauglus W.O, Studies in Indian and American Constitutional Law.

7. E.S.Venkataramaiah, Federalism Comparative Study

8. Finer, S.E.; Comparative Government; Penguin Books

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Godfrey and Blondel, The French Constitution and Government.

2. Jain, M.P.; Indian Constitutional Law; LexisNexis

3. K.C.Wheare, Modern Constitutions.

4. Loughlin, Martin; The Idea of Public Law; Oxford University Press

5. Mason and Beany, American Constitutional law

6. Rodney Brazier, Constitutional Practice.

7. Rotunda and Nowak, Treatise on American Constitution.

8. Singh, M. P.; V.N Shukla’s Constitution of India; Eastern Book Company

9. Tom Ginsburg, Rosalind Dixon, Comparative Constitutional Law

10. Elisabeth Zoller, Introduction to Public Law – a Comparative Study, Brill

 

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

• CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%

• CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

• CIA III – Research Topic – 10%

• Attendance – 05%

• End Semester Examination – 50%

TOTAL 100%

LLM133IPL - INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

 

International Trade Law (ITL) has two aspects: public and private. The public law aspect of ITL deals with the harmonization and coordination of national commercial policies. The private law aspect of ITL seeks to provide a legal framework for International commercial transactions between individuals belonging to different  nationalities. This course covers both public and private law aspects of ITL.

 

The World Trade Organization (WTO) is the only global institution seeking to harmonize and coordinate national commercial policies. It stands for the promotion of free trade among nations whereby goods and services can move freely across national frontiers. The course will mainly focus on the WTO with incidental references to other important regional institutions such as European Union, North American Free Trade Area etc. The WTO, as an institution administers many Multilateral Trade Agreements (MTAs) and a few Plurilateral Trade Agreements (PTAs).  The presence of a dispute settlement mechanism, which has de facto compulsory jurisdiction over all the disputes that may arise between  member states, has distinguished the WTO from other global institutions; and it is often said that thanks to this unique system, the power-oriented diplomacy has given way to rule-based system. The Appellate Body (AB) which is at the centre of the dispute settlement mechanism has significantly contributed to the development of International Trade Law.  ITL, as applied to international commercial transactions is characterized by Prof. Schmitthoff as “transnational commercial law”. This system comprises of general private international law principles, international conventions unifying national commercial laws and national legislations there under, and the customary practices developed by the international mercantile community represented by bodies such as the International Chamber of Commerce. Globalization of national economies requires a distinct transnational law, recognized and enforced by national courts. The course has one UNIT on transnational commercial law. 

 

India as a member of the WTO is under a legal obligation to promote free trade with other states in accordance with the WTO Agreements. India has panoply of legislations through which this obligation is discharged. The Foreign Trade (Development and Regulation) Act, Customs Act, Foreign Exchange Management Act etc., as well as an elaborate range of delegated legislations under these enactments, constitute the legal regime through which international trade policies of the Government of India are implemented.

 

Course Objectives:

 

1.   To familiarize the students about the World Trade Organization and its role in international trade.

 

2.   To give an insight into the origin of the WTO, sources of WTO law, structure, functions, dispute settlement mechanism, principles of the WTO, dumping and anti-dumping and allied matters related thereto.

 

3.   To familiarize the students about the various agreements entered into under the auspices of the WTO.

 

4.   To acquaint the students with the transnational commercial law covering history of lex mercatoria, UNDROIT and UNCITRAL, International Sales Contract, structure and features of the Vienna Convention etc.  To give an over-view of law relating to   international carriages, multi-modal transportation, international payments, the role of the ICC, international commercial arbitration and related matters.

 

5.   To give an overview of the law and policy of India in relation to international trade.

Course Outcome

CO1: Summarize the institutional structure, functions and sources of WTO.

CO2: Outline the historical background of WTO

CO3: Examine and apply the principles of WTO law to hypothetical situations

CO4: Explain the different stages, process and allied aspects of the WTO dispute settlement mechanism

CO5: Analyze and apply the provisions of the various agreements entered into under the auspices of the World Trade Organization.

CO6: Explain the various aspects relating to international sales transactions; provisions of the customs Act, 1962; FDI, SEZ and allied matters related thereto.

CO7: To identify, analyze and propose solutions to the issues involved in the field of International trade law.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
THE WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION- I
 

Learning Outcome: This UNIT aims at giving the students an insight into the history, establishment, structure and functions of the WTO. It also deals with the dispute settlement mechanism of the WTO. Further, it delves into the important principles of non-discrimination, namely the Most Favored Nation (MFN) Treatment and National Treatment. Further the students are also introduced to dumping and antidumping measures.

 

1.1.  Introduction to International trade and the law of the WTO, Sources of WTO Law, Basic rules andprinciples of WTO Law

 

1.2.  Economic Theories of   free trade – Absolute Advantage theory; Comparative Advantage theory, Heckscher–Ohlin theory; Leontief Paradox and New trade theory. 

 

1.3.   Historical background- of WTO – Evolution of GATT as a trading institution and transition of GATT to WTO; Marrakesh Agreement

 

1.4.  WTO as an International institution – Origin of WTO; Mandate of WTO; Membership of WTO; Institutional structure of the WTO; Decision-making in the WTO; Other Issues-status of WTO; budget of WTO.

 

1.5. WTO Dispute Settlement – Dispute Settlement Understanding; Principles of dispute settlement institutions of WTO settlement; WTO dispute settlement proceedings; Main challenges to the WTO dispute settlement system

 

1.6.  Principles of Non-discrimination – MFN Treatment and National Treatment obligation.

 General & Security Exceptions; Art XX  and XX1

1.7.  Dumping – Anti-dumping Measures;Trade remedies-countervailing duties and safeguards

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION-II
 

Learning Outcome: At the end of this UNIT the students will be equipped with an understanding of various agreements entered into under the auspices of the World Trade Organization and their importance in international trade relations.

 

2.1.WTO jurisprudence on TBT and SPS Agreements – Agreement on Sanitary and Phyto Sanitary Measures; Agreement on Technical barriers to Trade

 

2.2.Regional and Free Trade Agreements

 

2.3. WTO and environment protection

2.4.Environmental initiatives under the WTO (such as plastic pollution and fossil fuel subsidies) Fisheries subsidies agreement

 

2.5.  General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) – Meaning of trade in services. General   obligations.  Specific obligations. Financial services. Telecommunication services, India and the GATs.

 

 

 

2.6. Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) – IPRs covered by TRIPs. Rights of patentees under the TRIPs. Compulsory licensing. Public health and the TRIPs. Indian response to the TRIPs.

 

2.7. Agreement on Agriculture

 

2.8. Trade Related Investment Measures (TRIMS)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
TRANSNATIONAL TRANSACTIONS AND RESOLUTION
 

Learning Outcome: This UNIT is aimed at making the students aware of the International Sale of goods transaction and allied matters.

 

3.1. Transnational Commercial Laws – Meaning and scope of Transnational Commercial Law.  Evolution of Law Merchant. Sources of Transnational Commercial Law. Movement towards unification of national commercial laws. UNIDROIT and UNCITRAL.

 

3.2   International   Carriages – Carriage of goods by sea; Carriage by air; Multimodal transportation.

 

3.3.  International Sales of goods – Vienna Convention on Contract for International Sale of Goods; Drafting of International Commercial contracts - an Introduction.

 

3.4.  International Payments – The role of International Chamber of Commerce in the development of Transnational Commercial Laws; Uniform Customs and Practices on Documentary Credits.

 

3.5International Commercial Arbitration. UNCITRAL Model Law on International commercial arbitration. Indian Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996; Enforcement of foreign arbitral awards.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
LAW AND POLICY ON TRADE AND INVESTMENT- INDIAN PERSPECTIVE
 

Learning Outcome: At the end of this UNIT the students will be equipped with a brief understanding of the Law and Policy related to Export and Import Trade in India, The students will also be familiarized with FDI, Customs Act, SEZ’s in relation to International trade.

 

4.1 Introduction to Law and Policy of Export-Import Trade in India

 

4.2. Foreign Trade (Development and Regulation) Act, 1992

 

4.3. Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999

 

4.4. Special Economic Zones and International trade

 

4.5. Law relating to Customs- Customs Act, 1962

 

4.6. Foreign Investment in India-Liberalization in the nineties. Foreign Investment Promotion Board. Current issues relating to foreign direct investment

 

4.7. The Industries (Development and Regulation) Act and its application

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      A.G. Benjamin’s Sale of Goods (6thedn, London: Sweet & Maxwell, 1995)

 

2.      B.Griffin, Day & Griffin, The Law of International Trade (3rdedn, London: Butterworths Lexis Nexis, 2003)

 

3.      BhagirathLal Das, The WTO: a guide to framework for International Trade.

 

4.      C. Debattista, Sale of Goods carried by Sea (2ndedn, London: Butterworth’s, 1998)

 

5.      Carole Murray, David Holloway, Schmitthoff’s export trade: The Law & Practice of International Trade.

 

6.      Daniel L. Bethlehem, Oxford Handbook of International Trade Law.

 

7.       Dr. NeerajVarshney, Anti-dumping measure- Law, Practice & Procedure, Indian case laws, 2007 edition.

 

8.       From GATT to the WTO: the multilateral trading system in the new millennium by World Trade Organization Secretariat, Graduate Institute of International studies (Geneva, Switzerland.

9. Indira Carr & Richard Kidner, Statutes and Conventions on International Trade Law, 4th edition, Routledge Cavendish.

 

10.   Jackson, John H. and Edwin A. Vermulst, Anti-Dumping Law and Practice

 

11.  Jason C.T. Chauh, Law of International Trade, Fourth Edition, Sweet and Maxwell, South Asian Edition, 2011.

 

12.  JayantaBagchi, WTO: An India Perspective, Second edition, Eastern Law house.

 

13.   JF. Wilson, Carriage of Goods by Sea, (5thedn, Harlow, Pearson education, 2004).

 

14.  K.R. Gupta, A study of WTO, Second revised edition, Atlantic publishers and Distributors (P) Ltd.

 

15.   M.G.  Bridge, International Sale of Goods: Law and Practice, (oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999)

 

16.  Michael J. Trebilcock, Robert Howse, The Regulation of International Trade

 

17.   Michael K. Levine, Inside International Trade Policy formulation

 

18.   Nicholas Kouladin, Principles of Law relating to International Trade, Springer, 2006.

 

19.   P. Sellman, The Law of International Trade, 150 leading Cases (2nd 3dition, London: Old Bailey Press, 2004)

 

20.  P.Todd, Cases and Materials on International Trade Law (1stedn, London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2003)

 

21.  Palmeter, N. David; Mavroidis, Petros C., Dispute Settlement in the World Trade Organization: Practice and Procedure.

 

22.  Raj Bhalla, International Trade Law: Theory and Practice, Second Edition, Lexis Publishing, 2001.

 

23.   Rao M B, WTO & International Trade, 2nd edition, Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd

 

24.   Rene David, Arbitration in International Trade, Kluwer Law and Taxation Publishers, Netherlands, 1985.

 

25.  Schnitzer, Simone, Understanding International Trade law, Universal Publishing House, 2007

 

26.  VibhaMathur, WTO and India.

 

27.   WTO Analytical Index: Guide to WTO Law and Practice, WTO Geneva 2003

 

28.  Andrew T. Guzman and Joust Pauwelyn. International Trade Law: Cases and Materials, Aspen Publishers. Aspen Publishing, 2009.

 

29.  Parthapratim Pal, International Trade and India, Oxford publications.

 

30.  Clive M. Schmitthoff's Select Essays on International Trade Law, Kluwer academic publishers.

 

31.  John J. Parker, Drafting of an International Sales Contract: Problems and Remedies. University of North Carolina, chapel Hill.

 

32. Gabriel Moens, Peter Gillies, International Trade and Business: Law, Policy and Ethics, Cavendish Publishing House, 2005

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

ARTICLES:

 

1. Andrew T. Guzman. "Dispute Resolution in SPS Cases" Ten Years of WTO Dispute Settlement. Ed. Horovitz, Moulis, and Steger. London: International bar Association, 2007. 215-233. Available at: http://works.bepress.com/andrew_guzman/4

 

2. B.S.Chimni, WTO and Environment-Shrimp Turtle and EC-Hormone Cases, Economic & Political weekly, Vo. 35, No. 20, PP.1752-1761.

 

3. David Palmeter & Petros C. Mavroidis, The WTO Legal System, Sources of Law, The American Journal of International Law, Vol.92, No.3 (July 1998) PP. 398-41.

 

4.Debra P. Steger & Peter van den bossche, WTO dispute settlement, emerging practice and procedurewww.jstor.org/stable/25659196

 

5.Harold J. Berman, Law of International Trade: Contract, Custom and Codification, Harvard International Review, Vol.6, No.3 (December 1983), pp.44-46, http://www. Jstor.org/stable/42759682

 

6. Ingeborg Schwenzer and Pascal Hachem, The CISG, Successes and pitfall, The American Journal of Comparative Law, Vol. 57, No. 2 (SPRING 2009), pp. 457-478

 

7. John. H. Jackson, Robert E. Huedec, Donald Davis, The Role and effectiveness of the WTO dispute settlement mechanism, Brooking Trade Forum (2000) pp. 179-236.

 

8. John.H. Jackson, Case of  the WTO, pp. 437-454), http://www.jstor.org/stable/25144810

 

9. K Iida, Is WTO dispute settlement effective?, www.jstor.org/stable/27800522

 

10. K. Ravi Srinivas, WTO and Asbestos: Dispute Settlement at work,  Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 36, No. 36 (Sep. 8-14, 2001), pp. 3442-3447

 

11.Marc. L. Busch and Eric Reinhardt, Three’s  A crowd, Third Parties and Dispute  Settlement, World Politics, Vol. 58, No. 3 (Apr., 2006), pp. 446-477

 

12.   Michael M. Weinstein, Steve Charnovitz, The Greening of the WTO, Foreign Affairs, Vol. 80, No. 6 (Nov. - Dec., 2001), pp. 147-156

 

13. P.  M. Roth, Passing of Risk, The American Journal of Comparative Law, Vol. 27, No. 2/3, Unification of International Trade Law: UNCITRAL's First Decade (Spring - Summer, 1979), pp. 291-310

 

14.  P.Ranjan, Applicable law in the dispute settlement body of the WTO, Vol. 44, No. 15, Apr. 11 - 17, 2009  Economic and Political Weekly.

 

15. Steve Charnovitz, Environment and Health under WTO Dispute settlement, The International Lawyer, Vol. 32, No. 3, Symposium on the First Three Years of the WTO Dispute Settlement System (FALL 1998), pp. 901-92

 

16.Thomas J. Shoenbaum, International Trade and protection of the Environment, The American Journal of International Law, Vol. 91, No. 2 (Apr., 1997), pp. 268-313

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation         – 10%

 

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                         – 25%

 

CIA III – Research Topic                                           – 10%

 

Attendance                                                                 – 05%

 

End Semester Examination                                        – 50%

 

TOTAL                                                                      – 100%

LLM134IPL - COMPETITION LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The processes of globalization and liberalization have brought a considerable awareness towards improving the competitive process in developing economies such as India. Until recently most of the developing countries operated without a structured competition policy, and have justified the intervention by the state over economic activities. India owing to its WTO obligations enacted Competition Act, 2002. The course seeks provide fundamentals of market economy and extensive knowledge of application of competition policy in India.

 The course aims to study the developments of the policy of free and fair competition in India. The course will provide an analysis of the legal developments, from MRTP to the Competition Act. The course will analyze the progress of the Competition Law in various legal systems and also determine the role of WTO in its policies.

 

Course Objectives :

 

  • To equip students with an understanding of principles of Competition law, together with the ability to subject it to critical, legal and economic analysis.
  • To provide an understanding of fundamentals of market economy and extensive knowledge of application of competition policy on such systems in India.
  • To study the developments of the policy of free and fair Competition in India in the light of latest  legal developments, from MRTP to the Competition Act.
  • To study and understand the working of Competition Law Enforcement and compare the same with US and EU.
  • To compare substantive laws relating to Competition in India, EU and US, including the control of monopoly and oligopoly, merger control, anti-competitive agreement and abuse of dominant position.

Course Outcome

CO1: To appreciate the economic theory, practice and analytic tools that underpin and inform Competition law and policy

CO2: To analyze how Competition Law facilitates the promotion of free Competition and acts as an instrument in regulating the markets.

CO3: To apply the law to solve practical problems concerning the control of anti-competitive practices

CO4: To critically appreciate the strategies and mechanisms of Competition law enforcement agencies in India and abroad.

CO5: To research Independently and evaluate solutions to more complex Competition law, Economic, Legal and enforcement issues, through interdisciplinary learning

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
INTRODUCTION TO COMPETITION LAW
 

  1.1.            Concept of market, Open market- Regulated market, Market functions of role of competition law

   1.2.            Nature & Scope of competition law and policy

   1.3.            Evolution & Growth of competition law

   1.4.            Theoretical foundations of competition law

   1.5.          Competition Act, 2002- overview, definitions and ideas of agreement, dominant position, combination and effects of anti- competitive activities

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
ANTI- COMPETITIVE AGREEMENTS
 

2.1.Anti-competitive agreements: Concept, forms and treatment in India

2.2.   Parallel import

2.3.   Treatment of anti- competitive agreements under USA, EU, UK, Australia

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
ABUSE OF DOMINANT POSITION
 

3.1.  Abuse of dominant position: Concept, forms and treatment in India

3.2.   Essential facilities doctrine

3.3.   Refusal and abuse of dominant position.

3.4.   Pricing strategies and abuse of dominant position

3.5.   Treatment of abuse of dominant position under USA, EU, UK, Australia

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
COMBINATIONS
 

4.1.   Combinations:  Concept, forms, reasons and regulatory framework in India

4.2.    Different tests for studying the impacts of combinations in the market

4.3.    Unilateral and co- ordinate effects of combinations

4.4.    Foreclosure

4.5.    Failing firm

4.6.    Creeping acquisitions

4.7.    Regulation of Cross- border combinations

4.8.   Treatment of combinations under USA, EU, UK, Australia

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
COMPETITION COMMISSION OF INDIA
 

5.1.   Composition, powers and function of CCI

5.2.   Role of the DG

5.3.   Appellate Tribunal

5.4.   Penalties and remedies

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
IPR AND COMPETITION LAW
 

6.1. Theoretical basis of IPR and Competition law

6.2. TRIPs and its impact on competition law regime

6.3. Abuse of IPR and competition law (agreements, abuse of dominant position, combination)

6.4. Doctrine of exhaustion and its treatment

6.5.Modern trend to the conflict in IPR and Competition law

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
INVESTMENT AND COMPETITION LAW
 

7.1.   WTO norms for investment

7.2.   OECD guidelines in investment

7.3.   FDI policies and it’s impacts on Competition in domestic market

7.4.   Regulation of FDI in India, USA, EU, UK, Australia

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:8
MODERN DIMENSIONS OF COMPETITION LAW
 

8.1.   WTO and its impacts on Competition Laws with reference to UNCTAD

8.2.   International enforcement and judicial assistance

8.3.   Applicability of competition law into agricultural sector

8.4.   Dumping

8.5.   State aid

8.6.   Recession

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Alexandra Karmerling, Restrictive Convenants Under Common And Competition Law: London Sweet And Maxwell 2007.

 

2.      Alphen aan den Rijn, The reform of EC competition law : new challenges

 

3.      Avtar Singh; Competition Law; Eastern Law House, 2012-11-27

 

4.      Competition Law and Cartels ICFAI University,

 

5.      Competition Law in India; Srinivasan Parthsarthy; Wolter Kluwer, 2012

 

6.      Competition Law-Emerging Trends: ICFAI University

 

7.      D P Mittal, Competition Law and Practice : New Delhi Taxmanns Allied Services 2008

 

8.      Dabbah, Maher M,.EC and UK competition law : commentary, cases, and materials /Cambridge, UK

 

9.      Dugar,S.M ,Guide to Competition Law : Containing commentary on Competition Act, MRTP Act & Consumer Protection Act LexiNexis Butterworths Wadhwa Nagpur, 2010

 

10.  Furse, Mark., Competition law of the EC and UK,  Oxford University Press, 2008

 

11.  Gurbax Singh, Law of Consumer Protection.

 

12.  Haracoglou, Irina, Competition law and patents : a follow-on innovation perspective in the biopharmaceutical industry Cheltenham, UK

 

13.  Haracoglou, Irina, Competition law and patents : a follow-on innovation perspective in the biopharmaceutical industry Cheltenham, UK ;

 

14.  Indian Competition Law: An International Perspective; Suzanne Rab; CCH - A Wolters Kluwer Business, 2012

 

15.  Ioannis, N Kessides, Reforming Infrastructure: Privatization, Regulation, and Competition, Washington D C World Bank 2004.

 

16.  Law of Monopolistic, Restrictive and Unfair Trade Practices, Wadhwa & Co.

 

17.  Ritter European ,Competition Law: A Practitioners Guide Netherlands Kluwer Law International 2004

 

18.  Martin Smith, Competition Law-Enforcement and Procedure, Oxford University Press 2001.

 

19.  Renato Nazzini, Concurrent Proceedings in Competition Law, Oxford University Press 2007

 

20.  Rodger, Barry J. Competition law and policy in the EC and UK London : Cavendish, 1999

 

21.  Rodriguez, A. EThe limits of competition policy : the shortcomings of antitrust in developing and reforming economies Aspen Pub, 2010

 

22.  T Ramappa, Competition Law in India: Policy, Issues, and Developments, New Delhi Oxford University Press 2006

 

23.  Taxmann’s Guide to Competition Act.

 

24.  Telecommunications, Broadcasting and the Internet EU Competition Law and Regulation  London : Thomson Reuters Limited,

 

25.  Van Der Jones Woude, Ec Competition Law Handbook, Lib London Sweet And Maxwell

 

26.  Vinod Dhall ,Competition Law Today: Concepts, Issues, and the Law in Practice New Delhi Oxford University Press 2007

 

27.  Vinod Dhall, Competition Law Today, Oxford University Press.

 

28.  Whish, Richard, Competition law, Oxford University Press, 2009.

 

29.  Yang-Ching Chao , International And Comparative Competition Law And Policies India Kluwer Law International 2008

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Alexandra Karmerling, Restrictive Convenants Under Common And Competition Law: London Sweet And Maxwell 2007.

2.      Alphen aan den Rijn, The reform of EC competition law : new challenges

3.      Avtar Singh; Competition Law; Eastern Law House, 2012-11-27

4.      Competition Law and Cartels ICFAI University,

5.      Competition Law in India; Srinivasan Parthsarthy; Wolter Kluwer, 2012

6.      Competition Law-Emerging Trends: ICFAI University

7.      D P Mittal, Competition Law and Practice : New Delhi Taxmanns Allied Services 2008

8.      Dabbah, Maher M,.EC and UK competition law : commentary, cases, and materials /Cambridge, UK

9.      Dugar,S.M ,Guide to Competition Law : Containing commentary on Competition Act, MRTP Act & Consumer Protection Act LexiNexis Butterworths Wadhwa Nagpur, 2010

10.  Furse, Mark., Competition law of the EC and UK,  Oxford University Press, 2008

11.  Gurbax Singh, Law of Consumer Protection.

12.  Haracoglou, Irina, Competition law and patents : a follow-on innovation perspective in the biopharmaceutical industry Cheltenham, UK

13.  Haracoglou, Irina, Competition law and patents : a follow-on innovation perspective in the biopharmaceutical industry Cheltenham, UK ;

14.  Indian Competition Law: An International Perspective; Suzanne Rab; CCH - A Wolters Kluwer Business, 2012

15.  Ioannis, N Kessides, Reforming Infrastructure: Privatization, Regulation, and Competition, Washington D C World Bank 2004.

16.  Law of Monopolistic, Restrictive and Unfair Trade Practices, Wadhwa & Co.

17.  Ritter European ,Competition Law: A Practitioners Guide Netherlands Kluwer Law International 2004

18.  Martin Smith, Competition Law-Enforcement and Procedure, Oxford University Press 2001.

19.  Renato Nazzini, Concurrent Proceedings in Competition Law, Oxford University Press 2007

20.  Rodger, Barry J. Competition law and policy in the EC and UK London : Cavendish, 1999

21.  Rodriguez, A. EThe limits of competition policy : the shortcomings of antitrust in developing and reforming economies Aspen Pub, 2010

22.  T Ramappa, Competition Law in India: Policy, Issues, and Developments, New Delhi Oxford University Press 2006

23.  Taxmann’s Guide to Competition Act.

24.  Telecommunications, Broadcasting and the Internet EU Competition Law and Regulation  London : Thomson Reuters Limited,

25.  Van Der Jones Woude, Ec Competition Law Handbook, Lib London Sweet And Maxwell

26.  Vinod Dhall ,Competition Law Today: Concepts, Issues, and the Law in Practice New Delhi Oxford University Press 2007

27.  Vinod Dhall, Competition Law Today, Oxford University Press.

28.  Whish, Richard, Competition law, Oxford University Press, 2009.

29.  Yang-Ching Chao , International And Comparative Competition Law And Policies India Kluwer Law International 2008

Evaluation Pattern

 

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

 

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

LLM135IPL - LAW OF E-COMMERCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES: This subject aims at an understanding of the basic principles of E-Commerce and gives an insight into the application of this important area. It also analyses the impact of other areas such as IP and attempts a holistic view. It would make the students aspiring for corporate jobs more up-to-date.

Course Outcome

CO1: ? Student will be to apply law to the technology applicable to e-commerce and legal regime of e-commerce.

CO2: ? Students will be able to differentiate electronic commerce from other kinds of commercial transaction.

CO3: ? Students will be able to draft electronic contracts as well as identifying the laws applicable to electronic contracts

CO4: ? Students will be able to identify the legal challenges faced by consumer protection laws in online transactions.

CO5: ? Students will be able to critically analyse the legal framework regulating IPR in electronic transactions.

CO6: ? Students will be able to critically analyse the existing legal framework regulating taxation as well as drafting policies for effective taxation of e-commerce transactions.

CO7: ? Students will be able to discuss the problems in the market in respect of e-commerce and the related case law.

CO8: Students will be able to identify the jurisdictional and cloud computing issues in deciding e-commerce disputes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
INTRODUCTION TO E- COMMERCE
 

1.2.      Advantages and disadvantages of e- commerce

1.3.      Types of e- commerce

1.4.      Medium and Transactions in e- commerce

1.5.      UNCITRAL Model Law on e-commerce,

1.6.      Information Technology Act,2000

1.2.      Advantages and disadvantages of e- commerce

1.3.      Types of e- commerce

1.4.      Medium and Transactions in e- commerce

1.5.      UNCITRAL Model Law on e-commerce,

1.6.      Information Technology Act,2000

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
CONTRACTS IN ELECTRONIC ENVIRONMENT
 

2.1. E-contracts – concept, offer and acceptance,

2.2.Acceptance of contract: applicability of postal rule

2.3.E-commerce directives and Regulations

2.4.Incorporation of terms

2.5. Identity of contracting parties

2.6. E-contracts: extent of details

2.7. Breach of contract

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
ELECTRONIC SIGNATURE
 

3.1.   Provisions under IT Act

3.2.   Certifying authorities

3.3.   Issuing authorities

3.4.   PKI

3.5.   Electronic Signature Certificate

3.6.   Grant, Revocation and withdrawal of ESC

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
PAYMENT ISSUES
 

4.1. Modes and mechanism of payment in electronic environment

4.2. Fraud Risk and Protection

4.3. Breach of contract

4.4.Charge back agreements

4.5. EDI

4.6. Electronic fund transfer

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
CONSUMER PROTECTION
 

5.1. Concept of the rights of consumer

5.2. Problems of protection of consumers in virtual world

5.3. Consumer Protection Act, 1986

5.4. EC Directive on distance selling

5.5. E-commerce Directives and consumer protection

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
IPR ISSUES IN E- COMMERCE
 

6.1. Digital copyright, linking, caching

6.2. Digital rights management, DMCA, Patents, Trademarks and domain names

6.3. Brand identities, search engines and secondary market

6.4. ICANN,

6.5. Database Right – Digital Copyrights

6.6. Open Source

6.7. Software Patents

6.8. Right to forgetting

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:7
TAXATION IN E COMMERCE
 

7.1. Problem of taxation in virtual world

7.2. OECD guidelines on taxation

7.3   Tax structure on e- commerce in India (Direct, Indirect, and VAT)

7.4. EU, US practice on taxation on electronic commerce

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:6
JURISDICTION ISSUES IN E- COMMERCE
 

8.1.   Theoretical framework to address multiple jurisdictions

8.2.   Application of the principles of Private International law

8.3.   Hague Convention, EC Regulations (Brussels & Rome)

8.4.   Minimum contact test, Effect test, Zippo Test

8.5.   Current trends

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 9: E- COMMERCE AND COMPETITION ISSUES
 

9.1. Impacts of e- commerce in traditional market

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:6
CLOUD COMPUTING AND E- COMMERCE
 

10.1.    Concept of cloud computing

10.2.    Impacts of cloud computing in e- commerce

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.         Paul Todd. Law of E-commerce. London: Cavendish, 2008.

2.         Sharma, Vakul. Information Technology: Law and Practice. 2nded. New Delhi: Universal Law Publishing Co., 2007.

3.         Ramappa, T. Legal Issues in Electronic Commerce. Delhi: Macmillan, 2003.

4.         Schellekens, M. H. M. Electronic Signatures: Authentication Technology from a Legal Perspective. The Hague: T. M. C. Asser Press, 2004.

5.         Ahmad, Tabrez. Cyberlaws, e-commerce & m-commerces. New Delhi: A. P. H. Publishing Corporation, 2009.

6.         Phillips, Jeremy. Butterworths E-commerce and IT Law Handbook. 4th ed. London: LexisNexis Butterworths, 2007.

7.         Seth, Karnika. Cyber Laws in the Information Technology Age. New Delhi: LexisNexis ButterworthsWadhwa, 2009.

8.         Ryder, Rodney. Guide to Cyber Laws. 3rded. New Delhi: Wadhwa& Co., 2007.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

"An organ of expression for students with an interest in international legal and commercial studies."Vol. 35, no. 2 (spring 2008) (viewed Jan. 30, 2009).

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

           CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation          – 10%

           CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                          – 25%

           CIA III – Research Topic                                            – 10%

           Attendance                                                                  – 05%

           End Semester Examination                                        – 50%

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

LLM136IPL - LAW OF COPYRIGHT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Copyright law from its historic origins has evolved as a response to the change in the new technology and is known for its complexities both on the procedural and substantive aspects which make it a favourite subject for both academicians and practicing lawyers.This subjects gives an idea about the subject matters covered under Copyright Law, the modes of acquistiion, the procedure for issuing licence and assignment of copyright works. the acts which constitutes infringment and the various remedies available for aggrieved person.

Objectives 

1.This paper is aimed to expose the students to such philosophical conundrums and the practical issues associated thereto, especially in light of the digital technology.

2. It also aims to analyse the effectiveness of the 2012 Copyright Amendment Act to deal with the various issues that are evolving in light of the digital technology and mass communication.

3.Students will also be exposed to the practical side of drafting licensing agreements and the procedure for registration. 

Course Outcome

At the end of the course students will be able to -

  • Identify and describe the basic requirement of copyright protection and ownership of copyrighted works.
  • List out the rights enjoyed by copyright owners.
  • Apply the principles of copyright protection to legal problems correctly.
  • Analyse the principles related to infringement of copyright.
  • Evaluate as against other the international legal framework related to copyright protection and articulate the problem areas for the deficiency.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
ELIGIBILITY AND SUBJECT MATTER
 

1.1. History of Copyright protection

1.1.1. Meaning of Copyrights

1.1.2. International Treaties related to Copyright- Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary Artistic Work - Universal Copyright Convention -Rome Convention for the Protection of Performers, Producers of Phonograms Broadcasting Organisations, 1961 - TRIPS Agreement -  WIPO Copyright Treaty, 1996 -WIPO Performances Phonograms Treaty, 1996

 

1.2.Philosophical foundations of Copyright.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
ACQUISITION OF COPYRIGHT
 

 2.1 Subject Matter of Copyright

 2.2. Criteria of Protection

 2.3.  Idea-expression dichotomy;

 2.4. Doctrine of merger

 2.5 Copyright Rules 2013: Procedure for registration of copyright

 2.6 Different statutory agencies under the Copyright Act and their roles

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
OWNERSHIP AND TRANSFER
 

 

3.1. Moral Rights

3.2  The concept of authorship and ownership in copyright law;

3.3 Assignment and licensing of rights;

3.4 Collective Management of Rights (copyright societies under copyright act)

3.5 Compulsory Licensing

3.6 Statutory licensing

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
INFRINGEMENT AND REMEDIES
 

 

4.1  Infringement

4.2  Secondary Liability

4.3  Remedies for infringement

4.4  Exceptions and Limitations

4.5  Digital Rights Management

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.             Adeney, Elizabeth. The Moral Rights of Authors and Performers: An International Comparative Analysis. London: Oxford University Press, 2006.

2.             Alain Strowel, Peer to peer File Sharing and Secondary Liability in Copyright Law, Edward Elgar, 2009

3.             Cohen, Loren et.al, Copyright in the Global Information Economy, Aspen, 2nd ed., 2006

4.             Copinger and Skone James on Copyright, Vol. 1, Sweet & Maxwell, 2010

5.             Cornish, Graham P., Copyright: Interpreting the Law for Libraries, Archives and Information Service, Facet Publishing, London, 2009

6.             D’AgostinoGuiseppina, Copyright, Contracts, Creators: New Media, New Rules, Edward Elgar, 2010

7.             ElezabethAdeney, The Moral Rights of Authors and Performers: An International and Comparative Analysis, OUP, 2006

8.             Gervais, Collective management of Copyright and Related Rights, Kluwer, 2010

9.             Goldstein on Copyright Law, Kluwer, 2000

10.         Gopalakrishnan, N. S. &Agitha T. G, Principles of Intellectual Property, Eastern Book Company, 2009

11.         Jude C. Umeh, The World beyond Digital Rights Management, british Computer Society, UK, 2007

12.         Kathey Bowery, New Directions in Copyright Law, Edward Elgar, 2007

13.         Lionel Bently et.al., Copyright and Piracy: An Interdisciplinary Critique, CUP, 2010

14.         LiorZemer, Idea of Authorship in Copyright Law, Ashgate, 2007

15.         Nimmer on Copyright Law, LexisNexis, 2007

16.         Nimmer, Copyright Illuminated, Kluwer, 2008

17.         Okediji, Cohen et.al., Copyright in a Global Information Economy, Aspen, New York, 2006

18.         Stamatoudy, Irini A., Copyright Enforcement and the Internet, Kluwer, 2010

 

19.         StavroulaKarapapa, Private Copying, Routledge 2012.

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Copinger and Skone James on Copyright, Vol. 1, Sweet & Maxwell, 2010

2. Cornish, Graham P., Copyright: Interpreting the Law for Libraries, Archives and Information Service, Facet Publishing, London, 2009

3. D’AgostinoGuiseppina, Copyright, Contracts, Creators: New Media, New Rules, Edward Elgar, 2010

4. Nimmer on Copyright Law, LexisNexis, 2007

Evaluation Pattern

 

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                 – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

 

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

LLM151IPL - FOUNDATION COURSE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The course aims at understanding the various jurisprudential theories and concepts, the basics of law and economics and also to hone their soft skills in order to enhance their capacities to build a strong foundation for the study of Master of Law course.

Course Objectives:

  • To give an insight into the nature, purpose, role of law in the society and the various perspectives and critique of law.
  • To give an overview of the nature of judicial process and precedent in English law.
  • To familiarise the students with the basics of law and economics and legal research.
  •  To focus on developing various soft skills required for the legal profession.

Course Outcome

CO1: Summarize the various concepts and theories of Jurisprudence.

CO2: Analyze the various jurisprudential concepts, doctrines and principles.

CO3: Apply the concepts, doctrines and principles to solve hypothetical problems.

CO4: Demonstrate legal reasoning and research skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION TO JURISPRUDENCE
 

1.1           Nature of Jurisprudence

1.2        Schools of Jurisprudence-Natural law, Positivism, Pure science of law, Historical, Sociological, Realism, teleological school

1.3           Evolution and definition of law

1.4            Sources of Law

1.5           The Technique of the law-Classification, Titles, Acts, Events

1.6           Public Law-Law and the State, Criminal law

1.7           The concept of Legal Personality

1.8           Rights  and Duties

1.9           The Concept of Property

1.10       Possession and Ownership

1.11       Law of Procedure

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
THE CONCEPT OF LAW-H.L. A. HART
 

2.1  Laws, commands and Orders

2.2  The variety of Laws

2.3  Sovereign and subject

2.4  Law as the Union of Primary and Secondary Rules

2.5  The foundations of a Legal system

2.6  Formalism and Rule Skepticism

2.7  Justice and Morality

2.8  International Law

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
TAKING RIGHTS SERIOUSLY-RONALD DWORKIN
 

3.1  Introduction

3.2  Model Rules I and II

3.3  Hard cases, Constitutional Case

3.4   Justice and Rights

3.5  Taking Rights seriously

3.6  Civil Disobedience

3.7  Reverse discrimination

3.8  Liberty and Moralism; Liberty and Liberalism

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
NATURE OF JUDICIAL PROCESS-BENJAMIN CARDOZA
 

4.1  Introduction-The Method of Philosophy

4.2  The Methods of History, Tradition and Sociology

4.3  The Method of Sociology, The Judge as a Legislator

4.4  Adherence to Precedent- The Subconscious element in the Judicial Process

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
PRECEDENT IN ENGLISH LAW-RUPERT CROSS
 

5.1  The English Doctrine of Precedent

5.2  Ratio Decendi and Obiter Dictum

5.3  Stare decisis and exceptions to stare decisis

5.4  Precedent as a source of law; Precedent and Judicial Reasoning; Precedent and legal theory

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
LAW AND ECONOMICS
 

6.1. Basics of Law and Economics

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:2
SOFT SKILLS
 

7.1. Public speaking

7.2. Communication skills-Reading and writing

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:2
INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL RESEARCH
 

8.1. Basics of legal research

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Taking Rights Seriously-Ronald Dworkin
  2. Nature Of Judicial Process-Benjamin Cardoza       
  3. Precedent In English Law-Rupert Cross     
  4. The Concept Of Law-H.L. A. Hart
  5. A Text book on Jurisprudence, G. W. Paton
  6. Principles of statutory interpretation, G.P. Singh
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Taking Rights Seriously-Ronald Dworkin
  2. Nature Of Judicial Process-Benjamin Cardoza       
  3. Precedent In English Law-Rupert Cross     
  4. The Concept Of Law-H.L. A. Hart
  5. A Text book on Jurisprudence, G. W. Paton
Evaluation Pattern

Examination at the end of the course.

LLM152IPL - RESEARCH METHODS AND LEGAL WRITING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course intends to enhance the legal research skills among students. Students would be able to appreciate the nuances of legal research by discussions outlined in Unit I of the syllabus which will deal with basics of legal research. Unit II deals with Major steps in Legal Research. Unit III deals with Data collection, analysis and Interpretation of data. Unit IV deals with Report Writing. Unit V deals with Legal Writing.

The main objective of this course is to acquaint the students of LLM with the scientific method of social science research. This course is expected to provide the knowledge of the technique of selection, collection and interpretation of primary and secondary data in socio-legal research. Emphasis would be laid on practical training in writing and publishing a research paper in this course. 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate understanding on how to use key research methods and approaches.

CO2: Survey literature and to identify research gaps in the existing body of knowledge.

CO3: Demonstrate the ability to choose research methods appropriate to research aims and objectives.

CO4: Develop research skills and apply it in legal practice

CO5: Ability to adapt the presentation of research to the mode of publication.

CO6: Apply the intellectual skills required for producing creative and original research

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
BASIC OF LEGAL RESEARCH
 

 

Learning Outcome: On completion of this UNIT students will be able to understand the basics of research, kinds of research and scientific methods.

1.1.     Definition, Meaning, objectives of legal research 

1.2.     Characteristics of scientific method – applicability of scientific method

1.3.     Kinds of Research

1.4.     Concepts and constructs-relationship between theory and fact

1.5.     Induction and Deduction method in scientific research

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Major steps in Legal Research
 

Learning Outcome: On completion of this UNIT students will be able to understand the major steps involved in conducting a legal research. 

2.1 Research problem – Identifying and defining the research problem, Steps in problem formulation, significance and rationale of study.

2.2 Review of Literature- Identification of research gaps, significance of literature rereview and steps involved in review of literature.

2.3 – Formulation of research objectives.

2.4 Hypothesis – Meaning, importance, characteristics, sources, types and formulation of hypothesis.

2.5 Research design- Meaning, significance and types of research design.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Data Collection, Analysis and Interpretation of Data
 

3.1.         

Learning Outcome: On completion of this UNIT students will be able to collect, tabulate and intepret data in doctrinal and non doctrinal research methods.

3.1 Data collection in Doctrinal Research – Meaning and types of data, primary and secondary source of data, data analysis and data interpretation.

3.2 Data collection in non-doctrinal research – Primary and secondary source of data, sampling technique and types of sampling.

3.3 Methods of data collection in non – doctrinal research – Questionnaire and schedules, observation, interview and group discussions.

3.4 Tabulation, analysis and interpretation of data in non-doctrinal legal research.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
REPORT WRITING
 

Learning Outcome:On completion of this UNIT students will be able to write a report and know the different Citation methods commonly used in research and publication.

4.1 Research Report writing- Meaning and Significance

4.2 Steps in research report writing – contents and criteria of good legal research report.

4.3 Citation methods – Foot notes, endnotes, references, bibliography, OSCOLA and Bluebook.

4.4 Reference tools for research publication – Mendley and Zotero.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
LEGAL WRITING
 

Learning Outcome: On completion of this UNIT students will be able understand the Foundations of writing and how to write a case comment and book review.

5.1         Foundations of writing.

5.2         Transmittal letter, client opinion letter and e-mail correspondence.

5.3     Article writing, Book Review and case comments.

 

5.4     Legislative research and legislative drafting and preparation of draft bill.

5.5     Proposal writing.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.             Amy E Sloan, Basic Method Research – Tools and Materials

2.             Baxi, Upendra, ‘Socio-Legal Research in India–A Program Schriff, ICSSR, Occasional Monograph, 1975.

3.             Carol M Bast, Foundations of Legal Research and Writing

4.             Cohen, Morris L., ‘Legal Research’, Minnesota, West Publishing Co. 1985.

5.             Dawson, Catherine, 2002, Practical Research Methods, New Delhi, UBS

6.             Erwin C. Surrency, B.Fielf and J. Crea, A Guide to Legal Research (1959)

7.             Ghosh, B.N., ‘Scientific Method and Social Research’, New Delhi, Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd., 1984.

8.             Goode and Hatt, ‘Methods in Social Research’, Singapore, Mc. Graw Hill Book Co., 1985 (reprint).

9.             H.M.Hyman, Interviewing in Social Research (1965)

10.         Harvard Law Review Association, Uniform System of Citations.

11.         High Brayal, Nigel Dunean and Richard Crimes, Clinical Legal Education: Active Learning in your Law School, (1998) Blackstone Press Limited,London.

12.         ILI Publication, Legal Research and Methodology

13.         Johari J.C. (ed.), ‘Introduction to the Method of Social Sciences’, New Delhi, Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 1988.

14.         Kothari C.K., ‘Research Methodology: Method and Techniques’, New Delhi, Wiley Eastern Ltd., 1980.

15.         Kothari, C.R., 1985, Research Methodology- Methods and Techniques, New Delhi, Wiley Eastern Limited.

16.         Kumar, Ranjit, 2005, Research Methodology-A Step-by-Step Guide for Beginners, (2nd.ed.), Singapore, Pearson Education.

17.         Whitney, F.L, The elements of Research.

18.         Legal Research Methodology Indian Case Laws, www.nyulawglobal.org/globalex/india_legal_research.htm

19.         M.O.Price, H.Bitner and Bysiewiez, Effective Legal Research (1978)

20.         Morris L. Cohan, Legal Research in Nutshell, (1996), West Publishing Co.

21.         N.R. MadhavaMenon, (ed.) A Handbook of Clinical Legal Education, (1998) Eastern Book Company, Luck now.

22.         Ne, The art of Asking Question (1965)

23.         Pauline V. Young, Scientific Social Survey and Research, (1962)

24.         Payne, The Art of Asking Questions (1965)

25.         S.K. Verma and M. Afzal Wani (Eds.) Legal Research and Methodology, Indian Law Institute (2001) 2nd Edition.

26.         S.K.Agrawal (Ed.), Legal Education in India (1973), Tripathi, Bombay.

27.         Stone, Julius, ‘Legal System and Lawyer’s Reasoning’, Sydney, Maitland Publications, 1968.

28.         William J. Grade and Paul K. Hatt, Methods in School Research, McGraw-Hill Book Company London.

29.         Dr. Tewari H N, Legal Research Methodology

30.         Ranjit Kumar Research methodology: a step by-self guide for beginners

31.         Krishna Swami O R Methodology of research in social sciences

32.         Dr. Tewari H N Legal Research Methodology

33.         Joseph Gibaldi MLA handbook for writers of research papers

34.         Myneni S R Legal research methodology

 

35.         AnwarulYagin Legal research and writing methods

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  1.    High Brayal, Nigel Dunean and Richard Crimes, Clinical Legal Education: Active Learning in your Law School, (1998) Blackstone Press Limited, London
  2. Legal Research Methodology Indian Case Laws-www.indiancaselaws.wordpress.com
  3.   N.R. Madhava Menon, (ed) A Handbook of Clinical Legal Education, (1998) Eastern Book Company, Lucknow.     M.O.Price, H.Bitner and Bysiewiez, Effective Legal Research (1978)
  4. Pauline V. Young, Scientific Social Survey and Research, (1962)
  5.   William J. Grade and Paul K. Hatt, Methods in Social Research, Mc Graw-Hill Book Company, London
  6.  H.M.Hyman, Interviewing in Social Research (1965)
  7. Payne, The Art of Asking Questions (1965)
  8. Erwin C. Surrency, B.Fielf and J. Crea, A Guide to Legal Research (1959)
  9. Morris L. Cohan, Legal Research in Nutshell, (1996), West Publishing Co.
  10.  Havard Law Review Association, Uniform System of Citations.
  11. ILI Publication, Legal Research and Methodology
  12.  S.K.Agrawal (Ed.), Legal Education in India (1973), Tripathi, Bombay.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1 – Submission of Survey             20%

of Literature Review     

CIA II – Mid Semester Exam               20%

CIA III – Completed Coursera             15%

Certificate        

End Semester Exam                              30%

(Publication of research

Paper in UGC care

Listed Journals)

Viva                                                       10%

Attendance                                             05%

 

Total                                                     100%

LLM231IPL - GLOBALIZATION, LAW AND JUSTICE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Description: It is said that we are now living in a global neighborhood, which is not yet global village.  This is the result of the so called “globalization” which refers to those processes that tend to create and consolidate a unified economy, a single ecological system, and a complex network of communications that covers the whole globe, even if it does not penetrate into every part of it.  We find in every discipline studies under the titles global, globalism and globalization but not much in the discipline of law and now it is entering it also.  The process of globalization has its own impact on every discipline and this paper or course intends to study its influence on the discipline of law. The purpose is to sensitize students of law about implications of the process of globalization on basic principles, concepts and ideas underlying the discipline of law. To name a few the concept of law itself, justice, human rights and legal process.  The thrust is to analyze and evaluate them from a global perspective.

 

Objective: The Course aims at providing an understanding of the concept of globalization and it's impact on contemporary society and legal theory. In addition the course seeks to provide a critical perspective of globalization and its impact on issues like human rights, justice, democracy et. al.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the idea of globalization and explain its various dimensions.

CO2: Examine the various facets of globalization and its consequent impact on the developments of law and legal theory.

CO3 : Evaluate the various issues relating to sovereignty of nation-state, rule of law, democracy, security and legitimacy of international law in the wake of globalization.

CO4: Examine various theories/perspectives of human rights.

CO5: Develop a critical understanding of the idea of justice and theories connected to it.

CO6: Analyse how integration of municipal laws has taken place with the onset of globalization.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
GLOBALIZATION: PROCESS AND ITS EFFECTS
 

1.1.Concept of Liberalization, Privatization, Globalization, Meaning and definition of globalization, nature, scope and limits of globalization,   Different kinds.

1.2.History and evolution of globalization.

1.3.Causes and consequence of globalization, effect of globalization on economic, social, cultural and political aspects of life in twenty-first century.

1.4.Effect of globalization on law and justice - An introduction

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
GLOBALIZATION AND LEGAL THEORY
 

2.1   Jurisprudence, globalization and the discipline of law

2.2   Globalization and legal theory, the need for the study of concept of law from a global perspective.

2.3   Basic concepts of law in western legal thought.  A brief analysis of positivist, normative and   realist theories of law in western tradition.

2.4. The concept of justice and its relation to law in Western and Indian Legal thought and    concept of Dharma as a legal tradition.  The relation between law and justice.

2.5. Normative Jurisprudence, the western heritage, classical utilitarianism, Benthamite and modified Benthamite utilitarianism.

2.6. Theories of Justice Rawls and Pogge.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
POLICY ISSUES
 

3.1. Globalization and Democracy

3.2. Rule of Law-economic development-political development

3.3. Globalization and Justice

3.4. Globalization and Security

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE CONTEXT OF GLOBALIZATION
 

4.1. Human rights Theory and  Perspectives

4.2. Human Rights law as universal-criticism and rhetoric or Rights

4.3. Human Rights and the challenges-pluralist theories and Sen’s challenge

4.4. Human Rights and Southern voice - Upendra Baxi.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
HARMONIZATION OF LAW
 

5.1. Public and Private International Law governance

5.2. Regulation of International banks and money laundering

5.3. Harmonization of private commercial law-lex mercatoria

5.4. Harmonization of Intellectual Property law

5.5. Jurisdictional Issues in the era of globalization.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Jan Aart Scholte, Globalization – A critical introduction

2.      Jarrod Wiener – Globalization and the harmonization of law

3.      Michael Goodhart – Democracy as Human Rights – Freedom  and Equality in the age of Globalization

4.      James H Mitelman, The Globalization Syndrome

5.      Manfred B. Steger, Globalization –A very Short introduction-Oxford introductory series.

6.      Thomas Fleiner & Lidija R. Basta Fleiner, Constitutional democracy in a multicultural and globalised world, Springer.

7.      William Twining, General Jurisprudence; Understanding Law from a Legal perspective, Cambridge, Cambridge University, 2009

8.      William Twining, Globalization and Legal Theory, New York: Butterworths, 2006.

9.      Boaventura d Sousa Santos, Towards a New Legal Common Sense: Law, Globalization and Emanicipation, London: Butterworths, 2002.

10.  Otto A Bird, The Idea of Justice, New York: Frederick A Praeger, 1968

11.  M.D.A. Freeman, Lloyd’s Introduction to Jurisprudence, London: Sweet and Maxwell, 2010

12.  Amartya Sen, The idea of Justice, New Delhi: Allen Lane, 2009.

13.  Upendra Baxi, The Future of Human Rights, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2006.

14.  Thomas Pogge, Global Justice, Oxford: Blackwell, 2001

15.  B.S. Santos and Cesar A. Rodriquez-Gravito (ed.,) Law and Globalization from below: Towards a Cosmopolitan Legality, New York Cambridge University Press, 2005.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 1. William Twining, General Jurisprudence; Understanding Law from a Legal perspective, Cambridge, Cambridge University, 2009

2. William Twining, Globalization and Legal Theory, New York: Butterworths, 2006

3. Boaventura d Sousa Santos, Towards a New Legal Common Sense: Law, Globalization and Emanicipation, London: Butterworths, 2002.

4.  Thomas Pogge, Global Justice, Oxford: Blackwell, 2001

Evaluation Pattern

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation                  – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                  – 50%

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

LLM232IPL - INVESTMENT LAWS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course seeks to provide the investment mechanism in India and the regulatory framework for the protection of investor and other stake holders of the market.

UNIT 1: On completion of this Unit, students will be familiar with the legal framework of various investment laws applicable in India.

 

UNIT 2: Helps in understanding the basic concepts of raising corporate finance and the laws related to the same.

 

UNIT 3:  Provides the working knowledge of the operation of the legal framework of stock exchange and the legal sanctions behind various market regulatory authorities.

 

UNIT 4:  Exposes the students specifically to the establishment of SEBI, its constitution, roles, powers, functions etc.

 

UNIT 5: Gives an account of the depositories system in India, its operation and legal framework.

 

 

UNIT 6: Helps  the students to understand the basic principles of international investment and investment related treaties.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain and analyze the legal and regulatory framework governing investments in India.

CO2: List out the importance, characteristic features and functions of the various markets.

CO3: To define, explain and analyze the basic concepts, financial system and financial instruments relating to investments.

CO4: To explain the concept of mutual funds, venture capital and collective investment schemes.

CO5: Explain the constitution, powers, functions and working of SEBI and the Securities Appellate Tribunal

CO6: Discuss the depository system and analyze the provisions of the Depositories Act, 1996

CO7: To evaluate the principles relating to International Investments.

CO8: Analyze the legal concepts, principles, cases and provisions applicable thereto.

CO9: Devise a correct way of handling legal problems.

CO10: To develop good analytical skills that is a pre-requisite for good advocacy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction
 

1.1  Meaning of investment and market

1.2  Nature and risk associated with investment

1.3 Evolution of Investment  and bargaining norms

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Shares
 

2.1  Definition and nature

2.2  Shares and Shareholders

2.3  Stock and Shares

2.4  Certificate of shares

2.5  Call on shares

2.6  Lien on shares

2.7  Minimum subscription

2.8  Share capital

2.9  Issue and allotment of shares

2.10          Transfer and Transmission of shares

2.11          Debentures, Charges and Deposits

2.12        Inter-Corporate loans and investments  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Securities Contracts
 

3.1  Basic Features of the Securities Contracts

3.2  Recognition of stock Exchange

3.3  Derivatives

3.4  Options and futures

3.5. Debt and Money Market Instruments

3.6. Mutual Funds, Venture Capital, Collective Investment Schemes

3.7. Methods of Resource Mobilization in International Capital Markets

3.8.  Listing of securities

3.9.  Penalties and procedure for adjudication                                    

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Securities and Exchange Board
 

4.1  SEBI constitution

4.2  Powers and Functions of SEBI

4.3  Securities Appellate Tribunal

4.4   SEBI (Disclosure & Investor Protection) Guidelines

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Depositories Act
 

5.1  Salient features

5.2  Agreement between  depository and participant

5.3  Registration of transfer of securities with depository

5.4  Stamp duty on transfer

5.5   Non-Banking Financial Institutions

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Principles of International Investment Law
 

6.1  International treaties

6.2  Types of Investment contracts

6.3  Applicable law

6.4  Stabilization clauses

6.5  Renegotiation and adaptation 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Chandratre,K.R, et,al. Bharat's SEBI Compendium. 2Vol, 4th Ed. New Delhi: Bharat Law House, 2010.

2.      Ferran,Eilis. Principles of Corporate Finance Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.

3.      Khilnani,D.T. FEMA Ready Reckoner. 2Vol, 12th Ed. New Delhi: Snow White Publications Pvt., 2007.

4.      Myneni, S.R. Law of Investment and Securities. Hyderabad: Asia Law House, 2006.

5.      Puliani,Ravi, et,al,eds. Bharat's Manual of SEBI Act,Rules,Regulations,Guidelines,Circulars,ETC. 2Vol, New Delhi : Bharat Law House Pvt,2007.

6.      Saxena, Ashok. Bharat's Foreign Exchange Management Manual. 3Vol, 5th Ed. New Delhi: Bharat Law House, 2008.

7.      Singh,Avtar. Company Law. 14th ed. Lucknow: Eastern Book Company, 2004.

8.      Taxman. Taxman's Foreign Exchange Management Manual: With Foreign Exchange Laws Ready Reckoner. 2Vol, 18th Ed. New Delhi: Taxman Publications, 2011.

9.      Taxman. Taxman's SEBI Manual. 2Vol, 15th Ed. New Delhi: Taxman Publications, 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. A. Ramaiya Guide to Companies Act, 17th Edition, 2010.

2. Khan M.Y. Indian Financial System.

3. M. Sonarajah, The International Law on Foreign Investment.

 

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

 

LLM233IPL - LAW OF PATENTS AND DESIGNS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Patents are the exclusive monopoly rights granted to an inventor which could be used as a powerful tool for commercial exploitation of the patented invention. Determination of the rights of the patent holder is done taking into consideration the patentability of the invention, patent eligibility and the scope of the claims. This paper is aimed to give students a detailed account of the mandates in relation to patentability and patent eligibility which will equip them as better practitioners and researchers. The paper aims to give adequate emphasis to the procedural aspects of patent law in relation to acquisition and transfer of rights. The paper aims to analyse in detail the concept of infringement through interpretation of claims which carries a lot of significance in relation to patent litigation and research. The law relating to industrial designs is also included in detail.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and describe the concept taught in the respective module.

CO2: List out the essential characteristic of the concept

CO3: Apply the concept correctly to legal problems.

CO4: Analyse the legal concept.

CO5: Evaluate as against other events of a similar nature and articulate the problem areas for the deficiency. Devise a correct way of handling the legal problem

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
ELIGIBILITY AND SUBJECT MATTER