Department of MEDIA STUDIES

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Journalism Honours)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBS191A SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS191B A LIFE WORTH LIVING - FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS191C MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS191D CYBER SECURITY FOR THE MILLENNIAL GENERATION Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECH191A INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY Core Courses 3 3 100
BECH191B ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECJ161 INDIAN ECONOMY Generic Elective 4 4 100
BENG121 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION-I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
BENG191A READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION Generic Elective 3 3 100
BENG191B GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES Generic Elective 3 3 100
BHIS191A ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST Generic Elective 3 3 100
BHIS191B THE HISTORY OF URBAN SPACE AND EVOLUTION OF CITY FORMS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BJOH131 INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION Core Courses 20 5 100
BJOH132 PRINT JOURNALISM Core Courses 5 5 100
BJOH151 PHOTOGRAPHY Core Courses 4 4 100
BMED191A MEDIA LITERACY Generic Elective 3 3 100
BMED191B UNDERSTANDING THE VISUAL LANGUAGE OF CINEMA Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPOL162 INDIAN POLITICAL SYSTEM Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPOL191A PEACE AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPOL191B GLOBAL POWER POLITICS Generic Elective 3 03 100
BPSY191B ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY Generic Elective 3 3 100
SDMS111 SOCIAL SENSITIVITY SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 50
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBS291A APPLIED ETHICS-A MULTICULTURAL APPROACH Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS291B GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS291C COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS291D MAHATMA AND MANAGEMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS291E SACRED GAMES AND THE RULE OF LAW Generic Elective 2 3 100
BBS291F CONSUMPTION AND CULTURE IN INDIA Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECH291A ECONOMICS AND LITERATURE Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECH291B DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BENG221 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION-II Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
BENG291A READING CITYSCAPES: BANGALORE HISTORIES Generic Elective 3 3 100
BENG291B READING THE CYBERSPACE: PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE Generic Elective 3 3 100
BHIS291A THE POLITICS OF MEMORY: THE MAKINGS OF GENOCIDE Generic Elective 3 3 100
BHIS291B RELIGION: PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS THROUGH AGES Generic Elective 3 3 100
BJOH231 MEDIA, CULTURE AND SOCIETY Core Courses 5 5 100
BJOH241 JOURNALISTIC ETHICS Core Courses 15 4 100
BJOH251 WRITING FOR PRINT MEDIA Core Courses 5 5 100
BJOH252 AUDIO-VISUAL PRODUCTION Core Courses 4 4 100
BJOH261 DYNAMIC INDIA: RETHINKING HISTORY, REFRAMING IDENTITY Generic Elective 5 5 100
BMED291A INTER-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION Generic Elective 3 2 100
BMED291B AUDIO CONSUMPTION IN EVERYDAY LIFE Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPOL291A POLITICS IN INDIA Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPOL291B STATE AND TERRORISM Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPSY291A APPRECIATING AESTHETICS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPSY291B HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS Generic Elective 3 3 100
SDMS211 EXPRESSIVE SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 50
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BJOH331 COMMUNITY JOURNALISM Core Courses 4 5 100
BJOH341A ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATION Discipline Specific Elective 4 05 100
BJOH342 MEDIA ANALYSIS Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BJOH351 BROADCAST MEDIA Core Courses 5 5 100
BJOH352 AUDIO-VISUAL PRODUCTION Core Courses 4 4 100
BJOH381 INTERNSHIP-I Skill Enhancement Course 0 02 50
SDMS311 KNOWLEDGE ACQUISITION SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 50
SEL311 SERVICE LEARNING-I Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BJOH431 DEVELOPMENT COMMUNICATION Core Courses 5 5 100
BJOH432 RESEARCH METHODS Core Courses 4 4 100
BJOH442 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY Generic Elective 4 4 100
BJOH451 REPORTING SOUTH ASIA Core Courses 4 4 100
BJOH452 DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION Core Courses 5 5 100
SDMS411 KNOWLEDGE APPLICATION SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 50
SEL411 SERVICE LEARNING-II Core Courses 2 2 50
5 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BJOH531 GLOBAL MEDIA AND POLITICS Core Courses 5 5 100
BJOH532 MEDIA LAW Core Courses 5 5 100
BJOH533 NEW MEDIA JOURNALISM Core Courses 5 5 100
BJOH541A FILM APPRECIATION Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BJOH541B SPORTS JOURNALISM Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 100
BJOH551 DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCTION Core Courses 4 4 100
BJOH581 INTERNSHIP-II Skill Enhancement Course 0 2 50
BJOH582 DISSERTATION/PROJECT I Skill Enhancement Course 5 4 100
SDMS511 SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 50
6 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BJOH631 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING Core Courses 5 5 100
BJOH634 MEDIA ECONOMICS Core Courses 4 4 100
BJOH642A MEDIA AND HUMAN RIGHTS Discipline Specific Elective 5 4 100
BJOH642B MEDIA AND GENDER Discipline Specific Elective 5 5 100
BJOH651 DATA JOURNALISM Core Courses 4 4 100
BJOH681 DISSERTATION/PROJECT II Core Courses 3 3 100
SDMS611 CAREER ORIENTED SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 50
      

    

Department Overview:

The undergraduate Department of Media Studies aims to provide a firm foundation for the students to either directly get into journalism and related areas in Media or make a foray into higher studies. The programmes are a combination of theory and practice, though tilted towards building a strong theoretical foundation on which to build a career in Media.BA Media Studies with Economics and Political Science, and BA (Journalism Honours) will provide the students with a varied set of options depending on their objectives. However, the department aims to inculcate among its students a critical engagement of the word of media, with the aim of molding them into responsible and social citizens of the nation.

Mission Statement:

Vision: To create a democratic space that can foster critical thinking and ethical practices in the area of communication research and incubation

Mission: To equip learners to harness the power of communication for societal upliftment and professional excellence 

Introduction to Program:

The syllabus for this programme is designed to give the students a theoretical and practical base to specialize in Journalism and Media industry. In the first two semesters, the emphasis is to locate Journalism in the broader field of communication and provide a background in the social sciences: political science, psychology, marketing, economics and sociology. The course in its first year emphasises on writing, reporting and editing that is aimed at strengthening the knowledge base and imparting skills necessary to survive in the field of written communication. Special emphasis is given in the second year to the fields of broadcast media. In the final year, the course focuses on digital and new media aspects of communication. The field of journalism has seen many changes in recent years. The Department of Media Studies at Bannerghatta Road campus have streamlined the courses to align with industrial expectations as well as provide intellectual and critical growth to our students.

Program Objective:

1. To have sound grounding in various aspects of journalism- theoretical and practical. 2. To train students to become journalists who help define communication. 3. To help create a common understanding rooted in reality. 4. To create an industry oriented talent pool who are able to fulfill demanding managerial, networking and organizational duties in a wide range of positions in the area of journalism. Learning Outcome: Brief understanding of Journalism, Communication and Media Studies Sound knowledge of English language and grammar Have technical know-how to operate camera and basic editing Basic understanding of media research Interpersonal communication skills Strong research, coordination and time management skills To become team players, but also work independently when needed Ability to design communication and media strategies

Assesment Pattern

70% CIA and 30% ESE

Examination And Assesments

Theory Courses: CIA 1 = 20 marks; MSE: 50 marks (25% weightage); CIA 3 = 20 marks; ESE: 50 marks (30%weightage)

All practical courses have cumulative assessement based on submissions.

BBS191A - SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To create a sense of ownership of issues related to CSR, Environment and sustainability of businesses.

Understand the basic concept of Sustainable Development (SD), the environmental, social and economic dimensions.

To teach how to critically analyze, evaluate and judge competing perspectives on the challenge of creating a sustainablefuture.

To understand the Sustainable development challenge for companies, their responsibility and their potentials for action.

Learning Outcome

Concern for society and nature

Ability to create sustainable organizations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Sustainability
 

Meaning and Scope, Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability, Sustainability Terminologies and Meanings, why is Sustainability an Imperative, Sustainability Case Studies, Triple Bottom Line (TBL)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Is it possible to combine sustainability and business success?
 

Reasons to adopt sustainable strategy by firms, tools used by the firm to implement their sustainable development strategies, evaluation of firm’s commitment to sustainable strategies by the stakeholders.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Environmental Management Systems
 

Using Standards, Certification and other Systems to further SD goals Introduction, Global management systems exist to guide firms in establishing and implementing a strategy,how do these various approaches, including certification, encourage sustainable business practices.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Taking charge and working together to change the future
 

Establishing priorities for sustainable future, Role of women in sustainability, Challenge of creating a green economy, Sustainability crisis in 21st century, failures of global capitalism, transforming global capitalism, creating a restorative economy.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Corporate Sustainability Reporting Frameworks
 

Global Reporting Initiative Guidelines, National Voluntary Guidelines on Social, Environmental and Economic Responsibilities of, Business, International Standards, Sustainability Indices, Principles of Responsible Investment, Challenges in Mainstreaming Sustainability Reporting, Sustainability Reporting Case Studies

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Legal framework, conventions, treaties on Environmental and social aspects
 

United Nations Conference on Human Environment, United Nations Environment Programme Brundtland Commission United Nations Conference on Environment and Development Agenda 21, Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, Statement of Forest Principles United Nations Framework Convention on climate change, Convention on Biological Diversity, Kyoto Protocol, Bali Roadmap, United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, Rio+20, Millennium Development Goals to Sustainable Development Goals.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Balachandran V, & Chandrashekharan V, (2011). Corporate Governance, Ethics and social responsibility, PHI.

2.      Concepts of Environmental Management for Sustainable Development

3.      Baxi C. V & Rupamanjari Sinha Ray, (2012). Corporate Social Responsibility: A Study of CSR Practices in Indian Industry, Vikas Publishing House.

4.      Corporate Goverance – Badi N. V, Vrinda Publications, 2012.

5.      Fernando A. C, (2011). Corporate Governance: principles, policies and practices, Pearson.

6.      Ghosh B. N, (2012). Business Ethics and Corporate Governance , Tata McGraw-Hill.

7.      Keshoo Prasad, Corporate Governance -, PHI.

8.      Lawrence and Weber, (2010). Business and Society, Tata McGraw-Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten (2010). Business ethics, Oxford.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Written assignment on cases relating to sustainability practices followed in any country. (No country should be repeated) (20 marks)

CIA 2 - Mid sem Class exam (25 marks)

CIA 3 - Group presentation and report for pre allotted topics.(20 marks)

End sem - Class exam (30 marks)

BBS191B - A LIFE WORTH LIVING - FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To examine health in its truest sense, one must explore beyond the limits of medicine to engage a much wider set of questions embracing social, cultural, political, economic, moral and spiritual aspects of human experience. The course focuses on the knowledge and skills that students require to lead a healthy, productive and balanced life.

 

Learning Outcome

On completing the course, students will be able to:

  • Explain health as a multi-dimensional and dynamic concept, which necessarily integrates individual, societal, biomedical, spiritual, cultural and historical influences, and how this relates to health issues encountered in everyday life.
  • Assess the inter-relatedness of health perceptions and practices across cultures.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to health
 

Health of individuals and communities – The significance of determinants of health and how these raise or lower the health of individuals and communities - Health promotion to improve health - Personal and popular attitudes and beliefs and their impact on decision making - self-management - interpersonal and key consumer health skills - Factors influencing health, and actions and strategies to protect and promote health, through investigation and inquiry processes.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Food and Values
 

Philosophy of food, Values – Three different types of values, Meat – Is it wrong to eat animals?Hunger – Do we have a duty to help starving people? - Drugs – Why is it wrong to take drugs? - GM food – How should food technology be regulated? - Capitalism – Food, globalization, and equality - Art – Can food be art? What is art? - Taste – Is taste entirely subjective? - Science – Can science explain conscious taste experiences? -Eating – Eat to live, or live to eat

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Nutrition
 

Balanced diet & Nutrition, Macro and micro nutrients – Nutritive and non nutritive components of diet – Eating for weight control – healthy weight – The pitfalls of dieting – food intolerance and food myths – Food supplements for adolescents. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Physical Education
 

Concept of physical education – Meaning – definition – aims – objectives of physical education and fitness – Need & importance of fitness – Types of fitness – Health related physical fitness – performance related physical fitness – physical activities and health benefits - Activities for developing physical fitness

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Sleep
 

What is sleep? – The phylogeny of sleep – Developmental course of sleep – Dreams- Functions of sleep – Daytime sleepiness and alertness – Sleep disorders.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Safety education and health promotion
 

Principles of accident prevention – health and safety in daily life – health and safety at work – first aid and emergency care – common injuries and their management

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:9
Spirituality, Religion and Social Change
 

Meaning of life - Meaning of death- Indian Rituals, symbols, and myths - Spirituality, altruism and moral justice - Resources to deal with stress, temptations, disappointments and failures, social oppression, the loss of possessions and of loved ones, and with one’s own death. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Indian Journals of health and well being

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

As prescribed by the facilitator

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1, Mid sem, CIA 3, End sem - 100 Marks

BBS191C - MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The Mahabharata of the great Maharishi Veda Vyasa is a treasure trove of knowledge, principles and paradigms. It is written that what is not in the Mahabharata will not be found elsewhere. Written nearly thousands of years ago, the Mahabharata is as yet a source of knowledge, especially modern management principles.In essence it highlights the victory of Dharma in times of Adharma.This subject is a comprehensive learning on management lessons which can be inferred from the great epic. It gives a clear understanding and comparison of management Principles, practices and the various functions of management with the epic. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of management. It also deals with behavioral issues in the individual processes, group and interpersonal processes.

Course Objectives:

  •  Discuss the epic by summarizing the various parvas/units in class in accordance with the management concept
  •  Review and make a critical estimate of the epic with a focus on morals, ethics, legal and management concepts
  • To develop competencies and knowledge of students to become effective professionals

Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcome: Students will get to know team work and group dynamics

  • Students will get to know determination and hard work and its implication on business decision
  • Students will be able to appreciate the role of general management for the success of an organization.
  • This subject will enable them to enhance their Moral, social, ethical and professional skills
  • To understand the manner in which strategic and competitive advantage is developed

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Mahabharatha
 

The older generations-The Pandava and Kaurava princes- Lakshagraha (the house of lac)

Establishment of the kingdom-Administration and Management principles

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Marriage and Building of New city
 

Marriage to Draupadi- An event study approach.

Indraprastha-A new beginning- Pressure for change – Change process, Types of change, Factors influencing change, Resistance to change

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
The Big Game
 

The dice game- Cooperative strategies & Reasons for strategic alliances-

Exile and return- Risks and costs of strategic alliances

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
The battle at Kurukshetra
 

The battle at Kurukshetra - Strategic Planning and Management- levels at which strategy operates- Event approaches to strategic decision making,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Post Kurukshetra
 

The end of the Pandavas- Succession Planning,Authority and Responsibility

The reunion Organizing- Choosing the organizational structure

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Rao, V.S.P., & Krishna, V.H., (2011). Strategic Management: Text and Cases. New Delhi: Excel Books.

Pratap Chandra Roy ,The complete Mahabharata translated into English prose directly from the original sanskrit text.(1st Edition) oriental publishing co.

Source: Jaya - An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

C Rajagopalachari (2017). Mahabharata (63rdedition), Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 10 Marks

MSE   30 Marks

CIA 3 10 Marks

End Assesment 50 Marks

BBS191D - CYBER SECURITY FOR THE MILLENNIAL GENERATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Any individual can have a real-time video conversation with someone on the other side of the planet, one can send and receive money without even taking out their wallet, and even can post content online that reaches millions of people in a matter minutes. Unfortunately, the same technology that enables all this new freedom and convenience also exposes us to new security threats that we've never encountered. Malware that infects your computer and watches everything you do, phishing scams that steal private information from millions of people - today's digital world is a criminal's playground. It makes the process of stealing money or even stealing someone's entire identity way more efficient. Hence it becomes very important to protect yourself and your private data from cyber intruders. This course outlines a step-by-step roadmap that one can follow to build a tight wall of security around your digital life.

Course Objectives:

This course gives the background needed to understand basic cyber security. Students will be introduced to the world of spyware, phishing, malware, spam, social engineering, hacking and other common internet spying techniques. Students will also learn the intervention methods in securing themselves in cyber space.

Learning Outcome

  • To understand how to identify online scams.
  • To develop the right mindset and habits for securing themselves from intruders.
  • To learn how to secure their online browsing.
  • To learn how to create super passwords and how to manage them.
  • To practice cyber security skills in real world scenarios.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Cyber security
 

Why security matters – The importance of multi-layer security – the most common security threats – The dark side of Internet – The world of malware – phishing – social engineering – scams – hacking –cyber warfare.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Mindset and Habits
 

Developing the right mindset and habits for security – the importance of skepticism – avoiding malicious sites and applications – Tools needed to browse the Internet securely - why software updates matter – knowing (and limiting yourself).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Smartphone security
 

Why mobile security matters – setting up a passcode lock –importance of password security – best practices – using password manager- managing third-party app permissions – locating a lost or stolen smartphone.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Multi-factor authentication and Connected apps
 

Framework – types of mobile two-factor authentication – Two-Factor authentication: Google, Facebook, Twitter and other services - danger of rogue connected apps – managing connected apps on Google and Facebook – managing browser extensions/add-ons – staying secure with connected apps and extensions.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Encryption
 

Encryption definition – How SSL (HTTPS) protects your passwords and private data - encrypting your web traffic with a virtual private network (VPN) – encrypting computer's hard drive – encrypting smartphone – firewalls – antivirus.

Text Books And Reference Books:

·     Graham,James., Howard,Richard., & Olson,Ryan. (2011). Cyber Security Essentials. USA: CRC Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Lalit,Gulab Chandra. (2014). Cyber security threats: An emerging challenge. New Delhi: Mohit Publications.

·        Arora, A. (2014). Information Warfare and Cyber Security. Jaipur: Book Enclave.

·       Santanam, R., Sethumadhavan, M., & Virendra, M. (2011). Cyber security, cybercrime and cyber forensics: Applications and perspectives. Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.

·         Ahamad, F. (2013). Cyber Law and Information Security. New Delhi: Dreamtech Press.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 20 marks

CIA II - 25 marks

CIA III - 20 marks

End Semester - 30 marks

Attendance - 05 marks

BECH191A - INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: 

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of institutions and the informal economy in a global context. The discourse examines the informal economy through the lens of institutional economics. The aim is to acquaint students with significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention.  

Course Objectives: 

The course aims to help students to: 

  • outline the concept of institutions and institutional change through some of the major  theoretical constructs in institutional economics; 
  • summarize and illustrate the various mechanisms of the informal economy  connecting the theoretical concept to issues of measurement; 
  • examine the linkages of formal and informal economy; 
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss these complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcomes: 

At the end of the course, the student will be able to: 

  • illustrate the major concepts and explain some of the theoretical discourses in the  study of institutional change and the informal economy;
  • examine how the formal and informal economies are no longer separate watertight  compartments but function together as an interactive system; 
  • apply these complex ideas of property rights and transaction costs to their own research 
  • demonstrate their research findings through written and oral presentation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Institutions and Institutional Change
 

Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance; Informal Constraints; Formal Constraints; The Path of Institutional Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Elements of Institutional Economics
 

Contracts and Property Rights: the Concepts of Exchange and Property, Critique of the Utilitarian Calculus; Transaction Costs, Bargaining Power; Markets as Institutions; Firms and Markets

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Informality: Concepts, Theory and Measurement
 

Bureaucratic Form and the Informal Economy; Formal and Informal Enterprises: Concepts, Definition, and Measurement Issues; Linking the Formal and Informal Economy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Empirical Studies in Institutional Change and Informality
 

CASE STUDIES: The Impact of Regulation on Growth and Informality: Cross-Country Evidence; Blocking Human Potential: How Formal Policies Block the Economy in the Maputo Corridor; Enforcement and Compliance in Lima’s Street Markets: The Origins and Consequences of Policy Incoherence towards Informal Traders

Text Books And Reference Books:

Alston, L. J., Eggertsson, T., & North, D. C. (Eds.). (1996). Empirical Studies in Institutional Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Guha-Khasnobis, B., Kanbur, R., & Ostrom, E. (Eds.). (2006). Linking the Formal and Informal Economy: Concepts and Policies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Misztal, B. (2002). Informality: Social Theory and Contemporary Practice. Routledge.
North, D. (1990). Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance. in Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Arias, O., Fajnzylber, P., Maloney, W., Mason, A., Perry, G., & Saavedra - Chanduvi, J.  (2007). Informality: Exit and Exclusion. Washington: The World Bank. 
Harriss, J. (2008). Explaining economic change: The relations of Institutions, Politics and  Culture. The Institutions of the Market: Organizations, Social Systems, and Governance,  309-327. New York: Oxford University Press 
Mehta, P. B., & Kapur, D. (2005). Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. Nayyar, D. (Ed.). (2002). Governing Globalization: Issues and Institutions. Oxford University  Press on Demand. 
Oviedo, A. M. (2009). Economic Informality: Causes, Costs, and Policies in A Literature Survey of International Experience. Background Paper prepared for Country Economic  Memorandum (CEM)–Informality: Causes, Consequences, Policies. 
Sengupta, A. (2007). Power Matters: Essays on Institutions, Politics, and Society in India.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

Institutions and Informal Economy

45%

50%

5%

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

End Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

BECH191B - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies.

This course will:

  • consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption
  • acquaint students to significant debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption
  • analyse corruption in emerging economies through various case studies
  • discuss issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing corruption as erosion of trust and abuse of power
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • appreciate that nuances in the way corruption is defined and understood in different economies
  • analyse the cause and  consequences of corruption
  • examine some of the policies reforms aimed at tackling corruption
  • investigate some impacts of corruption on emerging economies
  • effectively communicate complex ideas through written and oral presentation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries?, Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: the Role of Institutions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption?  Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anticorruption Device.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in Private Sector.Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187-203.

Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.
Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.
Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.
Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187-203.

Evaluation Pattern

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

The Economics of Corruption

45%

50%

5%

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

End Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

 

BECJ161 - INDIAN ECONOMY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper aims at initiating among the students discussion on some of the key issues of Indian economy. It also aims at making the students understand the macroeconomic challenges and policy management in India with special reference to Karnataka. This paper exposes the students to the quantitative data on various economic aspects and policies in India and Karnataka as well.

  • To give an overall understanding of major challenges faced by Indian economy.
  • To facilitate students to understand state wise key economic issues related with economic growth and development.

Learning Outcome

  • The student is able to understand the features and structural changes of Indian economy and compare with the growth pattern and challenges of other economies.
  • The course enables the student to apply the theoretical knowledge in the actual working of Indian economy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
India as a Developing Economy
 

India and the global economy; emerging issues of development; economic planning- broad objectives, targets, strategies, NITI AAYOG : Structure , role and functions , Vision document of planning in India; India’s human development in global perspective.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Sectoral Growth and Private-Public Sectors
 

Growth trends of primary, secondary and tertiary sectors, state wise comparison, comparison with other countries, low productivity issues, challenges and prospects; changes in occupational structure and employment ; privatization and disinvestment policies; public sector, sick units in public sector, strategy for revival of sick public sector units, private vs. public sector, small scale industries.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
External Sector
 

External sector and its significance, movement of capital, manpower and goods, recent trends in BOPs and exchange rate fluctuations, WTO requirements; foreign trade- composition, direction and organization, India’s trade policy and tariff policy; external debt and fiscal reforms, India and regional integration.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Macroeconomic Performance and Policies
 

Recent economic reforms; changing role of  RBI-, recent changes in monetary and fiscal policy and their effectiveness,; Federal finance, Finance Commissions, black money - estimates, genesis, consequences and remedies and comparison with other countries, Evaluation of recent development programmes in India.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
An Overview of Karnataka Economy- Policies, Prospects and Challenges
 

Trends and growth pattern of SGDP and human development in Karnataka, comparison with other  Indian states; sectoral performance, industrial and agricultural policies, problems and prospects of different sectors; State planning process- planning objectives and strategies, decentralized planning, intra-state disparities; education, health and housing, budgetary trends; Evaluation of recent development programmes in Karnataka.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Datt, G., & Mahajan, A. (2016). Indian economy. (72nd ed.). New Delhi: S.Chand&Company  Pvt. Ltd.

Iteshamul, H. (2015). A Handbook of Karnataka. Government of Karnataka, Bangalore, A Government of Karnataka Publication.

Kapila, U. (2016). Indian Economy – Performance and Policies (17thed.). New Delhi: Academic Foundation.

Misra, S. K., &Puri, V. K. (2011). Indian economy (34thed.). Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Aiyar, S. S., &Mody, A. (2011). The demographic dividend: Evidence from the Indian states.

Balakrishnan, P. (2007). The recovery of India: Economic growth in the Nehru Era. Economic and Political Weekly, 52-66.

Baru, R., Acharya, A., Acharya, S., Kumar, A. S., &Nagaraj, K. (2010). Inequities in access to health services in India: caste, class and region. Economic and Political Weekly, 49-58.

Basu, K. (2009). China and India: idiosyncratic paths to high growth. Economic and Political Weekly, 43-56.

Deaton, A., &Drèze, J. (2009). Food and nutrition in India: facts and interpretations. Economic and political weekly, 42-65.

Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2013). An uncertain glory: India and its contradictions. Princeton University Press.

Dyson, T. (2013). Population and development: the demographic transition. Zed Books Ltd

Economic survey of India, 2016-17.[New Delhi].

Economic Survey of Karnataka 2016-17.[Bangalore]

Himanshu, R., & Sen, A. (2010). Towards new poverty lines for India. Economic & Political Weekly, 45(1), 2-8.

Himanshu. (2011). Employment Trends in India: A Re-examination. Economic and Political Weekly, 43-59.

James, K. S. (2008). Glorifying Malthus: Current debate on'demographicdividend'in India. Economic and Political Weekly, 63-69.

Kapila, U. (Ed.). (2009). Indian economy since independence. Academic Foundation

Meti, T. K. (1976). The Economy of Karnataka: An Analysis of Development and Planning. New Delhi: Oxford & IBH Publishing Company.

Mohan, R. (2008). Growth record of the Indian economy, 1950-2008: A story of sustained savings and investment. Economic and Political Weekly, 61-71.

Narayana, M. R. (2004). An Overview of the Karnataka Economy'. Chapter One in Karnataka Development Report, Institute for Social and Economic Change.

Shetty, S. L. (2007). India’s Savings Performance since the Advent of Planning’. Institutions and Markets in India’s Development.

Somasekhara, N. (1978). Planning and Development in Karnataka: Targets, Allocations, and Perspectives. Geetha Book House.

Vaidyanathan, A., & Krishna, K. L. (Eds.). (2007). Institutions and Markets in India's Development: Essays for KN Raj. Oxford.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

 

BENG121 - ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION-I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

English Language and Composition course is an intensive program for two semesters for all the students of the BA/BSc programmes ENGH, ECOH, JOUH, PSYH, EPH and EMP) that introduces students to a wide range of expository works in order to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of graduate level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. It would provide students with the opportunity to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and the subjects in texts.

The purpose of the course is to enable students to read analytically, formulate arguments based on the readings, and respond by composing articulate essays that utilize advanced elements of sentence structure, syntax, style, purpose, and tone. Thus, by the use of rhetorical principles, students will learn how to become critical thinkers, and apply that knowledge to their writing by revising and improving their essays, as well as critiquing and editing peer essays. In addition, students will be required to thoroughly research relevant topics, synthesize information from a variety of sources, and document their knowledge in a cogent well written report. Also, as the course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in multiple mediums, including visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, comic strips, music videos, and TED talks; students would develop a sense to comprehend how a resource of language operates in any given text. While the first semester focuses on understanding principles of rhetoric through multiple texts, the second semester is more thematic in nature familiarizing students with texts from multiple disciplines, especially in the context of India.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner should be able to:

       Analyse and interpret samples of good writing by identifying and explaining an author’s use of rhetorical strategies and techniques

        Analyze both visual and written texts.

        Apply effective strategies and techniques in their own writing

        Create and sustain arguments based on reading, research, and/or personal experience.

       Demonstrate understanding and mastery of English Language as well as stylistic maturity in their own writings

       Produce expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that introduce a complex central idea and develop it with appropriate evidence drawn from primary and/or secondary source material, cogent explanations, and clear transitions;

       Move effectively through the stages of the writing process with careful attention to inquiry and research, drafting, revising, editing, and review;

       Write thoughtfully about their own process of composition.

         Revise a work to make it suitable for a different audience

 

       Communicate effectively in different medium by developing their LSRW skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Language of Composition
 

The unit will focus on understanding rhetoric and various rhetorical situations. The aim is to assert the idea that rhetoric is always contextual and there is a link between the speaker, audience and what the content of the text is. This will enable students to understand the significance of context while analysing and composing a text.

1.      Introduction to Rhetoric and Rhetorical Situation.

a.      Lou Gehrig’s Farewell Speech https://www.lougehrig.com/farewell/

 

2.      SOAP Analysis: Through the analysis of the text the aim is to look at the mode in which various factors like subject, occasion, audience and purpose impact rhetoric.

a.      Letter to Einstein and Reply. http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/05/dear-einstein-do-scientists-pray.html

b.      George W. Bush 9/11 speech http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/gwbush911addresstothenation.htm

c.       Tryst with Destiny by Jawaharlal Nehru

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jawaharlalnehrutrystwithdestiny.htm

 

3.      Ethos, Pathos and Logos: Understanding Aristotle’s concept of Ethos, Pathos and Logos is significant in understanding an effective rhetoric. By looking at some of the famous rhetorical works the aim is to understand how the writer’s/ orators of some of the famous rhetorical pieces have used these elements to persuade the reader/ audience.

  1. Ethos
    1.  
    2. King George VI King’s Speech (Can play part of the movie
    3. https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/George-VI-King-s-Speech-September-3-1939
    4. The Myth of Latin Women: I Just met a Girl Named Maria https://www.quia.com/files/quia/users/amccann10/Myth_of_a_Latin_Woman
    5. Quit India Speech by Gandhi
  2.  Logos
    1. SlowFood Nation by Alice Watershttps://www.thenation.com/article/slow-food-nation/
    2.  My Vision For India by Abdul Kalam.
  3. Pathos

a. Richard Nixon, from The Checkers Speech http://watergate.info/1952/09/23/nixon-checkers-speech.html

b. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Order of the Day

https://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/order-of-the-day-6-june-1944

c .Bal Gangadhar Tilak http://speakola.com/political/bal-gangadhar-tilak-freedom-is-my-birthright-1917

  1. Combining Ethos, Logos, and Pathos

a.      Toni Morrison, Dear Senator Obama http://observer.com/2008/01/toni-morrisons-letter-to-barack-obama/

 

b.      Crisis of Civilization by Rabindranath Tagore

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Written Texts
 

Focus of the unit would be to introduce multiple ways of analysis, close reading, and usage of argumentative statements and diction. 

 

1.      Ralph Ellison, from On Bird, Bird-Watching and Jazz http://www.unz.org/Pub/SaturdayRev-1962jul28-00047

2.       Virginia Woolf, The Death of the Moth

3.       Groucho Marx, Dear Warner Brotherhttps://archive.org/details/Groucho_Marx_Letter_to_Warner_Brothers

 

4.      Christopher Morley, On Lazinesshttp://essays.quotidiana.org/morley/laziness/

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Visual Texts
 

The unit will focus on how to read visual text and the impact it has on the audience.

1.      ACLU, The Man on the Left(advertisement)

2.      Tom Toles, Rosa Parks (cartoon) http://thenexthurrah.typepad.com/the_next_hurrah/2005/10/rosa_parks.html

3.      http://webneel.com/rk-lakshman-editorial-cartoons-indian-cartoonist (Political Cartoons) India

4.      https://www.tatacliq.com/que/isro-launch-breaks-record-memes/ ISRO Launch (Times)

 

5.      Analysing Advertisements ( Fair and Lovely,…) , gender stereotypes in ads.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Determining Effective and Ineffective Rhetoric
 

The unit will engage with the questions on why few texts are effective rhetorical pieces as opposed to others.  A few texts will be analysed to look at different rhetorical situations, and how it is effective and ineffective in persuading the audience/ reader.

1.      PETA, Feeding Kids Meat Is Child Abuse (advertisement) 25

2.      Anne Applebaum, If the Japanese Can’t Build a Safe Reactor,Who Can? https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/if-the-japanese-cant-build-a-safe-reactor-who-can/2011/03/14/ABCJvuV_story.html?utm_term=.8

3.      Stop for Pedestrians (advertisement)

4.      The Times, Man Takes First Steps on the Moon

5.      William Safire, In Event of Moon Disaster http://mentalfloss.com/article/57908/event-moon-disaster-white-house-speech-worst-case-scenario

6.      Herblock, Transported (cartoon)

 

7.      Ted Talk: Speak Like a Leader https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGBamfWasNQ

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
From Reading to Writing
 

By carefully reading the viewpoints of others and considering a range of ideas on an issue, one develops a clearer understanding of our own beliefs — a necessary foundation to writing effective arguments. The unit will focus on analysing elements of argument as a means of critical thinking and an essential step toward crafting argumentative essays. The unit will focus on making an argument and supporting it by synthesising multiple sources. 

1.      Understanding Argument https://csalexander03.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/why-investing-in-fast-food-may-be-a-good-thing-by-amy-domini/

2.      http://www.nytimes.com/2004/07/11/opinion/felons-and-the-right-to-vote.html

3.      Using Visual text for Argument https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjjV_X5re4g

4.      Using sources to inform an Argument

5.    Using Sources to Appeal to Audience.

Text Books And Reference Books: