Department of SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Syllabus for
Master of Architecture
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MARC131 CITIES IN HISTORY - 4 4 100
MARC151 DESIGN STUDIO I - READING CITIES - 12 10 600
MARC152 WORKSHOP - I - 5 4 200
MARC181S SEMINAR - I - 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MARC231 INFRASTRUCTURE AND MANAGEMENT - 4 4 100
MARC251 DESIGN STUDIO II - CITIES, METROPOLIS AND REGION - 12 10 600
MARC252 WORKSHOP - II - 5 4 200
MARC281S SEMINAR - II - 3 3 100
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MARC331 INDIAN PLANNING PROCESS AND METHODS - ADVANCED - 4 4 100
MARC351 DESIGN STUDIO -III- ECOLOGICAL URBANISM - 12 10 600
MARC352 WORKSHOP - III - 5 4 200
MARC381I SUMMER INTERNSHIP - 0 3 200
MARC382S SEMINAR - III - 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MARC451 THESIS - 16 16 999
MARC481S SEMINAR - IV - 4 3 100
    

    

Department Overview:

The School of Architecture, approved by the Council of Architecture (COA) New Delhi, is conceived in the academic year 2017-18. It offers a five-year Bachelor's Degree Program in Architecture (B.Arch) and a two-year Master's Degree Program in Architecture (M.Arch) aspiring to make a compelling presence in the field of Architectural education. The School's core strength of academic rigor focuses on experiential learning as a pedagogy, specialization of faculty, the best of infrastructure facilities, and the involvement of practicing architects in design teaching.

Mission Statement:

VISION: The School of Architecture CHRIST is dedicated to an architectural education through excellence and rigor in learning, research, and community engagement to nurture individuals to become ethical professionals, creative designers, and responsible citizens.

  

Introduction to Program:

The M.Arch Program, affiliated with Christ University (Deemed to be University), is a two-year program, approved by the Council of Architecture New Delhi. It is interdisciplinary in nature to make the program diverse and nuanced. The program is structured in four verticals, Studio, Theory, Workshop, and Seminar. 1. Studio Courses: This course is the mandatory design studio-based course for Semester I, II, and III, which shall deal with multiple aspects, shall be interdisciplinary in nature and shall be paradigm or issue-based culminating with a thesis project. The syllabus of the studio course for each of these semesters will be suggestive of a) Representation and Skills; the level and intensity of technical and soft skills required for representation and communication that need to be imparted and acquired in the particular semester informed by workshop courses in the respective semesters. b) Contextual Quality; suggestive of a particular physical, environmental, social, built context that the studio must be based upon. c) Scale of Enquiry; suggestive of multi-scalar or lateral approach, or intensity or depth of inquiry that the studio shall engage in, informed by the theory & semester courses in respective semesters. d) Critical Thinking; suggestive of the theoretical premise, aspects, and depth of critical thinking that the studio s

Program Objective:

Programme Objective: The M.Arch Programme intends a deep immersion in an ecosophical perspective of architecture, as part of an inspired understanding of larger discourses: environmental, social, political, artistic, and technological.

Programme Educational Objectives 1. To provide an education in the field of the built environment that recognizes its interdisciplinary nature between urbanism, ecology, social, economic, and political realms. 2. To offer learning that encourages a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach and bridges the gap between academics and practice. 3. To offer education and conduct research on pertinent urban and ecological issues of the global south and specifically in the context of Asia. 4. To provide an education that makes students understand the roles and responsibilities to effectively find informed solutions through design, advocacy, and activism. 5. To offer courses that are domain-specific, issue-based that are relevant and contemporary. 6. To provide for choice-based credit systems so that students can specialize in the subject of their choice.

Programme Outcomes:

Sensitivity: a. Ability to be socially and environmentally responsible b. Ability to work effectively in multi-disciplinary teams within the field of human habitat. b. Ability to engage in community outreach programs and assimilate knowledge in built environment-related disciplines that are relevant to ethical practice in architecture.

Knowledge: a.  Ability to use and extend appropriate knowledge for designing the built environment. b. Ability to think critically to assess the existing environment in the service of the discipline of architecture. c. Ability to apply urban design theories and their applications, building technology, social, cultural, and environmental factors. d. Ability to apply interdisciplinary knowledge and use tools that enable it.

Skilled practice: a. Ability to use necessary skills for the physical, social, and creative realms of crafting architecture and urbanism. b. Ability to recognize and act upon opportunities and aspirations. c. Ability to apply the creative problem-solving skills acquired through active and experiential learning by working with varied materials and mediums; d. Ability to demonstrate design concepts and solutions, and adopt effective communication of those ideas to peers, clients, decision-makers, and the public.  

Programme Specific Outcomes:

Cognitive: a. Ability to use appropriate technology for designing the urban built environment, to think critically and assess existing environments. b. Ability to assume professional roles in architecture and urban design by offering sound knowledge in design theories and applications, building technology, social, cultural and environmental factors, and the application of information technology and interdisciplinary knowledge.

Affective: a. Ability to be socially and environmentally sensitive and to work effectively in multi-disciplinary teams within the building industry b. Ability to uphold and demonstrate ethical responsibilities and professional obligations in architecture and urban design.

Psychomotor: a. Ability to demonstrate creative problem-solving skills while working with varied cultural contexts, materials, and mediums b. Ability to communicate effectively the design concepts and solutions necessary for the urban built environment

Assesment Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50. The courses are classified into two types – Studio Courses and Theory Courses.

a.        CREDIT STRUCTURE As referred in the detailed syllabus

b.        CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

1. The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments. The CIA shall have four components of CIA 1, CIA 2, CIA 3, and Attendance (Refer to Table 2)

2. CIA 1 and 3 for Theory courses shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.

3. CIA 2 for Theory courses shall be conducted in the form of Mid Semester Examination.

4.  A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course

The breakup of the CIA marks for theory, courses are given below.CIA 1- 10 marks; CIA 2 - 15 marks (conducted out of 50 marks and converted to out of 15 marks ); CIA 3 - 20 marks; Attendance -5 Marks

5 marks for attendance is distributed as follows

 

Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% - 100%

05

90% - 94%

04

85% - 89%

03

80% - 85%

02

76% - 79%

01

 c.        END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

1. End semester examinations shall be conducted for all courses.

2. Eligibility to appear for ESE

·       A student has passed in CIAs for that course with 50% minimum marks

·       A student has at least 85% of the attendance in aggregate at the end of the semester

·       The Vice-Chancellor is satisfied with the character and conduct of the student

3. The Theory courses shall have a written exam of three-hour duration. The Studio courses shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.

d.        PASS CRITERIA

1. A student shall pass each course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

2. The overall aggregate of 50% and pass in all courses is required to pass the semester.

3. Students passing the semester shall be awarded different class as per Table 3

e.        GRADING PATTERN

Grading system: Grades are awarded based on absolute grading. The University follows a 4-point grading system. However, the transcripts will also show grading on a 10-point scale.

1. All marks cards will indicate the marks, grade, and Grade Point Average.

2. The Grade Point Average is calculated as follows: For each subject, multiply the grade points with the Number of Credits; divide the sum of the product by the total number of credits.

3. The CGPA (Cumulative Grade Point Average) is calculated by adding the total number of earned points (GP x Cr) for all completed semesters and dividing by the total number of credits for completed semesters.

Percentage 

Grade 

Grade point

(10 point scale) 

Grade point

 (4 Point scale) 

Interpretation 

80-100 

O

10

4

Outstanding

70-79

A+

9

3.6

Excellent 

60-69

A

8

3.2

Very Good

55-59

B+

7

2.8

Good

50-54

B

6

2.4

Above Average

45-49

C

5

2

Average*

 

GRADING SCHEME FOR SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

f.       PROMOTION POLICY

1.   Candidates who have not passed in at least 50% of the courses of the previous semesters are not promoted to the following year of the program.

Examination And Assesments

The M Arch Programme offers theory and studio courses. The theory courses conduct periodical Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA) which include tests, assignments, and attendance to evaluate the students' progress. Each course would culminate with an End Semester Examination (ESE) conducted centrally by the University.

The Studio courses are continuously evaluated through reviews, assignments, and time problems, which accumulate as CIA marks. The ESE will be conducted through Viva-voce reviewed and marked by an external examiner.

MARC131 - CITIES IN HISTORY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course introduces the concepts of Urbanism through evolution of time and space. The course aims to show the evolution of physical form of cities and built form, through various social, political and economic determinants.

Course Objective:

To introduce the historical evolution of cities and their urban space to study what shaped them that led to their morphological advancements. To develop the ability to analyze through parameters and urban, ecological and socio-cultural determinants that help to interpret cities for future references as well.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Ability to define and describe urban design and its theories that contribute in shaping urban form.

CO 2: Ability to comprehend and analyze evolution of cities and its urban form based on urban, ecological and socio-cultural determinants for Indian and Western context.

CO 3: Ability to comprehend and critically appraise urban design and development through various theories.

CO 4: Ability to define and develop critical lens to interpret and appraise urban design and development till the contemporary times.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Urban Design and Urban Form
 

Introduction of urban design ideology and theory, various concerns in the field, components of urban design and its terminologies.
Introduction of urban forms, the various factors that may have shaped cities and urban spaces.

City as patterns, diagrams, spaces and ideas such as organic; grid; political functional- secularist-socialist diagrams; grand manner; skyline; city edge; urban division;

Public spaces and its various typologies including street, plazas, chowks and parks.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Evolution of Cities - Indian Cities and Cities of the World
 

Introduces the concepts of urbanism through the evolution of time and space in Indian cities and cities of the world. Evolution of physical form of cities and built form, through socio cultural determinants; as centres of power, politics, trade and economy, religion and culture.

Study of beginnings of cities derived from being centres of agriculture to dynamic cities of the world; Indian cases of Early towns, Temple towns, Colonial towns, New Towns. Cases of Early towns, Medieval towns, Renaissance and Pre-industrial and Post-Industrial cities.

Understanding cities through socio cultural determinants; as centres of power, politics, trade and economic centres, religion and culture.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Theories of Urban Form
 

Introduction to Theories of modern, postmodern perspectives and influences of Lewis Mumford, Kevin Lynch, Aldo Rossi, Christopher Alexander, Jane Jacobs, Gordon Cullen; Utopia; Archigram; New Urbanism. Social access - territoriality, exclusion and inclusion, Proxemics theory, Defensible spaces, Public and private spaces, Community spaces, Suburbs and periphery, Future of the city.

Various theoretical views associated with nature of city form - Normative and positive theories; Cosmic, Machine and Organic Models; Descriptive and functional theories; Alternative theoretical postulations.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Urban Movements - Post industrialization to Contemporary
 

Industrial revolution and its effect in cities of Europe and America, Garden city, Modern movement, City Beautiful movement, Capitalist cities.

The Rise and fall of cities; destruction & reconstruction of cities, Urban renewal, post-war reconstruction, the picturesque city, Haussmanization, Urban sprawl, Sustainable cities, transit oriented development.

Post-independence cities, New Town Movement in India and its influence on post-independent Indian city planning concepts, modern planned cities.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.    Kostof, S. (1991). The City Shaped: Urban Patterns and Meanings Through History. Bulfinch.
T2.    Kostof, S., & Castillo, G. (1999). The City Assembled: The elements of Urban Form through History. Thames and Hudson.
T3.    Bacon, E. N. (1976). Design of Cities. Penguin Books.
T4.    Morris, A. E. (1994). History of Urban Form: before the industrial revolutions. Longman Scientific & Technical.
T5.    Lynch Kevin, “Image of the City.” MIT Press.
T6.    Lang, Jon. (2005) “Urban Design: A Typology of Procedures and Products”. Oxford, United Kingdom: Architectural Press.
T7.    Alexander, C., Ishikawa, S., & Silverstein, M. (1977). “A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction”.. New York: Oxford University Press.
T8.    Mumford, L. (1989). “The City in History: Its Orgins, Its Transformation and Its Prospects”. San Diego: Harvest Book.
T9.    Mumford, L. (1964). “Highway and the City”. Toronto: United.
T10.    Cullen, G. (2010). “The Concise Townscape”. London; London: Routldge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.   H.D.F.Kitto. (1951). "The Polis" The City Reader. Routledge.
R2.   Kotkin, J. (2005). The City: A Global History. Modern Library.
R3.   Spreiregen, P. D. (1965). Urban Design: The Architecture of Towns and Cities. 
R4.   Lynch Kevin, “Good City Form.” MIT Press.
R5.   Broadbent, Geoffrey. “Emerging Concepts of Urban Design”.
R6.   Bally Meeda, N. P. (2007). Graphics for Urban Design. Thomas Telford.
R7.   Cliff Moughtin, R. C. (2003). Urban Design: Methods and techniques. Elsevier
R8.   Amoroso, N. (2010). The Exposed City: Mapping the Urban Invisibles. Taylor & Francis.
R9.   Hall Peter, “Cities of Tomorrow”; Blackwell Publications.
R10. Calvino, Italo. (1978).” Invisible Cities”. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
R11. Elkin Lauren, (2016) “Flaneuse, Women walk the city in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London”, London, Penguin Random House UK.
R12. Phadke Shilpa Khan Sameera Ranade Shilpa, (2011). “Why Loiter? Women and Risk on Mumbai Streets”. India: Penguin Random House.
R13. Barnett, Jonathan. (1974), “Urban Design as Public Policy”, McGraw-Hill Inc., US.
R14. Barnett, Jonathan. (1982), “Introduction to Urban Design”, Icon (Harpe); 1st edition.
R15. Jacob, Alan. (1980);” Making City Planning Work”, American Planning Association.
R16. Mostafavi Mohsen (2016). “Ecological Urbanism”. Switzerland: Lars Muller Publishers.
R17. Guha, R. (2006). How much should a person consume?: Environmentalism in India and the United States. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

MARC151 - DESIGN STUDIO I - READING CITIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:180
No of Lecture Hours/Week:12
Max Marks:600
Credits:10

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This design studio course aims at reading, comprehending cities and urban spaces and their determinants in the context of ecological and urban orders. It entails understanding morphology, relationships, and activities in urban spaces and landscape through documentation, mapping exercises, and then arriving at design at a tangible scale of an urban insert. It includes undertaking placemaking, design at an urban block, neighborhood-level or public space-interface design.

  1. Reading and representing the urbanscape, public space, open space.

  2. Contextual quality – suggested to take a historical context or a brownfield; old and/or small-town urbanism.

  3. The scale of inquiry – typology study; public-private interfaces; the role of environment, public realm, understanding of stakeholders, urban accessibility & mobility networks – in multiple media representations.

  4. Critical thinking - humanising cities, readings on culture and gender, analogies from literature, music, and the like. Dwell in questions such as who inhabits the city, what is the form of the city, what are the connections, what is the liveability of the city.

Course Objective:

The objective shall be to comprehend, organize and synthesize in visual, tactile, and measurable ways to create sustained improvements in the places and to undertake design that make up urban living environments.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to acquire narrative skills to define and identify urban fabric, character, phenomenon. Ability to comprehend issues and relationships between built environment and people.

CO2: Ability to critically appraise the given urban realm to arrive at a programmatic premise.

CO3: Ability to comprehend, critically appraise the interdisciplinary nature of urban development and design.

CO4: Ability to study, innovate and integrate typologies of public spaces and built environment.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:36
Studio-on-Wheels Documentation and Analysis
 

Introduction to the city and its urban realm. Comprehending the urban context, the processes, activities, relationships and interconnections to physical form with natural and socio-cultural determinants.

Studio-on-Wheels to a city and/or an urban space for documentation, mapping and analysis to understand the fabric of the city, nature of activities, issues, the overlaying complexities that make the city and/or urban space work.

Documentation using Transect Mapping techniques, to illustrate the issues, opportunities, challenges faced by urban spaces in terms of various dimensions such as morphological geographical, hydrological, environmental, experiential, gender, mobility, language, aspects of social theory and normative.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:36
Programmatic Premise
 

Analysis and critique to lead to identifying functions and activity patterns that contribute to form and space and learn to respond to the urban realm by arriving at a programmatic premise. Identification of urban design tools for urban design intervention.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Collaborative Studio and Workshop
 

Immersive studio in a workshop format which is interdisciplinary in the realm of the urban and built environment, ecology, including aspects from politics, economics, sociology and (suggested) involving participation from other academic and research organisations, government agencies, NGOs.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:84
Design and detailing of Urban Design/ Public Space Intervention and demonstration
 

Arriving at and creating proposals for improvements, creating scenarios and strategies informed by the analysis to demonstrate the urban design intervention through built forms that are responsive to the given landscape and context.

Text Books And Reference Books:
R1.  Bacon, E. N. (1976). Design of Cities. Penguin Books.
R2.  Bally Meeda, N. P. (2007). Graphics for Urban Design. Thomas Telford.
R3.  Cliff Moughtin, R. C. (2003). Urban Design: Methods and techniques. Elsevier
R4.  Amoroso, N. (2010). The Exposed City: Mapping the Urban Invisibles. Taylor & Francis.
R5.  ITDP and EPC (2011): “Better Streets Better Cities: A Guide to Street Design in Urban India”. Institute for Transport and Development Policy.

Books on principles of Design and theory to be studied and applied.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

As recommended by course faculty.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50. 

CUMULATIVE CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 300 Marks

 END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 300 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

MARC152 - WORKSHOP - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:200
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The Workshop course of Semester I focusses on developing the narrative and representational skills to comprehend and represent documentation and design development through various techniques, such as graphical, audio-visual, manual, digital and computational in multiple media.

Unit 1: Resources that are eclectically and thematically chosen by the course instructor that complement the corresponding Studio I.

Unit 2: Choice- based unit chosen by students to complement their skill development in necessary for Studio I.

Course Objective: To develop narrative and representational skills in multiple media to represent documentation, analysis tools and design development.

Course Outcome

UNIT 1:
1. Ability to represent overlay of multiple datasets and analysis in various techniques and methods of mapping in digital and non-digital media.
2. Ability to comprehend and describe graphical and cartographic maps.
3. Abillity to create layered graphical, photographic and audio-visual productions present documentation, analysis as an effective story telling approach.
4. Ability to comprehend basic transportation systems and terminologies and the relevance of urban transportation and its practice in India.
5. Ability to acquire knowledge and fundamental concepts in transportation planning, transportation and traffic surveys and analysis.

UNIT 2: (Choice based)
1. Ability to produce a short film on a relevant subject involving processes of concept, story line, pre and post production techniques.
2. Ability to produce a narrative on a relevant subject involving processes of concept, story line.
3. Ability to use method of drone surveying and analysis.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:50
1.1 Mapping Techniques and Representation
 

1.1 Mapping Techniques and Representation

This workshop unit aims at developing skills in mapping techniques, using transect mapping methods of location and distribution of resources, land uses, landscape, socio- economic condition, heritage, identifying constraints and opportunities. It includes outdoor and on field activities, observations, discussion and diagramming. It introduces various mapping techniques of urban and natural determinants through documentation, analyses and diagramming.

Transect Mapping: Develop various transects through the area of study, to illustrate the issues and challenges of urban spaces, by mapping morphological, geographical, hydrological, environmental, experiential, gender, mobility, language and normative.

Reading and Creating Representations: Understand macro and regional networks, cartographic maps (district, Survey of India, Village maps). Activity mapping of human settlements, public and urban spaces; at varied scales, maps representing temporal (spatial and time-related)

Visual Documentation and Analysis: Photomontages, audio-video, and film-making documentation methods to create storyboards and represent issues, challenges, and their analysis. Use of graphical and publishing software. Adobe Creative Cloud and other plugins for high-resolution graphical and visual presentations are suggested.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:50
1.2 Computational Skills & Analysis
 

1.2 Computational Skills & Analysis

This skill development unit shall include application based spatial and digital mapping by using data and analytics methods for urban design, planning and infrastructure representation. It enables students to learn and apply computational methods in data, analysis and design through complex computation and spatial means; integration of mathematical, geographic, environmental, spatial and information science for data and spatial visualization and analysis; skills in software ranging from Microsoft Excel to GIS mapping techniques and urban design tools for use in research and practice in urban design, planning, site selection and site analysis.

Data Mapping & Computation: Data types, formats & systems. Primary and secondary data, Questionnaire & Interview Format, Group Interview, Focus group discussion, Formulation process, Advantages, Limitations. Qualitative and quantitative methods of computation. Computation using Microsoft Office tools, such as MS Excel, MS Word and the like.

Spatial Data Analysis - Geographic Information Systems: a. Introduction of RS & GIS and its application in spatial planning map and map analysis, Raster/vector GIS models. b. General coordinate system, Map Projections and Transformation. c. Geo Referencing, spatial database development and analysis: Introduction to GIS software – QGIS, ArcGIS, ArcInfo, ArcView, IDRISI, GRASS, etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:50
1.3 Mobility and Networks
 

1.3 Mobility and Networks

This course aims at gaining knowledge on all modes of transportation systems. It aims to include theories, technological, policy and design aspects, and inclusive of role multi-modal and NMT principles in urban transportation. This course aims at studying the various modes of transportation systems and its linkages to land uses at varied scales in cities and settlements.

Understanding Traffic and Transportation: Characteristics of Transportation systems, factors and need of transportation, transportation modes, demand, design and operating means. Urban transportation in India, Components and issues of Urban transport system and introduction to Traffic Engineering.

Introduction to Transportation Planning, Surveys and analysis: Role, relevance and scope of transportation planning, its historical overview, and relation of transport network to urban development. Classification of roads, road networks and hierarchy, design of roads, road capacity, geometric design and preparation of road intersections, signalized intersections. Introduction to Transportation surveys, definition of study area, zoning, traffic volume, speed and delay, types of surveys (origin and destination). Interpretation of travel data and analysis, and traffic studies. Suggested to undertake workshop of transport survey and analysis; origin-destination survey for a small design project, such as junction design.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Unit 2 (Choice based)
 

These courses are choice based, elective module, which the students can choose/ select based on their interest and specialization for the suggested topics of inquiry.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
A. Film and Media Communication
 

A. Film and Media Communication

This workshop-based unit course shall include to sensitize students to film and media communication for inculcating narrative skills, for documentation and analysis purposes. This unit aims to skill students in technicalities of audio, videography and photography. Processes of scripting, editing, production, post-production will be included. The purpose is to appreciate technicalities in storytelling and filmmaking. Short film making: Sensitising to audio-visual aids and equipment. Scripting, shooting, pre-production and post-production techniques.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
B. Creative Communication;
 

B. Creative Communication

This workshop-based unit course shall include to sensitize students to descriptive communication for inculcating narrative skills, for documentation and analysis purposes. This unit aims to skill students in technicalities of literature, caricature or digital drawings. Processes of scripting, editing, production will be included.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
C. Drone Surveying and Mapping
 

C. Drone Surveying and Mapping

This workshop-based unit shall include application-based spatial and digital mapping by using drone surveys and techniques of analysis. This course enables students to learn and apply computational methods in data, analysis, and design through complex computation and spatial means; integration of mathematical, geographic, environmental, spatial, and information science for data and spatial visualization and analysis; through drone survey and mapping.

Drone Surveying and Mapping: Introduction to practical use of Drone in surveying and mapping by selecting an appropriate Intervention site (small area or town) or site from design studio. Use of Drone data processing tools for 2D and 3D imagery; Drone2Map for ArcGIS streamlines the creation of professional imagery products from drone-captured imagery by implementing professional photogrammetry suite. Helping to generate products quickly for visualization and analysis.

Text Books And Reference Books:
Unit 1:
R1.  Amoroso, N. (2010). The Exposed City: Mapping the Urban Invisibles. Taylor & Francis.
R2.  Cliff Moughtin, R. C. (2003). Urban Design: Methods and techniques. Elsevier.
R3.  G.S.Srivastava. (2014). An Introduction to Geo-Informatics. McGraw Hill Education.
R4.  Fazal, S. (2008). GIS Basics. New Delhi: New Age International
R5.  Michael Law, A. C. (2015). Getting to Know ArcGIS. Esri Press.
R6.  Christian Harder, T. O. (2013). Understanding GIS: An ArcGIS Project Workbook. Esri Press.
R7.  Markus Neteler, H. M. (2007). Open Source GIS: A GRASS GIS Approach. Springer.
R8.  B.G.Hutchinson.(1974).“PrinciplesofUrbanTransportSystemsPlanning”.Scripta Book Company.
R10.Papacostas and Prevendours, (2013); “Transportation Engineering and Planning”, PHI Publication.
R11. S. Ponnuswamy, Johnson Victor (2014), “Urban Transportation: Planning, Operation and Management”, Tata McGraw Hill- New Delhi.
R12. ITDP and EPC (2011): “Better Streets Better Cities: A Guide to Street Design in Urban India”. Institute for Transport and Development Policy.
R13. Hank Dittmar, Gloria Ohland. (2004). “The New Transit town: Best practices in Transit Oriented Development.” Island Press. Washington DC.
R14. Stephen Graham, S M (2001). “Splintering Urbanism, Networked Infrastructure, Technological Mobilities and the Urban Condition”. London. Routledge.
 
Unit 2: (Choice based)
A. Film and Media Communication B. Creative Communication
R1. McQuire, S. (2008). ‘The media city: Media, Architecture and Urban Space.’ London, UK: SAGE Publications.
R2. Burd, G., Drucker, S., & Gumpert, G. (Eds.). (2007). The Urban Communication Reader (Vol. 1). Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.
R3. Calvino, I. (1997). ‘Invisible Cities’(Trans. William Weaver). London, UK: Vintage Classics.
R4. Carey, J. (1989). ‘Communication as Culture’. New York, NY: Routledge.
R5. Gibson, T. A., & Lowes, M. (Eds.). (2007). ‘Urban Communication: Production, Text, Context’. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
R6. Gould, M. R. (2013). ‘Sonic city: Digital storytelling and the study of popular culture.'
R7. Lefebvre, H. (1991). ‘The Production of Space.’ Oxford, UK: Blackwell.
R8. Makagon, D., & Neumann, M. (2009). Recording culture: Audio documentary and the ethnographic experience. Los Angeles, CA: SAGE Publications.
R9. Park, R. E. (1915). ‘The city: Suggestions for the investigation of human behaviour in the city environment.’
R10. Ridell, S., & Zeller, F. (Eds.). (2013). ‘Mediated Urbanism. International Communication Gazette.

C. Drone Surveying and Mapping
Reference manuals / guides to skills and critique in film making and creative communication as rendered and referred by course instructor.
Reference manuals / guides to Geodatabase Design and GIS Analysis.
R1.  G.S.Srivastava. (2014). An Introduction to Geo-Informatics. McGraw Hill Education.
R2.  Fazal, S. (2008). GIS Basics. New Delhi: New Age International
R3.  Michael Law, A. C. (2015). Getting to Know ArcGIS. Esri Press.
R4.  Christian Harder, T. O. (2013). Understanding GIS: An ArcGIS Project Workbook. Esri Press.
R5.  Markus Neteler, H. M. (2007). Open Source GIS: A GRASS GIS Approach. Springer.
R6.  Sham, T. (2018). Exploring AutoCAD Map 3D 2018. BPB Publications.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

As recommended by course faculty.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 100 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 100 Marks

PASS CRITERIA: A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

MARC181S - SEMINAR - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Seminar courses of Semester I shall dwell into further critical thinking triggered in the studio course, to offer in-depth inquiry.

Unit 1: Courses that are eclectically and thematically chosen by the course instructor that complement Studio I.

Unit 2: Choice-based unit chosen by students to complement their skill development in necessary for the studio I.

Course Objective: To develop critical thinking and in-depth enquiry in the seminar course.

Course Outcome

UNIT 1:
1. Ability to identify and comprehend all types of heritage and the need for conservation.
2. Ability to comprehend, gain knowledge, critically appraise the practice, processes, approach and methods adopted in heritage conservation through national and international case studies at varied scales.
3. Ability to comprehend the legislative, institutional, governance and implementation framework of heritage conservation to understand their role and application in urban development.
4. Ability to ascertain and comprehend the need to study the influence and impact of culture and gender studies on urban design, planning and development.
5. Ability to devise approaches and new lens for more conceptual, humane and poetic understanding/visualization of cities and urban spaces.

Unit 2: (Choice based)
A. Social theory and Urbanism
1. Ability to understand the different urban social theoretician and their theories and its influence on the city.
2. Ability to understand the social theory through timeline and its changing position.

B. Social Ecology
1. Ability to acquire basic knowledge and understanding of the concept Ecology and the various perspectives.
2. Ability to discuss human-nature interactions, Ability to analyze local, personal and community conflicts, demands and aspirations regarding socio-ecological issues.
3. To familiarize with different environmental issues and levels of activism required for public policy.

C. Urban Conservation
1. Ability to comprehend, gain knowledge, critically appraise the practice, processes, approach and methods adopted in heritage conservation through national and international case studies at varied scales.
2. Ability to comprehend the legislative, institutional, governance and implementation framework of heritage conservation to understand their role and application in urban development.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
1.1 Heritage and Conservation; 1.2 Culture and Gender Studies; 1.3 Imagined Cities
 

1.1 Heritage and Conservation

To introduce heritage and conservation concepts, need, approaches, methods, principles, policies in the built and urban environment context. It shall introduce urban and architectural conservation, its need, concepts, approaches, methods, principles, policies in the built environment context. The course shall delve into historically developed cities, heritage zones, world heritage sites, their culture and development of cities or zones of various scale, culture and locations. It shall comprehend the contemporary framework, legislations of urban conservation through case examples.

Understanding Heritage and Conservation: Introduction to heritage and urban conservation and its terminologies; its concepts, need, debate and purpose. Difference between conservation, restoration and preservation. Distinction between Architectural, Urban Conservation and its principles. Importance of heritage – tangible and intangible heritage in the context of historic and inner city areas. Ethics of conservation.

Practise of Conservation: Stages in conservation process – documentation, listing of heritage sites and precincts, grading, proposals and guidelines. Practice and role of conservation in urban development by using various urban planning tools and regulations, understand the relevance of heritage tourism (and eco-tourism) through case studies. Approaches and methods of conservation, such as community participation, concepts of adaptive reuse, upgradation programs, revitalization, regeneration, redevelopment of inner city areas. New developmental activities in historic settings. Townscape analysis, Visual Integration heritage impact assessment.

Heritage Legislation, Institutional, Management: Conservation legislative acts, policies, heritage charters, development plans, Govt. schemes such as HRIDAY, Smart cities and their respective present institutional framework. Financing, implementation and governance mechanism in heritage conservation and heritage management.

1.2 Culture and Gender Studies

This study shall sensitise students to human interactions with the built environment, through critical readings on anthropology, cultural paradigms, gender and the like. It lends a contemporary intersectional and interdisciplinary perspectives on cultural phenomena and theories; provide understanding of epistemological, methodological, ideological frameworks pertaining to nation and culture, perspectives of gender, regional, caste identities. Role and permeability of culture and gender in urbanism; safe and friendly cities.

Culture and Gender Studies: Humanising cities, through anthropology, cultural paradigms, gender, child friendly cities and the like.

1.3 Imagined Cities

This study shall initiate a poetic understanding of cities and urban spaces. It shall enable the student to appreciate and critique a more nuanced and poetic understanding of cities of the past, present and the future. Examine how urban spaces have been conceptualised and they have been translated into reality; Examine historical particularities of individual situations. Examine the theoretical underpinnings of the terms “Utopia” and “City”, drawing parallels between the utopian dreams, practice and implementation. Endeavour to study not only what the city is, but also how it has been imagined and reimagined, even up to the current day. Explore specific experiments to use a utopian impulse to recondition disturbing urban environments.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Unit 2 (Choice based); A. Social theory and Urbanism; B. Social Ecology; C. Urban Conservation
 

This unit is a choice-based, elective unit, which the students can choose based on their interest and specialization from the suggested topics in the syllabus. The production may be in form of a term paper and/or publication.

A. Social theory and Urbanism

This Unit introduces students to conceptual and theoretical perspectives of urban social theory. It shall enable the student to understand the relationship between urbanism and social theory through concepts of Rob Krier, Christopher Alexander, Edmund Bacon, and the like.

Social theory and Urbanism: Fundamental hypothesis: the study of building typology in relation to the city, concepts of Aldo Rossi. The street, Square, façade & typologies of sections and elevations, the works of Rob Krier. City as a visual matter, philosophy of perception, comprehension of the environment through visual examination, Serial vision, place, content, etc based on the concepts of Gorden Cullen. Perception of movement and clarity/ legibility in the cityscapes, Concepts of Kevin Lynch. Pattern language of Christopher Alexander, City seen as a complex. Lattice and the underlying principles expressed in an abstract pattern. Edmund Bacon’s work on city design based on the movement system. “Learning from Las Vegas” tools.

B. Social Ecology

The unit is intended to introduce to the students the concept of ecology from a historical perspective and the integral relationship between man, community, and environment. It introduces students to the concept of ecology from a historical perspective and the integral relationship between man, community, and environment. To initiate discussions on the pertinent ecological issues, concerns, and environmental movements and reactions to them. To understand various discourses and pioneering works in Social Ecology.

Introduction to Ecology: Understanding nature, ecology, and environment, the historical development of ecology. The aspects of human decision-making and the environment – environment and society, carrying capacity. Perspectives on the environment: Marxist, Techno -centrist and Functional; Indian thought.

Development process and Environment: Understanding process in the context of the environment - technology and industrialization, commercialization of agriculture, urbanization and globalization, deforestation, and ecological imbalance.

Environmental Issues and Management: Environment Degradation and pollution of Natural Resources. Tragedy of the Commons - Encroachments over Common Property Resources. The Energy Crisis, Global Warming, and Interventions from civil society. State and Environmental Preservation Role of traditional systems in Environmental management.

C. Urban Conservation

To dwell further in-depth in urban conservation, its approaches, methods, principles, policies in the built and urban environment context. This unit shall dwell further in urban and architectural conservation, its approaches, methods, principles, policies in the built environment context. The course shall delve into historically developed cities, heritage zones, world heritage sites, their culture, and the development of cities or zones of various scales, cultures,s, and locations. It shall comprehend the contemporary framework, legislations of urban conservation through case examples.

Urban Conservation: Stages in conservation process – documentation, listing of heritage sites and precincts, grading, proposals, and guidelines. Practice and role of conservation in urban development by using various urban planning tools and regulations, understand the importance of heritage tourism (and eco-tourism) through case studies. Approaches and methods of conservation, such as community participation, concepts of adaptive reuse, up-gradation programs, revitalization, regeneration, redevelopment of inner-city areas. New developmental activities in historic settings. Townscape analysis, Visual Integration heritage impact assessment. Conservation legislative acts, policies, heritage charters, development plans, Govt. schemes such as HRIDAY, Smart cities, and their respective present institutional framework. Financing, implementation, and governance mechanism in heritage conservation and heritage management.

Text Books And Reference Books:

UNIT 1:
R1.  Feilden, B. M. (1982). “Conservation of Historic Buildings”. London: Architectural Press.
R2.  Glendinning, M. (2013). “The Conservation Movement: A History of Architectural Preservation”; Antiquity to Modernity. Oxon: Routledge.
R3.  Oxley, R. (2015). “Survey and Repair of Traditional Buildings: A Sustainable Approach”. New York: Routledge.
R4.  Tawab, A. A. (2013). “Introduction to Urban Conservation”. Deutschland, Germany: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.
R5.  Fitch James, “Historic Preservation- A Curatorial Approach”, University Press of Virginia.
R6.  Phadke Shilpa Khan Sameera Ranade Shilpa, (2011). “Why Loiter? Women and Risk on Mumbai Streets”. India: Penguin Random House.
R7.  Elkin Lauren, (2016) “Flaneuse, Women walk the city in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London”, London, Penguin Random House UK.
R8.  Calvino, Italo. (1978).” Invisible Cities”. New York:Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

UNIT 2:
A. Social theory and Urbanism
R1.  Borden, Iain, Tim Hall and Malcolm Miles (Eds.). 2003. “The City Cultures Reader” (Routledge).
R2.  Castells, Manuel. (1978.) ”City, Class and Power (Sociology, politics & cities)” (Palgrave Macmillan).
R3.  Davis, Mike. (1990.) “City of Quatrz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles” (Verso).
R4.  Harvey, David. (2001). “Spaces of Capital: Towards a Critical Geography” (Blackwell/Wiley).
R5.  Harvey, David. (2000). “Spaces of Hope” (University of California Press).
R6.  Jacobs, Jane.( 1961). “The Death and Life of Great American Cities” (Vintage).
R7.  Lin, Jan and Christopher Mele (eds.).(2012.) ”The Urban Sociology Reader” (Routledge).

B. Social Ecology
R1.  Arnold, D and Ramchandra Guha (eds.), (1999).”Essays on the Environmental Nature, Culture, Imperialism: History of South Asia”. Delhi: OUP.
R2.  Gadgil, M and Ramchandra Guha, (1994). “This fissured Land: An Ecological History of India.” Delhi: OUP.
R3.  Ibid. (1995). “Ecology and Equity: The Use and Abuse of Nature in Contemporary India.” Delhi: Penguin.
R4.  Guha, R. (ed). (1998). “Social Ecology: Readings in Sociology and Anthropology.” London: OUP.
R5.  Gilbert F. La Freniere. (2012). “The Decline of Nature: Environmental History and the Western Worldview.” Paper Back ed. Oregon: Oak Savanna .
R6.  Emilio F. Moran. (2006). “People and Nature: An Introduction to Human Ecological Relations.” Wiley-Blackwell.
R7.  Grove, Richard. (1996). “Green Imperialism: Colonial Expansion, Tropical Island Edens and the Origins of Environmentalism, 1600-1860.” Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

C. Urban Conservation
R1.  Tawab, A. A. (2013). “Introduction to Urban Conservation”. Deutschland, Germany: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.
R2.  Fitch James, “Historic Preservation- A Curatorial Approach”, University Press of Virginia.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference books, journal articles as suggested by course faculty.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

MARC231 - INFRASTRUCTURE AND MANAGEMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims at studying the linkages and processes of urban, infrastructural, environmental systems and management that impact urban design and planning in cities and settlements. Case studies of infrastructure projects, Infrastructure and Environment Impact Assessment. Discussion of practical cases & critical analysis.

The objective of the course is to introduce basic concepts related to infrastructure development in urban areas with an aim for developing expertise in effective management of infrastructure challenges. The focus is to comprehend aspects of infrastructure planning, effective delivery of infrastructure projects and their management.

 

 

Course Outcome

 

CO 1: Ability to comprehend and have an overview of urban infrastructure systems and their management mechanisms. Level: Basic

CO 2: Ability to gain knowledge in physical urban infrastructure and relate them to spatial aspects to urban development and management. Level: Intermediate

CO 3: Ability to gain knowledge in social urban infrastructure and relate them to spatial aspects to urban development and management; liveability and sustainability. Level: Intermediate

CO 4: Ability to apply analytical skills to critically assess infrastructure networks in terms of sustainability, liveability, and resilience. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Urban Infrastructure
 

Elements of Infrastructure - physical and social; their definitions, concepts, significance and importance; data required for provision and planning of urban networks and services. Resource analysis, provision of infrastructure, and land requirements, Principles of resource distribution in space; Types, hierarchical distribution of facilities, Access to facilities, provision and location criteria, norms and standards

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Physical Infrastructure: Water, Waste Water & Solid Waste Infrastructure & Management.
 

Water supply systems, quality and quantity requirements, sources; collection and conveyance of water, treatment methods, and treatment plant location, planning distribution systems and management, their zoning with respect to urban structure. Waste water disposal mechanism and systems, waste water treatment methods, planning and location of treatment plants; disposal of municipal and industrial effluents, effects of rivers and water bodies, legal and institutional aspects.

Solid waste collection and disposal, elements of solid wastes management; classification and properties of solid wastes, on site collection, storage, transportation and disposal of solid wastes, processing and treatment of solid wastes, various social and legal aspects of the solid waste management. Power and communication system, source, generation, distribution and transmission networks, safety norms. Power consumption, demand and supply gap, duties and incentives impact on cities growth and development. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Social Infrastructure
 

Green infrastructure, parks, playgrounds, health facilities, education facilities, urban commons, their planning, accessibility and infrastructure gap analysis.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Infrastructure Plan & Management
 

Infrastructure plan involves development of city level infrastructure plans, project prioritization of infrastructure and implementation framework. Infrastructure mapping at the city level, supply side and demand side diagnostics, identification of key city level infrastructure supply side and demand side issues and develop strategies to address existing gaps and as well as to address future city development needs and strategy and prepare a schematic Infrastructure plan.

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Clayton Kenneth C, (1973) ‘Solid waste management: The Regional approach’; Ballinger Pub. Co, Cambridge

R2. Chatterjee, A. (2016). ‘Water supply, Waste Disposal and Environmental Engineering’. New Delhi: Khanna Publication.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R3. Waldram Mincin L.T.(1952).’Street Lighting’. Edward Arnold Publishers;

R4. Elhers V.M. (1977). ‘Municipal and Rural Sanitation (Sanitary Science & Water Engineering S.)’ McGraw-Hill Inc.US.

R5. Wasp Edward.J. (1979). ‘Solid Liquid flow Slurry pipeline Transportation’. Gulf Publishing Company.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks (Follow the syllabus for respective course wise Marks)

End Semester Examination (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

Pass Criteria

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

 

MARC251 - DESIGN STUDIO II - CITIES, METROPOLIS AND REGION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:180
No of Lecture Hours/Week:12
Max Marks:600
Credits:10

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This design studio course studies and responds creatively to the impact on cities seen through a macro and regional lens by looking at ecological determinants such as regional water systems, along with corresponding infrastructural (physical & social) requirements. It shall include the administrative jurisdictional frameworks and their social and political influences on city building and sustenance.

  1. Deciphering, representing and measuring the city as an organism, city as a system/ machine.
  2. Understanding cities and its systems, from macro to micro perspectives - environmental, integrated transport, infrastructural, organisational, institutional, legislation, social, political aspects.
  3. Scale of enquiry – urban form study, typology study; role and impact of ecology – environment and society, public realm, understanding of stakeholders, integrated transport and networks – in multiple media representations;
  4. Critical thinking - higher order questions, how cities interphase with systems, processes and methods; cities and resilience, social ecology, cities and health, design and law.
  5. Suggested projects, Transit Oriented Development, Looking at water systems driven, Greenfield development projects.

Course Objective: The objective shall be to comprehend, document, analyze, critique the complexities of macro and regional systems and its relationship and impact on the city and metropolitan scale. To create and design possibilities and options to augment and cater at this city- metropolis-region interface.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Ability to comprehend the regional scale of urban systems and issues. Ability to comprehend the city-region, city or part of the city through analysis, synthesize the complexities of natural, socio cultural issues of urban environment.

CO 2: Ability to strategize and devise scenarios that guide urban development through a multi-scalar approach.

CO 3: Ability to formulate area development level plans along with demonstration at the urban scale.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:48
Studio-on-Wheels Documentation, Analysis and Critique
 

Introduction to comprehend the macro scale of the city-metropolis-region their growth parameters, regional, ecological, infrastructural, transport linkages, human settlements and their people; to relate and understand the impact on urban and local development.

Undertaking investigation in an emerging metropolitan or a non- metropolitan region (with growth prospects); context of green field or brown field; to study, document, analyse issues, challenges faced and critique it to arrive at possible opportunities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:48
Vision, Strategizing growth and creating scenarios
 

To comprehend possibilities of integrated, collaborative and resilient development, explore concepts of urban expansion, urban regeneration. Arrive at spatial strategies and scenario building for integrated, sustainable development using multi scalar approaches. Investigate means between top down and bottom up methods to approach urban design and development. Explore linkages of regional and/or metropolitan scale to urban and/or municipal scale to local and/or neighbourhood scale. Delve into demography and built densities, transport networks, ecological linkages or existing agricultural settings, jurisdictional and institutional linkages.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:84
Design Development and Demonstration of a Project
 

Project formulation for a design intervention and demonstration at urban scale, local area development with regional linkages or context. For e.g. Multi-modal integration hubs, transit oriented development, BRT design, station accessibility plans, area level development of environmentally sensitive urban precincts, financial and business hubs/parks.

Text Books And Reference Books:
R1.  Regional/Structure Plans and Master Plans of Bangalore, New Delhi, Mumbai and other Metropolitan Indian cities.
R2.  Barnett, Jonathan. (1974), “Urban Design as Public Policy”, McGraw-Hill Inc., US.
R3.  Jacob, Alan. (1980),”Making City Planning Work”, American Planning Association.
R4.  Barnett, Jonathan. (1982), “Introduction to Urban Design”, Icon (Harpe); 1st edition.
R5.  Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment. (2009) “Design Review, Principles and Practice”. (www.cabe.org.uk/files/design-review-principlesand- practice.pdf.)
R6.  Hall, Tony. (2008) “Turning a Town Around: A Proactive Approach to Urban Design”. Oxford, United Kingdom: Blackwell Publishing,
R7.  Steve Tiesdell, David Adams. (2011) “Urban Design in the Real Estate Development Process.” Wiley-Blackwell.
R8.  Lang,Jon.(2005)“UrbanDesign:ATypologyofProceduresandProducts”.Oxford,United Kingdom: Architectural Press.
R9.  Gerald E. Frug. (1999) “City Making: Building Communities without Building Walls.” Princeton University Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

As recommended by course faculty.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT CUMULATIVE (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 300 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 300 Marks

PASS CRITERIA: A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

MARC252 - WORKSHOP - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:200
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Workshop courses of Semester II focusses on developing the interpretative skills to comprehend and represent documentation and design development through various techniques, such as graphical, audio-visual, manual, digital and computational in multiple media.

Unit 1: Resources that are eclectically and thematically chosen by the course instructor that complement the corresponding Studio II.

Unit 2: Choice- based unit chosen by students to complement their skill development in necessary for studio II.

To develop interpretative skills in multiple media to represent documentation, analysis tools and design development. 

Course Outcome

1. Ability to represent overlay of multiple datasets and analysis in various techniques and methods of mapping in digital and non-digital media. Ability to create layered graphical, photographic and audio-visual productions to present documentation, analysis

2. Ability to comprehend aspects of research methodology, including theory of science and qualitative and quantitative methods.

3. Ability to comprehend and critique through research literature, data sourcing and citation, for developing a research proposal for the subsequent master’s thesis project.

4. Ability to gain competence in planning, conducting, evaluating and presenting a research project. Level: Intermediate

5. Ability to demonstrate research through term paper write-up and presentation. 

UNIT 2

6. Ability to represent data, analysis in Auto Cad 3d and ESRI City Engine.

7. Ability to comprehend the influence, impact and interconnections of transport planning and accessibility to urban development in cities and towns.

8. Ability to comprehend the prospects of transport networks and infrastructure at a regional and urban scale.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:50
Introduction
 

To develop interpretative skills in multiple media to represent documentation, analysis tools and design development.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:50
Site Planning
 

This study aims at developing analytical skills in Site Planning and land suitability and capability analyses to comprehend location and distribution of resources, land uses, landscape, socio-economic condition, heritage, identifying constraints and opportunities. It involves developing analysis tools and methods through site planning and land suitability and capability of regional, urban and natural determinants through documentation, analyses and diagramming.

Site Planning and Land Suitability: Develop various transects through the area of study to illustrate the issues and challenges of urban spaces – geographical, hydrological, environmental, experiential, gender, mobility, language and normative. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:50
Research Methodology
 

This study aims to expose students to different approaches to research and develop their skills in conducting research. It does so by introduction to research design, research methods tools and techniques, research questions, topic identification, formulating proposal, hypotheses formulation, research writing, analytical reading, evaluation, data sourcing and review. This course enables the student to approach technical research and writing in a professional manner.

Introduction to Research: Research as a science, Research problems, Types of research and research design. Developing Research Questions, Hypothesis & Types of hypotheses.

Introduction to Statistics & Quantitative techniques: Need and application of statistical approaches, scientific perspective, systematic enquiry Quantitative research design, methods, instruments, data analysis, writing and presentation.

Research Methodology: Identification of Research Problems, Objectives, Methodology and Research framework, conceptualising and conducting a research proposal, theoretical and empirical gap identification, sample selection, data interpretation through quantitative and qualitative techniques. Limitations of Research, Technical Writing, Report Writing, Importance of Research ethics and Plagiarism.

Research Quantitative & Qualitative tools: Preview of primary and secondary data, Questionnaire & Interview Format, Group Interview, Focus group discussions, Formulation process, Advantages, Limitations. Interviewer & Respondent, Process of Interviewing, Merits & Demerits. Identification and Selection of Term Paper Topic, Class Discussions on Student Topics, Term Paper Presentations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
A. Computational Skills & Analysis (Advanced)
 

This skill based unit shall include 3d Mapping that are application based spatial and digital mapping by using data and analytics methods for urban design, planning Ability to develop creative and dynamic 3D visualization experiences and to project relationships, feasibility, and implementation. It enables students to learn and apply 3d visualisations and computational methods in data, analysis and design through complex computation and spatial means; integration of mathematical, geographic, environmental, spatial and information science for data and spatial visualization and analysis; skills in AutoCad 3D and ESRI City Engine and urban design tools for use in research and practice in urban design, planning.

AutoCAD Map 3D: AutoCAD Map 3D software provides access to GIS and mapping data to support planning, design, and data management. Intelligent models and CAD tools help you to apply regional and discipline-specific standards. Integration of GIS data helps to improve quality, productivity, and asset management.

ESRI City Engine: City Engine is advanced 3D modelling software for creating huge, interactive and immersive urban environments in less time than traditional modelling techniques. The cities you create using City Engine can be based on real-world GIS data or showcase a fictional city of the past, present, or future. Building entire 3D cities, designing urban environments, Mastering 3D content creation and bringing in community vision to life. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
B Urban Development and Accessibility
 

This Unit aims at gaining knowledge on policy and design aspects of integration of land use and transportation in urban design, to dwell in the role multi-modal and NMT principles in urban transportation. It aims at studying the interdependency and integration of land use and traffic and transportation systems.

Urban Development and Accessibility: Interdependency and integration of land use and traffic and transportation systems. Multi – modal transportation systems, public transportation systems (Metro, mono rail, BRT, Suburban Rail) Problems and prospects. Transit Oriented Development, last mile connectivity and station accessibility and design. Design of road sections and intersections. Road safety – factors for road safety, pedestrian and vehicular traffic, signals, signage, street lighting, street furniture design, NMT Design (pedestrian path, cycle tracks, greenways etc.). Urban traffic problems – parking issues, accident reporting and recording systems, Intelligent transport systems, Air pollution standards, Traffic noise, factors affecting noise, noise abatement measures, standards.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
These courses are choice based, elective module, which the students can choose/ select based on their interest and specialization for the suggested topics of inquiry.
 

These courses are choice based, elective module, which the students can choose/ select based on their interest and specialization for the suggested topics of inquiry.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
C. Traffic and Transportation Planning
 

This unit aims at comprehending the importance of regional and urban transportation systems, traffic management. It aims to include theories, technological, policy aspects. It aims at studying the various modes of transportation systems and its linkages to land uses at varied scales in cities and settlements. Comprehending the relationship of traffic and transportation with environment and economy.

Importance of regional transport planning, road, rail, metro, air, water and other transport systems. Characteristics of National, State and District networks. Introduction to Highway and By-pass Design.

Traffic Management – Existing organizational and legal framework, traffic and environmental management techniques, and analytical review of existing measures.

Environment and Economy– EIA Assessment, Traffic Impact assessment. Economic Evaluation, techniques for estimating direct and indirect user costs and benefits and value of time. Pricing and financing of public transport services.

Technology for transportation – technological options, choice of technology, corridor analysis, integrated system plan concept, system selection.

Transport Modelling - Introduction to Four Step Modelling – trip generation, trip distribution, modal split, trip assignment. Interpretation of travel data and analysis

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Ranjit Kumar, Research Methodology- A step by step guide for Beginners. Sage Publications, New Delhi.

R2. Fred N. Kerlinger, Foundations of Behavioural Research, Holt, Rinehart and Winston Inc., New York. 

R3. Enquiry by Design: Tools for Environment-Behaviour Research. John Zeisel. PublisherCUP Archive, 1984. ISBN-0521319714, 978052131971.

R4. Robert Sommer & Barbara Sommer (2002) A Practical Guide to Behavioural Research: Tools and Techniques. New York: The Oxford University Press.

R5. Reinhold. John W. Creswell (2003) Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Method Approaches. 2nd Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

R6. Huff, D. (1954). How to Lie with Statistics. New York: W. W. Norton & Company. Reference books, journal articles as suggested by the course faculty.

R7. G.S.Srivastava. (2014). An Introduction to Geo-Informatics. McGraw Hill Education.

R8. Kadiyali L.R. “Traffic Engineering and Transportation Planning”, Khanna Publications.

R9. Shah Sonal, Goswami Sahana, Rangawala Lubaina, Robin King, Das Himadri, Suri Akhila (2014), “Safe Access Manual: Safe access to mass transit stations in Indian cities, Bangalore”; EMBARQ India.

R10. ITDP and EPC (2011): “Better Streets Better Cities: A Guide to Street Design in Urban India”. Institute for Transport and Development Policy.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R11. Hank Dittmar, Gloria Ohland. (2004). “The New Transit town: Best practices in Transit Oriented Development.” Island Press. Washington DC.

R12. Stephen Graham, S M (2001). “Splintering Urbanism, Networked Infrastructure, Technological Mobilities and the Urban Condition”. London. Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 100 Marks (Follow the syllabus for respective course wise Marks)

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 100 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

MARC281S - SEMINAR - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Seminar courses of Semester II shall delve into further critical thinking triggered in the studio course, to offer in depth inquiry.

Unit 1: Courses that are eclectically and thematically chosen by the course instructor that complement Studio II.

Unit 2: Choice- based unit chosen by students to complement their skill development in necessary for the studio II.

To develop critical thinking and in depth enquiry in the respective seminar course.

Course Outcome

1. Ability to comprehend the urban planning theories, principles, techniques and methodologies. Level: Intermediate

2. Ability to comprehend, analyze planning process and frameworks. Level: Intermediate

3. Ability to comprehend the issues that affect urban development and the inhabitants in the context of insurgencies and to examine possible solutions.

UNIT 2

4. Ability to comprehend and examine the issues and aspects that alter the state of wellbeing in the built environment and how to improve the same.

5. Ability to conduct research, critique and write effectively in chosen area of study.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
Indian Planning Processes I
 

This study aims to inform the students on the various processes and practices of city planning, development, regulatory processes implementation in Indian cities. It shall introduce the students on city planning, its processes, scope in urban development, land use zonal regulations, emerging planning strategies and concepts, enforcement and implementation in planning in Indian cities.

Planning Principles for Cities: Concepts and theories of planning and their applications as Master Plans, Development Plans, Structure Plans etc. Planning terms and their definitions, Concepts of Zonal Plans, Area Development Plans, Development Schemes, Urban Renewal, Redevelopment, City Development Plans, Planned Unit Development etc.

Concept of Planning and Planning tools: Concepts of land use, zoning regulations, mixed use development, Special Economic Zones, Planning surveys and sampling, evaluation of planning requirements, town planning schemes, Planning standards and models.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
Cities and Insurgencies
 

This topic critically dwell into the impact on cities and urban development when faced with insurgencies that are environmental, economic, cultural, social and political in nature. It shall examine cities and how they behave in the backdrop of insurgencies, under extreme environmental, economic, cultural, social and political unrest; the impact on state of society, infrastructure and wellbeing on the inhabitants.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
(Choice-based)
 

This unit is a choice based, elective unit, which the students can choose based on their interest and specialization from the suggested topics in syllabus. The production may be in form of term paper and/or publication.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Cities and Health
 

This unit shall comprehend and critically appraise the role of social infrastructure on cities and environment. It looks at linkages of liveability of cities through the lens of social infrastructure, public health, mismanaged physical infrastructure, adverse environmental effects on various beings in cities and settlements.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
History and Criticism
 

This unit’s objective is to analyse and critique approaches, theories, methods for critical thinking, conducting research and writing. It shall delve in critical understanding of urbanism, architecture in historical, contemporary contexts and theories, through aspects of research and practice.

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Arthur Gallion, “Urban Pattern”, John Wiley & Sons; 5th Edition, 2003.

R2. Siddhartha N. Mukherjee, “Cities -Urbanization and Urban System”, Kitab Mahal, 12th Edition, 2017.

R3. Peter Hall, “Urban and Regional Planning”, Routledge, 5th edition.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R4. K.P.Yadav, “Vol. 1-5- Encyclopaedia of Economic Planning and Development”, Ivy Publishing House.

Reference books, journal articles as suggested by course faculty.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks (Follow the syllabus for respective course wise Marks)

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

MARC331 - INDIAN PLANNING PROCESS AND METHODS - ADVANCED (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course shall introduce the students on city planning, its processes, emerging planning strategies and concepts, enforcement and implementation in planning in Indian cities.

Course Objective:

This course aims to inform the students on the various methods and practices of city planning, development, regulatory processes implementation in Indian cities.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to comprehend, analyze as planning approaches towards sustainable strategies. Level: Intermediate

CO2: Ability to comprehend, analyze and critique the planning models and processes in the context of Indian cities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Planning Policies and Strategies for Cities
 

National Urban Planning-Polices and strategies, Overview of Legal and statutory aspects of Planning, Town Planning Acts.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Planning Models and Theories
 

Models and theories will be taken as per the case of the selected Indian Cities.

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Arthur Gallion, (2003) “Urban Pattern”, John Wiley & Sons; 5th Edition.

R2. Mukherjee Siddhartha N., (2017). “Cities -Urbanization and Urban System”, Kitab Mahal, 12th Edition,

R3. Hall Peter, “Urban and Regional Planning”, Routledge, 5th edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R4. Yadav K.P. “Vol. 1-5- Encyclopaedia of Economic Planning and Development”, Ivy Publishing House.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50

Marks (Follow the syllabus for respective course wise Marks)

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a

minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

MARC351 - DESIGN STUDIO -III- ECOLOGICAL URBANISM (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:180
No of Lecture Hours/Week:12
Max Marks:600
Credits:10

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This studio course studies the inter-discipline of ecology and urbanism, the overlaying and intersecting patterns, processes and conflicts in a collaborative manner. It shall delve into ecological urbanism as an approach and means to urban design and development. 1. Representation of the region, urban and local through ecology and urbanism, systems of production 2. Understanding and mapping the contextual quality: understanding the idea of city as a product; part of larger systems, relationships between physical, environmental and societal. Engaging in participative approaches of design & planning. It maps cities in the backdrop of their processes, management systems that challenge their resilience, through natural disasters, climate change, urban flooding, growing urbanization, infrastructural challenges, solid waste management, energy consumption, urban regeneration. 3. The scale of enquiry adopts a multi scalar approach ranging from regional, to urban to local, public-private interfaces, understanding of stakeholders, in multiple media representations. 4. Critical thinking in the realms of political ecology, water resource and reason, urban jurisdictions, legislation and governance, implementation mechanisms, the role of urban economics. It will examine the role of resilient practices, initiating, enabling, facilitating, managing processes and agencies.

The objective shall be to document, analyze, and synthesize the overlaying and intersecting patterns, processes and conflicts of ecological and urban contexts in a collaborative manner to arrive at a design proposal. To understand and evolve policy level guidelines which ensure an imagined future physical scenario. 

Course Outcome

CO 1: Ability to comprehend the inter-disciplinary relationship between ecology and urbanism. Ability to analyze, synthesize the complexity of environmental, socio cultural, physical issues of urban environment.

CO 2: Ability to critically appraise case analyses in order to establish a premise for the studio project.

CO 3: Ability to comprehend, critically appraise the interdisciplinary nature of urban development and design.

CO 4: Ability to demonstrate an urban intervention to innovate and provide a solution in a particular context.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:48
Studio-on-Wheels - Documentation, Analysis and Critique
 

Introduction to concepts of ecological urbanism, the inter-discipline of ecology and urbanism; an alternative approach to solving today’s acute urban and environmental issues.

Documenting, studying and analysing the overlaying and intersecting patterns of the [a] ecological and the urban-built & physical orders on cities, metropolis and their rural counterparts [b] urban spaces and productive landscapes.

Understanding the policies, regulations, jurisdictions that shape these territories that are under economic, political, social and cultural influences.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Case Analysis and Establishing Premise
 

Undertaking case analysis for establishing premise from existing research works, from suggested realms such as, understanding land through lens and approaches of geographical, natural, legal, ethical, ownership and the like. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Collaborative Studio and Workshop
 

Immersive studio in a workshop format which is interdisciplinary in the realm of the urban and built environment, ecology, including aspects from politics, economics, sociology and (suggested) involving participation from other academic and research organisations, government agencies, NGOs. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:84
Design Proposals and Project Formulation
 

Arriving at design intentions and proposals with an understanding of the land and its dependency on physical, environmental and social structures for new spatial forms.

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Mostafavi Mohsen (2016). “Ecological Urbanism”. Switzerland: Lars Muller Publishers.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R2. Hagan, S. (2014). Ecological Urbanism: The Nature of the City. Location: Routledge. doi:https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315761480.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation-rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course.
  • Total CIA - 300 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 300 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.

MARC352 - WORKSHOP - III (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:200
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Workshop course of Semester III focuses on developing the interpretative, analytical skills to comprehend and represent documentation and design development through various techniques, such as graphical, audio-visual, manual, digital, and computational in multiple media. The workshop also intends to develop soft skills to communicate to non-technical and for public interphases.

Unit 1: Resources that are eclectically and thematically chosen by the course instructor that complement the corresponding Studio III.

Unit 2: Choice-based unit chosen by students to complement their skill development in necessary for studio III.

Course Objective: To develop interpretative, analytical, and soft skills in multiple media to represent documentation, analysis tools, and design development.

Course Outcome

Unit 1: 

1. Ability to comprehend the importance, relevance and scope of public participation and consultation processes.

2. Ability to comprehend and gain knowledge in various approaches, methods and processes in public participation and consultation.

3. Ability to apply and communicate effectively of technical matters to common people who may or may not have domain knowledge or technical expertise through verbal, visual, graphical and written mediums.

4. Ability to infer new indices to approach urban development and liveability.

5. Ability to develop approaches to enable gender sensitive city.

Unit 2:

A: Ability to infer new indices to approach urban development and liveability.

B: Ability to comprehend and critically appraise concepts of Paradigms of Urbanism.

C: Ability to comprehend concept of urban sustainability, using computational methods.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:50
1.1 Public Participation & Consultation
 

The study is intended to introduce the concept of people’s participation in urban design and development projects. It is as part of training students in soft skills, in engaging with stakeholders in government bodies, agencies, and public communities; involving in advocacy activities through employing suitable verbal, visual, graphical, written and mapping techniques.

Introduction to Public Participation:

Concept and importance of people’s participation in planning and developmental activities. The scope, types and relevance and the existing system/approaches to public participation and consultations.

Identification of stakeholders, issues and interactions, institutionalization of people participation. Individual/NGO/CBO efforts in peoples planning with examples, national and international.

Approaches, methods and Processes of Public Participation:

Participatory approaches, typology of participation, key principles of applying participatory methods and tools, participatory attitudes and behaviour, Teamwork skills in the context of participation, participation as a process, participatory monitoring and Evaluation, beneficiary assessment, social assessment, stakeholder analysis.

Community Participation:

Detailed cases of community participation in areas of provision of housing/shelter, electricity, water supply, sanitation, solid waste disposal, transport, social infrastructure – health, education and cultural facilities; economic upliftment, resource mobilisation; maintenance and management of community assets. Integrated with Design Studio to conduct public and/or stakeholder participation and consultations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:50
1.2 Alternative City Metrics
 

The aim of this study is to delve into alternative parameters of city building, reading of cities and their liveability. Also develops alternative methods, strategies and approaches of gauging/establishing a city or settlement in context of liveability, gender sensitivity and happiness index.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
B. Paradigms of Urbanism
 

This unit develops alternative methods, strategies and approaches of gauging/establishing a city or settlement in context of liveability. It aims to understand the three paradigms of urbanism that endeavours with different ‘Sensibilities, Methodologies, and Outcomes’.

● New Urbanism: Apprise about Utopian, idealist and reformist approaches to strategies; inspirational in style and structuralist in conception - explore case-examples; Explain how it aspires to a social ethic that builds new or repairs old communities in ways that equitably mix people of different income, ethnicity, race, and age, etc.

● Everyday Urbanism: Explore nonutopian or atopian, conversational, and nonstructuralist. Realize the non-utopian in how it celebrates and builds on everyday ordinary life and reality, with little pretence about the possibility of a perfectible, tidy or ideal built environment.

● Post Urbanism: Explore Koolhaas Urbanism; heterotopian, sensational, and poststructuralist approaches to design thinking. Explore with case-examples: Architectural languages that are abstract, with little reference to surroundings, physical or historical context.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
C. Sustainable Environmental Design
 

This unit is to comprehend urban design, architecture and design in the context of environment and sustainability. This unit delves into urban sustainability in a multi-scalar approach for climate regions, urban block and micro climate of building types using tools and computational methods and undertaking case analyses.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
A. Urban Projects and Products
 

These courses are choice-based, elective module, which the students can choose/ select based on their interest and specialization for the suggested topics of inquiry. 

This unit is to comprehend the various urban design and developments projects and products. It enables the student to gain knowledge in various types of urban projects and products of urban development and their practical aspects as in its industry. It includes comprehending the need for such projects and schemes, their bidding processes and proposals, feasibility for national and international projects such as Smart Cities; AMRUT, HRIDAY and the like.

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2001). Citizens as Partners Information, Consultation and Public Participation in Policy-Making. Paris: OECD Publishing. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264195561-en.

R2. Roger W. Caves, Fritz Wagner, (2018) Liveable Cities from a Global Perspective, Routledge.

R3. 3Peter Evans (2002), Liveable Cities Urban Struggles for Livelihood and Sustainability, University of California Press.

R4. Elkin Lauren, (2016) “Flaneuse, Women walk the city in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London”, London, Penguin Random House UK.

R5. Phadke Shilpa Khan Sameera Ranade Shilpa, (2011). “Why Loiter? Women and Risk on Mumbai Streets”. India: Penguin Random House.

Unit 2

A: R1. Lang, J. T. (2005).” Urban design: A typology of procedures and products.” Oxford: Elsevier/Architectural Press.

B: R1. Emily Talen, Congress for the New Urbanism (2013). ‘Charter of the New Urbanism’, McGraw-Hill Education.

R2. Peter Katz (2014). ‘The New Urbanism: Toward an Architecture of Community’, McGraw- Hill Education.

R3. John Chase, John Kaliski, Margaret Crawford (2008). ‘Everyday Urbanism’, Monacelli Press.

R4. Michel de Certeau (1984). ‘Practice of Everyday Life,’ University of California Press.

R5. Garth Myers (2020). ‘Rethinking Urbanism Lessons from Postcolonialism and the Global South’, Bristol University Press.

R6. Felipe Hernández, Ken Nicolson, Dewi Jayanti (2002). ‘Hybrid Places/hybrid Urbanism’, Center for Environmental Design Research, University of California at Berkeley.

C: Reference books, journal articles as suggested by course faculty.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference books, journal articles as suggested by course faculty.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment

(CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 100 Marks 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 100 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

MARC381I - SUMMER INTERNSHIP (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:0
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:200
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

All students shall undergo a mandatory summer internship of 8-week duration after the first year of the M. Arch Program. The students should undertake internship with design offices or NGO’s rendering urban design, planning projects that may have interdisciplinary teams, in government bodies and agencies, advocacy groups, NGOs and the like.

To serve as an introduction to the various dimensions of professional practice in fields of urbanism, urban design and planning, architecture and urban development sectors.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to comprehend skills and processes required for a professional to practice as an urban design and development professional.

CO2: Ability to prepare a practical training report and communicate the nature of professional training undergone.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
Internship
 

The eight-week duration should ensure the student, gains exposure in professional practice in the urban development sector, inclusive of any of the following aspects, large scale architecture, urban design, urban planning, regional planning, environmental planning, transport planning, heritage and urban conservation, policy formulation, advocacy, Governance interface, exposure in projects of Smart Cities, HRIDAY, legislation, financial and implementation aspects of projects.

Text Books And Reference Books:

NIL

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NIL

Evaluation Pattern
 

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 100%

  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 200 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

 A student shall pass the course only on a minimum ESE score of 45%.

MARC382S - SEMINAR - III (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Seminar courses of Semester III shall delve into further critical thinking triggered in the studio course, to offer in-depth inquiry.

Unit 1: Courses that are eclectically and thematically chosen by the course instructor that complement Studio III.

Unit 2: Choice- based unit chosen by students to complement their skill development in necessary for the studio III.

Course Objective: To develop critical thinking and in depth enquiry in the respective seminar course.

Course Outcome

Unit 1: 

1. Ability to comprehend the components, types and methods adopted in Research.

2. Ability to write a research proposal to demonstrate the knowledge on research writing.

3. Ability to theorize, articulate research questions for chosen a subject in a spatial context.

4. Ability to comprehend and critically appraise the politics of environment and its spatial impact.

5. Ability to comprehend the role, impact, effectiveness of urban bodies, organizations that guide economic and physical development.

6. Ability to comprehend and examine governance from legal, political, social and economic perspectives.

7. Ability to comprehend and gain knowledge the various means and approaches to urban schemes and their role in decision making for urban development.

8. Ability to comprehend and critique the legal framework that impacts urban development. Ability to comprehend the linkages between legislation and governance that determine and guide developmental activities.

Unit 2:

A: Ability to comprehend and critically appraise the role and impact of legislation on design and development in the urban and environmental contexts.

B: Ability to comprehend water as a resource and the reasons for its current state in the urban and environmental context.

C: CO 1: Ability to comprehend the evolution of housing policies in India. Ability to critically review the existing policy/framework that influences on housing including housing finance, market price, and valuation.

CO 2: Ability to comprehend the concepts of housing and its access by different socio economic groups. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
1.1 Pre-Thesis
 

This study taken by third semester students undertake various reading and writing exercises in the process of identifying and refining their thesis topics. It aims to be a precursor to each student’s Thesis Project Formation for the final semester, where it entails to investigate and set a context, and explore research methodologies and design attitudes.

Introduction and Identification of topic of Research: Introduction to Pre-thesis, by studying various approaches and modes of research. Identification of a relevant topic of research in chosen area of interest. Students must undertake in depth reading and writing to identify and refine their research topics. This can be done through identification of research issues, problems, and knowledge gap to arrive at specific research questions which help frame the research topic.

Designing Research Methodology:

On the basis of research questions and type of research, identification and adoption of appropriate research methodology, research methods, data sources. Research proposal writing and its components; research writing and its components; use of language, use of software, plagiarism and writing the research document.

Proposal Definition: Definition of the Thesis proposal that shall be undertaken in the subsequent semester. A plan of action for a working title of the Thesis, literature review, objectives and study methodology.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
1.2 Political Ecology
 

The objective of this study is to sensitize the student to the political influences and impact on the environment, urbanity, society. It examines the impact on environment and settlements through the lens of underplaying socio-cultural factors of society, economy and politics its spatial impact in cities and the environment (local or regional).

EIA and corresponding notifications, its assessment on the effects on Environment. Social Impact Assessment and its assessment influence on the society. Activism, stakeholders and their participation in decision making.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
1.3 Urban Legislation & Governance
 

This study provides an introduction to the mechanism of urban legislation and governance in urban development. It informs the legislation and governance framework that influence and impact urban planning and design along with its outreach in governance of cities studied through comparative case studies.

Introduction of Urban bodies and Governance: An overview of people, land and environment, urban and metropolitan planning authorities, role of municipal bodies. Types, organizational structure and functions, their interface and conflicts, reach, and their effectiveness; methods, process and evaluation; present organizations and involved in urban governance.

Institutional aspects of Urban Governance: Municipal functions and territory, public and private accountability, official orders and notifications. Collection of revenue and allocation of budget. Differences between institutions and organizations; approaches to understanding organizations, aspects of EGovernance.

Urban Mission, Schemes and Cities Empowerment: Role of Urban Mission and Urban Schemes; Housing, Sanitation, Power, Drinking Water. Resource Allocation and Governance.

Impact of Urban Issues on Governance and Legislation: Institutional frame and mechanism for urban governance as envisaged in the 73rd and 74th Constitution Amendment Acts. Challenging Urban Issues, Managing Centrally sponsored Urban Missions, Project Planning and Execution, Central and State Govt. Subjects and Legality.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
A. Design and Law
 

The objective of this unit is to comprehend the role of legislations and their impact on environment, urban design and development conducted through case analyses. This unit examines the role of legal systems, legislations, policies that impact urban development and design of cities; their impact on spatial, environmental, societal and governance aspects by taking case studies and analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
B. Water Resource & Reason
 

The objective of this unit is to comprehend the various dimensions of the water resources and management, conservations, concerns and issues of sustainability. This unit shall exclusively look at Water and its systems, processes, renewability, issues of groundwater and surface water depletion, pollution and linkages to social justice.

Introduction to Water Resources Management: Introduction: Water availability and uses: regional and global scenario; Challenges in water management. Relationship between land and water connections in human habitats and environments; surface runoff, infiltration factors. Land Use and Water Resources.

Water Conservation - techniques and practices: Traditional water harvesting techniques - Global, Regional and Zonal scenarios Community water conservation practices in ancient India, community water conservation practices. Contemporary urbanization and water needs. Recent urbanization trends; Water resource supply & demand. Participatory water management in contemporary India: Challenges and potentials. Combining policy-driven and needs-driven initiatives towards water sustainability.

Water, Society and Sustainability: Understanding and discerning the concept of sustainable water consumption and management with economic, social and ecological perspectives; stakeholder’s participation. Sustainability and water resources planning: Social, economic and ecological perspective. Integrated water resources management: visions, goals and strategies for sustainable future.

Surface Water Management: Watershed Planning: Overview, problem definition, project scope and stakeholder involvement. Watershed inventory and identification of water impairments

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
C. Urban Housing
 

The unit is an introduction to the policies, market, finance and delivery of housing to various segments of urban population. This unit also includes the connected elements of housing; land and rent. This unit shall include the evolution of housing policies, housing need, supply and their estimation, understanding of housing markets, price and valuation.

Evolution of Housing policies, housing demand- supply and markets: Evolution of housing policies in India, introduction to housing need; demand and supply process; estimation of housing need and demand; review of housing policies in various planning periods in India; Basic concepts in understanding housing markets; market price and valuation; policies which affect the housing market (land & rent); review of existing housing finance market and institutions of housing finance.

Housing Layouts and Density: Concepts of housing layouts; issues of density, open spaces, community spaces, services and accessible open areas. House types and their implication on layout. Technology and project delivery of housing; private and public role in housing market. Low income, marginal income and affordable housing schemes and institutions involved in the production. Design guidelines for housing with special focus on marginal housing schemes for varied socio economic groups.

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Government of India, “UDPFI Guidelines”, 2014.

R2. The Karnataka Government Town and Country Planning Act, 1961.

R3. C S Yadav, “Urban Planning and Policies -Volume 16-A -Part A: Reorientation of Policy Norms”, Concept Publishing Company.

R4. Sujit Kumar Singh, Vikrant Wankhede (2017), Social Impact Assessment (SIA) and Social Impact Management Plan (SIMP), Centre for Science and Environment.

Unit 2:

B: R1. Richter, B. (2006). “Protecting In-stream flows, How much water does a River Need? The Nature Conservancy's Freshwater Initiative.” Watershed Academy. Retrieved from http://www.epa.gov.watertrain/river/

R2. United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2008). “Handbook for developing Watershed Plans to Restore and Protect our Waters.” Washington DC: EPA.

R3. Vladimir Novotny, J. A. (2010). “Water Centric Sustainable Communities: Planning, Retrofitting, and Building the Next Urban Environment.” John Wiley & Sons.

C: R1. Datta Kavita and Jones G.A., “Housing Finance in Developing Countries.” Routledge, London.

R2. Pugh Cedric, “Housing and Urbanization”, Sage Publications, New Delhi.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference books, journal articles as suggested by course faculty.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of the course
  • Total CIA - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%

MARC451 - THESIS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:240
No of Lecture Hours/Week:16
Max Marks:999
Credits:16

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course entails guided research where students shall have their individual design thesis where they shall investigate, conceptualise and demonstrate research and design methodology for their own context and design.

A ‘Special Topic’ is suggested to be taken up, in an area of interest that complements the ongoing Thesis.

The thesis will be guided by a primary guide from the SOA and an optional co-guide from any other institution, organization from the academia or the practice.

Course Objective:

To demonstrate the ability to comprehend the nature of urbanism problem and create a brief which sets the framework for design. To demonstrate an advanced level of design ability to convert the brief set forth into a speculative proposition of design.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Ability to comprehend and define an urbanism related issue to delve into project or research formulation to arrive at possible tangible solutions.

CO 2: Ability to correlate urbanism and its ecological generators and its spatial dimensions.

CO 3: Ability to demonstrate the research methodology that involves defining urban design tools and proposed design aspects.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
Project or Research - Problem and Brief?
 

In depth analysis of the design project to comprehend the nature of urbanism guided by the research questions. Site visit, documentation and dependency mapping of the context or issue under exploration.

Creating a design brief for a framework of design.

The project should demonstrate competence in integrating various issues of social, formal, and environmental and urbanistic concerns into design.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:60
Case Reviews and Conceptual Design
 

Conducting case reviews, critique of literature, and live case analysis of examples related to the project.

Conceptual design guided by sound research methodology, larger strategies, program formulation for an informed thesis project.

The ‘Special Topic’ is suggested to be taken up, in an area of interest that complements the ongoing Thesis.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:120
Detailed Demonstration and Written proposal
 

Detailed demonstration of the design; policy or design guidelines, research design and the design demonstration shall be as per the accepted norms of scientific research methods.

Developing a detailed written report of the thesis project.

Text Books And Reference Books:

As suggested by guides, books on principles and theory of urban design, urban and environmental planning, and ecological urbanism to be studied and applied; references books on qualitative methods of enquiry, inductive research methods, ethnography and crafting a thesis.

Suggested References in Research Methodology

R1. Ranjit Kumar, Research Methodology- A step by step guide for Beginners. Sage Publications, New Delhi.

R2. Fred N. Kerlinger, Foundations of Behavioural Research, Holt, Rinehart and Winston Inc., New York.

R3. Enquiry by Design: Tools for Environment-Behaviour Research. John Zeisel. Publisher- CUP Archive, 1984. ISBN-0521319714, 978052131971.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

As suggested by guide.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks has a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1, 2, and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks. Attendance and participation in the studio would be considered in the evaluation-rubrics.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course
  • Total - 500 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in the CIA.
  • The course shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.
  • Total ESE - 500 Marks

MARC481S - SEMINAR - IV (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Objective:

The objective of this unit is to comprehend urban finance with respect to urban projects and municipal finance.

Course Description:

This unit examines the various means, methods and tools of financial and economic models that dictate and contribute in city development and implementation of proposals.

Course Outcome

Unit 1: Ability to acquire knowledge and comprehend the public finance mechanisms that guide and impact urban development projects.

Unit 2: CO 1: Ability to gain knowledge in fundamentals of urban land economics.

CO 2: Ability to comprehend economic implications of various issues in the economic growth and development of cities.

CO 3: Ability to acquire knowledge and comprehend the public finance mechanisms that guide and impact urban development projects.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Urban Project Finance
 

This unit examines the various means, methods and tools of financial and economic models that dictate and contribute to city development and implementation of proposals.

Course Objective: The objective of this unit is to comprehend urban finance with respect to urban projects and municipal finance.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Urban Economics
 

This unit shall include microeconomics and its approaches, application, linkages to urbanism, land use and development, and other infrastructural components that shape cities.\

Course Objective: The objective of this unit is to study cities with respect to their economic patterns; to introduce a theoretical framework for understanding the spatial structure of cities and the nature of urban economy; to explain the existence, growth and impact of cities; to comprehend the role of public and private policies that impact the urban form, structure and economy.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Urban Economics and Governance
 

The role of local government, state and central government urban bodies; Sources of finance and economic viability; role of private and public sectors in urban economics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Introduction to Urban Economics and Cities
 

Cities Land use and economy, Cities Cluster, Agglomeration Economics and size of Cities, Land Use Patterns and Urban Sprawl, Land economics for spatial urban planning.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Urban Economic Growth
 

Economic growth and pace of urbanization and its rapid development; Concepts of urban innovation, competitiveness and economy, human capital, demand and supply. Land Utilization, capital and market; pressures on urban infrastructure.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Urban Economics and Impact on Cities
 

Urban crime, poverty and inequality and disparity, urban housing and environmental issues; in & out migration.

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Harvey Jack, (2003), “Urban Land Economics”, Palgrave Macmillan, 6th Edition.

R2. Kundu Amitabh, (1997), “Urban land markets land price changes”, Ashgate.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference books, journal articles as suggested by course faculty.

Evaluation Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks of CIA marks and ESE marks have a ratio of 50:50.

CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

  • CIA 1 and 3 for this course shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for the award of marks.
  • CIA 2 for the course shall be conducted in the form of the Mid Semester Examination.
  • A minimum of 50% in the CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination

(ESE) of the course

  • CIA -1- 10 Marks; CIA -2 - 15 Marks; CIA -3 - 20 Marks; Attendance- 05 Marks; Total - 50 Marks

END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

  • Eligibility to appear for ESE is a score of a minimum of 50% in CIA.
  • The course shall have a written exam of three-hour duration.
  • Total ESE- 50 Marks

PASS CRITERIA

A student shall pass the course only on a minimum aggregate score (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and an ESE score of 40%.