Department of
SOCIOLOGY-AND-SOCIAL-WORK






Syllabus for
Master of Arts (Applied Sociology)
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MSA131 CLASSICAL SOCIAL THEORIES 4 4 100
MSA132 GENDER STUDIES 4 4 100
MSA133 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS 4 4 100
MSA134 APPROACHES TO THE STUDY OF INDIAN SOCIETY 4 4 100
MSA135 SOCIAL DEMOGRAPHY 4 4 100
2 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAIS291 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION 4 4 100
MCN291 ECOLOGICAL DISCOURSES 4 4 100
MSA231 ADVANCED SOCIAL THEORIES 4 4 100
MSA232 SOCIAL STATISTICS 4 4 100
MSA233 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS 4 4 100
MSA234 CORPORATE SOCIOLOGY 4 4 100
MSA291 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY 4 4 100
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MSA331 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
MSA332 SOCIOLOGY OF CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT 4 4 100
MSA333 SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH 4 4 100
MSA334 CULTURE AND POLITICS 4 4 100
MSA335 PUBLIC RELATIONS 4 4 100
MSA381 INTERNSHIP 0 4 100
MSA382 DISSERTATION I 0 2 50
4 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MSA431 SOCIAL WELFARE ADMINISTRATION AND NGO 4 4 100
MSA432 SOCIOLOGY OF MEDIA 4 4 100
MSA433 SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY 4 4 100
MSA441A SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND SOCIAL CHANGE 4 4 100
MSA441B SOCIOLOGY OF DIASPORA 4 4 100
MSA441C HUMAN RIGHTS AND SOCIOLOGY OF LAW 4 4 100
        

  

Assesment Pattern

QUESTION PAPER PATTERN FOR MID SEMESTER EXAMINATION (MSE) 

MSE is carried out as a two-hour paper, carrying 25 marks. 

 Section I Essay Questions                                                                                     10 x 1=1Section 

One compulsory question for 10 Marks

II Essay Questions                                                                                       20 x 2=40

This section will have a total of three questions out of which Two to be answered. Each question carries twenty marks and hence a total of 40 Marks. 

 

QUESTION PAPER PATTERN FOR END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE)

 

ESE is conducted as a three hour paper which carries 50 per cent weightage. Examination is conducted out of 100 marks and later reduced to 50 marks

5 Essays                                                                                                                      20 x 5 = 100

There will be a total of 8 questions of which any 5 have to be answered. Each question carries 20 marks.

  

Examination And Assesments

The course teacher would decide the internal assessment matrix to be adopted for a given subject and would incorporate them in the course plan for validation which will be circulated among the students in the beginning of each semester. 

 

 

Overview of Assessment patterns for internship 

1.                     Reflective weekly Journal                           040 marks

2.                     Report on Internship                                   030 marks

3.                     Presentation                                                010 marks

4.                     Viva                                                            020 marks       

                 Total                                                          100 marks

 

OVERVIEW OF ASSESSMENT PATTERN FOR DISSERTATION:

 

III SEMESTER

1.                  Proposal                                            20 marks

2.                  Proposal Presentation                       10 marks

3.                  Colloquium I                                           20 marks

                     Total                                                      50 marks

 

IV SEMESTER

1.                  Colloquium II                                          10 marks

2.                  Dissertation                                            30 marks

3.                  Viva                                                        10 marks         

 

                    Total                                                       50 marks   

Department Overview:
The Department of Sociology is one of the first departments to be established in Christ College. Post graduate studies at Christ College began in 1991 with the initiation of the MA programme in Sociology. Today the Department of Sociology also offers M.Phil and Ph.D programs. The goal of the Department of Sociology is to equip students with a critical, analytical ability by providing them theoretical and empirical exposure to various social realities. The Department offers an up-to-date curriculum which takes into account recent advancements in theory, methodology and contemporary social phenomena. The curriculum is supported with an innovative pedagogy which emphasises on interactive forms of teaching-learning process. The Department encourages research and focuses on providing its students with an atmosphere for rigorous academic and intellectual development.
Mission Statement:
Vision & Mission: Vision : To produce Socially Sensitive Sociologists Mission: - Enable serious engagement with the discipline - Nurture research skills - Incorporate Social Responsibility - Understand social realities - Engage effectively with the industry
Introduction to Program:
The Masters Programme in Applied Sociology is conceived as a course providing a sound theoretical base for the understanding of contemporary social phenomena in conjunction with the skills necessary to apply this knowledge in various fields such as in the Government sector, Human Resources, NGO sector, Research and Project Management. The course provides equal importance to classical and contemporary theories on one hand and a number of special fields of empirical Sociological studies on the other. This program balances course s which offer a strong grounding in theory and methods with others which impart skills.
Program Objective:
Program objectives: - Provide a sound foundation in Sociology, its theoretical frameworks and perspectives - Learn the Methods of Social Research - Encourage lateral and analytical thinking - Horne soft skills such as presentation skills and interpersonal skills - Promote management and administrative abilities By the end of the programme students should be able to: PO1. Disciplinary Knowledge: ? Exhibit competence in the discipline ? Analyze seminal pieces of work in the area ? Apply disciplinary principles to conduct academic inquiry ? Evaluate aspects of social reality using the principles of the discipline PO2.Critical Thinking: ? Recognize and examine the social structures underlying our society and how they shape our existence ? Reflect upon lived experiences with reflexivity ? Analyze and engage with their social surroundings, problematize and raise questions based on academic inquiry PO3. Research Skills ? Exhibit problem solving skills, reflective thinking ? Apply analytical and scientific thinking ? Demonstrate technical skills in terms of handling data, working with various research related software ? Conceptualize, design, and execute research project/s PO4. Communication and social Interaction: ? Communicate effectively across media in varied contexts ? Collaborate as members or leaders in teams in multidisciplinary settings ? Work in multicultural spaces PO5. Effective Citizenship: ? Act with an informed awareness of issues ? E

MSA131 - CLASSICAL SOCIAL THEORIES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description:This course aims at making students capable of appreciating theory from a historical perspective and trace continuities in the accumulation of knowledge. It helps them to understand theory as systematically organized, law-like propositions about society that can be supported by evidence. This course covers an important phase in the development of sociological theories when the three fundamental traditions i.e. Structural Functionalism, Conflict Theory and Interactionist Theory took shape. It also introduces the students to the major proponents of these traditions.

 

Course Objectives :

  • To orient the students to the broad spectrum of the theoretical discourses in Sociology.

  • To provide foundational understanding of the sociological paradigms

  • To help students comprehend the contemporary world through the lense of theories

 

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course:

Students will be able to understand social phenomena from different perspectives.

will be able to look at the contemporary happenings through a sociological eye.

will acquire with the skills and knowledge to understand social phenomena systematically without individual bias.

will be able to appreciate the scientific understanding of society over the commonsensical understanding of it.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Nature of Sociological Perspectives
 

1.      Sociological perspectives: Introduction

2.      Concepts, theories and paradigms

3.      Theory and Social Reality

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Structural Functionalism
 

1.      Structural Functionalism: Emergence

a.       Comte, Spencer, Durkheim

2.      The Analytical Functionalism of Talcott Parsons

3.      The structure of Social Action

4.      The Empirical Functionalism of R. K Merton

a.       Merton’s Paradigm for Functional analysis

5.      Applications of functional analysis

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Conflict Theory
 

1.      Conflict as a perspective: the contribution of Karl Marx

2.      The Dialectical conflict theory of Dahrendorf

3.      The conflict Functionalism of Lewis Coser

4.      Conflict Sociology – Randal Collins

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Symbolic Interactionism
 

1.      Introduction

2.      Weber, Social Action, Ideal Type

3.      Cooley- Looking Glass Self

4.      Mead – Development of Self

5.      Blumer – Sociological Analysis of the Variable

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Social Exchange Perspective
 

1.      Structural Exchange theory of Peter M. Blau

2.      Exchange Network Theory of Richard Emerson

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Abraham M, F.(2008).Modern Sociological Theory. NewYork: Oxford University Press.

2.      Birks, M. (2011). Grounded Theory: A Practical Guide. Los Angeles: Sage.

3.      Collins, R. (1997). Theoretical Sociology. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.

4.      Joas, H. (2009). Social Theory: Twenty Introductory Lectures. New York: CUP

5.      Jonathan, H T. (1987). Structure of Sociological Theory. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.

6.      Parsons, T. (1964). Social Structure and Personality. Free Press.

7.      Ritzer, G. (1988). Contemporary Sociological Theory. New Jersey: MGH.

8.      Smelser, N. J. (1959). Social Change in the Industrial Revolution. London: Routledge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Allan, K. (2011). A Social Lens an Invitation to Social and Sociological Theory. Los Angeles: Sage.

2.      Baldwin, J.D (1986). George Herbert Mead: A Unifying Theory for Sociology. New Delhi:Sage.

3.      Becker, H. (1971). Sociological Work: Method and Substance. Allen Lane.

4.      Furedi, F. (2013). Authority: A Sociological History. New York: CUP

5.      Jones, P. (2005). Introducing Social Theory.  Cambridge: Polity Press.

6.      Visvanathan, S. (2009). Structure and Transformation: Theory and Society in India. New Delhi: OUP.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

  • Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) constitutes a total of 50 percent. The distribution is as follows:
    • CIA I is a 20 marks assignment that contributes to 10% of the final grade
    • CIA II is the 2 hour long 50 mark Mid semester Examination conducted during August/January for 25 % of the final grade 

The pattern for the exam is as follows:

Section A: This section has 1 compulsory question that carries 10 marks

Section B: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 20 marks 

    • CIA III also carries 20 marks and is based on an assignment that is set for the course. This contributes to 10% of the final grade
    • Attendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 
  • End Semester Examination (ESE) is conducted at the end of the semester. This is a 3 hour long 100 mark exam that contributes 50% of the final grade. The pattern for the exam is given below:

Section A: Attempt any 5 questions out of the 8 options given. Each question carries 20 marks

MSA132 - GENDER STUDIES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is a programme focused on understanding the impact of gender on the world around us and on power hierarchies that structure it. It is important therefore to build awareness about these issues into the academic curriculum. This will enable students to critically engage with their lived reality and also empower them with the necessary tools for building a more gender just and egalitarian society.

The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with gender and its related key issues.

Course Objectives:

 

  • to familiarize students with the dynamics of gender and its related key issues

  • to orient students towards major theoretical perspectives connected with gender

  • to  help them understand the politics of gender in the real world

  • to critically analyse the deeper implications of gender inequality in society

 

Learning Outcome

Students will become familiar with the social constructionist perspective on sex and gender and they will also become familiar with how a society’s gender constructions affect people’s lives through processes like socialization, social control and stratification

At the end of the course:

 

  • Students will be able to demonstrate a capacity to seriously delve in gender related topics

  • they will be able to incorporate gender as a major area of concern in their research topics, project areas etc.

  • will be able to develop a gender sensitive approach towards various facets of life

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Concepts for studying men and women
 

  1. Defining Gender
  2. Feminist Methodology
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Feminist Theories
 

1.      Liberal Feminism and Marxist Feminism

  1. Radical Feminism and Socialist Feminism
  2. Postcolonial/Multicultural Feminism
  3. Existentialist Feminism 
  4. Third Wave Feminism
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Gender Stereotypes
 

  1. Social Constructions of Gender : Natural and Social Inequalities
  2. Femininity and Masculinity
  3. Gender and Social Institutions
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Gender and the Work Sphere (Field Exposure)
 

  1. Gender and Power
  2. Gender and the Economy
  3. The Intersection of Gender and Class
  4.  Gender and Development - Constraints in Development Polices
  5. Gender on the International agenda
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Gender & Society: Applications of Gender Stereotypes
 

  1. Gender and Religion
  2. Gender and Law
  3. Gender and health
  4. Women, environment and ecology
Text Books And Reference Books:

 Pal.M, P. b. (2011). Gender and Discrimination. New Delhi : Oxford University Press.

Ray, R. (2012). Handbook of Gender. New Delhi : Oxford University .

Tapan, B. (2007). Human Rights and Environment. New Delhi : Viva Books Private Limited.

John, Mary E. (2008). Women’s Studies in India: A Reader. New Delhi:Penguin Books.

      Jackson, Stevi & Jackie Jones (ed). (1998). Contemporary Feminist Theories, Edinburgh: University Press

      Kamla Bhasin. (1994). Patriarchy. New Delhi: Kali for Women.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kimmel, M S. (2010). The Gendered Society, (4thed.), Oxford University Press.

Kristof, N., & Wu Dunn, S. (2009) Half the Sky, Vintage Press. Chapter 7

Leonhardt, D. (2006), Gender Pay Gap, Once Narrowing, Is Stuck in Place. The New York Times.

Parrot, A. and Cummings, N. (2006) Forsaken females: The global brutalization of women, Rowman and Littlefield. Chapter 1.

Roscoe, W. (1992) Zuni Man/Woman. University of New Mexico Press. Chapter 1

Towle, E. B, & Morgan, L. M (2002) Romancing the Transgender Native: Rethinking the Use of the "Third Gender" Concept GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 8, (4) 469-497.

Radha Kumar. (1998). History of Doing, Kali for Women.

Butler, Judith (1990). Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern
  • Continuous Internal Assessment or CIA constitutes a total of 50 percent. The distribution is as follows
    • CIA I is a 20 marks assignment that contributes to 10% of the final grade
    • CIA II is the 2 hour long 50 mark Mid semester Examination conducted during August/January for 25 % of the final grade 

The pattern for the exam is as follows:

Section A: This section has 1 compulsory question that carries 15 marks

Section B: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 20 marks 

    • CIA III also carries 20 marks and is based on an assignment that is set for the course. This contributes to 10% of the final grade
    • Attendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 
  • End Semester Examination (ESE) is conducted at the end of the semester. This is a 3 hour long 100 mark exam that contributes 50% of the final grade for the course. The pattern for the exam is given below:

Section A: Attempt any 5 questions out of the 8 options given. Each question carries 20 marks

MSA133 - SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course seeks to train students to conceptualize and carry out social research. It introduces students to the various stages of research, equipping them with the necessary skills to collect data, analyze data and present the findings in a report format.

 Course Objectives: This course aims 

        To introduce students to the methodological complexities in  sociological research

        To inculcate a capacity to conceptualize and conduct social research projects

        To acquire the technical expertise to execute a research project

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course:

        Students will be aware of the various philosophical standpoints on research.

        They will acquire with the necessary skills to conceive and conduct sociological research.

        Through various assignments, they will be able to demonstrate practical knowledge of conducting research.

        This course will also help them to do their dissertation systematically during the fourth semester.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Social Research: An Introduction
 
  1. Philosophical Roots of Social Research-Positivism, Interpretivism, Critical theory.
  2. Social Research:  Meaning – Objectives – Types- Induction-deduction.
  3. Different Types of research :

a.       Based on the nature of research question- Exploratory – Descriptive –Explanatory-       Experimental.

b.      Based on the strategy- Quantitative and Qualitative

c.       Based on the outcome- Pure and Applied, Action and participatory, evaluative

  1. Reliability and Validityin Research and Ethical concerns in social research
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Steps in Social Research, Research Design and Sampling
 
  1. Research Problem: Identification and Formulation, General Objectives and Specific Objectives –concept-variable - hypotheses
  2. Review of Literature
  3. Research Design: Meaning – Purpose- types : Survey Designs- Cross sectional and Longitudinal, Case Study, Comparative and Experimental           

Sampling: Probability and Non-Probability -Types; Merits & Limitations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Data Collection
 
  1. Types of Data: Primary and Secondary, Quantitative and Qualitative, Sources of Data
  2. Methods for Data Collection: Census-Survey, Ethnography or Participant observation, Focus Group Discussion
  3. Tools for Data Collection: Questionnaire–Interview-Participant Observation, content analysis.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Data Processing & Presentation
 
  1. Steps in Data Processing: Checking – Editing – Coding –  Tabulation
  2. Methods of Data Analysis: Using Descriptive and Inferential statistics, Qualitative data analysis- Grounded theory and Analytic Induction
  3. Data Presentation: Tables & Diagrams, Narratives 
  4. Research Report: Structure & Components
Text Books And Reference Books:

Andres, L. (2012). Designing and Doing Survey Research. London: Sage.

Babbie, E. (2002). The Basics of Social Research. London: Wadsworth Publications.

Bryman, A. (2012). Social Research Methods (4thed.). New York: OUP.

Cresswell, J. (2009). Research Designs.  New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Goode, W. & Paul K. H. (1981). Methods in Social Research. New York: McGraw Hill.

Hammersley, M. (2012). Ethics in Qualitative Research. New Delhi: Sage.

Packer, M. (2011). The Science of Qualitative Research. New York: CUP.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kerlinger, F.N.(2004). Foundations of Behavioural Research. Delhi, Surjeet Publications.

Wheeldon, J. (2012). Visualizing Social Science Research: Maps, Methods and Meaning. Los   Angeles: Sage.

Young, P. (1996). Scientific Social Survey and Research. New York: Prentice Hall.

Evaluation Pattern

 Evaluation scheme:

§  CIA I is a 10 marks assignment and involves the adoption of any one or two of the following methods: written Assignment, Book/Article review, group presentations, symposium, group task, Individual seminars, Quiz, and class test.

§  CIA II is the 2 hour long 25 mark Mid semester Examination (50 marks reduced to 25 mark weightage) conducted during August/January 

The pattern for the exam is as follows:

Section A: Attempt any 3 questions out of the 5/6 options given. Each question carries 5 marks

Section B: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 10 marks

Section C: This section has 1 compulsory question that carries 15 marks

§  CIA III carries 10 marks and is based on an assignment that is set for the course. 

§  Attendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 

·  End Semester Examination (ESE) is conducted at the end of the semester. This is a 3 hour long exam for a weightage of 50 marks

The pattern for the exam is given below:

Section A: Attempt any 6 questions out of the 9 options given. Each question carries 5 marks

Section B: Attempt any 4 questions out of the 6 options given. Each question carries 10 marks

                         Section C: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 15 marks

MSA134 - APPROACHES TO THE STUDY OF INDIAN SOCIETY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course focuses on the development of sociology in India, its relationship to colonial anthropology, Orientalism and Indology and the approaches that emerged in Indian sociology over the years. It introduces the learner to the counter influences of power and knowledge especially during the time of colonialism. The paper begins with an introduction to the theoretical foundations of empirical, structural, Marxist and subaltern approaches to the study of Indian society. It then introduces a number of seminal works in various areas of study such as the study of caste, family, village and tribe in India which have utilized these different perspectives. The readings for most of these units will be shared in class.                        

Course Objectives: 

 

  • To introduce students to the dynamics of Indian Society

  • To help them have a thorough knowledge about the different approaches to study Indian Society

  • To familiarize them with the structural and non structural issues connected with indian society

  • To apply this understanding in studying about the contemporary social scenario.

Learning Outcome

At the end of teh course students will be able to:

           Demonstrate their understanding of Indian society and social structure

           Explain the characteristics of the Indological, structural functionalist, conflict, structuralist and subaltern perspectives

           Analyse aspects of social structure using these different approaches to the study of Indian Society

 

           Evaluate the approaches used with respect to the study of Indian Society

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Caste
 

 

  1. Indological perspective

  2. Structural functionalist perspective: M.N.Srinivas

  3. Conflict perspective: Kathleen Gough, Thorner

  4. Structuralist perspective: Dumont

  5. Subaltern Perspective with reference to Dalit critiques

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Village Studies
 

 

  1. Indological perspective (Concept of self-sufficient little republics)

  2. Structural functionalist perspective: M.N. Srinivas

  3. Conflict perspective: Kathleen Gough, Beteille, Daniel Thorner

  4. Structuralist perspective: Dumont

  5. Subaltern Perspective

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Religion
 

 

  1. Indological perspective: Weber, William Jones and Max Muller,

  2. Structural functionalist perspective: M N Srinivas

  3. Conflict perspective

  4. Structuralist perspective: Veena Das and Uberoi

  5. Subaltern Perspective: Kancha Illiah

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Family and Kinship
 

 

  1. Indological perspective: Morgan, Maine, Rivers

  2. Structural functionalist perspective: Iravati Karve

  3. Conflict perspective with reference to the feminist critiques of the family

  4. Structuralist perspective: Levi Strauss, Trautman and Dumont

  5. Subaltern Perspective with reference to Dalit critiques

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Tribe
 

 

  1. Indological perspective: Rivers

  2. Structural functionalist perspective: N K Bose

  3. Subaltern Perspective: Ramachandra Guha, Tanika Sarkar 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Cohn, B. S. (2017). Notes on the History of the Study of Indian Society and Culture. In Structure and change in Indian society(pp. 3-28). Routledge.

Desai, A. R. (1994). Rural sociology in India. Popular Prakashan.

Desai, A. R. (2005). Social Background Of Indian Nationalism (6Th-Edn). Popular Prakashan.

Guha, R. (Ed.). (1997). A subaltern studies reader, 1986-1995. U of Minnesota Press.

Gupta, D. (Ed.). (1992). Social stratification (p. 15). Bombay, India: Oxford University Press.

Said, E. (1978). Orientalism: Western representations of the Orient. New York: Pantheon.

 

Srinivas, M. N. (2009). The Oxford India Srinivas. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cohn, B. S. (2017). Notes on the History of the Study of Indian Society and Culture. In Structure and change in Indian society(pp. 3-28). Routledge.

Desai, A. R. (1994). Rural sociology in India. Popular Prakashan.

Desai, A. R. (2005). Social Background Of Indian Nationalism (6Th-Edn). Popular Prakashan.

Guha, R. (Ed.). (1997). A subaltern studies reader, 1986-1995. U of Minnesota Press.

Gupta, D. (Ed.). (1992). Social stratification (p. 15). Bombay, India: Oxford University Press.

Said, E. (1978). Orientalism: Western representations of the Orient. New York: Pantheon.

 

Srinivas, M. N. (2009). The Oxford India Srinivas. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

The evaluation pattern is as follows:

·  Continuous Internal Assessment or CIA constitutes a total of 50 percent. The distribution is as follows

oCIA I is a 20 marks assignment that contributes to 10% of the final grade

oCIA II is the 2 hour long 50 mark Mid semester Examination conducted during August/January for 25 % of the final grade 

The pattern for the exam is as follows:

Section A: This section has 1 compulsory question that carries 10 marks

Section B: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 20 marks 

oCIA III also carries 20 marks and is based on an assignment that is set for the course. This contributes to 10% of the final grade

oAttendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 

·  End Semester Examination (ESE) is conducted at the end of the semester. This is a 3 hour long 100 mark exam that contributes 50% of the final grade for the course. The pattern for the exam is given below:

Section A: Attempt any 5 questions out of the 8 options given. Each question carries 20 marks

MSA135 - SOCIAL DEMOGRAPHY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Social Demography attempts to study the population, its size, structure, characteristics and the processes operating within it, using a sociological perspective. This paper attempts to introduce the students to this discipline and enable them to understand the impact that society and its various institutions have on the population and its demographic processes. The course will cover the characteristics of the population and tools used to measure and study the same, such as the Census of India, theories of population, the various population processes and an examination of the changes in the policies relating to population over the past 50 years in India. It also enables the student to comprehend the significance of demography in diverse areas such as public planning and policy, market research, healthcare and politics.

Course Objectives: This course introduces students to the field of social demography and its significance in areas like policy framing and development. This course will provide

 

  • An understanding of the significance of Social Demography
  • Knowledge about the study of the population in India, her population composition and the various processes involved as well as the areas of application of demographic data
  • Skills to critically examine demographic data through in class exercises

Learning Outcome

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course the student will be able to-

 

  • Demonstrate their understanding of  the scope of social demography and the importance of studying the population with reference to social change and human development

  • Explain the significance of the demographic processes in society

  • Elaborate on how the different theoretical frameworks can be used to understand demographic processes

  • Analyse and interpret demographic data

  • Evaluate the significance of interventions on the population

  • Conceptualize policy recommendations for demographic issues

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Social Demography: An Introduction
 

1.       A brief introduction to the discipline

2.       Characteristics of the Population: Size, Structure and Composition

3.       Demographic processes

4.       Sources of Data

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Theoretical Perspectives
 

1.       Pre Malthusian Theories

2.       Malthusian Theory

3.       Marxian Perspective

4.       Demographic Transition

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Population Processes
 

1.       Fertility and Fecundity                                                                   

a.       Measuring Fertility

b.       Theories of Fertility

c.        Differentials with special emphasis on India: Rural-urban, age, gender, class, caste, region and religion

2.       Migration                                                                              

  1. Measuring Migration
  2. Theories of Migration
  3. Migration Patterns – streams of migration
  4. Impact of Migration, both at the place of origin and the place of  destination
  5. Diaspora

3.       Mortality and Morbidity                                                        

a.       Measuring mortality

b.       Differentials with special emphasis on India: Rural-urban, age, gender, class, caste, region and religion.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Areas of Application
 

1.       Population Policies

2.       Population and Poverty

3.       Healthcare and Planning

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Bhende, A, and T Kanitkar.(1978/97).Principles of Population Studies. India: Himalaya Publishing House.

       Srinivasan, K. (2006). Population Policies and Family Planning Programmes in India: A Review and Recommendations. IIPS Newsletter.

       Weeks, J. (2011). Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues. Wadsworth Publishing Company, California.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Census of India Reports- (2011) at www.censusindia.net

http://www.chaf.lib.latrobe.edu.au/census/

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/

Pathak, L.P. (1998).Population Studies (Chapters 1 and 2). India: Rawat.

Sahoo A.K, ed., (2007), Sociology of Diaspora, Jaipur Rawat Publications.

Sahoo, A K, Kadekar, L N., ed. (2012), Global Indian Diaspora: History, culture, and identity, Jaipur Rawat Publications. 

Tumbe, C. (2016). Missing men, migration and labour markets: Evidence from India. Indian Journal of Labour Economics, 58(2), 245-267.

Evaluation Pattern

The evaluation pattern is as follows:

  • Continuous Internal Assessment or CIA constitutes a total of 50 marks. The distribution is as follows
    • CIA I is a 10 marks assignment 
    • CIA II is the 2 hour long Mid semester Examination conducted during August/January for 25 marks 

The pattern for the exam is as follows:

Section A: This section has 1 compulsory question that carries 15 marks

Section B: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 20 marks 

    • CIA III also carries 10 marks and is based on an assignment that is set for the course. 
    • Attendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 
  • End Semester Examination (ESE) is conducted at the end of the semester. This is a 3 hour long exam that is for 50 marks

Section A: Attempt any 5 questions out of the 8 options given. Each question carries 20 marks

MAIS291 - INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The goal of this course is to help the students develop a theoretical understanding of international organizations (IOs) and the global problems they attempt to address. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to articulate the leading explanations within political science for why IOs exist, controversies surrounding IOs in the context of international relations theory, why they are thought to help solve global problems, and the major challenges IOs face in meeting their objectives.

Unit 1 is designed to give an introduction to the conceptual and theoretical aspects of International Organization.

Unit 2 discusses the historical evolution of international organizations

Unit 3 designed to familiarize students with the structure of United Nations.

Unit 4 focuses on the record of United Nations

 

Unit 5 isdesigned to teach about the global financial institutions

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course, it is hoped that the students will

  • Demonstrate theoretical and analytical aptitude to studying and analyzing International Organizations
  • Develop an understanding of the relationship between International Organizations, Globalization and Global Governance
  • Develop a thorough understanding of the role and significance of International Organizations and their significance in global governance
  • Demonstrate the skills to analyze the nature and implications of the increasing tendency of cooperation and competition among key International Organizations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Definition, Characteristics and Classification of international organizations, Theories of International Organizations

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
HISTORICAL PROGRESSION OF IO'S
 

Origins of International Institutions; Treaty of Westphalia, Congress of Vienna, League of Nations, Evolution of Bretton wood Institutions.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
UNITED NATIONS INSTITUTIONS
 

United Nations, Principle structures of United Nations, Reform of United Nation.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Regional Organizations: Beyond the Nation-State
 

EU, BRICS, SCO, GCC, SAARC ASEAN, BIMSTEC.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Foreign Aid and Development
 

Politics of Foreign Aid and Development by International Financial Institutions, WTO: Issues and Reforms.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
FUTURE OF GLOBAL GOVERNANCE
 

Issues of Global Governance: Peace and Security, Human Rights, Environment. Role of Non- State Actors. Challenges to global governance- Legitimacy, Accountability, Effectiveness

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Margaret Karns and Karen Mingst, International Organizations: The Politics and Process of Global Governance. Boulder: Lynne Reinner Publishers. 2009

2. Clive Archer, International Organizations, 3rd edn.London.Routledge.2011

3. Michael Barnett and Martha Finnemore, Rules for the World: International Organizations in Global Politics. Ithaca: Cornell UP. 2004

4. Paul Kennedy, The Parliament of Man: The Past, Present, and Future of the United Nations. Toronto: Harper Collins. 2006

5. Thomas D. Zweifel, International Organizations and Democracy: Accountability, Politics, and Power, Lynne Rienner Publishers.2006.

6. Inis Claude Jr. From Swords into Ploughshares: The Problems and Progress of International Organization, 4th edn, New York Random House.

7. Thomas G Weiss and Sam Daws (eds) The Oxford Handbook on the United Nations, New York, Oxford University Press.2007.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Margaret Karns and Karen Mingst, International Organizations: The Politics and Process of Global Governance. Boulder: Lynne Reinner Publishers. 2009

2. Clive Archer, International Organizations, 3rd edn.London.Routledge.2011

3. Michael Barnett and Martha Finnemore, Rules for the World: International Organizations in Global Politics. Ithaca: Cornell UP. 2004

4. Paul Kennedy, The Parliament of Man: The Past, Present, and Future of the United Nations. Toronto: Harper Collins. 2006

5. Thomas D. Zweifel, International Organizations and Democracy: Accountability, Politics, and Power, Lynne Rienner Publishers.2006.

6. Inis Claude Jr. From Swords into Ploughshares: The Problems and Progress of International Organization, 4th edn, New York Random House.

7. Thomas G Weiss and Sam Daws (eds) The Oxford Handbook on the United Nations, New York, Oxford University Press.2007.

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

1.     CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%

2.     CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

3.     CIA III – Research Topic – 10%

4.     Attendance – 05%

5.     End Semester Examination – 50% 

MCN291 - ECOLOGICAL DISCOURSES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Ecology is one of the prime concerns of anybody alive today. However, the Humanities and Social Sciences have not given it due importance. This course is an attempt to highlight the contemporary and ethical significance that Ecology possesses and the need for engaging with it rigorously. Also, the course aims at empowering the Humanities and SocialSciences students to pick up an interdisciplinary understanding of ecology and gain an ecological consciousness.

Learning Outcome

 

  • Engage with ecological concerns from a Humanities and Social Sciences perspective

  • Demonstrate interdisciplinary knowledge of Ecology

  • Analyse diverse contexts and concerns of ecology

  • Exercise ecological consciousness

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Ecology
 

 

  • Terms and Concepts: Altruism, Ecology, Environment, Biodiversity, Biocentrism, Anthropocentrism, Conservation, Climate Change, Cloning, Food Chain, Carbon FootPrint, Ecosystem, Ecopsychology, Ecofeminism, Ecocriticism, Environmental Ethics, Environmental Philosophy, Gia Theory, Deep Ecology, MOVE, Behavioural Ecology, Genetics, Habitats and Niches, Biomes, Political Ecology, Postmodern Environmentalism, Sustainability, Symbiosis, Environmental Overkill, Eco-Warrior, Social Ecology, Ecotopian Discourse, Ecological Philosophy, Ecological Self, Romanticism, Utilitarianism, Carrying Capacity, Blue Water, Grey Water, Virtual Water, Organic Farming, NGT, FRCA

  • The Ecology of Affluence and the Southern Challenge (Excerpts from Environmentalism: A Global History)

 

This unit is a platform that enables the entrant to pick up key vocabulary, and attain conceptual clarity regarding the discourse of ecology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The Idea of Nature
 

 

  • Four Frames of Relating to Nature: Nature for Itself, Nature despite People, Nature for People, People and Nature

  • William Cronon's The Trouble with Wilderness; or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature

  • The Hungry Tide by Amitav Ghosh

  • Excerpts from Nature in the City by Harini Nagendra

 

This unit presents some of the key discourses on nature that circulate both in the popular and in the theoretical domains.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Ecology: Contexts, Concerns
 

 

  • The Food Crises: Hunger via Corporate-Controlled Trade chapter from Making Peace with the Earth by Vandana Shiva

  • Pollution: Addressing Pollution in Urban Rivers: Lessons from the Vrishabhavathy River in Bengaluru by Priyanka Jamwal and Sharachchandra Lele (excerpts from Transcending Boundaries: Reflecting on Twenty years of Action and research at ATREE)

  • The Madhav Gadgil and Kasturirangan Reports

  • Conservation Conversations E3: Science and Conservation

  • Human-Animal Conflict: Gaur in My Garden by Rita Banerjee

 

This unit presents some of the prime ecological concerns that haunt our lives and a few contexts that are detrimental in deciding the course of our earth’s ecological well-being.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Limits to Growth
 

 

  • The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable - History (Chapter II)

  • The Hunt - BBC Series

  • How Much should a Person Consume? (excerpts from How much should a person consume?: Thinking through the environment. )

 

This unit highlights how our finite world is plundered with indiscriminate looting and infinite demands.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Field Visits
 

 

  • A one-day trip to a forest (Excerpts from My Husband and Other Animals to be discussed)

  • Visit to ATREE/ Bhoomi College/ Environment specific-NGO/ Ecologically-stressed area in Bangalore

 

Field visits are to enable the student to gain an experiential sense of biodiversity, forest life, eco initiatives and ecological stress.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Banerji, Rita. (2013) Gaur in my garden. Film.

Callenbach, E. (2008). Ecology: A pocket guide. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Conservation Conversations E3: Science & Conservation. (n.d.). Retrieved April 06, 2017, from http://www.conservationindia.org/videos/conservation-conversations-e3-science-conservation

Ghosh, A. (2016). Great derangement. Place of publication not identified: John Murray  Lt.

Guha, R. (2014). Environmentalism: A global history. London: Penguin Books.

Guha, R. (2006). How much should a person consume?: Thinking through the environment. Delhi: Permanent Black.

Home. (n.d.). Retrieved April 06, 2017, from http://conservationindia.org/

Lenin, J. (2012). My husband and other animals. Chennai: Westland.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Nagendra, H. (2016). Nature in the city: Bengaluru in the past, present, and future. New Delhi, India: Oxford University Press.

Rangarajan, M. (2015). Nature and nation: Essays on environmental history. Ranikhet: Permanent Black in association with Ashoka University.

Shiva, V. (2013). Making peace with the earth: Beyond resource, land and food wars. Auckland Park, South Africa: Jacana Media.

Vincent, P. (n.d.). Carrying Capacity. Encyclopedia of Human Geography. doi:10.4135/9781412952422.n21

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: ​​Need to submit a report on an approved ecological issue.

Mid Semester: Written test. 5 out of 7 to be answered. Maximum mark per question: 10.

CIA III: Need to make a Pecha Kucha presentation on an approved and researched ecological problem

End Semester: Written test. 5 out of 7 to be answered. Maximum mark per question: 20.

MSA231 - ADVANCED SOCIAL THEORIES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Students are expected to have an understanding of the underlying principles of Neo Marxism, Phenomenology, Ethnomethodology, Structuralism and post structural theories through the contributions of respective theorists. The applicability of these theories in understanding contemporary social reality is also emphasised. The objectives are

  • To introduce the various schools of thought 
  • To know the major theorists and their contributions

Learning Outcome

At the end of teh course students will be able to:

 understand the distinctive features of Modern Sociological perspectives.

 apply their knowledge of major sociological perspectives to the contemporary social context drawing on appropriate studies and research evidence. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Neo Marxism & Critical Theory
 

1.        Background and origin

a.       Gramsci – Role of Ideology, Hegemony

b.      Lukacs- Class Consciousness, Reification 

2.        Habermas – Theory of Communicative Action, Public sphere.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Phenomenology : An Introduction
 

.      Emergence of Phenomenological Thought - Husserl’s contributions - Life world and Subjectivity

.      Alfred Schutz and Common sense world and inter subjectivity

.      Social Construction of Marital Reality – Peter Berger and Hansfried Kellner (1964)

4.  Social Construction of Reality - Peter Berger &Thomas Luckman

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Ethnomethodological Challenge
 

1.      Origins of Ethnomethodology,

2.      Garfinkel’s Ethnomethodology

3.      Goffman’sDramarturgical approach  

4.      Criticism of Ethnomethodology

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Structuralism and Post Structuralism
 

1.      Influence of Structural Linguistics- Saussure

2.      Levi Strauss: Structural Analysis

3.      Althusser –  Structural Marxism

4.      Anthony Giddens: Structuration Theory; Agency structure debate

5.      Bourdieu – Field, Habitus and Social Capital.

6.      Foucault – Power and Knowledge.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Appelrouth, S. & Edles, L Desfor. (2011). Sociological Theory in the Contemporary Era. New Delhi : Sage Publications.

 Best, S & Kellner, D. (1999). Post Modern Theory: Critical Interrogation. London: Mac Millan Publications.

 Giddens, Anthony. (1987). Social Theory and Modern Sociology. Stanford: Sanford University Press.

 Harrington, A. (2005). Modern Social Theory: An Introduction. New York: OUP.

 Ritzer, G. (2011). Sociological Theory (8th ed.). New York: Mc Grow Hill.

 Seidman S. (1994). The Postmodern Turn. London: Cambridge Publications.

 Swingewood, A. (2000). Short History of Sociological Thought:

 Turner, J., Contemporary Sociological Theory (2012) SAGE Publications, Inc.

 Ritzer, George. (2000). Blackwell companion to Major contemporary social scientiss. USA: Blackwell

 Mills, Sara (2007). Michel Foucault. London: Routledge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Lawler S., (2007) Identity: Sociological Perspectives, (1st ed.), Polity Publications.

Morris, L. (2006), Rights : Sociological Perspectives,(1st ed.), Routledge Publications.

Vannini P., Waskul D., Gottschalk S. (2011), The Senses in Self, Society and Culture : A Sociology of the Senses, Routledge Publications.

Wilcox, M. M., (2012), Religion in Today’s World, Routledge Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I carries 10 marks 

CIA II - Mid semester Examination conducted for a total weightage of 25 marks

CIA III carries 10 marks 

ESE carries 50 Marks

Attendance - 5 marks

 

MSA232 - SOCIAL STATISTICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:This course seeks to develop the necessary statistical competence with the students in order to make them to acquire with the necessary skills to undertake quantitative analysis of data. Apart from basic statistical tools and measures, students will also be trained in the use of SPSS software for data analysis.

 

Course Objectives:

  • To introduce students to Quantitative Sociology with special emphasis on methods and social statistics

  • To use social statistics to quantify and analyse the different aspects of social reality.

  • To learn technical skills to manage quantitative data