Department of
PHYSICS-AND-ELECTRONICS






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Science (Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics)
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN121 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
CHE131 BASIC CHEMISTRY 4 4 100
CHE151 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I 4 2 50
ENG121 ENGLISH 3 2 100
FRN121 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN121 HINDI 3 3 50
KAN121 KANNADA 3 03 100
MAT131 DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS 4 4 100
MAT151 DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS USING MAXIMA 2 2 50
PHY131 MECHANICS 4 04 100
PHY151 MECHANICS LAB 2 02 50
SAN121 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
TAM121 TAMIL 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN221 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
CHE231 PHYSICAL AND ORGANIC CHEMISTRY - I 4 4 100
CHE251 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II 4 2 50
ENG221 ENGLISH 3 2 100
FRN221 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN221 HINDI 3 3 50
KAN221 KANNADA 3 03 100
MAT231 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 4 4 100
MAT251 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS USING MAXIMA 2 2 50
PHY231 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 4 04 100
PHY251 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM LAB 2 02 50
SAN221 SANSKRIT 3 2 100
TAM221 TAMIL 3 3 100
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 2 50
CHE331 PHYSICAL AND ORGANIC CHEMISTRY - II 4 4 100
CHE351 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - III 4 2 50
ENG321 ENGLISH 3 2 100
FRN321 FRENCH 3 2 50
HIN321 HINDI 3 2 50
KAN321 KANNADA 3 02 50
MAT331 REAL ANALYSIS 4 4 100
MAT351 INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR MATHEMATICS 2 2 50
PHY331 THERMAL PHYSICS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS 4 4 100
PHY351 THERMAL PHYSICS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS LAB 2 02 50
SAN321 SANSKRIT 3 2 50
TAM321 TAMIL 3 2 50
4 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 2 50
CHE431 INORGANIC AND PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 4 4 100
CHE451 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - IV 4 2 50
ENG421 ENGLISH 3 2 100
FRN421 FRENCH 3 2 50
HIN421 HINDI 3 2 50
KAN421 KANNADA 3 02 50
MAT431 ALGEBRA 4 4 100
MAT451 MATHEMATICAL MODELS USING PYTHON PROGRAMMING 2 2 50
PHY431 WAVES AND OPTICS 4 04 100
PHY451 WAVES AND OPTICS LAB 2 02 50
SAN421 SANSKRIT 3 2 50
TAM421 TAMIL 3 2 50
5 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CHE541A SPECTROSCOPY 3 3 100
CHE541B CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS AND HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS 3 3 100
CHE541C INORGANIC MATERIALS OF INDUSTRIAL IMPORTANCE 3 3 100
CHE551A CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - V A: SPECTROSCOPY 4 2 50
CHE551B CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - V B: NATURAL PRODUCTS AND HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS 4 2 50
CHE551C CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - V C : INORGANIC MATERIALS OF INDUSTRIAL IMPORTANCE 4 2 50
MAT531 LINEAR ALGEBRA 3 3 100
MAT541A INTEGRAL TRANSFORMS 3 3 100
MAT541B NUMERICAL METHODS 3 3 100
MAT541C NUMBER THEORY 3 3 100
MAT541D CALCULUS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES 3 3 100
MAT541E FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS 3 3 100
MAT551 LINEAR ALGEBRA USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT551A INTEGRAL TRANSFORMS USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT551B NUMERICAL METHODS USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT551C NUMBER THEORY USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT551D CALCULUS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT551E FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS USING PYTHON 2 2 50
PHY531 MODERN PHYSICS - I 3 3 100
PHY541A ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS 3 3 100
PHY541B RENEWABLE ENERGY AND APPLICATIONS 3 3 100
PHY541C ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS 3 3 100
PHY551 MODERN PHYSICS - I LAB 2 2 50
PHY551A ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS LAB 2 2 50
PHY551B RENEWABLE ENERGY AND APPLICATIONS LAB 2 2 50
PHY551C ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS LAB 2 2 50
6 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CHE641A MOLECULES OF LIFE 3 3 100
CHE641B INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS AND ENVIRONMENT 3 3 100
CHE641C NOVEL INORGANIC SOLIDS 3 3 100
CHE651A CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - VI A : MOLECULES OF LIFE 4 2 50
CHE651B CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - VI B: INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS AND ENVIRONMENT 4 2 50
CHE651C CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - VI C: NOVEL INORGANIC SOLIDS 4 2 50
CHE681 DISSERTATION IN CHEMISTRY 7 5 150
MAT631 COMPLEX ANALYSIS 3 3 100
MAT641A MECHANICS 3 3 100
MAT641B MATHEMATICAL MODELLING 3 3 100
MAT641C COMPUTATIONAL AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS 3 3 100
MAT641D GRAPH THEORY 3 3 100
MAT641E OPERATIONS RESEARCH 3 3 100
MAT651 COMPLEX ANALYSIS USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT651A MECHANICS USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT651B MATHEMATICAL MODELLING USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT651C COMPUTATIONAL AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT651D GRAPH THEORY USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT651E OPERATIONS RESEARCH USING PYTHON 2 2 50
PHY631 MODERN PHYSICS - II 3 3 100
PHY641A SOLID STATE PHYSICS 3 3 100
PHY641B QUANTUM MECHANICS 3 3 100
PHY641C NUCLEAR PHYSICS 3 3 100
PHY651 MODERN PHYSICS - II LAB 2 2 50
PHY651A SOLID STATE PHYSICS LAB / PROJECT 2 2 50
PHY651B QUANTUM MECHANICS LAB / PROJECT 2 2 50
PHY651C NUCLEAR PHYSICS LAB / PROJECT 2 2 50
        

  

Assesment Pattern

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

 

Examination And Assesments

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

Department Overview:
Department Overview The Department of Chemistry of CHRIST (Deemed to be University) aims at developing young talent for the chemical industry and academia. The curriculum is developed in such a way that the students are able to venture into allied fields too. The aim of the department through the programmes it offers is to provide ?a cut above the rest? man-power to the ever growing demands of the industry and to prepare students for higher studies and research. The interactive method of teaching at Christ University is to bring about attitudinal changes to future professionals of the industry. Equal importance is given to practical and theoretical aspects apart from experiential and digital modes of learning. Industrial projects form an integral part of the curriculum. Along with the syllabus, the University emphasizes on Value Addition Programs like Current Affairs, Holistic Education, Certificate programmes and Placement Training Programs, which include training students in group discussions, facing interviews and so on. Department of Mathematics, CHRIST (Deemed to be University) is one of the oldest departments of the University, established in the year 1969. It offers programmes in Mathematics at the undergraduate level, post graduate level as well as M.Phil and Ph.D. It is equipped with the highly committed team of instructors having versatile experience in teaching, research and has a passion to explore and innovate. Department is committed to provide the quali
Mission Statement:
Vision To ensure the department of Chemistry of CHRIST (Deemed to be University) is a world leader in pioneering research to inspire and educate the students today and for the future in the concepts and skills of Chemistry Mission To develop proficient leaders of ethical values to contribute effectively to the nations growth. Mission(Department of Mathematics): To organize, connect, create and communicate mathematical ideas effectively, through 4D's; Dedication, Discipline, Direction a
Introduction to Program:
Introduction to the Programme: The UG Chemistry programme is offered to students opting for BSc degree with the combinations BCB, BCZ, CBZ and PCM. Chemistry being a central science all efforts are made to connect with physical and biological sciences. Mathematics: The undergraduate course in Mathematics is designed to enable the students to lay a strong foundation in various fields of Mathematics. The course enables the students to develop a respectable intellectual level seeking to expose the various concepts in Mathematics. It also aims at enhancing the students reasoning, analytical and problem solving skills. The first four semesters are devoted to appreciate the beauty of mathematics through Differential Calculus, Differential Equations, Real Analysis and Algebra. In order to help the students in exploration of mathematical concepts through activities and exploration, FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) tool MAXIMA and the computer language "Python" are introduced. Students find better perceptions of the classical courses like Linear Algebra, Complex Analysis and the elective courses.
Program Objective:
Science Deanery - BSc Programme Programme Outcome On successful completions of the BSc Programme students will be able to PO1. Understand and apply the fundamental principles, concepts and methods in key areas of science and multidisciplinary fields PO2. Demonstrate problem solving, analytical and logical skills to provide solutions for the scientific requirements PO3. Develop the critical thinking with scientific temper PO4. Communicate the subject effectively PO5. Understand the importance and judicious use of technology for the sustainable growth of mankind in synergy with nature PO6. Understand the professional, ethical and social responsibilities PO7. Enhance the research culture and uphold the scientific integrity and objectivity PO8. Engage in continuous reflective learning in the context of technological and scientific advancements On successful completions of the BSc PCM Programme students will be able to PSO1. Demonstrate the problem solving skills in mathematical and physical sciences. PSO2. Express proficiency in oral and written communications to appreciate innovation in research. PSO3. Use software effectively for mathematical modelling. PSO4. Understand the impact of chemicals in societal and environmental contexts. PSO5. Develop industry-focused skills to lead a successful career.

AEN121 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Additional English course is offered as a second language course and seeks to introduce the students to the nuances of English literature in its varied forms and genres. The students who choose Additional English are generally proficient in the English language. Hence, instead of focusing on introducing them to language, challenging texts in terms of ideas, form, and technique are chosen. Additional English as a course is designed for students in place of a regional language. Non-Resident Indians (NRIs), foreign nationals and students who have not taken Hindi, Kannada, Tamil or French at the Plus 2 or Class XII levels are eligible to choose Additional English. The course is taught for students from different streams, namely, BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA in the first year and for BA, BSc and BCom (Regular) in the second year.

The first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian and Indian sub-continental voices in English in English translation for the Additional English students of the first year. This effort aims to familiarize the students with regional literatures in translation, Indian Writing in English (IWE) and literatures from Pakistan, Nepal and Srilanka, thereby, enabling the students to learn more about Indian culture and ethos through writings from different regions of the country. We have tried to represent in some way or the other the corners of India and the Indian sub-continent in this microcosmic world of short stories, poems and essays

 

There is a prescribed text bookfor the first year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

The first semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Nepal. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. An important addition to this syllabus is the preponderance of North-Eastern writing which was hitherto not well represented. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

  

 

Learning Outcome

Learning Outcome

 

The students will become

sensitive to cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities and help them engage with their peers and all around them in a more understanding and ‘educated’ manner.

 

it will also enable them through the activities conducted to become more proactive citizens/participants in society.

 

aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Keki N Daruwala     “Migrations”

 

2.      Kamala Das            “Forest Fire”

 

3.      Agha Shahid Ali      “Snow on the Desert”

 

4.      Eunice D Souza       “Marriages are Made”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Rabindranath Tagore    “Babus of Nayanjore”

 

2.      Ruskin Bond  “He said it with Arsenic”

 

3.      Bhisham Sahni       “The Boss Came to Dinner”

 

4.      N. Kunjamohan Singh    “The Taste of Hilsa”

 

5.      Mohan Thakuri                “Post Script”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Mahatma Gandhi       “What is True Civilization?” (Excerpts from Hind Swaraj)

 

2.      Ela Bhatt                    “Organising for Change”

 

3.      Sitakant Mahapatra     “Beyond the Ego: New Values for a Global Neighborhood

 

4.      B R Ambedkar             “Waiting for A Visa”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Contemporary knowledge of the soci-political situation in the sub-continent

The text book copy "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

On-line resources to appreciate the text through the Comprehension Questions

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  Classroom assignment for 20 marks keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

Total                   50

CHE131 - BASIC CHEMISTRY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In this introductory paper the students acquire knowledge of the basic concepts of organic and inorganic chemistry. 

Learning Outcome

The students learn the fundamental concepts in the field of inorganic and organic chemistry. This learning enables the students to gain conceptual knowledge in the field of organic and inorganic chemistry.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Section A: Inorganic Chemistry
 

1.   Atomic Structure                                                                                                   14 Hrs

 

Prelearning topics: Bohr’s theory and its limitations, Black body radiation, dual behaviour of matter and radiation, de Broglie’s relation, Heisenberg Uncertainty principle. Hydrogen atom spectra. Need of a new approach to Atomic structure.

Quantum mechanics: Postulates of quantum mechanics,Introduction, time independent Schrodinger equation and meaning of various terms in it. Significance of ψ and ψ2, Schrödinger equation for hydrogen atom. Radial and angular parts of the hydogenic wavefunctions (atomic orbitals) and their variations for 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p and 3d orbitals (Only graphical representation). Radial and angular nodes and their significance. Radial distribution functions and the concept of the most probable distance with special reference to 1s and 2s atomic orbitals. Significance of quantum numbers, orbital angular momentum and quantum numbers ml and ms. Shapes of s, p and d atomic orbitals, nodal planes. Discovery of spin, spin quantum number (s) and magnetic spin quantum number (ms).Rules for filling electrons in various orbitals, Electronic configurations of the atoms.*Stability of half-filled and completely filled orbitals,* concept of exchange energy. Relative energies of atomic orbitals, Anomalous electronic configurations.

 2.   Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure                                                          16 Hrs

 

Ionic Bonding: General characteristics of ionic bonding. #Energy considerations in ionic bonding, lattice energy and solvation energy and their importance in the context of stability and solubility of ionic compounds. Statement of Born-Landé equation for calculation of lattice energy, Born-Haber cycle and its applications, polarizing power and polarizability. Fajan’s rules, ionic character in covalent compounds, bond moment, dipole moment and percentage ionic character.

Covalent bonding: VB Approach: Shapes of some inorganic molecules and ions on the basis of VSEPR and hybridization with suitable examples of linear, trigonal planar, square planar, tetrahedral, trigonal bipyramidal and octahedral arrangements. Concept of resonance and resonating structures in various inorganic compounds.

MO Approach: Rules for the LCAO method, bonding and antibonding MOs and their characteristics for s-s, s-p and p-p combinations of atomic orbitals, nonbonding combination of orbitals, MO treatment of homonuclear diatomic molecules (O2, N2) of 1st and 2nd periods (including idea of s-p mixing) and heteronuclear diatomic molecules such as CO, NO and NO+. Comparison of VB and MO approaches.

Hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interaction, metallic bonding and coordinate bonding (mention only)

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Section B: Organic chemistry
 

3.   Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry                                                                        12 Hrs

 

Prelearning topics: Hybridizations, bond lengths, bond angles, bond energy. Localized and delocalized chemical bond, polarity of bonds, types of chemical reactions

IUPAC naming of bifunctional organic compounds

Physical Effect: Electronic Displacements: Inductive Effect, Electromeric Effect, Resonance and Hyperconjugation. Effect of the above on strength of organic acids and bases: Comparative study with emphasis on factors affecting pK values. Cleavage of Bonds: Homolysis and Heterolysis. Nucleophiles and electrophiles. Reactive Intermediates: Carbocations, Carbanions, free radicals, carbenes, nitrenes and benzynes - Structure, shape and reactivity of organic intermediates.

Aromaticity: Aromatic, non-aromatic and anti-aromatic and Hückel’s rule.

 

4.   #Stereochemistry                                                                                                            10 Hrs

 

Conformational analysis with respect to ethane, propane, butane, and cyclohexane. Interconversion of Wedge Formula, Newman, Sawhorse and Fischer representations.

Configuration: Geometrical and Optical isomerism;

Concept of chirality (upto two carbon atoms). Enantiomerism, Diastereomerism and Meso compounds. Racemic mixture, racemisation and resolution.  Threo and erythro; D and L; CIP Rules: R/ S (for upto 2 chiral carbon atoms) atropisomerism. Examples. Geometric isomerism; cis - trans nomenclature; E/Z Nomenclature (for upto two C=C systems). Geometrical isomerism in alicyclic compounds.

 

5.   Aliphatic Hydrocarbons                                                                                                8 Hrs 

 

Prelearning topics: Classification, Nomenclature and sources of organic compounds.

Functional group approach for the following reactions (preparations & reactions) to be studied in context to their structure.

 

Alkanes: (Upto 5 Carbons)

Preparation: Catalytic hydrogenation, Wurtz reaction, Kolbe’s synthesis, from Grignard reagent. Reactions: Free radical Substitution: Halogenation. Selectivity and reactivity. Mechanisms for all these reactions.

 

Alkenes: (Upto 5 Carbons)

Preparation: Elimination reactions: Dehydration of alkenes and dehydrohalogenation of alkyl halides (Saytzeff’s rule); cis alkenes (Partial catalytic hydrogenation) and trans alkenes (Birch reduction). Mention stereoselective and regioselective reactions. Reactions: cis addition (alk. KMnO4) and trans-addition (bromine), Addition of HX (Markownikoff’s and anti-Markownikoff’s addition), Hydration, Mechanism of Ozonolysis, oxymecuration-demercuration, Hydroboration-oxidation.

 

Alkynes: (Upto 5 Carbons)

Prelearning topics: geminal and vicinal dihalides, basic concepts of addition and oxidation reactions.  Preparation: Acetylene from CaC2 and conversion into higher alkynes; by dehalogenation of tetra halides and dehydrohalogenation of vicinal-dihalides.

Reactions: formation of metal acetylides, addition of bromine and alkaline KMnO4, ozonolysis and oxidation with hot alk. KMnO4.

 

 

* Topics identified for student seminar.

# Topics to enhance employability.

$ Service learning

** Self learning

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]   Lee, J.D. Concise Inorganic Chemistry ELBS, 1991.

 

[2]   Bahl, A. & Bahl, B.S. Advanced Organic Chemistry, S. Chand, 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]   Cotton, F.A., Wilkinson, G. & Gaus, P.L. Basic Inorganic Chemistry, 3rd ed., Wiley.

[2]   Douglas, B.E., McDaniel, D.H. & Alexander, J.J. Concepts and Models in Inorganic Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons.

[3]   Huheey, J.E., Keiter, E.A., Keiter, R.L. & Medhi, O.K. Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure and Reactivity, Pearson Education India, 2006.

[4]   Graham Solomon, T.W., Fryhle, C.B. & Dnyder, S.A. Organic Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons (2014).

[5]   Sykes, P. A Guidebook to Mechanism in Organic Chemistry, Orient Longman, New Delhi (1988).

[6]   Eliel, E.L. Stereochemistry of Carbon Compounds, Tata McGraw Hill education, 2000.

[7]   Finar, I.L. Organic Chemistry (Vol. I & II), E.L.B.S.

[8]   Morrison, R.T. & Boyd, R.N. Organic Chemistry, Pearson, 2010.

 

[9]   Bahl, A. & Bahl, B.S. Advanced Organic Chemistry, S. Chand, 2010.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance(75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

CHE151 - CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is intended to impart basic analytical skills with an emphasis on volumetric analysis. It also emphasises the importance of organized and systematic approach in carrying out experiments.This course introduces the students to the separation of mixtures using chromatographic technique.

Learning Outcome

Students learn volumetry as an analytical tool, separation of mixtures by chromatographic techniques.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Section A: Inorganic Chemistry - Volumetric Analysis
 

 

1. Estimation of oxalic acid by titrating it with KMnO4.

 

2. Estimation of water of crystallization in Mohr’s salt by titrating with KMnO4.

 

3. Estimation of Fe (II) ions by titrating it with K2Cr2O7 using internal indicator.

 

4. Estimation of Fe (II) ions by titrating it with K2Cr2O7 using external indicator.

 

5. Estimation of Cu (II) ions iodometrically using Na2S2O3.

 

6. Estimation of sodium carbonate and sodium hydrogen carbonate present in a mixture.

 

7. Estimate the amount of nickel present in a given solution as bis(dimethylglyoximato) nickel(II) or aluminium as oxinate in a given solution gravimetrically.

 

8. Estimation of (i) Mg2+ or (ii) Zn2+ by complexometric titrations using EDTA.

 

9. Estimation of total hardness of a given sample of water by Complexometric titration.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Section B: Organic Chemistry
 

 

1. Separation of mixtures by Chromatography: Measure the Rf value in each case (combination of two compounds to be given)

 

(a) Identify and separate the components of a given mixture of two amino acids (glycine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, tyrosine or any other amino acid) by paper chromatography

 

(b) Identify and separate the sugars present in the given mixture by paper chromatography.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

[1]   Svehla, G. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Pearson Education, 2012.

 

[2]   Mendham, J. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Pearson, 2009.

 

[3]   Vogel, A.I., Tatchell, A.R., Furnis, B.S., Hannaford, A.J. & Smith, P.W.G.,

 

[4]   Textbook of Practical Organic Chemistry, Prentice-Hall, 5th edition, 1996.

 

[5]   Mann, F.G. & Saunders, B.C. Practical Organic Chemistry Orient-Longman, 1960.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

[1]   Svehla, G. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Pearson Education, 2012.

 

[2]   Mendham, J. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Pearson, 2009.

 

[3]   Vogel, A.I., Tatchell, A.R., Furnis, B.S., Hannaford, A.J. & Smith, P.W.G.,

 

[4]   Textbook of Practical Organic Chemistry, Prentice-Hall, 5th edition, 1996.

 

[5]   Mann, F.G. & Saunders, B.C. Practical Organic Chemistry Orient-Longman, 1960.

 

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

Final  mark

CIA1

Prelab quiz/group task/

Every lab

Every lab (20 marks)

20

 

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2Hrs

20

 

CIA3

Record

Every lab

 

10

Total 25

 ESE

Centralized

 3 Hrs (50 marks)

 

 25

Total

 

50

ENG121 - ENGLISH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Learning Outcome

·         Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities and politics

 

·         Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

 

·         Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

 

·         Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 1 1. The Happy Prince By Oscar Wilde 2. Shakespeare Sonnet 18
 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
unit 2
 

1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer

2. What Solo Travel Has Taught Me About the World – and Myself -ShivyaNath- Blogpost

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
unit 3
 

1. Thinking Like a Mountain

By Aldo Leopold

2. Short Text: On Cutting a Tree

By Gieve Patel

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
unit 4
 

1. Violence in the name of God is Violence against God

By Rev Dr Tveit

 

2. Poem: Holy Willie's Prayer

By Robert Burns

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Paragraph writing

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
unit 5
 

1. The Story of B24

By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 2. Short Text: Aarushi Murder case 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
unit 6
 

1.Long text:My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

2. short text: Why You Should Never Aim for Six Packs

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
unit 7
 

1.Long Text: Sir Ranjth Singh- Essay by SouravGanguly

2. Short text: Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
visual text
 

Visual Text: Before the Flood

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addfitional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks online and 50 marks written exam

FRN121 - FRENCH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the UG program

Learning Outcome

Enhancement of linguistic competencies and sharpening of written and oral communicative skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Dossier 0- Discovery
 

1.      First and Last Names of French Families

2.      Few French and International personalities

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Dossier 1 - The Ones, the others
 

1.      Greetings- Usage of “tu” and “Vous”

2.      Telephone Numbers in France 

3.      Some cultural / festive events in Paris- The Francophone

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Dossier 2- Here, Elsewhere
 

1.      Pontoise and Ile de France- The City

2.      Annecy- Youth hostel and accommodation

3.      The wording of address in France- postal codes and departments

 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Dossier 3 Tell me who you are
 

1.      The French and sports- The Reality shows

2.      New ways of meeting- The Differences men/ women

3.      Surnames of married women/ children- Announcements and family functions

 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Dossier 4 Each person at his own pace
 

1.      Rhythm of Life and Rhythm of the city- Internet and media in daily life

2.      The Outings 

3.      Family life and Household chores- Routine and change in rhythm

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Tales
 

1.      The tooth of the cat – Renaud FABBRI 

2.      The Princess and the pea- Odile THIEVENAZ

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Berthet, Annie, Catherine Hugot et al. Alter Ego + A1. Paris : Hachette, 2012 

2.      Krishnan, Chitra. De Bouche à Oreille. New Delhi : Langers International Pvt Ltd., 2009

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Thakker, Viral. Plaisir d’écrire. New Delhi : Langers International Pvt. Ltd., 2011

2. French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN121 - HINDI (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The detailed text book “Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha” edited by Dr.N Mohanan is an anthology of contemporary Hindi Poems written by representative poets of Hindi Literature. From the medieval poetry ' Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur ke pad 'is also included.  The poets reflect on the social, cultural and political issues which are prevalent in our society since the medieval period. Hindusthani sangeeth-parampara eva kalakar is one of the module. Since translation is a significant area in language and literature, emphasis is being given on it in the syllabus.Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthik kalayein  Yakshagana,Kathakali,Ram Leela,Krishna Leela etc. included in the syllabus to enrich cultural values among students.

Course Objectves:

  • to impart the knowledge of poetics
  • to acquire translation skills
  • to expose students to veriety of texts to interact with them
  • to help students develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organisation of language
  • to help students understand the relationship between the world around them and the text
  • to improve their oral and written skills
  • to expose them to the world of music

Learning Outcome

Students will be exposed to the world of poetry and Music. Through translation and cultural studies, students can understand different languages, literature and culture. Grammar portions will help the students to develop their language proficiency.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection of contemporary Hindi Poems),Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur Ke Pad.
 

’  Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection ofcontemporary Poems)  Edited By: Mahendra Kulashreshta Rajpal and Son’s, New Delhi

 

Level of knowledge: Analytical

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Translation-Theory and Practice
 

                                                                                            

                                      

                                          

                                           

         

Translation-Practice                English to Hindi and vice- versa.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthic kalayen-
 

Ramleela,Krishnaleela,Yakshagaana,kathakali.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Hindusthani Sangeeth-parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav,Vikas aur paramparaein

Pramukh Sangeethkar-1.Bhimsen Joshi 2.Gulam Ali 3.Pandit Ravishankar 4. Bismillah Khan.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. 'Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha’ (Collection of Poems) Edited By: Dr.N Mohanan,  Rajpal and Son’s,New Delhi.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. A Hand Book of Translation Studies         By: Das Bijay Kumar.               

2. Saral Subodh Hindi Vyakaran,                 By: Motilal Chaturvedi. Vinod pustak mandir, Agra-2

3. Anuvad Evam Sanchar –                         Dr Pooranchand Tantan, Rajpal and Son’s, Kashmiri

4. Anuvad Vignan                                       By: Bholanath Tiwar

5. Anuvad Kala                                           By: N.E Vishwanath Iyer.

                                                                 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-Editing of Hindi article in Hindi Wikipedia )-20 marks

CIA-2(Mid semester examination)-50 marks

CIA-3(Digital learning-article creation in Hindi Wikipedia)-20 marks

End sem examination-50 marks

KAN121 - KANNADA (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Select Old Kannada, Medieval Kannada and Modern Kannada Literatures are  introduced for I Semester BA/ BSc. courses in the syllabus. This will enrich the  Language and Communication  skills, Critical and analytical thinking of the students. this will help them to enhance their social sensitivity.  

Course Objectives

  • To expose learners to variety of texts to interact with them
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of Literature through the organization of Language
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text
  • To help lerarners to improve their oral and written skills for their respective career goals
  • To help improve their communiction skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

Learning Outcome

  •  Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analize the various literature they read and discuss  in class
  • Develop a more humane and service orented aproach to all forms of life around them
  • Ability to communicate effectively in speech and in writing
  • Ability to use better language to communicate effectively

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Poetry -Old, Medivial and Modern Kannada Literature
 

1. Poetry (Old Kannada literature)

1 Pampa-Bharata Bahubali Prasamga

2. Janna- Chitramapatre Ramate Naari

3. Raghavanka- Purada Punyam Purusha Roopinde Pogutide

 

2. Vachanas & Keerthanas (Medieval Kannada Literature)

          1. Devaradasimayya 2. Basavanna 3. Akkamahadevei

          4. Allamaprabhu 5. Urilingapeddi 6. Purandara Dasa

          7. Kanakadasa 8. Vadiraja  

  3. Modern Kannada Poetry

        1. B.M.Shree- Kaarihrggadeya Magalu

        2.  Bendre- Hakki Haarutide Nodidira

        3. Gopala Krishna Adiga- Neharu Nivruttaraguvudill

        4. G.S Shivarudrappa – Mumbai Jaataka

        5. T Yellappa- Avaru Mattu Naavu

       6. Muktayakka- Mooru Mukhagalu

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
. Prose: Short Stories