Department of
MATHEMATICS






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Science (Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics)
Academic Year  (2020)

 
1 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CHE131 CHEMISTRY - I BASIC CHEMISTRY 4 4 100
CHE151 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I 2 2 50
ENG121 ENGLISH - I 3 2 100
FRN121 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN121 HINDI 3 3 50
KAN121 KANNADA 3 03 100
MAT131 DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS 4 4 100
MAT151 DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS USING MAXIMA 2 2 50
PHY131 MECHANICS 4 04 100
PHY151 PHYSICS LAB I 2 02 50
SAN121 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
TAM121 TAMIL 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CHE251 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II 2 2 50
ENG221 ENGLISH - II 3 2 100
FRN221 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN221 HINDI 3 3 50
KAN221 KANNADA 3 03 100
MAT231 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 4 4 100
MAT251 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS USING MAXIMA 2 2 50
PHY231 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 4 04 100
PHY251 PHYSICS LAB II 2 02 50
SAN221 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
TAM221 TAMIL 3 3 100
3 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
CHE331 PHYSICAL AND ORGANIC CHEMISTRY - II 4 4 100
CHE351 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - III 2 2 50
ENG321 ENGLISH-III 3 3 100
FRN321 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN321 HINDI 3 2 50
KAN321 KANNADA 3 03 100
MAT331 REAL ANALYSIS 4 4 100
MAT351 INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR MATHEMATICS 2 2 50
PHY331 THERMAL PHYSICS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS 4 04 100
PHY351 PHYSICS LAB III 2 02 50
4 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
CHE431 INORGANIC AND PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 4 4 100
CHE451 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - IV 2 2 50
ENG421 ENGLISH-IV 3 3 100
FRN421 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN421 HINDI 3 2 50
KAN421 KANNADA 3 03 100
MAT431 ALGEBRA 4 4 100
MAT451 INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL MODELLING USING PYTHON 2 2 50
PHY431 WAVES AND OPTICS 4 04 100
PHY451 PHYSICS LAB IV 2 02 50
5 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CHE531 SPECTROSCOPY 3 3 100
CHE541A CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS AND HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS 3 3 100
CHE541B INORGANIC MATERIALS OF INDUSTRIAL IMPORTANCE 3 03 100
CHE551 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS V-SPECTROSCOPY 2 2 50
CHE551A CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS VA-NATURAL PRODUCTS AND ORGANIC ANALYSIS 2 2 50
CHE551B CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS VB-INORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS 2 2 50
MAT531 LINEAR ALGEBRA 3 3 100
MAT541A INTEGRAL TRANSFORMS 3 3 100
MAT541B MATHEMATICAL MODELLING 3 3 100
MAT541C GRAPH THEORY 3 3 100
MAT541D CALCULUS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES 3 3 100
MAT541E OPERATIONS RESEARCH 3 3 100
MAT551 LINEAR ALGEBRA USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT551A INTEGRAL TRANSFORMS USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT551B MATHEMATICAL MODELLING USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT551C GRAPH THEORY USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT551D CALCULUS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES USING PYTHON 2 2 50
PHY531 MODERN PHYSICS - I 3 3 100
PHY541A ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS 3 3 100
PHY541B RENEWABLE ENERGY AND APPLICATIONS 3 3 100
PHY541C ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS 3 3 100
PHY551 MODERN PHYSICS - I LAB 2 2 50
PHY551A ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS LAB 2 2 50
PHY551B RENEWABLE ENERGY AND APPLICATIONS LAB 2 2 50
PHY551C ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS LAB 2 2 50
6 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CHE631 MOLECULES OF LIFE 3 3 100
CHE641A INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS AND ENVIRONMENT 3 3 100
CHE641B NOVEL INORGANIC SOLIDS 3 3 100
CHE651 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS VI-MOLECULES OF LIFE 2 2 50
CHE651A CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS VIA-INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS AND ENVIRONMENT 3 03 100
CHE651B CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS VIB-NOVEL INORGANIC SOLIDS 2 2 50
CHE681 DISSERTATION IN CHEMISTRY 5 5 150
MAT631 COMPLEX ANALYSIS 3 3 100
MAT641B NUMERICAL METHODS 3 3 100
MAT641C DISCRETE MATHEMATICS 3 3 100
MAT641D NUMBER THEORY 3 3 100
MAT641E FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS 3 3 100
MAT651 COMPLEX ANALYSIS USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT651A MECHANICS USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT651B NUMERICAL METHODS USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT651C DISCRETE MATHEMATICS USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT651D NUMBER THEORY USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT651E FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS USING PYTHON 2 2 50
MAT681 PROJECT ON MATHEMATICAL MODELS 5 5 150
PHY631 MODERN PHYSICS - II 3 3 100
PHY641A SOLID STATE PHYSICS 3 03 100
PHY641B QUANTUM MECHANICS 3 3 100
PHY641C NUCLEAR PHYSICS 3 3 100
PHY651 MODERN PHYSICS-LAB II 2 2 50
PHY651A SOLID STATE PHYSICS-LAB 2 02 50
PHY651B QUANTUM MECHANICS-LAB 2 2 50
PHY651C NUCLEAR PHYSICS-LAB 2 2 50
        

  

Assesment Pattern

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

 

Examination And Assesments

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

Department Overview:
Department Overview The Department of Chemistry of CHRIST (Deemed to be University) aims at developing young talent for the chemical industry and academia. The curriculum is developed in such a way that the students are able to venture into allied fields too. The aim of the department through the programmes it offers is to provide ?a cut above the rest? man-power to the ever growing demands of the industry and to prepare students for higher studies and research. The interactive method of teaching at Christ University is to bring about attitudinal changes to future professionals of the industry. Equal importance is given to practical and theoretical aspects apart from experiential and digital modes of learning. Industrial projects form an integral part of the curriculum. Along with the syllabus, the University emphasizes on Value Addition Programs like Current Affairs, Holistic Education, Certificate programmes and Placement Training Programs, which include training students in group discussions, facing interviews and so on. Department of Mathematics, CHRIST (Deemed to be University) is one of the oldest departments of the University, established in the year 1969. It offers programmes in Mathematics at the undergraduate level, post graduate level as well as M.Phil and Ph.D. It is equipped with the highly committed team of instructors having versatile experience in teaching, research and has a passion to explore and innovate. Department is committed to provide the quali
Mission Statement:
Vision To ensure the department of Chemistry of CHRIST (Deemed to be University) is a world leader in pioneering research to inspire and educate the students today and for the future in the concepts and skills of Chemistry Mission To develop proficient leaders of ethical values to contribute effectively to the nations growth. Mission(Department of Mathematics): To organize, connect, create and communicate mathematical ideas effectively, through 4D's; Dedication, Discipline, Direction a
Introduction to Program:
Introduction to the Programme: The UG Chemistry programme is offered to students opting for BSc degree with the combinations BCB, BCZ, CBZ and PCM. Chemistry being a central science all efforts are made to connect with physical and biological sciences. Mathematics: The undergraduate course in Mathematics is designed to enable the students to lay a strong foundation in various fields of Mathematics. The course enables the students to develop a respectable intellectual level seeking to expose the various concepts in Mathematics. It also aims at enhancing the students reasoning, analytical and problem solving skills. The first four semesters are devoted to appreciate the beauty of mathematics through Differential Calculus, Differential Equations, Real Analysis and Algebra. In order to help the students in exploration of mathematical concepts through activities and exploration, FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) tool MAXIMA and the computer language "Python" are introduced. Students find better perceptions of the classical courses like Linear Algebra, Complex Analysis and the elective courses.
Program Objective:
Science Deanery - BSc Programme Programme Outcome On successful completions of the BSc Programme students will be able to PO1. Understand and apply the fundamental principles, concepts and methods in key areas of science and multidisciplinary fields PO2. Demonstrate problem solving, analytical and logical skills to provide solutions for the scientific requirements PO3. Develop the critical thinking with scientific temper PO4. Communicate the subject effectively PO5. Understand the importance and judicious use of technology for the sustainable growth of mankind in synergy with nature PO6. Understand the professional, ethical and social responsibilities PO7. Enhance the research culture and uphold the scientific integrity and objectivity PO8. Engage in continuous reflective learning in the context of technological and scientific advancements On successful completions of the BSc PCM Programme students will be able to PSO1. Demonstrate the problem solving skills in mathematical and physical sciences. PSO2. Express proficiency in oral and written communications to appreciate innovation in research. PSO3. Use software effectively for mathematical modelling. PSO4. Understand the impact of chemicals in societal and environmental contexts. PSO5. Develop industry-focused skills to lead a successful career.

CHE131 - CHEMISTRY - I BASIC CHEMISTRY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In this introductory paper the students acquire knowledge of the basic concepts of Physical, Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. 

 

Learning Outcome

LO1: On completion of the course the students will be able to understand and recall the fundamental properties of atoms, molecules, and fundamental atomic structure, basics of environmental and nuclear chemistry, the periodicity of elements in the periodic table, the concepts of nucleophiles, electrophiles, electronegativity ,electronic effects, types of organic reactions and resonance.

LO2: On completion of the course the students will be able to interpret the current bonding models for simple inorganic and organic molecules in order to predict structures and important bonding parameters

LO3: On completion of the course the students will be able to apply the simple quantum mechanical treatments of atoms and molecules and predict the molecular geometries of selected molecular species

LO4: On completion of the course the students will be able to apply the mechanisms of selected organic reactions and use them in proposing mechanisms to similar reactions.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:13
Section A: General and Inorganic Chemistry 1. Atomic Structure
 

Prelearning topics: Bohr’s theory and its limitations, Black body radiation, dual behaviour of matter and radiation, de Broglie’s relation, Heisenberg Uncertainty principle. Hydrogen atom spectra. Need of a new approach to Atomic structure.

 

Quantum mechanics: Introduction, Postulates of quantum mechanics, time independent Schrodinger equation and meaning of various terms in it. Significance of ψ and ψ2, Schrödinger equation for hydrogen atom. Radial and angular parts of the hydrogenic wave functions (atomic orbitals) and their variations for 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3and 3orbitals (Only graphical representation). Radial and angular nodes and their significance. Radial distribution functions and the concept of the most probable distance with special reference to 1and 2atomic orbitals. Significance of quantum numbers, orbital angular momentum and quantum numbers ml and ms. Shapes of sand atomic orbitals, nodal planes. Discovery of spin, spin quantum number (s) and magnetic spin quantum number (ms). Rules for filling electrons in various orbitals, Electronic configurations of the atoms. *Stability of half-filled and completely filled orbitals,*concept of exchange energy. Relative energies of atomic orbitals, Anomalous electronic configurations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
2.Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure
 

Ionic Bonding: General characteristics of ionic bonding. #Energy considerations in ionic bonding, lattice energy and solvation energy and their importance in the context of stability and solubility of ionic compounds. Statement of Born-Landé equation for calculation of lattice energy, Born-Haber cycle and its applications, polarizing power and polarizability. Fajan’s rules, ionic character in covalent compounds, bond moment, dipole moment and percentage ionic character.

Covalent bonding: VB Approach: Shapes of some inorganic molecules and ions on the basis of VSEPR and hybridization with suitable examples of linear, trigonal planar, square planar, tetrahedral, trigonal bipyramidal and octahedral arrangements. Concept of resonance and resonating structures in various inorganic compounds.

MO Approach: Rules for the LCAO method, bonding and antibonding MOs and their characteristics for s-ss-p and p-pcombinations of atomic orbitals, nonbonding combination of orbitals, MO treatment of homonuclear diatomic molecules (O2, N2) of 1st and 2nd periods (including idea of s-p mixing) and heteronuclear diatomic molecules such as CO, NO and NO+. Comparison of VB and MO approaches.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
3. $Environmental Chemistry
 

Prelearning topics: Ecosystems. Energy flow and eco system stability, Bioelements, cycles of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur.

 

Air Pollution: 

Air pollutants: Photochemical smog: its constituents and photochemistry. Automobile emission.*Greenhouse effect,*Global warming, Ozone depletion by oxides of nitrogen, chlorofluorocarbons and halogens, Control of particulates. 

Water Pollution:

$Water purification and treatment (reverse osmosis, electro dialysis, ion exchange). 

#Effluent treatment plants (primary, secondary and tertiary treatment). 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
4. Periodicity and chemistry of main group elements
 

Arrangement of elements in the periodic table. Effective nuclear charge. Slater's Rules. Periodic variation of properties in periods and groups. General chemical characteristics of s and p block elements: Metallic and non-metallic character, oxidation and reduction reactions, diagonal relationships. polyhalides. Oxyacids of nitrogen, phosphorous, sulphur and halogens.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
5. Nuclear Chemistry
 

Isotopes- use of radio isotopes in tracer technique, agriculture, medicine, food preservation and Carbon dating-Numerical problems.

Nuclear fuels, Nuclear reactors, Breeder reactors, atomic energy programme in India.

**Case studies on Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear disaster.

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Section B: Organic chemistry 6. Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
 

Prelearning topics: Hybridizations, bond lengths, bond angles, bond energy. Localized and delocalized chemical bond, polarity of bonds, types of chemical reactions

 

IUPAC naming of bifunctional organic compounds

Electronic Displacements: Inductive Effect, Electromeric Effect, Resonance, Hyperconjugation and steric effect. Effect of the above on strength of organic acids and bases: Comparative study with emphasis on factors affecting pK values. Cleavage of Bonds: Homolysis and Heterolysis. Nucleophiles and electrophiles. Reactive Intermediates: Carbocations, Carbanions, free radicals and carbenes - Structure, shape and reactivity of organic intermediates. Types of organic reactions: Addition, elimination, substitution, rearrangement and redox reactions (definition and one example each). 

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:7
7. Aliphatic Hydrocarbons
 

Prelearning topics: Classification, Nomenclature and sources of organic compounds. 

 

Alkanes: (Upto 5 Carbons)

Preparation: Catalytic hydrogenation, Wurtz reaction, Kolbe’s synthesis, from Grignard reagent. Reactions: Free radical Substitution: Halogenation. Selectivity and reactivity. (Mechanisms)

Cycloalkanes-Relative stabilities-Baeyer’s strain theory-Sache-Mohr theory of strainless rings. 

Alkenes: (Upto 5 Carbons) 

Preparation: Elimination reactions: Dehydration of alkenes and dehydrohalogenation of alkyl halides (Saytzeff’s rule); cis alkenes (Partial catalytic hydrogenation) and trans alkenes (Birch reduction). Mention stereoselective and regioselective reactions. Reactions: cis addition (alk. KMnO4) and trans-addition (bromine), Addition of HX (Markownikoff’s and anti-Markownikoff’s addition with mechanisms), Hydration, Ozonolysis, oxymecuration-demercuration, Hydroboration-oxidation. 

Dienes: Nomenclature and classification of dienes Methods of formation of 1, 3 - butadiene. Chemical reactions of butadiene - 1, 2 and 1, 4 additions Diels-Alder reaction.

Alkynes: (Upto 5 Carbons)                                                                                           

Prelearning topics: geminal and vicinal dihalides, basic concepts of addition and oxidation reactions.  Preparation: Acetylene from CaC2 and conversion into higher alkynes; by dehalogenation of tetra halides and dehydrohalogenation of vicinal-dihalides.

Reactions: formation of metal acetylides, addition of bromine and alkaline KMnO4, ozonolysis and oxidation with hot alkaline KMnO4.

 

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
8. Alkyl Halides
 

Preparation - From alkenes and alcohols. Reactions - Types of aliphatic nucleophilic substitution reactions - SN1and SN2mechanisms with stereochemical aspects and effects of substrate structure, solvent, nucleophile and leaving group.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

B.R. Puri, L.R. Sharma and K.C. Kalia, Principles of Inorganic Chemistry, 31st Edition, Milestone Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi, 2013. 

Bahl, A. & Bahl, B.S. Advanced Organic Chemistry, S. Chand, 2010.

B. Mehta, M. Mehta, Organic Chemistry, PHI Learning Private Limited, 2017.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

J.A. Lee, Scientific Endeavour, Addison Wesley Longman 

D.A. Skoog, D.M. West, F.J. Holler and S.R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 8th Edition, Brooks/Cole, Thomson Learning, Inc., USA, 2004. 

J. D. Lee, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 5th ed., Blackwell Science, London, 2010. 

Satya Prakash, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, Volume 1, 5th Edition, S. Chand and Sons, New Delhi, 2012. 

R.K. Prasad, Quantum Chemistry, New Age International, 2001 

McQuarrie, J. D. Simon, Physical Chemistry – A molecular Approach, Viva Books. 

I. N. Levine, Physical Chemistry, Tata McGraw Hill, 

Manas Chanda, Atomic structure and Chemical bonding in Molecular Spectroscopy” Tata McGraw Hill. 

B. R. Puri, L. R. Sharma, Kalia, Principles of Inorganic Chemistry, Milestone Publishers, New Delhi. 

F. A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson and P. L. Gaus, Basic Inorganic Chemistry, 3rd ed., John Wiley. 

B. Douglas, D. Mc Daniel, J. Alexander, Concepts and models in Inorganic Chemistry. 

R. Gopalan, Inorganic Chemistry for Undergraduates, Universities Press, Hyderabad, 2009.

Jain and Sharma Modern Organic Chemistry 3rd edition, Vishal Publishing Company, 2009. 

R. T Morrison, and R. N. Boyd. Organic Chemistry.  7th ed. New Delhi: Prentice-Hall of India (P) Ltd., 2010.

S.M. Mukherji, S. P. Singh, and R. P. Kapoor. Organic Chemistry. 3rd, 12th Reprint, New Delhi: New Age International (P) Ltd. Publishers, 2009.

I. L Finar, Organic Chemistry Vol. II, 5th ed. New Delhi: ELBS and Longman Ltd., reprint 2008.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

Evaluation Pattern 

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance(75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3, 

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

CHE151 - CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is intended to impart basic analytical skills with an emphasis on volumetric analysis. It also emphasises the importance of organized and systematic approach in carrying out experiments.

Learning Outcome

CO1: On completion of the course Students will have a firm foundation in the safety requirements and lab skills to perform physico-chemical experiments.

CO2: On completion of the course Students will appreciate the central role of chemistry in our society and use this as a basis for ethical behavior in issues facing chemists including an understanding of safe and judicious handling of chemicals.

CO3: On completion of the course Students will be able to design and carry out scientific experiments as well as accurately record and analyze the results of such experiments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Section A: Inorganic Chemistry
 

 

1. Calibration of glassware.

2. Estimation of oxalic acid by titrating it with standard KMnO4.

3.  Estimation of water of crystallization in Mohr’s salt by titrating with standard KMnO4.

4. Estimation of Fe (II) ions by titrating it with standard K2Cr2O7 using internal indicator.

5. Estimation of Fe (II) ions by titrating it with standard  K2Cr2O7 using external indicator.

6. Estimation of Cu (II) ions iodometrically using standard Na2S2O3.

7. Estimation of total alkalinity of water samples (CO32-, HCO3-) using double titration method.

8. Measurement of chlorides in water samples by argentometry(AgNO3 and potassium chromate)

9. Estimation of Mg2+ by complexometric titrations using standard EDTA.

10. Estimation of Zn2+ by complexometric titrations using standard EDTA.

11. Estimation of total hardness of a given sample of water by complexometric titration.

 12. Measurement of sulphate in water samples by titrimetric method.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

[1]   Svehla, G. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Pearson Education, 2012.

 

[2]   Mendham, J. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Pearson, 2009.

 

[3]   Vogel, A.I., Tatchell, A.R., Furnis, B.S., Hannaford, A.J. & Smith, P.W.G.,

 

[4]   Textbook of Practical Organic Chemistry, Prentice-Hall, 5th edition, 1996.

 

[5]   Mann, F.G. & Saunders, B.C. Practical Organic Chemistry Orient-Longman, 1960.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

[1]   Svehla, G. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Pearson Education, 2012.

 

[2]   Mendham, J. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Pearson, 2009.

 

[3]   Vogel, A.I., Tatchell, A.R., Furnis, B.S., Hannaford, A.J. & Smith, P.W.G.,

 

[4]   Textbook of Practical Organic Chemistry, Prentice-Hall, 5th edition, 1996.

 

[5]   Mann, F.G. & Saunders, B.C. Practical Organic Chemistry Orient-Longman, 1960.

 

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

Final  mark

CIA1

Prelab quiz/group task/

Every lab

Every lab (20 marks)

20

 

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2Hrs

20

 

CIA3

Record

Every lab

 

10

Total 25

 ESE

Centralized

 3 Hrs (50 marks)

 

 25

Total

 

50

ENG121 - ENGLISH - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Learning Outcome

·         Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities and politics

 

·         Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

 

·         Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

 

·         Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 1 1. The Happy Prince By Oscar Wilde 2. Shakespeare Sonnet 18
 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
unit 2
 

1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer

2. What Solo Travel Has Taught Me About the World – and Myself -ShivyaNath- Blogpost

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
unit 3
 

1. Thinking Like a Mountain

By Aldo Leopold

2. Short Text: On Cutting a Tree

By Gieve Patel

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
unit 4
 

1. Violence in the name of God is Violence against God

By Rev Dr Tveit

 

2. Poem: Holy Willie's Prayer

By Robert Burns

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Paragraph writing

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
unit 5
 

1. The Story of B24

By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 2. Short Text: Aarushi Murder case 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
unit 6
 

1.Long text:My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

2. short text: Why You Should Never Aim for Six Packs

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
unit 7
 

1.Long Text: Sir Ranjth Singh- Essay by SouravGanguly

2. Short text: Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
visual text
 

Visual Text: Before the Flood

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addfitional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks online and 50 marks written exam

FRN121 - FRENCH (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the UG program

Learning Outcome

Enhancement of linguistic competencies and sharpening of written and oral communicative skills.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 1- I Discover
 

Lesson 1: Good Morning, How are you?

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 1 - I discover
 

Lesson 2: Hello, My name is Agnes.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 2- Culture : Physical and Political france
 

Lesson 1: Who is it?

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 2- Culture: Physical and Political France
 

Lesson 2: In my bag , I have......

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Les Fables de la Fontaine
 

1. La cigale et la fourmis

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Visual Text
 

A French Film 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 3- Viideo Workshop: He is cute!
 

Lesson 1 : How is he?

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
Les Fables de la Fontaine
 

2. Le renard et le corbeau

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 3- Video Workshop: He is cute
 

Lesson 2: Hello?

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Cocton, Marie-Noelle. Génération A1. Paris : Didier, 2016 

2.      De Lafontaine, Jean. Les Fables de la Fontaine. Paris, 1668

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Thakker, Viral. Plaisir d’écrire. New Delhi : Langers International Pvt. Ltd., 2011

2. French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignment & MOODLE Testing (Quiz)

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Role Play / Theatre and DELF Pattern: Reading & Writing

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

 

HIN121 - HINDI (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The detailed text book “Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha” edited by Dr.N Mohanan is an anthology of contemporary Hindi Poems written by representative poets of Hindi Literature. From the medieval poetry ' Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur ke pad 'is also included.  The poets reflect on the social, cultural and political issues which are prevalent in our society since the medieval period. Hindusthani sangeeth-parampara eva kalakar is one of the module. Since translation is a significant area in language and literature, emphasis is being given on it in the syllabus.Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthik kalayein  Yakshagana,Kathakali,Ram Leela,Krishna Leela etc. included in the syllabus to enrich cultural values among students.

Course Objectves:

  • to impart the knowledge of poetics
  • to acquire translation skills
  • to expose students to veriety of texts to interact with them
  • to help students develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organisation of language
  • to help students understand the relationship between the world around them and the text
  • to improve their oral and written skills
  • to expose them to the world of music

Learning Outcome

Students will be exposed to the world of poetry and Music. Through translation and cultural studies, students can understand different languages, literature and culture. Grammar portions will help the students to develop their language proficiency.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection of contemporary Hindi Poems),Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur Ke Pad.
 

’  Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection ofcontemporary Poems)  Edited By: Mahendra Kulashreshta Rajpal and Son’s, New Delhi

 

Level of knowledge: Analytical

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Translation-Theory and Practice
 

                                                                                            

                                      

                                          

                                           

         

Translation-Practice                English to Hindi and vice- versa.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthic kalayen-
 

Ramleela,Krishnaleela,Yakshagaana,kathakali.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Hindusthani Sangeeth-parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav,Vikas aur paramparaein

Pramukh Sangeethkar-1.Bhimsen Joshi 2.Gulam Ali 3.Pandit Ravishankar 4. Bismillah Khan.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. 'Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha’ (Collection of Poems) Edited By: Dr.N Mohanan,  Rajpal and Son’s,New Delhi.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. A Hand Book of Translation Studies         By: Das Bijay Kumar.               

2. Saral Subodh Hindi Vyakaran,                 By: Motilal Chaturvedi. Vinod pustak mandir, Agra-2

3. Anuvad Evam Sanchar –                         Dr Pooranchand Tantan, Rajpal and Son’s, Kashmiri

4. Anuvad Vignan                                       By: Bholanath Tiwar

5. Anuvad Kala                                           By: N.E Vishwanath Iyer.

                                                                 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-Editing of Hindi article in Hindi Wikipedia )-20 marks

CIA-2(Mid semester examination)-50 marks

CIA-3(Digital learning-article creation in Hindi Wikipedia)-20 marks

End sem examination-50 marks

KAN121 - KANNADA (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Selections from Old Kannada, Medieval Kannada and Modern Kannada Literature are introduced for I Semester BA/ BSc. courses in the syllabus. This will enrich the students Language and Communication skills, and also their critical and analytical skills.  This will help them to enhance their social sensitivity.  

Learning Outcome

  • Develops analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyse the various literature they read and discuss in class.
  • Develops a more humane and service oriented approach to all forms of life around them.
  • Ability to communicate effectively in speech and in writing.
  • Ability to use better language to communicate effectively.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Old , Medieval and Modern Kannada Literature
 

1. Raghavanka- Harishchandra Kavya. Selected chapter( Purada Punyam Purusha Roopinde Pooguthide) 

2. Vachanas- Devara Dasimayya, Basavanna, Akkamahadevi, Aydakki Lakkamma, Gajesha Masanaiah.

    Keerthanegalu: Purandaradasa, Kanakadasa

3. Modern Kannada poetry: Mumbai Jataka, Kari Heggadeya Magalu

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Prose- Selected Short Stories
 

1. Dheera Kumara- A Folk tale

2. Mandannana Marriage- (An episode in Novel Karvalo) K. P. Poornachandra Tejaswi

3. Gili Kathe-(Translation) -  Ravindranath Tagore

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Grammar- Folk Art forms
 

1. Differences in Prounounciation ( L-l) (A-H) 

2. Change of meanings

3. Report Writing

4. Folk Art forms of Karnataka ( Dollu Kunitha, Pooja Kunitha, Goravara Kunitha, Patada Kunitha ) 

Text Books And Reference Books:

       1. Adipurana- Pampa

       2. Yashodhara Charite- Janna

       3. Harishchandra Kavya- Raghavanka

       4. Shree Sahitya- B M Shreekantaiah

       5. Janapada Kathegalu- Jee sham paramashivaiah

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Pampa Ondu Adhyayana- G S Shivarudrappa

2. Vachana Chandrike- L Basavaraju

3. Purandara Sahitya Darshana- S K Ramachandra Rao

4. Kanakadasa- Basrur Subba Rao

5. Samagra Kannada Sahitya Charithre- Ed. G.S Shivarudrappa

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 Written Assignments- 20 Marks

CIA-2 Mid Semsester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA-3 Translation Assignment- English to Kannada -20 Marks

Attendance -05 Marks

End Semester Examination- 50 Marks

MAT131 - DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at enabling the students to know various concepts and principles of differential calculus and its applications.  Sound knowledge of calculus is essential for the students of mathematics for the better perceptions of the subject and its development.

Course objectives​: This course will help the learner to

COBJ1. Gain familiarity with the concepts of limit, continuity and differentiability.

COBJ2. Understand the relationship between the concepts of differentiability and continuity.

COBJ3. Analyse and interpret the different versions of mean value theorems.

COBJ4. Learn successive differentiation and nth derivative of product of two functions.

COBJ5. Find derivative of functions of more than one variable.

COBJ6. Be familiar with curve tracing.

Learning Outcome

On successful completion of the course, the students should be able to

CO1. Compute limits, derivatives and examine the continuity, differentiability of a function at a point.
CO2. Understand the properties of continuous functions and prove that differentiability implies continuity
CO3. Prove Mean value theorems and analyse its geometric interpretation.
CO4. Compute derivatives of any order and apply Leibniz’ theorem to find nth derivative of product of two functions.
CO5. Master the fundamental concepts of partial differentiation and apply Euler’s theorem for homogeneous functions.
CO6. Gain knowledge on the concepts such as asymptotes, concavity/convexity and singular points and apply the same for curve tracing.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Limits, Continuity, Differentiability and Mean Value Theorems
 

Definition of the limit of a function (ε-δ) form – Continuity, Uniform Continuity – Types of discontinuities – Properties of continuous functions on a closed interval - Boundedness theorem and extreme value theorem – Differentiability – Mean Value Theorems: Rolle’s theorem – Lagrange’s and Cauchy’s First Mean Value Theorems – Taylor’s theorem (Lagrange’s form and Cauchy’s forms of remainder) – Maclaurin’s theorem and expansions -Indeterminate forms. .

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Successive and Partial Differentiation
 

Successive differentiation – nth derivatives of functions – Leibnitz theorem and its applications – Partial differentiation – First and higher order derivatives – Differentiation of homogeneous functions – Euler’s theorem – Taylor’s theorem for two variables (only statements and problems)- Maxima and Minima of functions of two variables.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Curve Tracing
 

Tangents and Normals, Concavity and convexity, Curvature, Asymptotes, Singular points, Tracing of curves (Parametric representation of curves and tracing of parametric curves, Polar coordinates and tracing of curves in polar coordinates)..

Text Books And Reference Books:

G.B. Thomas, M.D.Weir and J. Hass, ThomasCalculus, 12th ed., Pearson Education India, 2015. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. H. Anton, I. Birens and S. Davis, Calculus, John Wiley and Sons Inc., 2002.
  2. F. Ayres and E. Mendelson, Schaum's Outline of Calculus, 6th ed. USA: Mc. Graw Hill., 2013.
  3. J. Stewart, Single Variable Essential Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 2nd ed.: Belmont, USA: Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning., 2013.
  4. S. Narayanan & T. K. M. Pillay, Calculus, Reprint, India: S. Viswanathan Pvt. Ltd., 2009. (vol. I & II.)
  5. M. Spivak, Calculus, 3rd ed., Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  6. T.M. Apostol, Calculus, Vol-II, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd., 2011.
  7. J. Edwards, An elementary treatise on the differential calculus: with applications and numerous examples, Reprint, Charleston, USA: BiblioBazaar, 2010.
  8. N. P. Bali, Differential Calculus, New ed. New Delhi, India: Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd., 2012.
Evaluation Pattern

 

Component

Mode of Assessment

Parameters

Points

CIA I

MCQ,

Written Assignment,

Reference work, etc.,

Mastery of the core concepts

Problem solving skills

 

10

CIA II

Mid-semester Examination

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

25

CIA III

Written Assignment, Project

Problem solving skills

10

Attendance

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

05

ESE

 

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

50

Total

100

MAT151 - DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS USING MAXIMA (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course Differential Calculus Using wxMaxima is aimed at enabling the students to appreciate and understand core concepts of Differential Calculus with the help of the free and open source mathematical software Maxima. It is designed to gain hands on experience in using MAXIMA to perform plotting of standard curves, to find limits of a function, illustrate differentiability and solve applied problems on differentiation.

Course objectives​: This course will help the learner to

COBJ1. Acquire skill in solving problems on Differential Calculus using MAXIMA.
COBJ2. Gain proficiency in using MAXIMA to solve problems on Differential Calculus.

Learning Outcome

On successful completion of the course, the students should be able to  

CO1. Acquire proficiency in using MAXIMA to study Differential Calculus.
CO2. Demonstrate the use of MAXIMA to understand and interpret the core concepts of various types of functions from the algebraic and graphical points of view.
CO3. Use MAXIMA to evaluate limits of functions and check for continuity graphically as well as algebraically.
CO4. Be familiar with the built-in functions to find derivatives of any order and solve application problems dealing with the concept of rate of change.
CO5. Sketch graphs of standard curves using MAXIMA to interpret tracing of curves.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Proposed Topics
 
  1. Introduction to MAXIMA
  2. Sketch the graph of various functions: explicit-implicit-parametric-polar.
  3. Evaluation of limits using built-in function in maxima and illustration of the same graphically.
  4. Demonstration of continuous functions and types of discontinuities.
  5. Determination of derivatives. - graphical interpretation of derivatives.
  6. Verification of mean value theorems.
  7. Evaluation of extreme points, maxima and minima.
  8. Calculation of nth derivatives of functions
  9. Partial differentiation of functions of two variables.
  10. Tracing of curves.
  11. Applications of differentiation
Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Zachary Hannan, wxMaxima for Calculus I (Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 International), Solano Community College, Edition 1.0 Publisher, Published June 17, 2015.
  2. Zachary Hannan, wxMaxima for Calculus II (Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 International), Solano Community College, Edition 1.0 Publisher, Published June 17, 2015.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Sandeep Koranne, Handbook of Open Source Tools, Springer Science & Business Media, 2010.

Evaluation Pattern

The course is evaluated based on continuous internal assessments (CIA) and the lab e-record. The parameters for evaluation under each component and the mode of assessment are given below.


Component

Parameter

Mode of  Assessment

Maximum

Points

CIA I

Mastery of the  concepts

Lab Assignments

20

CIA II

Conceptual clarity and analytical skills

Lab Exam - I

10

Lab Record

Systematic documentation of the lab sessions.

e-Record work

07

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

Lab attendance

03

95-100% : 3

90-94%   : 2

85-89%   : 1

CIA III

Proficiency in executing the commands appropriately,.

Lab Exam - II

10

Total

50

PHY131 - MECHANICS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:04

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed to provide a thorough knowledge of the basics of kinematics, gravitation, work, energy, oscillations, properties of matter and special theory of relativity. Each topic includes problem-solving which develops the thinking process and application skills of the students.  

Learning Outcome

Familiarisation of the fundamental mathematical formulations in mechanics and development of application skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Laws of Motion
 

Scalars and vectors, types of vectors, Vector algebra-Vector addition and subtraction, Graphical and analytical methods, components of vectors, Scalar and vector products, applications for scalar and vector products, Vector derivatives, 1st order and second-order differential equations.      

Motion in one dimension-Motion with uniform velocity, uniform acceleration and non-uniform acceleration, Motion in two dimensions-projectile motion- Motion along a curve in a plane (radial and transverse components of velocity and acceleration), examples. Drag force terminal velocity, Frames of reference- Inertial and non-inertial, two frames of reference moving with uniform relative velocity, uniform acceleration, rotating frames, fictitious forces-Examples-(Banking of curved railway track, Accelerometer, freely falling elevator). Newton’s Laws of motion. First, second and third laws, Conservative and non-conservative forces, Dynamics of a system of particles., Definition of centre of mass, centre of mass of two particles, group of particles, continuous bodies, uniform straight rod, motion of the centre of mass.              

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Momentum and Energy