Department of
PERFORMING-ARTS,-THEATRE-STUDIES-AND-MUSIC






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Theatre Studies, English and Psychology)
Academic Year  (2020)

 
1 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ENG121 ENGLISH - I 3 2 100
EST131 BRITISH LITERATURE: ANGLO SAXON TO EARLY VICTORIAN 5 4 100
FRN121 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN121 HINDI 3 3 50
KAN121 KANNADA 3 03 100
PSY131 BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - I 5 5 100
SAN121 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
TES131 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE 3 3 100
TES151 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE 5 2 100
2 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ENG221 ENGLISH - II 3 2 100
EST231 BRITISH LITERATURE: LATE VICTORIAN TO THE PRESENT 5 4 100
FRN221 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN221 HINDI 3 3 50
KAN221 KANNADA 3 03 100
PSY231 BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - II 5 5 100
SAN221 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
TES231 SCHOOLS AND STYLES OF ACTING 3 3 100
TES251 SCHOOLS AND STYLES OF ACTING 5 2 100
3 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
EST331 AMERICAN LITERATURES 5 4 100
FRN321 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN321 HINDI 3 2 50
KAN321 KANNADA 3 03 100
PSY332 SOCIOCULTURAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOR 5 5 100
PSY352 PERSONAL GROWTH 2 2 50
TES331 DIRECTION 3 3 100
TES381 INTERNSHIP 6 2 100
4 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ENG421 ENGLISH-IV 3 3 100
EST431 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY THEORY 5 4 100
FRN421 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN421 HINDI 3 2 50
KAN421 KANNADA 3 03 100
PSY432 LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT 5 5 100
PSY452 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS 2 2 50
TES451 CLASS PRODUCTION 3 2 100
TES471 MUSIC AND DANCE 4 4 100
5 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EST531 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES 4 04 100
EST532 INDIAN LITERATURES: THEMES AND CONCERNS 5 4 100
PSY531 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY533 THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS - I 4 4 100
PSY551 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-I 2 2 50
TES531 STAGE / PRODUCTION PROCESS 2 2 100
TES532 INTRODUCTION TO PERFORMANCE STUDIES 4 4 100
TES551 STAGE / PRODUCTION PROCESS 5 2 100
TES581 INTERNSHIP 6 2 100
6 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EST631 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD LITERATURES 5 4 100
EST641A CULTURAL STUDIES 4 04 100
EST641B ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING 4 04 100
EST641C INTRODUCTION TO SHORT STORY 4 04 100
EST641D INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES 4 04 100
EST641E ECOLOGICAL DISCOURSES AND PRACTICES 4 4 100
EST641F REVISITING INDIAN EPICS 4 4 100
PSY631 POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY633 THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS - II 4 4 100
PSY651 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-II 2 2 50
TES651 SPECIALISATION IN ACTING 5 2 2
TES652 SPECIALISATION IN DIRECTING 5 2 100
        

  

Assesment Pattern

Theory

 

Task

Marks Allocated

Weighting Adjustment

CIA I & III

Relevant Tasks Demonstrating Learning

20 Marks (each)

 

CIA II

Centralised Mid-semester Examination

50 Marks

 

 

Total CIA

90 Marks

Reduced: 45 Marks

 

Attendance

 

5 Marks

ESE

Centralised End-of-semester Examination

50 Marks

 

 

Total Mark

 

100 Marks

 

 

 

 

Practical

 

Task

Marks Allocated

Weighting Adjustment

CIA

No CIA I, II & III

 

 

ESE

End of semester Practical Examination: Performance

100 Marks

No Adjustment

 

Examination And Assesments

CIA 1

CIA2

CIA3

End Semester examination

Department Overview:
The Theatre Studies Department creates a space for creative control and an alternate simulation of life experiences. The course nurtures the ability to evoke emotions and craft those physical manifestations resulting in multiple perspectives towards problem-solving. The department has an academic orientation along with honing theatre skills through classical and contemporary plays. The department encourages the spirit of improvisations, experimentations and varied interpretations through the tenure of the course.
Mission Statement:
Vision To sculpt critical, discerning and thinking artists. Mission The Department of Theatre Studies strives to uphold transformative modes of artistic, academic theory and Praxis to foster the love of art in oneself and not oneself in art.
Introduction to Program:
TEP (Theatre Studies, English Studies and Psychology) is a triple major programme offered by the Department of Theatre Studies, English Studies and Psychology. This symbiotic combination helps instil an ensemble spirit and inspires and necessitates a quest for artistic excellence. Each of the majors is carefully tailored to work in tandem with the other two departments. The disciplines foster skills required for multiple career paths and a varied spectrum of Higher Education possibilities. The transformative processes of theatre lead to self-discovery and identity formation. Therefore, Theatre Studies being of socio-political relevance is a burgeoning academic discipline and a viable career choice.
Program Objective:
Programme Specific Objectives (TEP: Theatre Studies, English & Psychology) PO1. Academic expertise: ● Explore, create and experience Theatre-in-English through theory and praxis to develop a holistic theatre professional. ● To impart a critical reading of literature through aesthetic, linguistic, socio-political and cultural engagement. ● Familiarize students with the discipline of psychology, give them the necessary exposure to develop an insight into human beings. PO2.Critical Thinking: ● Using plays as a resource material about the time, space, weight and flow of the people in a context. ● Understanding the psyche of human archetypes using exercises specific to the theatre. PO3.Effective Communication: ● Increase kinesthetic discipline using accurate posture, delivery and stage presence. ● Use psychology to formulate thoughts in a meaningful yet attention-drawing fashion. ● Open-mindedness and a willingness to incorporate Direction and feedback. PO4. Social Interaction: ● Aiming to create resonant leadership skills through a conservatoire method with an ensemble focus. ● Equip students with the skills and competence to apply psychological principles in a range of environments to increase individual and collective wellbeing. PO5.Effective Citizenship: ● Help students understand the fundamental processes underlying human behaviour, development and change from biological and psychos

ENG121 - ENGLISH - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Learning Outcome

·         Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities and politics

 

·         Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

 

·         Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

 

·         Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 1 1. The Happy Prince By Oscar Wilde 2. Shakespeare Sonnet 18
 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
unit 2
 

1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer

2. What Solo Travel Has Taught Me About the World – and Myself -ShivyaNath- Blogpost

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
unit 3
 

1. Thinking Like a Mountain

By Aldo Leopold

2. Short Text: On Cutting a Tree

By Gieve Patel

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
unit 4
 

1. Violence in the name of God is Violence against God

By Rev Dr Tveit

 

2. Poem: Holy Willie's Prayer

By Robert Burns

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Paragraph writing

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
unit 5
 

1. The Story of B24

By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 2. Short Text: Aarushi Murder case 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
unit 6
 

1.Long text:My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

2. short text: Why You Should Never Aim for Six Packs

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
unit 7
 

1.Long Text: Sir Ranjth Singh- Essay by SouravGanguly

2. Short text: Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
visual text
 

Visual Text: Before the Flood

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addfitional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks online and 50 marks written exam

EST131 - BRITISH LITERATURE: ANGLO SAXON TO EARLY VICTORIAN (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course will serve as an introductory course for British Literature. The course will locate the texts in their respective socio-political and historical contexts. The selection aims to introduce different genres of British literature.

 

Course Objectives

 

  • To introduce  students to the socio-political, religious, cultural, and linguistic aspects of the UK through English literary texts
  • To help students understand texts as products of a historical, political and cultural processes
  • To enable students to identify different forms, genres and subgenres in literature
  • To sensitize students to human values through an exposure to socio-historical concerns of subjectivity, identity, community and nationhood.
  • To sharpen critical appreciation and analytical writing skills through an introduction to models of literary criticism

Learning Outcome

Awareness of the production, dissemination and reception of literary material in England across different eras and the contemporary debates and trends they stimulate and cognizance of classical forms, genres and styles of literature

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
The Anglo-Saxon Period and The Medieval Period
 

Emergence of English language, History of England from 42 BC to Norman Conquest- salient features

 Impact of Norman rule on English social structure, English language in the medieval period,mystery, morality plays and miracle plays, feudalism 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
The Renaissance Period and after
 

Protestantism, Bible translation, religious literature, humanism, English Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo Styles

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Reformation, Restoration and after
 

Metaphysical Poetry, Epic conventions, Mock epic, Puritanism, Restoration, Rise of the novel, the English novel in the eighteenth century, Gunpowder plot, Oliver Cromwell,

 

Dissolving the parliament, Periodical essays, empiricism, Influence of French culture through restoration, the enlightenment 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:25
Romantic and early Victorian Age
 

Romanticism, notion of literary creation and poets, closet drama, the French Revolution, Victorian morality, industrial revolution, utilitarianism, rise of nation-states, impact of colonialism on England, emergence of universal education in England 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chaucer: The Prioress from Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

William Shakespeare:          

Sonnet 116

‘O that this too solid flesh would melt” Soliloquy by Hamlet in Hamlet Act 1 Scene 2

‘To Be or Not To Be’ Soliloquy by Hamlet in Hamlet Act 3 Scene 1

 

Francis Bacon: “Of Truth”

John Donne: “Canonization”

 

John Milton: Excerpt from Satan’s speech in Book 1, Paradise Lost

John Dryden:  First three stanzas of “Mac Flecknoe”

Alexander Pope: Belinda’s Boudoir from The Rape of the Lock

Addison and Steele: “Character of Will Wimble”

Oliver Goldsmith: “Beau Tibbs”

 

Oliver Goldsmith: She Stoops to Conquer / Christopher Marlowe: Dr. Faustus 

William Wordsworth: “Lines Written in Early Spring”

S.T. Coleridge: “Christabel”

Shelley: “Ode to the Westwind”

Keats: “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”

Charles Lamb: “Dream Children”

Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 8th Ed. New York: Wardworth, 2005. Print.

Ferguson, Margaret, Mary Jo Salter and Jon Stallworthy. Eds. The Norton Anthology of Poetry. 4th Ed. New York: WW Norton, 1996. Print

Gordden, Malcom, and Michael Lapidge. The Cambridge Companion to Old English Literature. Rpt Cambridge: CUP, 2006. Print.

Gupta, Ambika Sen. Selected College Poems. Rpt. Hyderabad: Orient Longman,   1999.

Herman, Daniel. The Cambridge Companion to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2007. Print.

John, Eileen, and Dominic McIver Lopes. Philosophy of Literature: Contemporary and Classic Readings. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004. Print

Maxwell, Richard, and Katie Trumpener. The Cambridge Companion to Fiction in the Romantic Period. Cambridge: CUP, 2008. Print

Sampson, George.The Concise Cambridge History of English Literature, 3rd Ed. Cambridge: CUP, 2005. Print

Ramarao, Vimala. Ed.Explorations. Vol I. Bangalore: Prasaranga, Bangalore University, 2004. Print

 

Shingle, Michael. Daniel Defoe Robinson Crusoe. New York: WW Norton, 1994. Print

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

  1. group presentations on topics relevant to British literature/Art and literary movements
  2. an exhibition/display based on different eras, movements and literary and non-literary genres

 

CIA III will be a moddle test on the Novel

 

These are suggested examples of CIAs. However, during the course of teaching, there could be other suggestions, and CIAs could be slightly modified based on class dynamics and calibre of students.

 

Selected Texts chosen to be taught may be revised / used as extended reading which may be tested in CIA 1, 2 or 3. Example : only 1 soliloquy may be taught.

 

Mid Semester Examination CIA II: 2 Hours

 

Section A: Short Notes – 5x3 marks= 15 (5 questions out of 7)

Section B: Essay Questions – 2x10 marks = 20 (2 questions out of 3)

Section C: Long Essay Questions – 1x15 marks = 15 (1 question out of 2)

 

Total: 50 Marks

 

End Semester Examination: 3 Hours

 

Section A: Short Notes – 10x3 marks = 30 (10 questions out of 12)

Section B: Essay Questions – 4x10 marks = 40 (4 questions out of 6)

Section C: Long Essay Questions – 2x15 marks = 30 (2 questions out of 4)

 

 

Total: 100 Marks

FRN121 - FRENCH (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the UG program

Learning Outcome

Enhancement of linguistic competencies and sharpening of written and oral communicative skills.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 1- I Discover
 

Lesson 1: Good Morning, How are you?

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 1 - I discover
 

Lesson 2: Hello, My name is Agnes.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 2- Culture : Physical and Political france
 

Lesson 1: Who is it?

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 2- Culture: Physical and Political France
 

Lesson 2: In my bag , I have......

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Les Fables de la Fontaine
 

1. La cigale et la fourmis

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Visual Text
 

A French Film 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 3- Viideo Workshop: He is cute!
 

Lesson 1 : How is he?

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
Les Fables de la Fontaine
 

2. Le renard et le corbeau

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 3- Video Workshop: He is cute
 

Lesson 2: Hello?

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Cocton, Marie-Noelle. Génération A1. Paris : Didier, 2016 

2.      De Lafontaine, Jean. Les Fables de la Fontaine. Paris, 1668

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Thakker, Viral. Plaisir d’écrire. New Delhi : Langers International Pvt. Ltd., 2011

2. French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignment & MOODLE Testing (Quiz)

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Role Play / Theatre and DELF Pattern: Reading & Writing

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

 

HIN121 - HINDI (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The detailed text book “Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha” edited by Dr.N Mohanan is an anthology of contemporary Hindi Poems written by representative poets of Hindi Literature. From the medieval poetry ' Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur ke pad 'is also included.  The poets reflect on the social, cultural and political issues which are prevalent in our society since the medieval period. Hindusthani sangeeth-parampara eva kalakar is one of the module. Since translation is a significant area in language and literature, emphasis is being given on it in the syllabus.Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthik kalayein  Yakshagana,Kathakali,Ram Leela,Krishna Leela etc. included in the syllabus to enrich cultural values among students.

Course Objectves:

  • to impart the knowledge of poetics
  • to acquire translation skills
  • to expose students to veriety of texts to interact with them
  • to help students develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organisation of language
  • to help students understand the relationship between the world around them and the text
  • to improve their oral and written skills
  • to expose them to the world of music

Learning Outcome

Students will be exposed to the world of poetry and Music. Through translation and cultural studies, students can understand different languages, literature and culture. Grammar portions will help the students to develop their language proficiency.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection of contemporary Hindi Poems),Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur Ke Pad.
 

’  Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection ofcontemporary Poems)  Edited By: Mahendra Kulashreshta Rajpal and Son’s, New Delhi

 

Level of knowledge: Analytical

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Translation-Theory and Practice
 

                                                                                            

                                      

                                          

                                           

         

Translation-Practice                English to Hindi and vice- versa.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthic kalayen-
 

Ramleela,Krishnaleela,Yakshagaana,kathakali.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Hindusthani Sangeeth-parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav,Vikas aur paramparaein

Pramukh Sangeethkar-1.Bhimsen Joshi 2.Gulam Ali 3.Pandit Ravishankar 4. Bismillah Khan.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. 'Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha’ (Collection of Poems) Edited By: Dr.N Mohanan,  Rajpal and Son’s,New Delhi.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. A Hand Book of Translation Studies         By: Das Bijay Kumar.               

2. Saral Subodh Hindi Vyakaran,                 By: Motilal Chaturvedi. Vinod pustak mandir, Agra-2

3. Anuvad Evam Sanchar –                         Dr Pooranchand Tantan, Rajpal and Son’s, Kashmiri

4. Anuvad Vignan                                       By: Bholanath Tiwar

5. Anuvad Kala                                           By: N.E Vishwanath Iyer.

                                                                 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-Editing of Hindi article in Hindi Wikipedia )-20 marks

CIA-2(Mid semester examination)-50 marks

CIA-3(Digital learning-article creation in Hindi Wikipedia)-20 marks

End sem examination-50 marks

KAN121 - KANNADA (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Selections from Old Kannada, Medieval Kannada and Modern Kannada Literature are introduced for I Semester BA/ BSc. courses in the syllabus. This will enrich the students Language and Communication skills, and also their critical and analytical skills.  This will help them to enhance their social sensitivity.  

Learning Outcome

  • Develops analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyse the various literature they read and discuss in class.
  • Develops a more humane and service oriented approach to all forms of life around them.
  • Ability to communicate effectively in speech and in writing.
  • Ability to use better language to communicate effectively.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Old , Medieval and Modern Kannada Literature
 

1. Raghavanka- Harishchandra Kavya. Selected chapter( Purada Punyam Purusha Roopinde Pooguthide) 

2. Vachanas- Devara Dasimayya, Basavanna, Akkamahadevi, Aydakki Lakkamma, Gajesha Masanaiah.

    Keerthanegalu: Purandaradasa, Kanakadasa

3. Modern Kannada poetry: Mumbai Jataka, Kari Heggadeya Magalu

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Prose- Selected Short Stories
 

1. Dheera Kumara- A Folk tale

2. Mandannana Marriage- (An episode in Novel Karvalo) K. P. Poornachandra Tejaswi

3. Gili Kathe-(Translation) -  Ravindranath Tagore

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Grammar- Folk Art forms
 

1. Differences in Prounounciation ( L-l) (A-H) 

2. Change of meanings

3. Report Writing

4. Folk Art forms of Karnataka ( Dollu Kunitha, Pooja Kunitha, Goravara Kunitha, Patada Kunitha ) 

Text Books And Reference Books:

       1. Adipurana- Pampa

       2. Yashodhara Charite- Janna

       3. Harishchandra Kavya- Raghavanka

       4. Shree Sahitya- B M Shreekantaiah

       5. Janapada Kathegalu- Jee sham paramashivaiah

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Pampa Ondu Adhyayana- G S Shivarudrappa

2. Vachana Chandrike- L Basavaraju

3. Purandara Sahitya Darshana- S K Ramachandra Rao

4. Kanakadasa- Basrur Subba Rao

5. Samagra Kannada Sahitya Charithre- Ed. G.S Shivarudrappa

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 Written Assignments- 20 Marks

CIA-2 Mid Semsester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA-3 Translation Assignment- English to Kannada -20 Marks

Attendance -05 Marks

End Semester Examination- 50 Marks

PSY131 - BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to the study of basic psychological processes offered to the first-semester undergraduate students of psychology. It is an introductory paper that gives an understanding of the field of psychology, scope, and multiple perspectives and disciplines that provide a holistic picture of human behaviour. Students will learn the key concepts, classic examples, and modern and practical applications of fundamental psychological theories, methods, and tools. Emphasis is on the basic psychological processes of personality, learning, consciousness, motivation and emotion. This course allows them to learn the basics and demonstrate the skills that a student needs to move on to the more specific and in-depth psychology courses that follow. This course will help the learner to learn about

  • The world of Psychology with a brief historical sketch of the science of psychology, multiple perspectives and recent trends in the field.
  • The biological basis of behaiour
  • The fundamental processes underlying human behaviour such as learning, motivation, emotion, personality
  • Ethics in studying human behaviour and using them in academic assignments. Students will have an opportunity to develop skills such as writing, making presentations and using technology for academic purposes and teamwork.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Explain psychological concepts, including fundamental concepts, principles, theoretical perspectives, overarching themes, and arguments from across a range of psychology content domains like learning, personality, motivation, emotion and consciousness to various situations and contexts.
  • Critically evaluate the different schools of thought in psychology
  • Define the basic biological process that influence behaviour
  • Analyse methods of scientific inquiry, evidence-based thinking, and critical thinking skills to psychological phenomena and examples of psychological science
  • Write assignments and make presentations demonstrating basic knowledge of APA (American Psychological Association) style.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History and Schools of Thought
 

In this unit, we will examine the history of Western psychological theorizing from its beginnings in ancient Greece, through to the schools and perspectives of psychology including Structuralism, Functionalism, Psychodynamic, Biological, Behavioristic, Gestalt, Cognitive, Cross-cultural, Humanistic and Evolutionary. The aim is both to build a familiarity with psychology’s intellectual origins and to foster an awareness of its many false steps, dead-ends, and alternative pathways to gain a better appreciation of the social, cultural, and, above all, psychological influences on the theorizing of psychologists. Students will be able to define psychology and understand what psychologists do and identify the major fields of study and theoretical perspectives within psychology and know their similarities and differences. In the end, students will gain a better appreciation of why contemporary psychology takes the shape it does.

  1. Describe the evolution of psychology and the major pioneers in the field
  2. Identify the various approaches, fields, and subfields of psychology along with their major concepts and important figures
  3. Describe the value of psychology and possible careers paths for those who study psychology
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Biological basis of behaviour
 

Explain the biological perspective of psychology as it applies to the role of the nervous system and endocrine system in regard to behaviour and mental processes. Identify and describe the important structures of these systems. It is an introductory survey of the relationship between human behaviour and brain function.

  1. The interaction between biological factors and experience
  2. Methods and issues related to biological advances
  3. To develop an understanding of the influence of behaviour, cognition, and the environment on the bodily systems.
  4. To develop an appreciation of the neurobiological basis of psychological function and dysfunction. 

Laboratory Demonstration: Biofeedback/ EEG/ Eye-tracking

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Learning
 
This unit introduces students to the principles of learning and how those principles can be used to modify human behaviour. Explain the behavioural perspective of psychology and relate classical and operant conditioning concepts to student-generated scenarios. The course emphasizes the application of learning theories and principles. Topics include reinforcement, extinction, punishment, schedules of reinforcement, stimulus discrimination, prompting and fading, stimulus-response chaining, generalization, modelling, rule-governed behaviour, problem-solving, latent learning, observational learning, insight learning, concept learning, general case instruction, and stimulus equivalence.  
 
Laboratory Demonstration: Trial and Error learning, Habit Interference, Maze Learning 
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Personality
 

This unit is an introduction to the psychological study of human personality, broadly speaking and more specifically in terms of how we may understand individual differences in personality and the personalities of individual persons. Personality psychologists use empirical methods of behavioural and clinical science to understand people in biological, social, and cultural contexts. Students will learn the strengths and weaknesses of the major personality theories, as well as how to assess, research and apply these theories. As much as possible, application to real-life situations will be discussed.

  1. Identify the various perspectives that are common in the area of personality psychology and critically evaluate each in terms of its explanatory and predictive power.
  2. Theories and perspectives of personality development: psychoanalytic, humanistic, trait, and social-cognitive.
  3. Understand classic and current empirical measurement tools and approaches to investigation for personality assessment in psychological and clinical science
  4. To develop an understanding of the concept of individual differences with the goal to promote self-reflection and understanding of self and others.

 Laboratory Demonstration: Sentence completion test, NEO-PI, Type A/B

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Motivation and Emotion
 

The unit will explain how behaviour is energized and directed by the complex mixture of motives and emotions and describe the various theories that have been developed to explain motivation and emotion.

  1. Explain motivation, how it is influenced, and major theories about motivation
  2. Describe hunger and eating in relation to motivation, obesity, anorexia, and bulimia
  3. Describe sexual behaviour and research about sexuality
  4. Explain theories of emotion and how we express and recognise emotion

Laboratory Demonstration: Level of motivation, Achievement motivation, 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Weiten, W. (2014). Psychology: Themes and Variations (Briefer Version, 9th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

King, L. A. (2010). Experience Psychology. McGraw-Hill.

Gazzaniga, Heatherton, Halpern (2015). Psychological Science, 5th Edition, Norton.

Feldman.S.R.(2009).Essentials of understanding psychology ( 7th Ed.) Tata Mc Graw Hill.

Baron, R.A and Misra, G. (2014). Psychology (Indian Subcontinent Edition).Pearson Education Ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

 CIA (CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT)    

  •  CIA I –Written Assignment /Individual Assignment  - Total Marks 20     
  •  CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                        - Total marks 50                          
  •  CIA III –Activity-based Assignment                        - Total marks 20
  •   CIA I + II + III                                                      = 90 /100 = 45/50 
  •   Attendance                                                            = 5 marks 
  •  Total                                                                      = 100 = 50 

End Semester Examination : Total Marks=100=50

Question paper pattern

  •  Section A        Brief, concepts, definitions, applications               2 marks x 10 = 20
  •  Section B         Short Answers: Conceptual/Application                5 marks x 4   = 20
  •  Section C        Essay Type: Descriptive/Conceptual                       15 marks x 3 = 45
  •  Section D        Compulsory: Case Study (Application)                    15 X 1           = 15

SAN121 - SANSKRIT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The I semeste B.A/B.Sc students are prescribed wih the text " Ruthusamharam"

Strotra shithya 

Learning Outcome

The students will have exposure for the  style of poetry. Ruthusamhara is the work based on the nature which makes the students to understand about changes in nature

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
test
 

poery Buddhacharitham III canto, up to 52 stanzas.

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual/ descriptive/ Analytical.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:35
Ruthusamharam
 

Ruthusamharam

Strotra sahithya 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Grammar
 

Grammar

Grammer- Sandhis and lakaras                                                          

 Level of Knowledge:  Analytical /Conceptual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
. Language component.
 

language component.

Translation from Sanskrit to english                                                     

Level of Knowledge:  Analytical/. Conceptual

Composition to write in Sanskrit                                                              

Level of Knowledge:  Analytical/. Conceptual

Comprehension in Sanskrit                                                                     

Level of Knowledge:  Analytical/. Conceptual

Text Books And Reference Books:

Ruthusamharam

 Strotra sahitya : Madhurashtaka and Geeta govinda                                    

                            M.S. Subbalakshmi , Balamurali Krishna 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1) Ruthusamharam- Shivaprasad Dvivedi

2) Ruthusamharam- Dr. K . Narayanabhatta

3) sanskrit grammar Translation from English to Sanskrit by M.R.Kale

4) Sanskrt Grammar Kannada version by Hegde. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1  Wikipedia  assignment   Evaluated for 20 marks

CIA 2 Midsemester examination   Evaluated for 50 marks

CIA 3  Wikipedia assignment   Evaluated for 20 marks

          End semester   Evaluated for 50 marks

 

TES131 - INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • Analyze and interpret texts from the viewpoint of a theatre production
  • Plan, research and present individual and group projects
  •  Understand the basic production processes 

 

 

 

Learning Outcome

  •       The ability to understand play texts in relation to dramatic concepts and historical and cultural background
  •       The ability to respond to and transform a dramatic text into a performance
  •        The ability to perform a dramatic role or create a dramatic sequence in a particular way that conveys understanding of the playwright’s ideas and awareness of audience
  •         The ability to understand, interpret and translate a dramatic idea/vision into a design concept 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
History of Theatre: From the Greeks to 1875
 

Origins of drama, from Storytelling to Rituals, Greek and Roman festivals, Greek tragedy and Aristotle’s Poetics, Hubris, Nemesis, Hamartia, Catharsis, Eight elements of a play, Fabula Palliata, Old, Middle, New Comedy, Farce, Pantomime, Spectacle and Spectator sports, Circuses, Amphitheatres,  Horace- Ars Poetica, Unities of Time, Place and Action, Christianity and Theatre, Mumming, Carnival, Tournaments, Christian Religious Dramas, Guilds and secular entertainers, Dancing and disguise, Minstrels and Interludes, Pageants, Commedia Erudita,

 

Satyr Play, Machinery and stage lighting, Court festivals and Opera Seria, Commedia Dell’Arte, Caroline Court Dramas, Sentiment Vs Satire dramas, The licensing Act of 1737 and its consequences, Theatre in the North American Colonies, David Garrick and his contributions, Opera and Ballet, Schiller and Goethe and their contributions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Theatre of the Nineteenth Century
 

Industrial revolution and its impact on theatre, Spectacle and Melodrama, American contribution to melodrama, Gold rush and melodramatic ‘Western’ theatre, Grand and Comic Opera, Romantic Ballet, Serious Drama, Ibsen, GB Shaw, Chekov, Theatre and Early Cinema, Managerial Syndicates- Show Business, Variety and Vaudeville, Avant- garde players- Antoine, Brahm, JT Grein, Stanislavsky, Abbey Theatre in Dublin

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Theatre of the Twentieth Century
 

Two World Wars and its aftermath, Expressionist drama and theatre, Brecht, Surrealism, Pirandello, Eugene O’ Neil, Symbolism and Poetic Drama, The Explosive Sixties, The Calmer Seventies, Jean Genet, Arthur Miller, Marat/ Sade, Antonin Artaud, Theatre of Cruelty, Theatre of the Absurd, Alternative Theatre, Feminist Theatre                          

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Shakespearean Theatre
 

Innovations in Plot, Character, Scenes, Time, Tragicomedy, Historical, Romances, Costumes, Themes, Theatrical spaces and the use of Zeitgeist

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Balme, Christopher B. Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Studies. New York: Cambridge     University Press, 2010. Print.

2.      Brandt, George W. Modern Theories of Drama: A Selection of Writings on Drama and Theatre 1850-1990. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. Print.

3.      Chambers, Colin. The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre.  London: Continuum, 2002. Print.

4.      Dillon, Janette. Cambridge Introduction to Early English Theatre.  New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Print.

5.      Dillon, Janette. The Cambridge Introduction to Early English Theatre. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Print. 

6.      Elam, Keir. Semiotics of Theatre and Drama. 2007. Print.

7.      Meyer-Dinkgrafe, Daniel. Who`s Who in Contemporary World Theatre. 2002. Print.

8.      Postlewait, Thomas. Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Historiography.  New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Print.

9.      Powell, Kerry. Cambridge Companion to Victorian and Edwardian Theatre. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Print.

 

10.  Shepherd, Simon. The Cambridge Introduction to Modern British Theatre. New York:         Cambridge University Press, 2009. Print.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Oedipus Rex- Full text
  2. Everyman- Full text
  3. Dr. Faustus- Full text
  4. Volpone, the Fox
  5. Lady Windermere’s Fan
  6. Cathleen Ni’ Houlihaan
  7. Murder in the Cathedral
  8. Vagina Monologues
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I:

 

20 Marks

 Theory (Presentation)                         Practical (Class Room Performance)

Early Semester

CIA II: 

 

50 Marks

Theory (Presentation)                         Practical (Class Room Performance)

Mid Semester

CIA III:

 

20 Marks

Theory (Presentation)                         Practical (Class Room Performance)

Before End Semester

 

Attendance

10 Marks

 

 

 

                                                           

 

End Semester Exam: 5x10= 50. 10 Questions are to be given 

TES151 - INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims at giving insights into the structure of plays.

Orientation on Theatre Elements and Digital tools.

 

Learning Outcome

  • An understanding of theatre-performance place and space
  • Ability to write, enact and produce simple plays

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:45
Introduction to Aspects of Theatre
 

 

Acting, Directing, lighting, Costume, Setting, Makeup, sound playwriting and Prompting, Theatre spaces- amphitheatre, proscenium, Theatre in the round 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Design Technology for Theatre
 

Photography, Photoshop, Coral Draw, Canva, PPT, Word for poster making, Newsletter and Tile printing

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Technical Theatre: A Practical Introduction 1st Edition by Christine A. White  Hodder Education Publishers; 1edition, 2001

 

Technical Theater for Nontechnical People, 2nd Edition Paperback by Drew CampbellAllworth; 2nd edition,2004

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Technical Theatre: A Practical Introduction 1st Edition by Christine A. White  Hodder Education Publishers; 1edition, 2001
Evaluation Pattern

Practical performance and Poster/Brochure exhibition will be the End Semester Examination

ENG221 - ENGLISH - II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Learning Outcome

·         Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities and politics

·         Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

·         Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

·         Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
food
 

1.  Long text:    Witches’ Loaves

O Henry

2.   Short text:  Portion size is the trick!!!

By Ranjani Raman

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Presentation skills

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Fashion
 

1.Long text: In the Height of Fashion-Henry Lawson

 

2. short text: Crazy for Fashion- BabatundeAremu

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Report writing

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Group Discussion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Architecture
 

1.    long text:  Bharat Bhavan

By Charles Correa

2.   Short text:  The Plain Sense of Things

By Wallace Stevens

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Management
 

1.Long Text: The Amazing Dabbawalas of Mumbai- ShivaniPandita

 

2. Short Text:

If

By Rudyard Kupling

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Interview skills and CV writing

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
History
 

1.    Long tet: Whose Ambedkar is he anyway?

           By KanchaIlaiah

 

2. Short text: Dhauli

By JayantaMahapatra

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Developing arguments- debating

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Letter writing and email writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
War
 

1.    Long text: An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

By Ambrose Bierce

2.     Short text: Strange meeting

By Wilfred Owen

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Ethics of writing on social media platforms

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Social Media
 

1.Long text: Facebook and the Epiphanator: An

End to Endings?

            By Paul Ford

2. Short text:  'Truth in the time of Social Media' by Girish Balachandran

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
visual text
 

BBC Documentary- Dabbawalas

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

teacher manual and worksheets that teachers would provide. Listening skills worksheets.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1- 20

MSE-50

CIA3- 20

ESE- 50 online and 50 written

EST231 - BRITISH LITERATURE: LATE VICTORIAN TO THE PRESENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course will build on the previous course and continue the objectives of the previous course. The completion of this course should provide sufficientground to introduce literary theory in their fourth semester and postcolonial studies in the later semesters.

 

Course Objectives

 

  • To introduce  students to the socio-political, religious, cultural, and linguistic aspects of the UK through English literary texts
  • To help students understand texts as products of a historical, political and cultural processes
  • To enable students to identify different forms, genres and subgenres in literature
  • To sensitize students to human values through an exposure to socio-historical concerns of subjectivity, identity, community and nationhood.
  • To sharpen critical appreciation and analytical writing skills through an introduction to models of literary criticism

Learning Outcome

Awareness of the production, dissemination and reception of literary material in England across different eras and the contemporary debates and trends they stimulate and cognizance of classical forms, genres and styles of literature

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Middle, Late Victorian Age and After
 

Darwin and the publication of Origin of Species, Victorian morality, utilitarianism, working class struggles, realism, naturalism, neorealism, Marxism 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Early Twentieth Century
 

Modernism, The World Wars, The Boer war, Russian revolution, Surrealism, Cubism, Expressionism

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Late Twentieth Century to the Present Day
 

British Beat Generation, Performance Poetry, Postmodernism, Diaspora, Multiculturalism, Hybridity

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Alfred Lord Tennyson: “Ulysses”

Robert Browning: “Porphyria’s Lover”

Gerald Manley Hopkins: “TheWindhover”

Charles Dickens: Great Expectations/David Copperfield/Tale of Two Cities

Bernard Shaw: Pygmalion

W B Yeats: “Easter 1916”

T.S. Eliot: “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”

James Joyce: “The Dead”

Katherine Mansfield: “A Cup of Tea”

 Harold Pinter: The Birthday Party

Adrien Mitchell: “The Question”

Ted Hughes: “Hawk Roosting”

Benjamin Zephaniah: “Dis Poetry”

Neil Gaiman: Coraline

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 8th Ed. New York: Wardworth, 2005. Print.

Corcoran, Neil. The Cambridge Companion to Twentieth-CenturyEnglish Poetry. Cambridge: CUP, 2007. Print

Davis, Alex, and Lee M Jenkins. The Cambridge Companion to Modernist Poetry. Cambridge: CUP, 2007. Print

Ferguson, Margaret, Mary Jo Salter and Jon Stallworthy. Eds. The Norton Anthology of Poetry. 4th Ed. New York: WW Norton, 1996. Print

Gupta, Ambika Sen. Selected College Poems. Rpt. Hyderabad: Orient Longman,1999. Print

The Cambridge Companion to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2007.Print.

John, Eileen, and Dominic McIver Lopes. Philosophy of Literature: Contemporary and Classic Readings. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004. Print

Kaplan, Fred, and Monod, Sylvere. Hard Times. New York: WW Norton, 2002. Print

Sampson, George. The Concise Cambridge History of English Literature, 3rd Ed. Cambridge: CUP, 2005. Print

 

 Ramarao, Vimala,. Ed. Explorations. Vol II. Bangalore: Prasaranga, Bangalore. Print

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

 

1. A class test / presentation / exhibition/ performance based on the texts prescribed

 

CIA III

 

       1. A moodle test on the play / short stories/ age

 

These are a few suggested CIAs. However, during the course of teaching, there could be other suggestions, and CIAs could be slightly modified based on class dynamics and calibre of students.

 

Selected Texts chosen to be taught may be revised / used as extended reading which may be tested in CIA 1, 2 or 3.

 

Mid Semester Examination CIA II: 2 hrs

 

Section A: Short Notes – 5x3 marks= 15 (5 questions out of 7)

Section B: Essay Questions – 2x10 marks = 20 (2 questions out of 3)

Section C: Long Essay Questions – 1x15 marks = 15 (1 question out of 2)

 

Total: 50 Marks

 

End Semester Examination Pattern

 

Section A: Short Notes – 10x3 marks = 30 (10 questions out of12)

Section B: Essay Questions – 4x10 marks = 40 (4 questions out of 6)

Section C: Long Essay Questions – 2x15 marks = 30 (2 questions out of 4)

 

Total: 100 Marks

 

Notes:

 

  1. For all texts Norton Editions are to be treated as the official prescribed editions.
  2. For critical material The Cambridge Companion Series of CUP, Case Book Series of Macmillan and Palgrave, and Norton series of WW Norton are officially prescribed.

FRN221 - FRENCH (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the UG program

Learning Outcome

Enhancement of linguistic competencies and sharpening of written and oral communicative skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 4- Culture: A country of Vacations
 

Lesson 1: Hobbies

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 4- Culture: A country of Vacations
 

Lesson 2: The routine

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Poem
 

1. Demain dès l'aube - Victor Hugo

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 5 - I discover
 

Lesson 1 : Where to shop?

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 5: I discover
 

Lesson 2: Discover and Taste

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Visual Text
 

A French Film

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 6- Culture: Gourmet Countries
 

Lesson 1: Everyone is having fun

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
Poem
 

2. Le Lac - Alphonse de Lamartine

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 6- Culture: Gourmet countries
 

Lesson 2: Daily routine of Teenagers

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.  Cocton, Marie-Noelle. Génération A1. Paris : Didier, 2016 

2.   Poèmes : Demain dès l'aube par Victor Hugo & Le Lac par Alphonse de Lamartine (contenu rédigé sur ligne)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Thakker, Viral. Plaisir d’écrire. New Delhi : Langers International Pvt. Ltd., 2011

2.      French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignment & MOODLE Testing (Quiz)

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 –DELF Pattern: Listening and Speaking /Role Play / Theatre

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN221 - HINDI (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The text book ”Samakaleen Kahaniyam is a story collection edited by Dr.Vanaja  Published by Rajpal and sons, New Delhi.  In this semester Film appreciation is also included along with Conversation Writing.

Learning Outcome

Students are exposed to the world of Hindi fiction particularly short stories. Film appreciation helps them to improve their writing and analytical skills and know more about the thematic and technical aspects of Cinema. Conversation writing will enhance their Oral,written as wellas the communication skills..

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
Samakaleen Kahaniyam
 

The text book “  Samakaleen Kahaniyam    ” is a story collection edited by Dr. Vanaja from contemporary writers of Hindi Literature.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Film Studies
 

  • Theesari Kasam, English-Vinglish,Dangal and Ankur.                                           ,
  • Bharathiya cenema ke vikhyath kalakar,
  • Satyajit Roy,Girish Kasaravalli,Dadasaheb Phalke,Shyam Benegal and Adoor Gopalakrishnan.
  • Movie review.                                             

Level of knowledge: Conceptual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Conversation Writing
 

At least 10 exchanges each on the given context.                                                                                                                                                                               

Level of knowledge: Basic

Text Books And Reference Books:

Story Collection‘Samakaleen kahaniyam’ (Full Text) Edited By: Dr. Vanaja Published By: Rajpal and Sons Kashmiri Gate, New Delhi-6.

Level of knowledge: Analytical

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

‘Samakaleen kahaniyam

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-wikipedia)

CIA-2(Mid semester examination(

CIA-3(Digital learning-Wikipedia)

End semester examination

KAN221 - KANNADA (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Two texts are prescribed for this course. The one is a Play (AMRAPALI) written by a famous Kannada writer Dr. Prabhushankar, and the other one is a selection of short stories, essays and academic science writings.

The Legend of Amrapali originated in the Buddhist Jataka Tales some 1500 years ago. Amrapali is a great character in the Indian history. She was known as a dancer and also a philosophical thoughts oriented woman. A key goal of this course will be to familiarize students with the basic techniques of analysing written drama and its stages performances. The selected prose will extend the concerns of Environment, Current Marketing trend, Folk beliefs and social justice.

Course Objectives: Students will be able to read drama scripts in Kannada and understand main ideas and details in different kinds of dramatic scripts.  The Play improves listening comprehension of different types of spoken texts-for main ideas, details and speakers’ attitude and emotions. It helps in develop and use language learning strategies for all language skills.

Learning Outcome

To demonstrate knowledge of theatre and literature and draw connections between theatrical practices and social contexts in both modern and pre modern periods.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Text-1 AMRAPALI- DR. S. PRABHUSHANKARA
 

Act-1 ( Scene-1 ) Pages 07-13

Act-1 ( Scene-2 ) Pages 13-19

Act-1 ( Scene-3 ) Pages 19-28

Act-1 ( Scene-4 ) Pages 20-42

Act-2 ( Scene-1 ) Pages 42-50

Act-2 ( Scene-2 ) Pages 50-58

Act-2 ( Scene-2 ) Pages 59-65

Act-2 ( Scene-2 ) Pages 66-70

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Text-2 selection of short stories, essays and academic science writings.
 

1.     

1.      Pashchimaghattagala Patana- Nagesh Hegde

2.      Aeroplane mattu Chitte- K.P. Poornachandra Tejaswi

3.      Dheerakumara- Ed. Gee Sham Paramashiviah

4.      Post Master- Ravindranath Tagore (Translated by Ahobala Shankara)

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Writing Skills
 
  1. Essay Writing
  2. Conversation Writing
  3. Letter Writing
Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Adhunika Kannada Nataka- K. Marulasiddappa

2. Kannada Sahitya Charithre- Rum Shri Mugali

3. Ranga prapancha- K.V. Akshara

4. Kannadada Hadu Padu: K.C. Shivareddy

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Yajamanya Sankathana- T. Venkateshmuthy

2. Desheeya Chinthana- Chandrashekara Kambara

3. Yugadharma hagu Sahitya Darshana- Keerthinatha Kurthukoti

Evaluation Pattern
 

 

CIA-1 Book Review - 20 Marks

CIA-2 Mid Semsester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA-3 Written Assignments - 20 Marks

End Semester Examination- 50 Marks

Attendance: 05 Marks 

PSY231 - BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is conceptualised to help students understand basic cognitive processes as they affect the individual. The course introduces students about different cognitive concepts such as perception, memory, attention, intelligence, language and thought in the various manifestations of the study of mind and behaviour. It introduces the basic framework on how psychologists scientifically study and understand the cognitive processes through various quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry. The course also takes through the various applications on how the human mind works in different situations and in our everyday life such as the applications of human memory in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and modern machines. Students will have the opportunity to examine these concepts from multiple psychological perspectives and to reflect upon the applicability of these concepts. This course will help the learner learn about

  1. How people perceive, learn, represent, remember and use information.
  2. To develop an understanding of the influence of behaviour, cognition, and states of consciousness and behaviour.
  3. To appreciate the use of various models, theories and methods in understanding cognitive processes.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  1. Define the basic cognitive process that influence behaviour
  2. Explain how the influence of behaviour, cognition, and the environment affects behaviour.
  3. Compare and contrast various models, theories and methods in understanding cognitive processes.
  4. Apply these concepts to explain everyday life events and situation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Sensation and Perception
 

An introduction to the study of the human senses and perceptual processes. We will trace what happens to the physical stimulus as our sensory systems analyze it to produce complicated perceptions of the world around us. We will explore the fact that many complex perceptual phenomena draw upon explanations at the physiological, psychological, and cognitive levels. Topics on sensory perception in non-human animals may also be covered. Data gathered from psychophysical research and studies of both humans, and other animals will be discussed. The unit will review the mechanisms and principles of operation of vision, hearing, touch, taste and smell.

  1. Differentiate between sensation and perception
  2. Explain the process of vision and how people see colour and depth
  3. Explain the basics of hearing, taste, smell, touch, pain, and the vestibular sense
  4. Define perception and give examples of gestalt principles and multimodal perception

 Laboratory Demonstration: Illusion experiment, Depth Perception, Colour Blindness test, Dexterity test 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Memory and Forgetting
 

The unit is designed to provide a comprehensive account of modern experimental and theoretical approaches to the study of human memory. The course integrates experimental findings with neuropsychological and neurophysiological data and illustrates how basic concepts can illuminate phenomena such as organic and functional amnesia, childhood memory, and everyday forgetting.

  1. Describe and differentiate the various types of learning and memory and the brain regions that underlie these different processes.
  2. Evaluate their understanding of course materials through tests and assignments
  3. Discuss empirical research in the field of memory.
  4. Evaluate their own learning and understand how to improve their learning and memory in different settings.

Laboratory Demonstration: Digit Span, Memory Drum

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Intelligence
 

The unit will help the student explain how psychologists approach the study of intelligence, how intelligence is defined and measured, the problems associated with measurement and how heredity and environment affect intelligence.

  1. The measurement and assessment of intelligence.
  2. Biological and environmental influences on intelligence.
  3. Concepts and nature of Individual differences
  4. Describe intelligence theories and intelligence testing

Laboratory Demonstration: Ravens Test for Intelligence, Creativity

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Cognitive Processes
 

The unit introduces the basic cognitive perspective of psychology and describes key aspects that represent cognition. Contemporary theory and research are surveyed in such areas as attention, pattern and object recognition, knowledge representation, language acquisition and use, reasoning, decision making, problem-solving, and creativity. Applications in artificial intelligence and human/technology interaction are also considered. Students will learn to apply and evaluate the different problem-solving strategies, and different types of psychological assessments study cognitive process. They will be able to outline the strengths and limitations of each concept.

  1. Define cognition and explain the role of concept formation, problem-solving, reasoning
  2. Describe the role language plays in communication and thought
  3. Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence

Laboratory Demonstration: Concept formation, Creativity,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
States of Consciousness
 

Describe different states of consciousness and how these can vary across different situations (i.e., higher-level consciousness, lower-level consciousness, altered state of consciousness, and no consciousness). Topics including sleep, meditation, dreams, jet-lang and drug abuse will be discussed to illustrate the states of consciousness. Outline the different parts of sleep. Apply and evaluate strategies for getting a better night’s sleep.

  1. Describe consciousness and biological rhythms
  2. Describe what happens to the brain and body during sleep
  3. Explain how drugs affect consciousness
Text Books And Reference Books:

Weiten, W. (2014). Psychology: Themes and Variations (Briefer Version, 9th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

King, L. A. (2010). Experience Psychology. McGraw-Hill.

Gazzaniga, Heatherton, Halpern (2015). Psychological Science, 5th Edition, Norton.

Feldman.S.R.(2009).Essentials of understanding psychology ( 7th Ed.) Tata Mc Graw Hill.

Baron, R.A and Misra, G. (2014). Psychology (Indian Subcontinent Edition).Pearson Education Ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT)    

  •  CIA I –Written Assignment /Individual Assignment  - Total Marks 20     
  •  CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                        - Total marks 50                          
  •  CIA III –Activity-based Assignment                        - Total marks 20
  •   CIA I + II + III                                                      = 90 /100 = 45/50 
  •   Attendance                                                            = 5 marks 
  •  Total                                                                      = 100 = 50 

End Semester Examination : Total Marks=100=50

Question paper pattern

  •  Section A        Brief, concepts, definitions, applications               2 marks x 10 = 20
  •  Section B         Short Answers: Conceptual/Application                5 marks x 4   = 20
  •  Section C        Essay Type: Descriptive/Conceptual                       15 marks x 3 = 45
  •  Section D        Compulsory: Case Study (Application)                    15 X 1           = 15

SAN221 - SANSKRIT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Origin and development of Prose to understand the different theories and original nature of Sanskrit literature.Mithralabha from Hithopadesha of Narayana panditha

To develop moral and ethics in the mind of the students

Learning Outcome

Origin and development of sanskrit prose and important literary works  

Appreciate the works in Sanskrit .  The study will have impact on the students.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Origin and development of prose
 

  Origin and development of prose and Introduction to different prose forms     

   Level of knowledge: Basic/conceptual.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Mithralabha from Hitopadesha
 

Mithralabha from Hitopadesha of Narayanapanditha

             Level of knowledge: Basic/conceptual/ Analytical

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Grammar
 

Samasa prakaranam grammatically recognize.      

    conceptual/ Analytical

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:2
language component
 

Composition in sanskrit on the general topics                   

conceptual/ Analytical

Translation of unseen Sanskrit to English                         

            Conceptual/ Analytical

           Comprehension in sanskrit.                                               

conceptual/ Analytical

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Reading :Mithralabha from Hithopadesha of Naraya Panditha

Visual Text : Shankaracharya

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

            Recommended Reading : -

1. "Mithralabha from Hitopadesha" of Narayana Panditha - Srivishwanathasharmana

2. Samskruta shityaparampare by Acharya Baladeva Upadyaya translated by Ramachandra shastri.

3. Sanskrit grammar by M.R. Kale.

4.Samskrutha sahithya parampare by Acharya baladeva upadyaya translatedby Ramachandra shastri.

5. Sanskrit grammar by M.R. Kale

            

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1  Wikipedia assignment    evaluated for 20 marks

CIA 2  Mid-semester examination   Evaluated for 50 marks

CIA 3  Wikipedia assignment     Evaluated for 20 marks

           End semester evaluated for 50 Marks

TES231 - SCHOOLS AND STYLES OF ACTING (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

  • To gain an understanding of acting principles and techniques
  • Develop skills in the analysis and interpretation of dramatic texts for performance
  • Explore basic voice and movement skills to create dramatic effect on stage

Learning Outcome

  • An understanding of practical proficiency in executing the fundamental principles of all Schools and styles of acting techniques to perform diverse characters on stage
  • The ability and willingness to engage in a structured play in an ensemble as an actor

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Acting through the ages
 

 Ancient – Greek and Roman, Medieval European, Elizabethan- Victorian, Modern period, Avant-garde and the contemporary

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Styles of Acting