Department of
SCHOOL-OF-ARCHITECTURE






Syllabus for

Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC131 MYTH HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURE 3 3 100
ARC132 LOGIC OF STRUCTURES 3 3 100
ARC133 ART OF DESCRIPTION 3 3 100
ARC151 DISCOVERING DESIGN 6 9 300
ARC152 CREATIVE INQUIRY 5 3 100
ARC153 TECHNIQUE OF DRAWING - I 4 3 100
ARC154 MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR PHYSICAL WORLD 5 3 100
2 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC231 ARCHITECTURE TRADITIONS - FRAMES 3 03 100
ARC232 LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - FRAMES 3 3 100
ARC233 READING THE SITE 4 3 100
ARC251 DESIGNING THE FRAME 6 9 300
ARC252 ART OF JOINERY 4 3 100
ARC253 TECHNIQUE OF DRAWING - II 4 3 100
ARC254 MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR FRAMES 5 3 100
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC331 MATERIALS AND METHODS IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION III 5 3 100
ARC332 HISTORY AND THEORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND CULTURE III 4 3 100
ARC333 BUILDING STRUCTURES III 3 3 100
ARC334 BUILDING SERVICES I 3 3 100
ARC335 CLIMATE RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE 4 3 100
ARC351 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN III 6 9 300
ARC352 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 4 3 100
4 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC431 MATERIALS AND METHODS IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION IV 5 3 100
ARC432 BUILDING STRUCTURES IV 3 3 100
ARC433 BUILDING SERVICES II 3 3 100
ARC441A VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE 3 3 100
ARC441B THEORY OF DESIGN 3 3 100
ARC441C FURNITURE DESIGN 3 3 100
ARC451 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN IV 6 9 300
ARC452 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II 4 3 100
ARC453 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND LAB IN ARCHITECTURE 5 3 100
5 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC531 MATERIALS AND METHODS IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION V 5 3 100
ARC532 HISTORY AND THEORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND CULTURE IV 4 3 100
ARC533 LANDSCAPE AND SITE PLANNING 3 3 100
ARC534 BUILDING SERVICES III 3 3 100
ARC551 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN V 6 9 300
ARC552 BUILDING STRUCTURES V 5 3 100
ARC553 DIGITAL GRAPHICS AND ART 4 3 100
6 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ARC631 MATERIALS AND METHODS IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION VI 5 3 100
ARC632 HOUSING AND HUMAN SETTLEMENT PLANNING 4 3 100
ARC633 SPECIFICATIONS, ESTIMATION AND COSTING 3 3 100
ARC634 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE - I 3 3 100
ARC641A APPROPRIATE BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES 4 3 100
ARC641B EARTHQUAKE RESISTANT ARCHITECTURE 4 3 100
ARC641C INTERIOR DESIGN 4 3 100
ARC641D ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN WITH STEEL 4 3 100
ARC641E THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF BUILDINGS 4 3 100
ARC641F MAPPING TECHNIQUES 4 3 100
ARC641G RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 4 3 100
ARC651 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VI 6 9 300
ARC652 BUILDING STRUCTURES VI 5 3 100
        

  

Assesment Pattern

The assessment pattern comprises of two components; the Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the End Semester Examination (ESE). The weightage of marks for subjects having both CIA marks as well as ESE marks have the ratio of 50:50. The courses are classified into two types – Studio Courses and Theory Courses.

a.        CREDIT STRUCTURE As referred in the detailed syllabus

b.        CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (CIA): 50%

1. The students shall be continuously assessed towards their CIA which comprises of creative and innovative assignments. The CIA shall have four components of CIA 1, CIA 2, CIA 3 and Attendance (Refer Table 1 and Table 2)

2. CIA 1, 2 and 3 for Studio courses and CIA 1 and 3 for Theory courses shall be conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments. Students need to complete the assignments within the stipulated time for award of marks.

3. CIA 2 for Theory courses shall be conducted in the form of Mid Semester Examination.

4.  A minimum of 50% in CIA is required to appear for the End Semester Examination (ESE) of a particular course

 

Table 1 COMPONENTS OF CIA

Sl No

Components

Architectural Design

(Marks)

All other Courses

(Marks)

1

CIA – 1

25

10

2

CIA – 2

50

15

3

CIA – 3

70

20

4

Attendance

05

05

 

Total CIA

150

50

 

Table 2 ATTENDANCE MARKS

Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% - 100%

05

90% - 94%

04

85% - 89%

03

80% - 85%

02

76% - 79%

01

 

c.        END SEMESTER EXAMINATION (ESE): 50%

1. End semester examinations shall be conducted for all courses.

2. Eligibility to appear for ESE is score of minimum 50% in CIA.

3. The Theory courses shall have a written exam of three-hour duration. The Studio courses shall have a Viva Voce evaluated by an external examiner and internal examiner of the portfolio presentation.

4. An examiner for any of the subjects of examination shall have a minimum of 3 years teaching/professional experience in his/her field of study.

 

d.        PASS CRITERIA

1. A student shall pass each course with a minimum aggregate (CIA+ESE) of 45% and a minimum CIA Score of 50% and ESE score of 40%.

2. The overall aggregate of 50% and pass in all courses is required to pass the semester.

3. Students passing the semester shall be awarded different class as per Table 3

4. Students passing the programme shall be awarded different class asper Table 3

5. The maximum duration to complete the programme is two years beyond the prescribed minimum duration of the programme i.e. seven years.

e.        GRADING PATTERN

Grading system: Grades are awarded based on absolute grading. The University follows a 4-point grading system. However, the transcripts will also show grading on a 10-point scale.

1. All marks cards will indicate the marks, grade and Grade Point Average.

2. The Grade Point Average is calculated as follows: For each subject, multiply the grade points with the Number of Credits; divide the sum of product by the total number of credits.

3. The CGPA (Cumulative Grade Point Average) is calculated by adding the total number of earned points (GP x Cr) for all completed semesters and dividing by the total number of credits for completed semesters.

Table 3 GRADING SCHEME FOR SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Percentage

Grade

Grade Points 4-Point Scale

Grade Points 10-Point Scale

Interpretation

Class

80 – 100

A+

4.00

10.00

Excellent

First Class with Distinction

75 – 79

A

3.75

9.38

Very Good

70 – 74

A-

3.50

8.75

Good

First Class

65 – 69

B+

3.00

7.50

Good

60 – 64

B

2.50

6.25

Above Average

55 – 59

C+

2.00

5.00

Average

Second Class

50 – 54

C

1.50

3.75

Satisfactory

45 – 49

C-

1.00

2.50

Poor

Pass

0 – 44

F

0.00

0.00

Fails

Fail

 

f.       PROMOTION POLICY

1.     Candidates who have not passed in at least 50% of the courses of the previous semesters are not promoted to the next year.

2.     Should pass in all the courses of the first year to be promoted to the third year.

3.     Should pass in all the courses of the first and second years to be promoted to the fourth year.

4.      Should pass in all the courses of the first, second and third years to be promoted to the fifth year.

Examination And Assesments

The B Arch Programme offers theory and studio courses. The theory courses conduct periodical Continous Internal Assesments (CIA) which includes tests, assignments and attendance to evaluate the students' progress. Each course would culminate with an End Semester Exmination (ESE) conducted centrally by the University.

The Studio courses are continuously evaluated through reviews, assignments and time problems, which accumulates as CIA marks. The ESE will be conducted through Viva-voce, reviewed and marked by an external examiner.

Department Overview:
The School of Architecture, approved by the Council of Architecture (COA) New Delhi and All India Council of Technical Education (AICTE) India, is conceived in the Academic year 2017-18. It offers a five-year Bachelor's Degree Program in Architecture aspiring to make a compelling presence in the field of Architectural education. The School's core strength of academic rigour focuses on experiential learning as a pedagogy, specialisation of faculty, the best of infrastructure facilities and involvement of practising architects in design teaching.
Mission Statement:
VISION: The School of Architecture CHRIST is dedicated to an architectural education through excellence and rigour in learning, research and community engagement to nurture individuals to become ethical professionals, creative designers and responsible citizens. MISSION We believe in a responsible design thinking that is deeply sensitive to ecology, cultural diversity and social equity. Architectural education at our School will nurture inquisitiveness, creative inquiry and critical think
Introduction to Program:
The Bachelor's Degree Program in Architecture, affiliated to the Christ University, is a five-year program approved by the Council of Architecture New Delhi. The Programme has two components, Studio and Theory. Theory encompasses the current theoretical positions on Architecture, understanding historical precedents of built environment in India and across the world, Building sciences and Technology. Studio courses address the issues of methods in documentation, analysis and interpretations and design process of physical environments. The studio cycle is aimed at developing design language, tools and skills to design sustainable built environments. The programme entails Practical training of one semester with a registered practising architect. The Programme thus intends to render a holistic understanding of Architecture. The Board of Studies members includes acclaimed academicians and leading architects; Prof Neelkant Chhaya, Former Dean of Faculty of Architecture, CEPT University; Ar. Prem Chandavarkar, Managing partner of CnT Architects. A. ADMISSION Admission to the Bachelor of Architecture to all the candidates who have passed the Qualifying Examination of an examination at the end of the 10+2 scheme of examination of Central/State Govts with at least 50% aggregate marks in Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics and also 50% marks in aggregate of the 10+2 level examination or passed 10+3 Diploma Examination with mathematics as compulsory subject with at least 50% marks in
Program Objective:
Programme Objective: The B Arch Programme intends a deep immersion in an ecosophical perspective of architecture, as part of an inspired understanding of larger discourses: environmental, social, political, artistic and technological. Programme Outcomes: Sensitivity: a. Sensitize students to be socially and environmentally responsible and to work effectively in multi-disciplinary teams within the field of human habitat. b. Engage learners in community outreach programs and assimilate knowledge in built environment related disciplines that are relevant to ethical practice in architecture. Knowledge: a. Nurture quality education that enables use and extension of appropriate knowledge for designing built environment. b. Stimulate and develop critical thinking to assess existing environment in the service of the discipline of architecture. c. Offer sound knowledge in design theories and their applications, building technology, social, cultural and environmental factors. d. Learning to apply interdisciplinary knowledge and use tools that enable it. Skilled practice: a. Inculcate skills necessary for the physical, social and creative realms of crafting architecture. b. Prepare students to recognize and act upon opportunities and aspirations. c. Instill creative problem-solving skills by offering active and experiential learning by working with varied materials and media; d. Develop skills to demonstrate design concepts and solutions, and adopt effective communi

ARC131 - MYTH HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURE (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives: 

To develop the ability to critically understand concepts of built environment through history.

To experience the correlation of man, nature and their living habitat.

To understand, interpret and analyse art history through the integrated modules ARC 131 Unit-3 Art as a Medium of Representation & Expression and ARC 133 Unit-3 De-Scribe Art

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to describe the different ways Man relates to nature through time and his various ways of inhabiting it. Level: Basic 

CO2: Ability to differentiate between Myth - History and their significance to culture. Level: Basic 

CO3: Ability to conceptualize the relation between architecture and materials as integral elements of local ecology and cultural practices. Level: Basic

CO4: Ability to appreciate the ways in which art reflects or communicate social, political, economic, ideological and religious values. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Relationship between man & nature
 
  1. Introduction to History of built environment and Man’s relationship with Nature through the experience gained from the Studio-On-Wheels.
  2. Natural elements as a beginning of source, resource, ritual, society, culture, tradition & civilization and their progressive development through different ages with relevant examples.
  3. Tribal art, craft and architecture - local, regional and global.
  4. Myth and History and their relationship to architecture. 
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Material Culture
 

Material as an integral dimension of culture and to explore material resources through time and place with appropriate examples of Prehistoric art and architecture.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Art as a Medium of Representation & Expression
 
  1. Introduction to Art and Craft through history.
  2. Art as an important part of culture - as a form of representation, critique and information through diverse examples and illustrate.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 
  1. Master classes should focus on relevant topics.
  2. Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible. 
Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F., Jarzombek, M., & Prakash, V. (2011). A global history of architecture (2nd ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.

T2. Crouch, P. D. (1985). History of Architecture: Stonehenge to Skyscrapers. London: McGraw-Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Gardner, H., Kleiner, F. S., & Mamiya, C. J. (2006). Gardner's art through the ages: The Western perspective. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.

R2. Roa, A., Ketkar. S (2017) The History of Indian Art. (1st ed.). Jyotsna Prakashan. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I -10 Marks; CIA II - 15 Marks; CIA III - 20 Marks; ATTENDANCE - 5 Marks

TOTAL CIA - 50 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

ARC132 - LOGIC OF STRUCTURES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course intends to develop an informed intuition for structures by emphasizing the underlying concepts and synergy of form and structure. 

It aims to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture actively, through other courses offered in the Semester.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To comprehend and describe the basics of structures and structural systems. Level: Basic

CO2: To describe the basic principles of mechanics. Level: Basic 

CO3: To comprehend and evaluate the loads on structures & balancing the same Level: Intermediate

CO4: To conceptualize the idea of triangulation and evaluate the loads in trusses. Level: Intermediate 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Studio on wheels - The Beginning of Architecture
 
  1. Structure in Nature: Reading Structure in Natural Forms - Plants, Animals, Insects etc.
  2. Structure of Everyday objects: Baskets, Furniture, Ladder, spectacles, bags etc.
  3. Evolution of Structures: What makes buildings stand up.  Understanding Gravity. Historical perspective and definition of structure.
  4. Structural systems overview: Geometry of forces. Introduction to Loads. Vertical/lateral systems
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Study of Materials
 
  1. Experiment with structures
  2. Structural Materials: Mechanical properties of Structural materials
  3. Loads on Structures: Dead load (DL), live load (LL), static, dynamic, impact, and thermal loads.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Study of Forces, Stress/strain relationship
 
  1. Principle of transmissibility of forces: Understanding load flow
  2. Equilibrium of Forces: Force, Reaction, Moment and Principle of Support conditions and their significance.
  3. Basic principles of mechanics: Tension, compression, shear, bending, torsion; symbols and notations; force and stress.
  4. Stress/strain relations (Hooke's Law): Modulus of Elasticity.
  5. Graphic vector analysis: Resultant and equilibrant of coplanar, concurrent and non-concurrent force systems. 
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Truss (Guest lecture/Site Visits) along with MMBC
 
  1. Truss: Truss concept of triangulation, common truss configurations.
  2. Truss loads and reactions: Calculations of the dead weight of the truss and roof cover and support reaction loads.
Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Bansal, R., & Bansal, S. (2015). Engineering Mechanics. New Delhi: Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd.

T2. Salvadori, M., & Heller, R. (1985). Structure in Architecture: The Building of Buildings. Prentice Hall; 3rd Revised edition. 

T3. Salvadori, M., Hooker, S., & Ragus, C. (1980). Why buildings stand up: The strength of architecture. New York: Norton. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Schierle, G. (2008). Structure and Design. University Readers.

R2. Schodek, D., & Bechthold, M. (2013). Structures. Pearson; 7th Edition.

R3. Singer, F. (1975). Engineering Mechanics. Weatherhill: Harper & Row, 3rd Edition.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: 10 marks; CIA II: 15 marks; CIA III: 20 marks; Attendance: 5 marks

ESE: 50 marks

Total : 100 marks

ARC133 - ART OF DESCRIPTION (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introduction to different forms of communication - verbal, visual, artistic and written media, in order to discover one-self and realise one’s own potential in these forms. 

Orientation to new forms of perceiving and expression of the self and surroundings extending beyond one’s conditioning. 

Developing responsiveness to information for comprehension, expression and creation in a tangible manner.

Learning Outcome

CO1:  Ability to express in various forms of communication of verbal, visual and written. To know more about the self and to realise the potential, strengths and challenges in each form of communication. Level: Basic  

CO2: Ability to recognise new forms of perceiving and expression in context of self and surroundings. To learn to express one’s thoughts and attitudes through various media. Level: Basic  

CO3: Ability to see art and express as a medium of communication. Level: Intermediate  

CO4: Ability to put together a well done portfolio of what has been learnt in all courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Me and Nature
 

Observing, learning and appreciation of nature through various media.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Voice of Materials
 

Listening to context and what environments say, by exploring, reading, writing and performing in a descriptive and poetical manner.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
De-Scribe Art
 

Exploring the visual and artistic medium for appreciation, comprehension and expression. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Portfolio Development and Exhibition
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Sen, G. (2013). Your history gets in the way of my memory: Essays on Indian artists. India: Happer Collins.Jones, L. (2001).

T2. Jones,L. (2001). Working In English. Cambridge University Press. 

T3. Mudambadithaya, G. (2011). Communicative English for Professional Courses. Sapna Publishing House. 

T4. Taylor, G. (2011). English Conversation Practice. McGraw Hill Education; First edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Meuser, P., 1969-, & Pogade, D. (2010). Wayfinding and Signage: Construction and Design Manual. Berlin: DOM Publishers. 

R2. Ambrose, G., & Harris, P. (2010). Design thinking for visual communication (Second edition.). London: Bloomsbury.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: 10 marks; CIA II: 15 marks; CIA III: 20 marks; Attendance: 5 marks

ESE: 50 marks

 

ARC151 - DISCOVERING DESIGN (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Foundation Year Studio aims at introduction to the built environment in a natural setting. Orientation to the realm of architecture through an exploration of sensorial and artistic experience of natural and built environment in that setting. Unfold through exploring art & culture, craft, material & technology.  Introduce architectural design thinking by helping students to recognize design in natural, cultural and everyday environment.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to observe and document the natural world and the built environment in sensorial, poetic and technical manner. Level: Basic  

CO2: Ability to recognise concepts in architecture related to “my space” - form, scale and anthropometry. Level: Basic  

CO3: Ability to see art in the simple details and elements of architecture. Level: Intermediate  

CO4: Ability to put together a well-done portfolio of what has been learnt in all courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Understanding Nature
 

1. Travel to a natural setting to explore, document and represent Nature and the local culture through its art, craft, rituals and practices.   

2. Trace the relationship of the local built-environment with the ecology of the place.

3. Introduction to the discipline of architecture and the role of the architect in shaping the built-environment and its relationship with ecology and people.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Shape of Space
 

1. Introduction to concepts of architecture –

a. space, form, structure, material, geometry, pattern, proportion, mass, transparency etc.

b. flexibility, modularity, strength.

c. scale and proportion

d. architectural space - enclosure, partition, stacking, interconnection, separation, accumulation, connection, floating, climbing. 

2. Illustrate how these concepts are manifested in experiential and tangible ways.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Architecture as Art
 

1. Appreciating the art of architecture through making and representation as a way of looking at world.

2. Undertake group and individual exercises that are sculptural and begin to suggest architectural space.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Portfolio Development and Representation
 

To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley. T2. Callender, J. (1997). Time-saver Standards for Architectural Design Data (7th Revised edition edition ed.). McGraw-Hill Inc.,US. 

T2. Chakrabarti, D. (1997). Indian Anthropometric Dimensions: For Ergonomic Design Practice. National Institute of Design.

T3. The American Institute of Architects. (2016). Architectural Graphic Standards (Ramsey/Sleeper Architectural Graphic Standards Series) (12th Revised ed.). John Wiley & Sons.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Pandya, Y. (2015). Elements of Spacemaking. Ahmedabad: Mapin Publishing Pvt Ltd. 

R2. Gill, R. (1990). Rendering with Pen and Ink. Thames & Hudson Ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Cumulative): 150 marks

ESE: 150 marks

ARC152 - CREATIVE INQUIRY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The studio introduces students to creative inquiry as a way of learning about the world around us.  This is done through empirical, perceptive and representational exercises and techniques that:

1. Sensitises them to the diversity and heterogeneity of our ‘local’ culture.

2. Focuses on an aesthetical thinking through process-based techniques which can enhance the student’s aesthetic sense, creativity, responsiveness to the local ecology.

3. Encourages a reflective and thoughtful attitude to the context and environment in which they live. 

4. Helps connect the student’s creativity and aesthetic sensibility to the local knowledge and culture of their environment. They learn and adapt from the diversity of craftsmanship and interpret local knowledge and traditions.

5. Encourages group learning, effective communication, recognising responsibilities and cognitive coordination between social and emotional skills of the students.

Education responds to changing sensibilities, environment and scale of activity. Einstein mentions that education is not the learning of facts; rather, it is the training of the mind to think. The studio integrates activities which are process based, experience based in an open ended learning process. It aims for an:

1. Introduction to ‘design and the environment’.

2. Introduction to different media and rendering techniques.

3. Introduction to principles of composition

4. Developing a keen sensitivity to space, scale, proportion, light, wind, sound, texture.

5. Practice of basic principles of free hand drawing and colour.

6. Introduction to representation of human body and anthropometrics /ergonomics.

7. Introduction to translate abstract principles of design into architectural process, forms and solutions. 

8. Explore one’s own strengths and weakness, aptitude and sensibilities, fears and insecurities. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to recognize the realm of architecture and the range of ‘subjects’ that an architect needs to engage with.  Level: Basic   CO1 & 2:  Ability to sensitively observe and record various aspects of the immediate environment including human relationships, visual language, aesthetic characteristics and space, elements of nature, etc.  Level: Basic  

CO2: Ability to achieve skills of visualisation and communication, through different mediums and processes. Understanding basic graphic design theory and the ability to put them into practice including a holistic learning of colour theory. Level: Basic

CO3:  Awareness of a range of materials used in making our manmade environment and a handson ability to make different objects and artwork using some of them. Familiarity with traditional and contemporary skills in the use and crafting of materials. Level: Basic  

CO4: Ability for critical thinking, analysis, interpretation and communication in the context of spatial design.  Level: Intermediate  

CO5: Develop capability to understand different layers that forms an urban architectural fabric, exposing them to the interconnections of architecture with other disciplines like sociology, anthropology. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Orientation and Sensing Nature
 

Orientation Week [Integrated with ARC151, ARC153 and ARC154}

The orientation programme focuses on an introduction to the B.Arch Program, the Institutional Culture and Realm of Architecture through various activities and specific exercises.  It also focuses on a soft skill development program through different exploratory exercises.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Studio on Wheels: Seeing the Natural Environment around us.
 

1. Getting familiar with our immediate surroundings. 

2. Observing, experiencing, and analyzing the natural environment and how we inhabit it. 

3. Exploring and learning about human abilities like perception, intuition, observation, etc. 

4. Learning how identification, analysis and naming are cultural processes.   Engaging our senses through nature walks (seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, tasting). 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Discovering Materials and learning to use them
 

1. ‘Seeing’ materials around us, natural and man-made.

2. Understanding and experiencing characteristics, general usage of materials, properties and behaviour.

3. Getting familiar with tools and their use in traditional and contemporary practices

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Art and Design
 

1. Introduction to Art and basic principles.

2. Critical role of art in culture and society.

3. Drawing as an extension of seeing and as a basic tool towards different visualization techniques and representational techniques. 

4. Different ways of drawing and introduction to various techniques.

5. Origin of Design and its history.

6. Elements of design.

7. Developing skills of analysis, synthesis, interpretation and communication through elements and composition

8. Introduction to theory of visual perception through colour, form, space, light and shadow, texture and tones. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Portfolio development
 

To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the course. Establish connections with other courses where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Dondis, D. A. (1973). A primer of visual literacy. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

T2. Berger, J., Dibb, M., & BBC Enterprises. (1972). Ways of seeing. London: BBC Enterprises.

T3. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, space, & order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Ching, F., & Juroszek, S. P. (2010). Design drawing (2nd ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons. 

R2. Tanchis, A., & Munari, B. (1987). Bruno Munari: Design as art. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

R3. Norman, D. A. (2002). The Design of Everyday Things (1st Basic paperback.). New York: Basic Books.

R4. Edwards, B. (1986). Drawing on the artist within: a guide to innovation, invention, imagination, and creativity. New York: Simon and Schuster. 

Online Resources:

W1.www.oppenculture.com

W2.www.gutenberg.org

R5. Escher, M. C., Bool, F., Locher, J. L., & Escher, M. C. (1982). M.C. Escher, his life and complete graphic work: With a fully illustrated catalogue. New York: H.N. Abrams.

R6. Albers, J. (2006). Interaction of color. New Haven [Conn.: Yale University Press.

R7. Papanek, V. J. (1984). Design for the real world: Human ecology and social change. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Co.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Cumulative): 50 marks

ESE : 50 marks

ARC153 - TECHNIQUE OF DRAWING - I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course is an introduction to architectural representation techniques. It enhances the drawing visualization and representation skills emphasizing technical drawing as a medium of communication for basic vocabulary in architecture. It builds an introduction to graphic tools, techniques, and conventions, designers use to communicate architectural ideas. It introduces, techniques of drawing to generate orthographic projections, 2D and 3D representations, reading scale and surface developments used in architecture.

Course objectives: To introduce the fundamental geometric principles involved in architectural drawing.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to use different drawing tools and equipment. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to do freehand sketches/drawings following the basic principles of line drawing. Level: Basic

CO3: Acquire skills and learn techniques of geometric drawing to represent basic shapes and forms leading to architectural graphics.Level: Basic

CO4: Ability to present in a Portfolio, the subject content and work produced in a legible and comprehensive manner and to demonstrate its relevance in the context of other subjects in the semester. Level: Basic 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Representing Nature
 

1.Introduction to Line as a basic tool in representation. Explore the geometry found in Nature, Art and Craft.

2.Develop drawing as a tool to represent the observations from Nature. 

3.Types of drawing.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Scale, Lettering and Geometry
 

1.Concept of Scales.

2.Understanding Lettering as a tool to reveal geometry of shapes and forms.

3.Introduction to Euclidean geometry and curves.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Orthographic Projections
 

1.Introduction to projections and understanding orthographic projection as the base of an architectural drawing.

2.Sections and development of lateral surfaces of solids

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Bhatt, N. D. (2014). Engineering Drawing. Anand, India: Charotar Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.

T2. Venugopal, K. (2004). Engineering Drawing and Graphics. New Age International Publishers.

T3. Cooper Douglas (2007). Drawing and Perceiving. Van Nostrand Reinhold.  

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Francis, D. K. Ching, (2014). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order, Wiley publishers.

R2. Francis, D. K. Ching, (2015). Architectural Graphics. Wiley publishers.

R3. Alexander, W. White, (2011). The Elements of Graphic Design, Allworth Press.

R4. Victor Perard (2006). Anatomy and Drawing. Harper Publishers.

R5. Robert W. Gill (1984).  Rendering with Pen and Ink. The Thames & Hudson Manuals. 

R6. Barrington Barber (2014). The Fundamentals of Drawing. Arcturus Publishers.

Online Resources:

W1. The Complete Manual Of Typography, by James Felici.

http://ptgmedia.pearsoncmg.com/images/9780321773265/samplepages/0321773268.pdf 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA- 50

ESE- 50

ARC154 - MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR PHYSICAL WORLD (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course introduces the idea of exploring materials available in natural setting, their properties and characteristics, methods of preservation and treatment of indigenous materials. It is done through exploration of sensorial understanding. A combined review of portfolios of all core subjects, to be planned between 12th -14th week is also mandatory to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture.

Course objectives: Recognise in the Natural Landscape the resource of materials and structure, forms and filigree in an integrated learning visit to a natural setting.  The learning can begin from specific setting and be extended to the general.

Learn about the properties and characteristics, methods of preservation and treatment of indigenous materials.

To learn about the techniques of using natural materials in the local context and document them in an integrated studio with all core courses.  

Learning Outcome

CO1. To demonstrate and learn from Nature as resource and inspiration for art, design and architecture.
CO2. Ability to explore sensorial understanding of materials.
CO3. The skill to represent materials used in architecture through various mediums. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Handling Materials and Learning Anthropometrics
 

1. Touching, seeing & learning the way material has been woven in the built form.
2. Exploration of anthropometrics.
3. Learning from everyday objects - materials and their use.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Exploring Materials Through Making
 

1. Exploring concepts of strength, hardness, flexibility, malleability & brittleness through different materials.
2. Introduction to mud, bamboo, brick, stone, concrete, steel and glass.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Exploring Construction Techniques of Various material
 

1. Understand the position of materials mentioned in Unit II in the context of building construction.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 

1. Master classes should emphasis on different aspects of material.
2. Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F. D. 1. (1975). Building construction illustrated. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.

T2. Mckay, W. B. (2016). Building Construction Metric (Vol - 1.). Noida: Pearson. 

T3. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing ArchitectureMaterials Processes Structures A Handbook.Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Dunkelberg, K. (1985). IL 31 Bambus Bamboo. Stuttagart: Institutes for Leichte.

R2. Semper, G., Mallgrave, H. F., Robinson, M., & Getty Research Institute. (2004). Style in the technical and tectonic arts, or, Practical aesthetics. Los Angeles: Getty Research Institute.

R3. Frampton, K., & Cava, J. (1995). Studies in tectonic culture: The poetics of construction in nineteenth and twentieth century architecture. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

R4. Spence R. F. and Cook D.J.( 1983) Building Materials in Developing Countries, John Wiley and sons.

R5. Minke, G., & Mahlke, F. (2005). Building with straw: Design and technology of a sustainable architecture. Basel; Boston: Birkhäuser.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Marks: 50

ESE Marks: 50

ARC231 - ARCHITECTURE TRADITIONS - FRAMES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To develop the ability to critically understand the built environment concepts through history.

To enable students to understand the relationship between tradition and contemporary trends, material, form and function.

To introduce the idea of architecture as craft based with a system and technology in a cultural realm through integrated learning.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to comprehend and critique the integral part of craft and its relationship between the society, culture and architecture. Level: Basic

CO2: To be familiar and able to illustrate the similarities in society, culture and the architecture because of local ecology. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to recognise wood, steel, bamboo & RCC as a material that enable a framed architecture and how they are used in different ways in national and global level. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Discovering Craft
 

1. History of Craft and its importance in building communities.

2. Introduction to a craft as an experiential learning through Studio-on-wheels and understanding the craft traditions in various aspects with examples of local crafts. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Cultural History of the 'Frame'
 

Historic examples beginning from the ‘Vedic’ village, Mauryan architecture and discuss the influence of wood and bamboo framed architecture in masonry architecture through various examples across the world through the ages.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
The Modern Frame
 

1. Steel as a material of magical frame in the Industrial and Post Industrial Era.

2. Discovering the versatile Reinforced Concrete and journey of the Modern Frame.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 

Master classes should focus on relevant topics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ingersoll, R. And Kostof, S. (2013). World architecture: a cross-cultural history. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

T2. Ching, F., Jarzombek, M., & Prakash, V. (2011). A global history of architecture (2nd ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Frampton, K. (2016). Modern architecture: A critical history (4th ed.). London; New York, N.Y.: Thames & Hudson.

R2. Diane Ghirardo. ( 1990). Architecture after Modernism, Thames & Hudson, London. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: 10 marks; CIA II: 15 marks; CIA III: 20 marks; Attendance: 5 marks

Total CIA: 50 marks

ESE: 50 marks

ARC232 - LOGIC OF STRUCTURES - FRAMES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course completes the basics of structure and structural systems. It gives an overview to the principles of loads, structural materials and transmissibility of forces with examples and basic principles of mechanics; it deals with the structural systems of building elements such as beams and columns.

Course objectives: To introduce frame structures, transmissibility of forces and reactions and basic structural system concepts of slabs, beams and columns and walls to foundations. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To describe and comprehend the basic principles of mechanics of structures and structural systems. Level: Basic

CO2: To comprehend and describe the structural system embedded in building elements such as beams and columns and to evaluate the loads on structures. Level: Basic 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Studio on wheels-Beams and columns
 

1.Beams and support reactions: Beams and supporting conditions 

2.Types of Columns

a.Steel Columns: Axial stress and analysis of steel columns. 

b.RCC columns: Definition and design of short RCC columns.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Stress in Beams
 

1.Geometric properties: Centroid, Centroidal axes and Moments of Inertia 

2.Bending and Shear force in beams: Method of balancing moments and free-body diagrams.

3.Bending Moment and Shear Force Diagrams: Concept of Shear force and Bending Moment diagrams. 

4.Bending and Shear Stress in beams: Theory of simple bending.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Support structures - Columns & Formulae
 

1.General formula: Moment of Inertia, Section Modulus, Bending and Shear Stress.

2.Theory of Columns: Introduction

3.Deflection: Determination of deflection for beams

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Guest Lecture and Site visits
 

1.Columns and Struts: Introduction to Short and long columns.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Bansal, R. (2017). A Textbook of Strength of Materials. Laxmi Publications; Sixth edition

T2. Prasad, I. (2002). A Textbook of Applied Mechanics: Dynamics & Statics. Khanna Publishers

T3. Salvadori, M., Hooker, S., & Ragus, C. (1990). Why buildings stand up: The strength of architecture. New York: Norton.

T4. Salvadori, M., & Heller, R. (1985). Structure in Architecture: The Building of Buildings. Prentice Hall; 3rd Revised edition.  

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Schierle, G. (2008). Structure and Design. University Readers. 

R2. Schodek, D., & Bechthold, M. (2013). Structures. Pearson; 7th Edition. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 10marks, CIA 2 - 15marks, CIA 3 - 20marks, Attendance - 05marks

Total CIA - 50 marks

ESE- 50 marks

Total Marks - 100

ARC233 - READING THE SITE (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Brief understanding of the changing relationship of man with nature and its ecological resources in shaping our existence. To orient the students towards factors of the natural landscape that influence local culture and its built environment with a focus on a particular site of intervention. To introduce Mapping Techniques.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to conduct site analysis by establishing the relationship between site characteristics and design requirements. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to convert relevant site information and data to legible representation. Level: Basic

CO3: Recognize the fundamental importance of the Natural Ecology in our existence and issues that affect the balance of the natural environment. Level: Basic

CO4: Ability to conduct and describe the technical surveying process and its drawing output. Level: Basic

CO5: Ability to present in a Portfolio, the subject content and work produced in a legible and comprehensive manner and to demonstrate its relevance in the context of other subjects in the semester. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction to Mapping
 
  1. Introducing the idea of ecology and ecosystem as the combination of living things.

  2. Introduction to mapping as a way of reading and representing the site.

  3. Exploring different ways of mapping, sensorial and embodied mapping and representation.

  4. Exploring the methods and mediums in rendering the maps.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Site Study & Analysis
 
  1. Understanding the physical, natural and social context of the site in shaping the architectural design process.
  2. Recognising the geographical characteristics of the  site in both macro and micro region.
  3. Introduction to topography and its characteristics.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Surveying
 

Introduction to Survey, principles of Surveying, Contouring and learn how to read a survey drawing.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.  Dee, C.,(2001), Form and Fabric in Landscape Architecture: A visual introduction, UK: Spon Press.

T2. Lynch, K. (1962), Site Planning, Cambridge: The MIT Press.

T3. McHarg I. (1978), Design with Nature. NY: John Wiley & Co.

T4.  Booth, N. (2011), Foundations of Landscape Architecture: Integrating Form and Space Using the Language of Site Design, John Wiley & Co.

T5. Simonds, J.O. ( 1961), Landscape Architecture: The Shaping of Man’s Natural Environment, NY: McGraw Hill Book Co. Inc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Shaheer.M, Dua G., Pal A. (2013), Landscape Architecture In India, A Reader, LA,Journal of Landscape Architecture

Evaluation Pattern

CIA  Cumulative: 50 marks

ESE: 50 marks

ARC251 - DESIGNING THE FRAME (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introduce architecture and the design of spaces through documentation and design exploration of framed structures and architecture. Explore the logic of shaping space, material and structure and the inspired understanding from various examples in nature and culture. Focus on “Me and my immediate environment” through documentation and design exercises. Introduce the various ways of reading and documenting a site and its context intuitively and experientially. Learn to represent these in different media.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to document a context in which the craft of Framed Architecture is evident and recognise the concept of Frame in nature and culture. Level: Intermediate

CO2: Ability to document and represent the site in an intuitive and technical manner in coordination with other relevant courses. Level: Intermediate

CO3: Ability to design in response to the context and stated intent and demonstrate through skilled representation in appropriate media. Level: High

CO4: Ability to put together a well done portfolio of what has been learnt in all courses in the semester in a coherent manner. Level: Intermediate

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Rationalising Culture Need
 
  1. Introducing the concept of Framed Architecture in the Studio-on-Wheels setting. Travel to a habitat in a cultural setting where architecture is explored in context of craft-making.  Relate the architecture and craft to the ecology and local culture.

  2. Demonstrate the concept of Frame in nature, everyday objects, music, literature and other examples.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:48
Understanding Context and Site & Design Intervention of ?Framing a Pavilion?
 
  1. Reading of the context and site intuitively and technically and initiate the design exercise of a Pavilion.
  2. Exploration of local material resources that inform architecture.
  3. Design development of a Pavilion comprising of a simple function for “Me and my environment” exploring the architecture of the Frame.

Integrate with all other courses in the semester.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Portfolio Development and Presentation
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, Space, & Order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.

T2. Callender, J. (1997). Time-saver Standards for Architectural Design Data (7th Revised edition edition ed.). McGraw-Hill Inc.,US.

T3. Gill Robet W. (2003). Rendering With Pen +ink. London: Thames And Hudson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Rasmussen, S. E. (1959). Experiencing Architecture. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

R2. Rapoport, A (1969). House Form and Culture. Prentice-Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, NJ USA Pearson

R3. Clark, R. H., & Pause, M. (2012). Precedents in architecture: Analytic diagrams, formative ideas, and partis (4th ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.

R4 Carter, R. (2012). On and By Frank Lloyd Wright: A Primer of Architectural Principles. Phaidon Press.

R5. Curtis, W. (1994). Le Corbusier: Ideas and Forms. Phaidon Press; Revised ed. edition.

R6. Mertins, D., & Lambert, P. (2014). Mies. New York: Phaidon.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Cumulative) - 150

ESE VIVA - 150

ARC252 - ART OF JOINERY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To impart specific skills and to introduce students to the fundamental principles involved in the way materials come together. 

Learn carpentry and the qualities of wood

Learn the art of bringing together other materials - techniques, details and finishes.

Learning Outcome

CO1:  Ability to comprehend the different techniques of wood joinery and understand the role of joinery in different materials in architectural construction. Level: Basic

CO2: Ability to make and explore the wooden joineries used in architecture. Level: Basic

CO3: Ability to design and explore a composite artistic production and craftsmanship. Level: Intermediate 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Joinery in nature and built environment
 

1.       Introduction to Joinery in nature and manmade environment.

2.       Acquaint with the tools and machines used in carpentry.

Introducing Joints in carpentry and exploring variations in joinery.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
The logic of joinery
 

Understanding the logic of joinery with respect to different materials, the sequence of construction, location of the element - internal or external, the role of load transfers etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Filigree construction
 

Introduction to filigree construction and architecture in wood. Understanding the principles, structural formation of filigree construction and historical processes in traditional and vernacular architecture.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio Development
 

Designing an artistic ensemble exploring joinery with different materials. Portfolio of ensemble illustrating the joinery details used. Can take up the design project or a significant and relevant example of Framed Structure and develop a scale model as the final project.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. American Technical Society. (2017). Cyclopedia of Architecture, Carpentry, and Building, Vol. 4 of 10. Forgotten Books.

T2. Wagner, W.(2005). Modern Carpentry. Wilcox Publisher;2nd Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Cumulative): 50 marks

ESE - Viva Voce: 50 marks

ARC253 - TECHNIQUE OF DRAWING - II (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course explores development of drawing skills and of technical drawings as tools of design thinking, visualization and representation; through 3D drawing techniques with applicable renderings that include shades and shadows.

Course objectives: To introduce Architectural Design Language – technical drafting and presentation and impart appropriate manual skills for visualization and technical representation of built forms in different types of drawings.

Learning Outcome

CO1. A comprehensive understanding and ability to draw pictorial representation and sciography. Level: Basic 

CO2. Achieve a comprehensive understanding of the techniques and ability to draw technical drawings and architectural presentation. Level: Basic

CO3. Acquire skills to produce technical drawing for any object, design or a building. Level: Basic

CO4. Ability to present in a Portfolio, the subject content and work produced in a legible and comprehensive manner and to demonstrate its relevance in the context of other subjects in the semester. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Documentation of Existing Building Pictorial Projections
 

1.Coordinate with other courses, especially, AC251 ‘Designing the Frame’ to draw architectural drawings as required.

2.Documentation and presentation of a framed architecture/ traditional building.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
3D Drawing
 

1.Developing pictorial representations -Isometric Projection, Axonometric projection and Perspective projections.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction to Sciography, Rendering and Architectural drawings
 

1.Introduction to Sciography and principles of shades and shadows.

2.Pen and Ink Rendering of pictorial projections.

3.Introduction to Architectural drawings, components and conventions in an architectural drawing.

4.Measured drawing to scale of framed objects.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Portfolio
 

Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Bhatt, N. D. (2014). Engineering Drawing. Anand, India: Charotar Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.

T2. Venugopal, K. (2004). Engineering Drawing and Graphics. New Age International Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architecture: Form, space, & order (Fourth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.

R2. Ching, F. D. K. (2015). Architectural graphics (Sixth edition.). New Jersy: John Wiley.

R3. Alexander W. White. (2011)  The Elements of Graphic Design, Allworth Press; 2nd edition.

R4. Gill Robet W. (2003). Rendering With Pen +ink. London: Thames And Hudson.

R5. Mark A, Thomas, (2007). Exploring Elements of Design. Poppy Evans, 2nd edition.

R6. Philip Meggs, (1998). A History of Graphic Design. John Wiley & Sons, 3rd edition.

R7. Joseph D'Amelio. (2004). Perspective Drawing Handbook. Harper, New edition. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Overall)-50 Marks

ESE- 50 Marks

ARC254 - MATERIAL STRATEGIES FOR FRAMES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course introduces the idea of architecture as a craft based practice by exploring Framed Structures through experiential learning. It is done through case analysis and site visits.

A combined review of portfolios of all core subjects, to be planned between 12th -14th week is also mandatory to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture.

Course objectives: To introduce the idea of architecture as a craft based practice by exploring Framed Structures through experiential learning.

To learn about materials that are conducive to Framed construction.

Learning Outcome

CO1. To comprehend and apply the concept of frames in design project. Level: Intermediate

CO2. Ability to understand the nature and properties of wood, bamboo, Steel and RCC materials and their use in frame construction. Level: Basic

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Frame Architecture
 

1.Exploring a craft through Studio-On-Wheels and understanding the particular, techniques, material and aesthetical elements.

2.Introducing the idea of framework from parts to whole, from source to resource.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Materialising the Frame - Wood & Bamboo
 

1.Systems and Production in Bamboo and Wood– Doors and Windows assemblies, staircases, etc. Through drawings and model making.

2.Literature review of traditional timber construction.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Materialising the Frame - RCC & Steel
 

1.Steel - Introduction to steel, its various forms and sizes and examine the way these are used in various examples. 

2.Reinforced Cement Concrete- Introduction to the concrete as a building material. 

3.Specialised applications of steel, concrete and RCC- staircases, tanks, roofing material, bridges, etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Portfolio Development and Master classes
 

1.Master classes should emphasise on bamboo, wood, steel & RCC.

2.Portfolio development - To organise and review all works done in the semester. To compile a comprehensive portfolio for the subject. Establish connections with other subjects where possible.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ching, F. D. 1. (1975). Building construction illustrated. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.

T2. Mckay, W. B. (2016). Building Construction Metric (Vol - 1.). Noida: Pearson. 

T3. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

T4. Lyons, A. (1997). Materials for Architects and Builders. An introduction Arnold, London.

T5. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

T6. Preston, H. K. (1964). Prestressed concrete for Architects and Engineers. New York: McGraw Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Spence R. F. and Cook D. J. (1983) Building Materials in Developing Countries, John Wiley and sons.

R2. Sinha,S. N(2002). Reinforced Concrete Design. New Delhi: Tata-McGraw Hill.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Marks: 50

ESE Marks: 50

ARC331 - MATERIALS AND METHODS IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION III (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course is an introduction to building materials such as wood products and water proofing compounds. It details the building elements RCC slab types, Partition systems, Storage units and False ceiling; Building finishes including Floor finishes, Plastering and Paint finishes in architectural construction.

1. Material vocabulary modules in wood products such as Plywood, block board, particle board, hard board, laminates, MDF, HDF, HDPE wood wool, etc; water proofing compounds

2. Constructive grammar of building elements such as RCC slab types; Floor Finishes and paving; Masonry Plastering and Paint finishes; Wood Partition systems and storage units; False ceiling.

3. Their intrinsic relationship to a building system syntax.

4. A detailed Case study, preparation of construction drawings, market surveys, factory visits and site visits to buildings under construction are essential.

A one week long integrated studio-based workshop of all core subjects – Architectural Design-III, Building Structures-III, Climate responsive architecture and History & theory of architecture and culture-III – is mandatory. A combined review of portfolios of all core subjects, to be planned between 12th -14th week is also mandatory to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture.

Course Objective: To acquaint the students with construction practices pertaining to RCC, floors, roofs and flooring alternatives, wood partitions, masonry plastering and paint finishes.

Learning Outcome

1. To describe the properties of wood products and water proofing compounds, its manufacturing methods and the assembly of these materials to modules; to interpret the role of partitioning modules in organizing interior space.

2. To describe the means and methods of construction of RCC, floors, roofs and flooring alternatives, wood partitions, masonry plastering and paint finishes

3. To analyze and infer from documentation of a case study on interior residential or Office construction and its detailing describing the role of partitions in interior space definition.

4. To write a term paper on RCC slabs using observations from construction site visits.

5. To demonstrate all RCC roof details integrated with Building structures studio.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:21
RCC two-way slab and two-way continuous slabs:
 

Principles and methods of construction.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:21
Introduction to Advanced RCC roofs
 

Moment framed, Flat slab and Flat plate, Filler slabs, Waffle slab; Principles and methods of construction    

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:21
RCC one-way slab and one-way continuous slabs
 

Principles and methods of construction.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:21
RCC cantilever slabs and sloping slab
 

Principles and methods of construction

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:21
Introduction to RCC Slabs
 

one-way, two-way slabs, cantilever slabs, sloping RCC roof, one way continuous, and two ways continuous.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Floor finishes
 

Including Toilet flooring: Mud flooring, Murrum flooring, and Stone flooring in marble, granite, tandur/kota stone, other flooring in mosaic, terrazzo, ceramic tiles, wooden flooring and polished concrete: Laying Fixing and Finishes.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Paving
 

Cast in situ concrete including vacuum dewatered flooring, concrete tiles, interlocking blocks, clay tiles, brick and stone.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to wet Cladding
 

wet cladding in stone, marble, etc. including toilet cladding.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Method of plastering (Internal and External)
 

smooth, rough, textured, grit plaster etc. Use of various finishes viz., lime, cement, plaster of Paris, buffing etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to internal and external masonry plastering and paint finishes
 

Materials -Paints, varnishes and distempers, emulsions, cement base paints. Constituents of oil paints, characteristics of good paints, types of paints and process of painting different surfaces. Types of varnish, methods_ of applying varnish and French polish and melamine finish.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Interior office construction
 

book selves, file cabinets and work stations. Partition systems: wall and ceiling using plywood, PVC, marble, granite, aerated concrete blocks, gypsum board, glass etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to wood products as building material
 

Plywood, block board, particle board, hard board, laminates, MDF, HDF, HDPE wood wool, etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Interior residential construction
 

Detail of wardrobes and show cases in wood, ferro cement and stone; Modular kitchens and cabinet shelves

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Waterproof components
 

Water Proofing elements, construction chemicals and additives, adhesives, plaster of Paris, gypsum, Polystyrene sealants. Detailing of waterproofing of basement, toilets, terrace garden, French drains, etc.

NOTE - Minimum one plate on each construction topic. Site visits to be arranged by studio teachers. Study of Material applications in the form of portfolios.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
False ceiling systems
 

Fiber board, plaster of Paris, particle board, wood wool, metals, straw and any other materials introduced in the market including acoustic ceiling.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Ching, F. (2014). Building construction Illustrated. Wiley.

2. Chudley , R., & Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. Prentice Hall, 4 edition.

3. Mckay, W. (2012). Building Construction. Pearson India.

4. Emmitt , S., & Gorse, C. (2009). Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings. Wiley-Blackwell.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

2. Francis Mallgrave, H. (2004). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts; Practical Aesthetics. Los Angeles.

3. Frampton, K. (2001). Studies in Tectonic Culture. Cambridge.

4. Duggal, S. (2012). Building Materials. NEW AGE; 4th Revised edition.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Practical) - 50 Marks

ESE (Theory) - 50 Marks

TOTAL MARKS - 100

ARC332 - HISTORY AND THEORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND CULTURE III (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The course introduces the idea of architecture, history and theory. It explores European and Colonialarchitecture in different time periods in various cultural, geographical and political contexts, particularly environment & physical context socio-economic issues religion & cosmology. This is done descriptively as well as interpretatively, developing critical understanding of architectural concepts through history. The course weaves a web of connections between built environment and the social, political, religious, technological and environmental circumstances.   It is dealt in clusters of related notional contexts – e.g. Buddhist architecture, River valley cultures, Colonial architecture etc.   At the end of each set of clusters a theory class will explore some relevant thematic ideas in them –  ornament & detail, power & politics, form & iconography etc. constantly relating it to modern life – places and practices. There will be a minimum of 15 lectures, 5 theory seminars, 2 field trips, 2-3 workshops / master classes in each semester with 2 tests and 5 essay papers.

A one week long integrated studio-based workshop of all core subjects - Materials and methods in building construction-III, Building Structures-III, Climate responsive architecture and Architectural Design-III – is mandatory. A combined review of portfolios of all core subjects, to be planned between 12th -14th week is also mandatory to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture.

Course Objective: - To develop the ability to critically understand architectural concepts through history.

Learning Outcome

Course Output: To describe the various dimensions of European and Colonial architecture in different contextual influences. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Pre-classical Architecture & Classical Greek Architecture
 

Pre-classical Architecture & Classical Greek Architecture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Roman Architecture
 

Roman Architecture

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Byzantine Architecture & Gothic Architecture
 

Byzantine Architecture & Gothic Architecture

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Renaissance Architecture & the Transitional Period - 1700-1900.
 

Renaissance Architecture & the Transitional Period - 1700-1900.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Colonial Architecture ? South Asia - in detail. Other - British & French Colonial, Portuguese, Spanish and Dutch Colonial
 

Colonial Architecture – South Asia - in detail. Other - British & French Colonial, Portuguese, Spanish and Dutch Colonial

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Francis D.K. Ching,  Mark Jazombek, Vikramaditya Prakash (2011), A Global History of Architecture.Second Edition. John Wiley & Sons.

2. Volwahsen, Andreas (Author, Photographer),‎ Henri Stierlin (Editor) (1995),‎ India, Architecture of the World Series, Part 7) Paperback, Edition, Benedikt Taschen Velag GmbH, ISBN 3-8228-9301-3 

3. Tadgell, C. (1990). The History of Architecture in India: From the Dawn of Civilization to the End of the Raj. London: Architecture Design and Technology Press. 

4. Pandya, Yatin (2005). Concepts of Space in Traditional Indian Architecture. Mapin Publishing.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Vincent Scully (1964), The Earth, the Temple, and the Gods: Greek Sacred Architecture; Trinity University Press, Texas. ISBN: 978-159534-176-1

2. Norberg-Schulz Chirstian (1980), Genius Loci- Towards a Phenomenology of Architecture, Rizzoli International Publication, New York. ISBN: 0-8478-0287-6

3. Norberg-Schulz Chirstian (1988), Meaning in Western Architecture, Rizzoli International Publication, New York.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: 10 Marks

CIA II: 15 Marks

CIA III: 20 Marks

Attendance: 05 Marks

TOTAL CIA: 50

ESE: 50

TOTAL MARKS: 100

ARC333 - BUILDING STRUCTURES III (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is an introduction to mechanics of RCC, its analysis and design. It introduces the structural systems of slabs, beams and columns -one way concrete slab, joist systems, two way concrete flat plate, waffle slab. It discusses the structural material RCC.

A one week long integrated studio-based workshop of all core subjects - Materials and methods in building construction-III, Architectural Design-III, Climate responsive architecture and History & theory of architecture and culture-III – is mandatory. A combined review of portfolios of all core subjects, to be planned between 12th -14th week is also mandatory to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture.

 

Course Objective: - It intends to develop an understanding of structural system design and analysis of RCC elements.

Learning Outcome

To describe the basic characteristics and mechanics of RCC materials; To be able to conceptually characterize different types of one-way and two-way slab systems; To be able to determine sizes and detail reinforcement of beams, columns and slabs in one-way, two-way slab systems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
RCC Materials
 

Basic Characteristics of Concrete & Reinforcing Steel Materials including specifications and testing. Basics of mix design, water-cement ratio, strength, durability, workability requirements and formwork.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Mechanics of Reinforced Concrete
 

Concept of Concrete as a brittle, composite material that is strong in compression and weak in tension. Structural behavior under load and the need for reinforcement. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Structural Analysis & Design to satisfy building codes and standards
 

Introduction to National Building Code and IS456: Calculation of dead weight and live loads on structure as per IS875 (Part1&2). Determination of the general loads to be considered in the design of the structure based on the type of occupancy specified for each area. And introduction to safety factor and design philosophy. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Concrete structural system design
 

Introduction to the Project: Design of two story RCC frame office building with dimension of 15m X 30m and 3 m storey height using different Concrete Structural Systems including a framing plan, column, beam and slab arrangements and dimensions for all the different Concrete Structural systems already introduced(Indicative).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
One way concrete slab system
 

General framing arrangement of beams, columns and slabs for 15m X 30m building by One-way concrete slab system and design of single reinforced beams using SP 16: Design Aids for Reinforced Concrete to IS 456:1978.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
One way Concrete Joist System
 

1)     General framing arrangement of beams, columns and slabs for 15m X 30m building by One-way joist System and design of singly reinforced slabs using SP 16: Design Aids for Reinforced Concrete to IS 456:1978.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Two way concrete floor and roof system
 

General framing arrangement of beams, columns and slabs for 15m X 30m building by Two-way Slab-Beam, and design of short columns using SP 16: Design Aids for Reinforced Concrete to IS 456:1978.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Two way concrete flat plate system
 

General framing arrangement of beams, columns and slabs for 15m X 30m building by Two-way solid Flat Plate system design, and design of Isolated footings using SP 16: Design Aids for Reinforced Concrete to IS 456:1978. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Two way concrete waffle slab system.
 

General framing arrangement of beams, columns and slabs for the 15m X 30m building by two way (waffle) slab design. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Two way concrete flat slab system
 

General framing arrangement of beams, columns and slabs for 15m X 30m building by two-way solid Flat slab system, and formwork design and detailing. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Design Review
 

1)     Review of design of Column, Beam and Slab, total concrete volume, reinforcement tonnage and costing.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Reinforcement design
 

Approximate calculation of Column, Beam and Slab reinforcement. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Reinforcement Detailing
 

Preparation of working drawings showing the type, size and location of the reinforcement in a concrete structure. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Salvadori, M., & Heller, R. (1985). Structure in Architecture: The Building of Buildings. Prentice Hall; 3rd Revised edition.

2.     Schierle, G. (2008). Structure and Design. University Readers.

3.     Schodek, D., & Bechthold, M. (2013). Structures. Pearson; 7th Edition.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Varghese P C, “Limit state Design of Reinforced Concrete” PHI Learning, 2013.

2. Unnikrishnan Pillai S, Devadas Menon, “Reinforced Concrete Design”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2011.

3. Subramanian N, “Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures” Oxford publications, 2012.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - Project Based Assessment.

Assignment 1 - Conceptualization of a RCC structural system for a given building plan

Assignment 2 - Column positions, locations & structural framing plan

Test - Sizes of columns, beams & slabs.

Assignment 3 - Building Project

 

 

ARC334 - BUILDING SERVICES I (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description An introductory course to environment and health aspects covering the methods of organization and operation of water supply and sanitation services in architectural projects. It outlines planning, designing and construction for connection up to the main lines, and cover topics of plumbing, types of plumbing fixtures based on requirements, plumbing materials, storage, appurtenances, water supply, drainage systems and solid waste management. Site visits to see how these services are installed are imperative for learning. The course also outlines fire, life safety measures and advanced fire safety services in buildings. A one week long integrated studio-based workshop of all core subjects – Architectural Design-III, Materials and methods in building construction-III, Building StructuresIII, Climate responsive architecture and History & theory of architecture and cultureIII – is mandatory. A combined review of portfolios of all core subjects, to be planned between 12th -14th week is also mandatory to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture. 

Course Objective: To impart knowledge about water supply, sanitation, fire and safety and skills required to integrate them into the building design.

Learning Outcome

 1. To describe methods of organization and operation of water supply sanitation and fire safety measures in architectural projects.

2. To organize and demonstrate, through drawings, water supply and sanitation in small residential building.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Environment and Health Aspects
 

History of Sanitation with respect to human civilization, Importance of Health, Hygiene Cleanliness, Water borne, Water related, Water based, Epidemic diseases, Conservancy to water carriage system, Urban and Rural sanitation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Water Supply
 

Source of Water supply - Municipal, bore well, river, etc., uantity of water for different usages like Domestic, Hot water, Flushing, Gardening, Commercial, Industrial Applications, Assessment of requirement for different users, uality of supply for different users as per national and international standards, Treatment of water for different uses, filtration, softening, disinfection, Storage and pumping -gravity system, hydropneumatic system, Distribution of water to fixture and fittings, schematic diagrams, Swimming pool, water bodies, Efficient usage of water. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Sewerage System
 

Assessment of sewage generated, Collection of sewage / wastewater from all sources, schematic diagram, Conveyance of sewage - gully trap, chamber, manhole, intercepting trap, grease traps, backflow preventer, Materials of Construction of sewerage network - PVC, uPVC, HDPE, corrugated PP pipes, Objective of Sewage treatment, type of treatment, aerobic, anaerobic, Ventilation of STP, Space requirements. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Storm water Management
 

Assessment, quantification rainfall, flood control measures, Drainage system - piped drains, open drains, Recharging of storm water, Harvesting of roof top water, first flush, pretreatment, Drainage of basements, podium, paved areas, Collection, Reuse of water with in the project, reduction of the load on municipal system, landscape drainages and Rainwater harvesting. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Plumbing
 

Water supply piping - hot, cold, flushing water, Piping in sunken areas, false ceiling areas, shaft sizes, Drainage - floor traps, drains, P-trap, bottle traps, Single stack, two stack, cross venting, fixture venting, Material of construction like GI, PPR, PB, CPVC, Composite pipes, Copper, Flow control Valves - Gate valve, Globe valves, butterfly valves, Pressure Reducing valves & station, Pipe supports, hangers, fixing, plumbing of small houses. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Solid Waste Management
 

Assessment of waste, Waste to wealth concept, Municipal waste, garden waste, organic & inorganic, Commercial waste, Medical waste & Industrial waste, Collection, segregation, treatment, disposal, Organic waste - Biomethanation, Vermicomposting, Organic waste converter.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Sanitary Fixtures, Fittings & Wellness: Soil appliances
 

Water closets, Bidet, urinals, Cisterns, Flush valve, Waste appliances - wash basin, sink, dishwasher, washing machine, Hot water system -Geysers, boilers, heat pump, Bath & water fixtures - Taps, mixers, single lever, quarter turn, bathtub, multi-jet bath, rain showers, health faucets, Wellness products: Sauna bath, steam bath, Jacuzzi, single and double stack system.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Fire and Life safety
 

 Causes of fire, reasons for loss of life due to fire, development of fire, fire classification of buildings, Fire and water storage requirements, Fire control room, Code of practices, Idea of smoke detectors, Fire alarms, Wet risers, Fire escape stair case, equipment used e.g.: snorkel ladder, materials used to fight fire, Fire rating and Hydrants. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Special requirements
 

Solar Hot Water Generation, Central LPG Supply System, Medical Gases Supply, Storage of High Speed Diesel, Central Vacuum and Waste Collection.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Advanced Fire Safety
 

Grading of structural elements due to fire as per NBC. Classification of building types as per NBC and brief description of characteristics of combustible and non-combustible materials in case of fire. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Active fire control using portable etinguishers
 

Basic concepts in fixed firefighting installations, Fire sprinklers, Fire Hydrants, Automatic fire detection and alarm systems, fire signages. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Concepts in passive fire protection and control
 

Including design of escape routes, fire driveways, fire refuge area, fire assembly areas, pressurization, travel distance, fire tower and compartmentation etc. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Building code requirements for Fire safety
 

Rules for fire protection and firefighting requirements for high rise buildings in India.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.Deshpande, R. (1963). A Text Book of Sanitary Engineering Vol I and II Combined. Poona, United Book Corporation.

2.Birdi, G. (2010). Water supply and sanitary Engineering. Dhanpat. Rai & Sons Publishers. 8th. Edition. 50

3. SP35 Handbook on Water Supply and Drainage (with Special Emphasis on Plumbing. (1996). Bureau of Indian Standards. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Board, C. P. (2010). Green Book : Pollution Control Act, Rules and Notifications Issued. CPCB.

2. Indian Plumbing Association (IPA) and International Association of Plumbing & Mechanical Officials (IAPMO). (2014). Uniform Illustrated Plumbing Code-India (UIPC-I).

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 10 Marks

CIA 2 - 15 Marks

CIA 3 - 20 Marks

Attendance - 05 Marks

Total CIA - 50 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

TOTAL MARKS - 100

ARC335 - CLIMATE RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course is an introduction to climatic forces that shape the human environment with a particular focus on ecological determinants. Various design strategies and methods at all scales of design (site planning, architecture, interior design) are outlined in the process of integration and internalization of environmental considerations towards sustainable environments. It outlines concepts and methods of measuring climate and human comfort, to create the desired indoor conditions. It discusses brief design exercises in the lab to check indoor comfort conditions through manual and computer-based simulation.

A one week long integrated studio-based workshop of all core subjects – Architectural Design-III, Materials and methods in building construction-III, Building Structures-III, Climate responsive architecture and History & theory of architecture and culture-III – is mandatory. A combined review of portfolios of all core subjects, to be planned between 12th -14th week is also mandatory to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture.

Course objective: To introduce the knowledge required for understanding the influence of climate on architecture including the environmental processes which affect building, such as thermal, lighting etc.

Learning Outcome

To define, measure, evaluate and incorporate all the factors of climate to optimize living comfort and work climate; To describe the use of building elements like louvres, windows, doors, verandas and outer facades as devices of climate control and To design and integrate these devices as architectural elements.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Climate-1
 

The Climate-built form interaction with examples. Elements of climate, measurement and representations of climatic data. Classifications and Characteristics of tropical climates.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Climate-2
 

Major climatic zones of India. Site Climate: Effect of landscape elements on site/micro climate.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Thermal comfort-1
 

Thermal balance of the human body, Thermal Comfort Indices (Effective temperature, corrected effective temperature, bioclimatic chart, tropical summer index by CBRI Roorkee). Measuring indoor air movement: Kata-thermometer, and measuring indoor radiation: Globe thermometer.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Thermal comfort-2
 

Calculation of Overheated and Under heated period (based on air temperature only) for locations in Climatic zones and their optimization in terms of solar heating and Passive cooling desired.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Climatic Design -1
 

Introduction of a case exploration and a brief design exercise, of relevant traditional or contemporary building to discuss, measure explore and improvise the following theoretical parameters and devices outlined in Units 2, 3 and 4 – the concepts of thermal comfort, thermal performance of buildings, passive cooling building elements and other factors. Use of relevant literature study examples and the lab facilities are recommended.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Sun-path diagram
 

Solar geometry & design for orientation and use of solar charts in climatic design.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Thermal Heat gain or loss
 

Steady state and periodic heat flow concepts, Conductivity, resistivity, diffusivity, thermal capacity time lag and 'U' value. Calculation of U value for multilayered walls and Roof, Temperature Gradient, Inferring time lags from Graphs for walls and Roof. Construction techniques for improving thermal performance of walls and roofs. (Effect of density, Insulation and Cavity).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Thermal performance of building elements
 

Effect of thermo-physical properties of building materials and elements on indoor thermal environment. Conduction, Convection, Radiation, concept of Sol-air temperature and Solar Gain factor.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Natural ventilation
 

Functions of natural ventilation, Stack effect due to thermal force and wind velocity. Air movements around buildings, Design considerations and effects of openings and external features on internal air flow and Wind shadows.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Climatic Design -2
 

Case study explorations using two Indian case studies and one international for each climatic zone; to be submitted as a term paper.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Shading devices
 

Optimizing Design of Shading devices effective for overheated periods while allowing solar radiation for under heated periods for different wall orientations.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Day Lighting
 

Nature of natural light, its transmission, reflection, diffusion, glares. Advantages and limitations in different climatic zones, North light, Day light factor, components of Day light devices.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Givoni, B. (1981). Man, Climate and Architecture (2nd ed.). New York: Applied Science Publishers, ltd.

2. Koenigsberger, O. (1975). Manual of Tropical Housing & Buildings (Part-II). Universities Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Evans, M. (1980). Housing, Climate and Comfort. Architectural Press.

2. Fry, M., & Drew, J. (1964). Buildings in the tropics. Рипол Классик.

3. Konya, A. (1980). Design Primer for Hot Climates. London: Architectural Press; New York: Whitney Library of Design.

4. Krishnan, A., Baker, N., Yannas, S., & Szokolay, S. (2001). Climate Responsive Architecture: A Design Handbook for Energy Efficient Buildings. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill Education Publishing Company.

5. Majumdar, M. (2002). Energy efficient buildings:. TERI India publication.

6. Markus, T., & Morris, E. (1980). Buildings, Climate and Energy. Pitman Publishing, London.

7. Saini, B. S. (1980). Building in Hot dry climates. NY: Wiley Interscience-John Wiley.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Practical) - 50 Marks 

ESE (Theory) - 50 Marks

TOTAL MARKS - 100

ARC351 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN III (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course is an introduction to enquiries across disciplines for the development of architectural design language. It would emphasize on effective programmatic interpretation and spatial ordering inspired by the learnings from interdisciplinary study.

A one week long integrated studio-based workshop of all core subjects - Materials and methods in building construction-III, Building Structures-III, Climate responsive architecture and History & theory of architecture and culture-III – is mandatory. A combined review of portfolios of all core subjects, to be planned between 12th-14th week is also mandatory to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture.

Course ObjectiveTo enable extension of design ecologies across scales and disciplines.

Learning Outcome

1.    1. To interpret Programme through contextual analysis and capable of converting space into place through functions and elements.

2. To convert and extend place into built environment through organizational factors contextually. Finally enhance and carry to end the idea of “contextuality" culturally and physically to enable to read the context. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:18
Synthesis of interdisciplinary knowledge
 

1. Selection of an inter disciplinary topic of study – science, technology, environment, culture or art – an in depth understanding of the subject.

2. Develop abstract principles of ordering, patterns and organizing systems as inspirations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:27
Introduction to the Project and context
 

1. A detailed study of the site and context and presentation of portfolio.

2. A programmatic interpretation with regard to the learning from the synthesis of interdisciplinary knowledge in the previous unit.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:45
Exploration of architectural language
 

1.   Studio will explore evolution of architectural language through principles of abstraction, space-form-structure-site correlations, and the disciplines of building and sensory qualities. Studio will comprise of design of small institutions with key inputs on program-site analysis, area-volume diagrams, overlays, spatial structural system models and use of different media and representational techniques.

·       Techniques - layered, comparative, historical

·       Physical layer - location, networks, size, hierarchy, temporal functions

·       Perception: Density, volume, crowding, conflicting/conforming aspects

·       Visual layer: scale, contrast, forms and spaces and their hierarchy

·       Functional: core and auxiliary, formal/informal, incidental/intentional

Nature of Projects:

·   A small/medium size resort/hotel in a given natural context; Residential facility/cum training center in a slum; Museum; Nature cure or Health resort

·       Application of one particular technique (preferably layered technique for its comprehensiveness)

Any ONE of the suggested topics to be attempted

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. A Pattern language. Alexander, Christopher. Oxford University Press. 1977.

2. A Thousand Plateaus. Deleuze, Gillez and Guattari, Felix. University of Minnesota Press 2nd edition. 1987.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Books on Principles of Design and Theory of Design to be studied and applied; as per the studio brief and the project/project site selected by the studio faculty.

Evaluation Pattern
  • CIA 1 - 25 Marks - Evaluation would be based on the participation, creativity & comprehension and represetation of the exerecises based on workshops, guest lectures and studio exercises assigned.
  • CIA 2 - 50 marks - Evaluation of the contextual study would be based on the participation, creativity & comprehension and represetation of the exerecises based on travel & site study, literature & case studies and studio exercises assigned, to integrate preliminary study and site study.
  • CIA 3 - 75 Marks - Evaluation of the Exploration of architectural language would be based on the participation in the studio and creativity of the Design & its development.
  • Total CIA - 150 Marks
  • ESE (Viva-Voce) - 150 Marks
  • TOTAL MARKS - 300

ARC352 - COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This lab-based course introduces the methods of visualization through simulation. It outlines a range of digital tools and techniques in 2D drafting, 3D modeling and vector graphics. It is coupled with a design presentation using AutoCAD, 3D Modelling software Trimble SketchUp, rendering engine VRay, Graphics editing software Adobe Photoshop and Building Information modelling using Autodesk Revit.

Course Objective: To use computers and digital media as design tools to explore, develop, evaluate and present architectural ideas. 

Learning Outcome

To learn and demonstrate the use of basic level of 2D drafting and 3D modelling and visualization tools in explorations and communication of design ideas;

To learn and demonstrate vector graphics editing tools as effective communication tools to prepare presentations and portfolios.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to AutoCAD 2014 (or relevant 2D drafting software)
 

2D commands, viewports, dimensions, annotations. Time problem introduction; Classroom exercises such as measured drawing of studio (windows, doors and staircases included), architecture department (windows, doors and staircases included) etc. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to AutoCAD 2014 (or relevant 2D drafting software)
 

Understanding layers, paper space Vs model space, line weights, print set up and Modelling of Wall, Doors, Windows, Stairs etc. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
2D drafting
 

Presentation of time problem; plan, sections, elevations of a floor in a building, of a single storeyed building, of II / III semester architectural design studio project.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to 3d modelling
 

Trimble SketchUp or relevant 3D modelling software -Introduction to 3D modelling software interface, demonstration of 3D modelling commands required to convert 2D project (of 1 & 2) into 3D. Time problem.  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
3D modelling
 

Presentation of time problem; drawing quickly with basic shapes, viewing models in 3D, adding detail to Models in 3D space, use of cameras, material applications. Presenting models - to jury or clients. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Rendering & Visualization
 

Generating 3d Model and introduction to concepts of visualization using rendering engines such as VRay. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Autodesk Revit
 

Lecture and Classroom exercise to convert time problem (of 1 & 2) into Revit project, relationship to other file types (.dwg for AutoCAD, .ads for Trimble Sketch up). 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Autodesk Revit
 

Introduction to concepts of BIM (Building Information Modelling). Introduction to appropriate techniques to model walls, insert fenestration, staircases. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Autodesk Revit
 

Presentation of any simple project to illustrate skills attained in 2D drafting, 3D modeling, graphics editing tool. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to graphics editing tools
 

 Adobe Photoshop. Concepts of image editing, image scanning, effects, filters.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Graphics editing software
 

Classroom exercise to demonstrate use of Adobe Photoshop in simple projects. For e.g., rendering of 2D drawings, adding nature to 3D visualizations of architecture design project.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Graphics editing software
 

Presentation of any simple project to illustrate skills attained in 2D drafting, 3D modeling, graphics editing tool. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Adobe creative suite, Online web site of Adobe products: www.adobe.com

2. Autodesk Revit Architecture 2014 Essentials: Autodesk Official Press (Wiley, 978-1-118-57508-6, May 2013)

3. Google-Sketchup: Online documentation, videos: http://www.sketchup.com/learnivideos 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Vast amount of Auto Desk resources available on the Internet 

Evaluation Pattern

1. Timely submissions / promptness, 2. Accurate procedures and solution / output, 3. Quality of work [based on the evaluation rubrix], 4. Participation in class

CIA - 50 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

TOTAL - 100 Marks

ARC431 - MATERIALS AND METHODS IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION IV (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The course is an introduction to building materials such as in structural steel, aluminium. and alternative material bamboo in architectural construction. It details alternative roof systems using Jack arch, Madras Terrace, Filler slab and stone slab; Vaults and domes; Doors and windows in steel and aluminium; Columns beams and plane trusses in steel, in architectural construction.

1. Material vocabulary modules include structural steel and aluminium; Bamboo as an alternative material of construction.

2. Constructive grammar of building elements such as Alternative roofs using Jack arch, Madras Terrace, Filler slab and stone slab; Vaults and domes; Doors and windows in aluminium and steel; Columns and beams in steel; and Steel plane trusses

3. Their intrinsic relationship to a building system syntax.

4. A detailed Case study, preparation of construction drawings, market surveys, factory visits and site visits to buildings under construction are essential.

A one week long integrated studio-based workshop of all core subjects – Architectural Design-IV, Building Structures-IV, Environmental Lab, Computer Applications-II, Building Services-II – is mandatory. A combined review of portfolios of all core subjects, to be planned between 12th -14th week is also mandatory to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture.

Course Objective: - To develop the ability to describe, document and appreciate architectural expression of alternative constructional composition.

Learning Outcome

1. To describe the properties of structural steel, its manufacturing methods and the assembly of it to modules of columns, beams, plane truss, doors and windows.

2. To describe the means and methods of construction alternatives materials such as bamboo and alternative systems using Jack arch, Madras terrace, Filler slab and stone slab in architecture.

3. To analyze and infer from documentation of a case study on bamboo construction and its detailing, describing the role of alternative materials in architectural experience of space.

4. To write a term paper on Vaults and Domes using observations from construction site visits and literature study.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Bamboo Construction
 

Detailing of walls, wall panels, doors, windows and roof in Bamboo. A detailed case study suggested.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
RCC filler slabs
 

Principles and methods of construction. Introduction to different filler materials, Mangalore tiles, Burnt Clay Bricks, Hollow Concrete blocks, Stabilized Hollow Mud blocks, Clay pots, Coconut shells etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Alternate roofing
 

Jack Arch, Madras terrace, and stone slab roof.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Steel Plane Trusses
 

Construction of Steel trusses for various spans, ridged truss, saw tooth truss with lattice girders, roof lighting, aluminium sheet and profiled MS sheet cladding and roof fixing details.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Detailing of Steel trusses
 

Tubular and L-angle trusses with 8-16m spans.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Structural steel as a building material
 

Types, properties, uses and manufacturing methods.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Steel doors and windows
 

Study of joinery details.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Steel doors for garages and workshops
 

uses and manufacturing methods.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Steel construction
 

Steel columns/beam construction; Principles and methods of construction.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Collapsible gate and rolling shutters
 

uses and manufacturing methods.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Aluminum as a building material
 

Types, properties, uses and manufacturing methods. Detailing of aluminum partitions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Aluminum doors and windows
 

Casement, Pivot, Sliding type: Study of joinery details.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Vaults & domes II
 

Concepts and construction of Reinforced concrete domes and vaults with formwork design.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Vaults & domes I
 

Principles and methods of construction; Including techniques and details of form-work. Construction of Masonry Vaults and Domes - Concepts of Reinforced Concrete Domes and Vaults.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Chudley , R., & Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. Prentice Hall, 4 edition.

2.     Emmitt , S., & Gorse, C. (2009). Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings. Wiley-Blackwell.

3.     Mckay, W. (2012). Building Construction. Pearson India.

4.     Arora S.P. and Bindra S.P, A Text Book of Building Construction, Dhanpat Rai Publishing Company Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi,1990

6.     Punmia B.C., A Text book of Building Construction, Laxmi Publications Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 2005

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

2. Francis Mallgrave, H. (2004). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts; Practical Aesthetics. Los Angeles.

3. Frampton, K. (2001). Studies in Tectonic Culture. Cambridge.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Practical) - 50 Marks

ESE (Theory) - 50 Marks

TOTAL MARKS - 100

ARC432 - BUILDING STRUCTURES IV (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - the course gives an introduction to structural design and analysis of systems in structural steel.

Course Objective: - To develop the ability to design and analyse advanced steel structural systems.

Learning Outcome

To design and analyse advanced steel structural systems including composite construction, including fundamental principles and structural behavior in withstanding gravity, lateral forces, wind & seismic forces.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Structural Steel
 

Different kinds of Steel, their Basic characteristics of Steel & Light Gauge Steel materials.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Concepts of design of Steel Structures
 

Introduction to the concept of Working Stress Design and Load and Resistance Factor Design.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Steel Structural Systems
 

Introduction to Rigid Portal Frames design of a one story industrial building 18M X 48m with two-bay mezzanine office floor. Project work to include a framing plan for both the industrial building and the mezzanine, an approximate design of structural frame elements, columns and beams. Introduction to available sections in structural steel used in the design of frame -elements (Indicative).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to National Building Code: IS 800
 

Criteria & Design to satisfy Building Codes and Standards, Dead and Live load calculations as per 1S875 (Partl&2). Determine the general loads to be considered in the design of the structure, based on the type of occupancy for each area specified.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Rigid Frames design-1
 

Properties of Indian standard rolled steel section and general framing arrangement of beams and columns for the one story 18M X 48m industrial building.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Rigid Frames design-2
 

Design of Rigid frame including selection of frames according to the span spacing and frame configuration using steel manuals.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Composite Flooring Systems
 

Discussion on steel-concrete composite construction using steel beams, metal decking and concrete, including the role of shear connectors' attachment to the beam for composite action.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Composite flooring systems design for mezzanine
 

Loading and Analysis (Moment diagram to be provided) and design of composite steel decking with concrete topping.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Rigid frame elements design-1
 

Steel Structural Column design using IS special publication for the design of steel structures [SP-6 (1)]

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Rigid frame elements design-2
 

Steel Structural Beams and trusses design using IS special publication for the design of steel structures [SP-6 (1)]

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Field Inspection of Steel Construction Site
 

The structure for site visit shall be similar to the one discussed and project work to include documentation and a report about the observations, learning and findings at Site

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Drawings and Specifications for the Rigid frame design
 

Structural design criteria, including loads used, calculations, drawings and detailing, and steel tonnage calculation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

STRUCTURES - Martin Bechthold, Daniel L Schodek, PHI Learning Private limited.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

MOOC and NPTEL courses on Steel Structures.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 10 marks

CIA 2 - 15 marks

CIA 3 - 20 marks

TOTAL CIA - 45 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

Attendance - 05 Marks

TOTAL MARKS - 100

ARC433 - BUILDING SERVICES II (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Objective: - To develop the knowledge and skills required for understanding electricity, illumination and mechanical services in building and their integration with architectural design.

Course Description: - The course is an introduction to electrical services and illumination in buildings outlining the load calculations, supply and distribution of electricity, equipment, fixtures and their functions. It focuses on configuring electrical and lighting layouts in different building types and integrating them with the architectural design. It also focuses on integration of lifts, elevators and escalators with the design, covering calculation of traffic capacity and handling its design parameters.

Learning Outcome

To explain, calculate the requirements and configure the electrical and illumination layouts for various building types; To suggest and discuss electrical and illumination solutions for different types of buildings; To describe the equipment, functioning and distribution of loads in various types of electrical systems; To describe the fundamentals of mechanical services related to elevators, escalators and lifts.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Electrical Services
 

Introduction to commonly used terminology - Voltage, Current, Power, Connected Load, Max. Demand, Load Factors, Diversity Factor, Load Calculations and symbols as per IS standards etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Supply and distribution of electricity to buildings
 

Power Requirements, Voltage levels, Sub-stations, Ring Main Units, Metering panels, HT Breakers, Transformers, Generators, LT Panels, Cables - HT & LT, Energy Conservation, Codes and Standards like National Building Code, National Electric Code, IS Rules, State Electricity Board and Chief Electrical Inspectorate Guide lines.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Switchgear & Protection - Fuses, Breakers
 

Miniature Circuit Breakers, Earth Leakage Circuit Breakers, Molded Case Circuit Breakers & Air Circuit Breakers and Protection Relays.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Residential Building Electrical Distribution System
 

Power Requirement of each residential & individual apartment, Incoming Power source voltage, RMU, Transformers, Metering Panels, Sub mains, Circuit Mains, Point wiring, Point Matrix inside the apartment, Utility Loads etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Electrical Layout Design
 

Residential Layout design, Compliance to local building codes.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Commercial Bldg. Electrical Distribution System
 

Power Requirement for Lighting, Raw Power & UPS, and Incoming Power source voltage, RMU, Transformers, HT Metering & Sub Metering Panels, Rising Mains, UPS requirements, Server power requirements, Utility Loads etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Low Voltage systems
 

Telephone, Data & Cable TV Networking, Service provider requirements, Point matrix for Individual residential / Apartment.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Lighting
 

Lux Levels, Type of Light Fixtures - direct / indirect, Type of Lamps - FTL, CFL & LED Quality & Quantity of Lighting, Ambient, Task & Accent lighting, Street Lighting, Facade Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Auditorium lighting etc.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Elevators
 

Types of elevator systems, design considerations like Peak Handling capacity, Average Waiting Time, Lift speed etc., Lift well,requirements, Lift Rooms, Lift pit details, Lift Machine capacity, Arranging the ARD requirements, Lift car interiors, Lift code requirements.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Renewable Energy Systems
 

Solar, Wind, Bio-Mass, Thermal Wave plants, Achieving Net Zero Building design through utilization of above natural resources.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Site Visits
 

Sub-stations, Transformer Yards, Generator Yards, Panel Rooms etc. of multistoried residential buildings/campus, Hotels, Hospital & IT Buildings.

NOTE: For Progressive marks, submissions to contain 1) Calculation of required load and preparation of Electrical lay out design for a 3 bed room house with standard notations (Plan).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Case studies
 

Typical layouts and layout generation for lighting, transformers yards, generator rooms, lighting layouts for shops / clinic.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Escalators & Auto Walks
 

      Applications,Calculation of Traffic capacity, arranging the escalators inclination factor. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Earthing & Lightning Protection System
 

Type of soil, earthing requirements based on soil resistivity, conventional earth pits, advanced Earth pits, GI / copper conductors connected between earth pits & equipment's, conventional and early streamer type earthing system.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Frederick S. Merritt, Jonathan T. Ricketts, Building design and construction Handbook, McGraw-Hill Inc., 5th edition,1994

2.     Fred hall and Roger Greeno, Building Services Handbook, Routledge, 7th edition, 2013

3.     BIS, National Building Code 2005, New Delhi, 2005

4.     Benjamin Evans, Day light in Architecture, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1981

5.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

          Hopkinson R.G., Architectural Physics-Lighting, H.M. Stationery Office, London, 1963

6.     Millet Marietta, Light Revealing Architecture, Van Nostrand Reinhold, London,1996

7.     Pritchard D.C., Lighting, Longman scientific &Technical, Harlow, 1995

8.     Peter Treqenza, and David Loe, The Design of Lighting, E & FN Spon, London, 1998

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 10 marks

CIA 2 - 15 marks

CIA 3 - 20 marks

TOTAL CIA - 45 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

Attendance - 05 Marks

TOTAL MARKS - 100

ARC441A - VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Elective subjects have been suggested which are related to specialized areas in Architecture. The student may choose any one subject of interest. The detailed syllabus of the electives chosen and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to specialized areas of architecture.

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: -To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization; to apply or innovate the fundamentals and details learnt, in design.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Vernacular architecture as a process and not a product
 

 Determinants of vernacular form; Overview of the various approaches and concepts to the study of vernacular architecture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Various vernacular architectural forms in the various regions of India
 

Various vernacular architectural forms in the various regions of India

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Impact of Colonial rule on the vernacular architecture and settlements in India.
 

Impact of Colonial rule on the vernacular architecture and settlements in India.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1)    Brunskill R.W.(2000). Vernacular Architecture, An Illustrated Handbook. Faber and Faber Limited; Fourth Edition.

2)    Minke Gernot; Building with Bamboo, Design and Technology of a Sustainable Architecture; Birkhauser, Basel Switzerland (2012)

3)    Paul Oliver, Encyclopaedia of Vernacular Architecture of the World Sandra Piesik,Habitat : Vernacular Architecture for a Changing Planet Henry Glassie, Vernacular Architecture

4)    Randhawa T.S.,The Indian Courtyard House; Prakash Books.

5)  Rapoport Amos (1969),  House Form, and Culture;Prentice Hall Foundations of Cultual Gepgraphy Series

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1)    Widiastuti Indah and Vedamuthu Ranee (2009); A comparative study of vernacular settlement and dwelling culture: A case study in Kerala, South India, and Minagkabau in Sumatra, Indonesia; The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sceinces: Annual Review; January 2009.

2)    Hamed MohammadiMazraeh, MahdiehPazhouhanfar (2017); Effects of vernacular architecture structure on urban sustainability case study: Qeshm Island, Iran; Frontiers of Architectural Research (2018;  7, pg 11–24)

3)    Rashid Mamun, Rahat Ara Dilshad; Modernity in tradition:Reflections on building design and technology in the Asian vernacular. Frontiers of Architectural Research(2015; 4, pg 46–55)

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: 10 marks

CIA II:15 marks

CIA III: 20 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

ESE: 50 marks

ARC441B - THEORY OF DESIGN (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Elective subjects have been suggested which are related to specialized areas in Architecture. The student may choose any one subject of interest. The detailed syllabus of the electives chosen and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to specialized areas of architecture.

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: -To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization; to apply or innovate the fundamentals and details learnt, in design.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding design and design in history
 

Understanding design and design in history

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Role of the designer in changing society
 

Role of the designer in changing society: classification of design; Methodologies, theories and models of the design process

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Creativity and techniques to enable creative thinking
 

Creativity and techniques to enable creative thinking; creativity in architecture; pattern language and participatory approach to design.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Lidwell William, Kritna Holden (2010); Universal Principles of Design, Rockport Publishers Inc. Rockport United States 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Lidwell William, Kritna Holden (2010); Universal Principles of Design, Rockport Publishers Inc. Rockport United States 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: 10 marks

CIA II:15 marks

CIA III:20 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

ESE: 50 marks

 

ARC441C - FURNITURE DESIGN (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - Elective subjects have been suggested which are related to specialized areas in Architecture. The student may choose any one subject of interest. The detailed syllabus of the electives chosen and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to specialized areas of architecture.

Level of knowledge: - Basic

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: -To acquire the knowledge of the chosen area of specialization; to apply or innovate the fundamentals and details learnt, in design.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Principles and History of Furniture Design
 

Principles and history of furniture design.

Modern movements and the creation of ergonomic and functional furniture.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Modular concepts in Furniture Design, Mass Production and Fabrication
 

Modular concepts in furniture design, mass production and fabrication

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Codes and Specifications
 

Codes and specifications; eco- design.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carmen Espegel and Eileen Gray (2013); Objects and Furniture Design: By Architect Series; Ediciones Poligrafa

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Lawson Stuart (2013), Furniture Design: An introduction to Development, Materials and Manufacturing, Lawrence King Publishing, London

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: 10 marks

CIA II: 15 marks

CIA III: 20 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

Total CIA: 50 marks

ESE: 50 marks

ARC451 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN IV (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The rural studio would primarily deal with the dwelling environments of a small community, with a focus on ideas of type and typology through the study of correlation between climate-environmental parameters and social-cultural patterns as generators of an architectural space. Using field studies and analytical frameworks, it will explore the above patterns at the level of dwelling unit and the group of units through the analysis of site & activity patterns, principles & scales of grouping, and issues of appropriate building technology.

 A one week long integrated studio-based workshop of all core subjects - Materials and methods in building construction-IV, Building Structures-IV, Environmental Lab, Computer Applications-II, Building Services-II – is mandatory. A combined review of portfolios of all core subjects, to be planned between 12th -14th week is also mandatory to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture.

Course Objective:  To integrate cultural patterns and environmental characteristics in the process of developing an architectural form; To engage rural outreach programs in architectural education.

Learning Outcome

1.     1. To interpret Programme through contextual analysis and capable of making an informed choice of appropriate technology in the design project

2. To innovate and apply the study of alternative technology into built environment through typological understanding contextually. Finally, to apply the idea of ‘contextuality’, culturally and physically, to enable to read the context 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:18
Study of alternative material and systems in view of the context explorations in the following units
 

1.     Selection of an alternative material – like bamboo, cane, thatch, mud, scrap wood, an in depth understanding of the material characteristics and its uses.

2.       Develop material modules and patterns of material assembly; explorations on spatial elements and systems.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:27
Discourse on the idea of type and typology
 

1. Selection of a rural context with characteristic climatic, cultural or environmental issues and opportunities for study

2.  Conducting structured community meetings to raise issues and its documentation.

3. A detailed study and documentation of the site and context and presentation of portfolio on correlation between climate-environmental parameters and social-cultural patterns as generators of an architectural space. A discourse on type and typology through a workshops and guest lectures is suggested

4.     Develop patterns of configuration at the level of dwelling unit and the group of units through the analysis of site & activity patterns, principles & scales of grouping, and issues of appropriate building technology.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:45
Rural design-insert and application of the alternative technology developed in previous two Units
 

1. Introduction to a design premise on a specific site for the design exploration

2. Nature of Projects: An interpretation center, Community welfare center, Agriculture development center, Fuel research and Seed Bank and Rural Cooperative, Women empowerment center, Vocational training centers, Nodal centers of CEE etc.

3. Development of a built typology and programmatic interpretation

4.  Demonstration of design through working models and drawings. Community outreach projects suggested.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Coming of Age in Samoa by Margaret Mead

2.     Shelter and Society

3.     Urbanization and Housing by Charles Correa

4.     The New Landscape/ A Place in the shade by Charles Correa

5.     Housing in the Third World by Geoffrey Payne

6.     Floor Plan Manual-Housing edited by Oliver Heckmann and Fredrike Scheider

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Books on principles of Design and theory of Design to be studied and applied.

Evaluation Pattern
  • CIA 1 - 25 Marks - Evaluation would be based on the participation, creativity & comprehension and represetation of the exerecises based on workshops, guest lectures and studio exercises assigned.
  • CIA 2 - 50 marks - Evaluation of the contextual study would be based on the participation, creativity & comprehension and represetation of the exerecises based on travel & site study, literature & case studies and studio exercises assigned, to integrate preliminary study and site study.
  • CIA 3 - 75 Marks - Evaluation of the Exploration of architectural language would be based on the participation in the studio and creativity of the Design & its development.
  • Total CIA - 150 Marks
  • ESE (Viva-Voce) - 150 Marks
  • TOTAL MARKS - 300

ARC452 - COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The lab-based course introduces advanced 3D modelling tools and visualization in design process; introduction to vector graphics editing as a tool to present Architecture design studio projects; introduction to Desktop publishing tools, for instance Adobe InDesign, Corel Draw, as tools to create presentations and portfolios.

A one week long integrated studio-based workshop of all core subjects - Materials and methods in building construction-IV, Building Structures-IV, Environmental Lab, Architectural Design-IV and Building Services-II – is mandatory. A combined review of portfolios of all core subjects, to be planned between 12th -14th week is also mandatory to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture.

Course Objective: to develop advanced skills required in using digital tools to conceive, develop and present architectural ideas.

Learning Outcome

To learn and demonstrate the use of advanced 3D modelling and visualization tools in explorations and communication of design ideas; To learn and demonstrate vector graphics editing tools and desk top publishing tools as effective communication tools to prepare presentations and portfolios.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction to Rhinoceros
 

Concepts of NURBS modelling (curves and surfaces), curve / surface editing, solid modelling, layer management, etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction to Rhinoceros
 

Classroom exercise to demonstrate 3D modelling of modified/complex 3D objects - for e.g. Twisted tower, deformed cube, sliced cylinder. Introduction to file conversions and interdependencies between 3D modelling software and 2D drafting software, for e.g. Rhinoceros to AutoCAD. Conversion of 3D model (of modified objects) to 2D drawings (for e.g. plan, section, elevation)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction to advanced 3D modelling software and relevance, capabilities
 

- for e.g. Autodesk, 3DS Max, Autodesk Maya, Rhinoceros. Introduction to online resources, blogs, tutorials.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Introduction to Rhinoceros
 

Conversion of simple architecture/interior design project into Rhinoceros 5.0 project. For e.g. measured drawing of classroom, architecture department.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Introduction to Autodesk 3DS Max OR Autodesk Maya
 

concepts of solid modelling, polygonal modelling, modifiers.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Introduction to Autodesk 3DS Max OR Autodesk Maya
 

Application of materials, simple timeline animations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Vector graphics editing
 

Introduction to Vector graphics editing as a tool to present Architecture design studio projects -introduction to Adobe Illustrator / Corel DRAW.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Desktop publishing tools
 

For e.g. Adobe InDesign, CorelDraw as tools to create presentations and portfolios.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Techniques of 3D visualizations
 

Introduction to tool settings in 3D rendering engines. For e.g. Using VRay, Maxwell, Flamingo, Mental Ray.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Techniques of 3D visualizations
 

Classroom demonstration. For e.g. of objects, of simple Architecture design projects.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Project 1
 

Classroom exercise to convert architecture design project 2D drawings (of semester 31 4 OR any simple one to three storeyed building) into 3D model using Rhinoceros OR Autodesk Max OR Autodesk Maya DR Trimble Sketch up (less preferred ill this studio). Project to be rendered using appropriate 30 visualization software.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Project 2
 

Classroom demonstration/exercise of image rendering/collaging using Adobe Photoshop - adding context to visualizations. Project to include presentation of final outcomes in the form of drawing panels, booklets, posters.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Internet resources, blogs, http://www.rhino3d.com

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Mooc courses :

Introduction to Architectural 3D softwares

3D Rendering

Trimble sketchup tutorial videos on the official webpage

Evaluation Pattern

CIA -50 Marks

ESE (Viva voce) - 50 Marks

 

TOTAL MARKS - 100

 

 



ARC453 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND LAB IN ARCHITECTURE (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:The lab-based course is an introduction to complex relationships between the built and natural environments; searching underlying causes and impacts of environmental degradation and conversations; Strategies to transform the built environment to meet the risks of climate change; integration of Renewable Energy Systems in built environment. Lab based course involves measurements, documentation and recording; analysis and design using hand held and digital tools and through simulation using appropriate software.

A one week long integrated studio-based workshop of all core subjects - Materials and methods in building construction-IV, Building Structures-IV, Architectural Design IV, Computer Applications-II and Building Services-II – is mandatory. A combined review of portfolios of all core subjects, to be planned between 12th -14th week is also mandatory to foster an integrated understanding of Architecture.

Course Objective: - To develop the knowledge of environmental science to control the environment for the protection of health and comfort of all living beings on this earth.

Learning Outcome

To describe the complex relationships between the built and natural environments, its abuse and reviving strategies; To measure and evaluate the environmental performance of buildings.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction
 

Introduction to complex relationships between the built and natural environments, causes and impacts of environmental degradation and conversations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Water Efficiency
 

Innovative Wastewater Treatment and Reuse and Water Use Reduction and Re use factors.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Sustainable Sites
 

To meet the risks of climate change; Site Specific Design; Development Density and Community Connectivity, Alternative Transportation, Site Development, Storm water Design and Heat Island Effect.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Strategies to transform the built environment - Energy and Atmosphere
 

Optimize Energy Performance, On-site Renewable Energy, Enhanced Commissioning and Green Power. To apply the principles of Solar Passive Architecture to design of buildings.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Materials and Resources
 

Building Reuse: Maintain Existing Walls, Floors, and Roof, Construction Waste Management, Materials Reuse, Recycled Content, Regional Materials and Certified Wood.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:35
Study of natural structures and processes
 

Concepts of urban ecology and landscape urbanism; case studies; integration of Renewable Energy Systems in built environment.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:35
Performance evaluation of Renewable Energy Systems
 

Fenestration, Opaque Construction, etc. as per test standards specified in NBC and ECBC.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:35
Performance evaluation of live case study
 

Thermal performance of built environment; natural and artificial lighting and ventilation and wind movement which will involve measurements; documentation and recording; analysis and design using hand held and digital tools and through simulation using appropriate software.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Krishnan, A., Baker, N., Yannas, S., & Szokolay, S. (2001). Climate Responsive Architecture: A Design Handbook for Energy Efficient Buildings. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill Education Publishing Company.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Majumdar, M. (2002). Energy efficient buildings:. TERI India publication.

2. Markus, T., & Morris, E. (1980). Buildings, Climate and Energy. Pitman Publishing, London.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA -50 Marks

ESE (Viva voce) - 50 Marks

TOTAL MARKS - 100

ARC531 - MATERIALS AND METHODS IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION V (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The course is an introduction to advanced large span structures and methods of architectural construction. 

1. Material vocabulary module introduces plastics in architectural construction. 2. Constructive grammar of building elements detail advanced large span structures such as hyper paraboloid roof, folded plate, cylindrical shell, geodesic domes, space frame, tensile Structures, foundation; advanced methods of building construction include Pre-engineered structures, pneumatic structures, Prestressed and post tensioned construction systems. 3. Their intrinsic relationship to a building system syntax.  4. A detailed Case study, preparation of construction drawings, market surveys, factory visits and site visits to buildings under construction are essential.  

Course Objective: - To develop the ability to describe, document and appreciate architectural expression of alternative constructional composition.

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: - 

1. To describe the properties of plastics its manufacturing methods and assembly of the material to modules in architectural construction. 2. To describe the means and construction methods of metal cladding and building envelopes 3. To analyze and infer from documentation of a case study of any large span structure describing the means and methods of its construction, functional organization and integration of services.  4. To demonstrate all large span construction details integrated with Building structures studio. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Detailing of a Pre-engineered building
 

Detailing of a Pre-engineered building: Including Roof fixing details with aluminium sheet and profiled MS sheet cladding. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Introduction to pre-engineering metal buildings.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to large span roofs
 

 Introduction to large span roofs 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Detailing of folded plate and cylindrical shell roof
 

Detailing of folded plate and cylindrical shell roof: Principles and methods of construction including form-work techniques and reinforcement details. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Detailing of hyperbolic paraboloid shell roof
 

 Principles and methods of construction including form-work techniques and reinforcement details. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Detailing of geodesic domes
 

 Detailing of geodesic domes: Principles and methods of construction with explorations using physical models

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Tensile structures and pneumatic structures
 

Tensile structures and pneumatic structures: Principles and methods of construction with explorations using physical models

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Detailing of a space frame
 

Detailing of a space frame; Principles and methods of construction with explorations using physical models. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
UPVC, PVC & FRP
 

UPVC, PVC & FRP: Doors and windows and partitions (Detailing and study of joinery) 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Plastics as a building material
 

Plastics as a building material: types, properties and uses of plastics such as polycarbonates, acrylics, PVC polymer films, and fiber reinforced plastic. Application and details. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Metal cladding of facades and Building envelopes
 

Metal cladding of facades and Building envelopes: Fixing and fabrication details.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to metal cladding
 

Introduction to metal cladding: ACP, Aluminum louvers; Fixing and fabrication details. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Chudley , R., & Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. Prentice Hall, 4 edition.

2. Emmitt , S., & Gorse, C. (2009). Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings. Wiley-Blackwell.

3. Mckay, W. (2012). Building Construction. Pearson India. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

2. Francis Mallgrave, H. (2004). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts; Practical Aesthetics. Los Angeles.

3. Frampton, K. (2001). Studies in Tectonic Culture. Cambridge.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 50 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

Total -100 Marks

ARC532 - HISTORY AND THEORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND CULTURE IV (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course introduces the idea of architecture, history and theory. It explores 20th Century Architecture – International & Indian in different time periods in various cultural, geographical and political contexts, particularly environment & physical context socio-economic issues religion & cosmology. This is done descriptively as well as interpretatively, developing critical understanding of architectural concepts through history. The course weaves a web of connections between built environment and the social, political, religious, technological and environmental circumstances.   It is dealt in clusters of related notional contexts – e.g. Buddhist architecture, River valley cultures, Colonial architecture etc.   At the end of each set of clusters a theory class will explore some relevant thematic ideas in them –  ornament & detail, power & politics, form & iconography etc. constantly relating it to modern life – places and practices. There will be a minimum of 15 lectures, 5 theory seminars, 2 field trips, 2-3 workshops / master classes in each semester with 2 tests and 5 essay papers.

Course Objective: To develop the ability to critically understand architectural concepts through history.

Learning Outcome

To describe the various dimensions of 20th Century Architecture – International & Indian in different contextual influences.

1. Ability to understand Modern History and its International, Regional and Local influences.

2. Ability to understand theoretical underpinnings of Modern Architecture

3. Ability to read, understand and express ideas and concepts related to Modern architecture - in Material, Form and Structure

4. Ability to learn about design and planning of Institutional, Residential, Public and Civic  architecture through various examples in the past century.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Modernism & International Style & Alternate Modernism
 

What is ‘Modern’?

Modern movement/ Modernism in Architecture

Modern movement in Art & Culture

Tracing the emergence of the Modern movement from the Industrialization and Colonial influences and even before to a bit of the Enlightenment in Europe…Baroque, New-Gorthic, Romanesque to Arts & Crafts and Eclectic influencs such as the Indo Sarcenic etc.

Indigenous modernism – at Jaipur, Bangalore, Japan, etc.

Modernism

·       Values&  Positions

·       Stylisiticand Organisational  Elements

·       Ornament& Reference

·       Play and Juxtapostiion

Focus Examples:

Unite d Habition, Marseille, Bauhaus, Dessau / Mies van der Rohe, Villa Savoye, Poissy / Le Corbusier, Chandigarh & Brasilia, Seagram Building, Chicago / MVRDV, Supporting Examples:

Presentation by Students

Main Examples:

Alvar Alto, Ron Champ Chapel, Le Corbusier, GandhiBhavan, Charles Correa

Supporting Examples:

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Post Modernism and Deconstruction
 

POst Modernism and Deconsruction

·       Values &  Positions

·       Stylisitic and Organisational  Elements

·       Ornament & Reference

·       Play and Juxtapostiion

Main Examples:

Duck Building / Venturi & Scott Brown, Pompedou Center, Paris / Renzo Piano

Supporting Examples:

Peter Eisenmen, Frank Gehry, Charles Correa, Arato Isozaki.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Theoretical Interpretations in Pre-modern Cultures
 

Vitruvius, Leon Batista Alberti, Viollet-le-Duc, Vastushastra, Feng Shui.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Alternate theoretical positions
 

Organic Architecture, Metabolists, Archigram

Examples:

Tadao Ando, Hassan Fathy, GeoffreyBawa, Glen Murcut

Supporting Examples:

PaoloSoleri, Metabolism, Revathi Kamath, Romi Khosla, Laurie Baker

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Contemporary Architectural Theory
 

Ecological Urbanism, Biomimicry, Parametric Architecture 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Francis D.K. Ching, Mark Jazombek, Vikramaditya Prakash. A Global History of Architecture. Second Edition. John Wiley & Sons.

Norberg-Schulz, Christian (1980) Meaning in Western Architecture. Revised Edition. New York: Rizzoli International

Gideon, Sigried. Space, Time and Architecture

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ockman, Joan. Architecture Culture1943-1968. A Documentary Anthology. Rizzoli, 1993.

von Moos, Stanislaus. Le Corbusier Elements of a Synthesis. The MIT Press, 1979

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 10

CIA 2 - 15

CIA 3 - 20

Total CIA - 45

Attendance -05

ESE - 50

TOTAL MARKS - 100

ARC533 - LANDSCAPE AND SITE PLANNING (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Introduction to the fundamentals of landscape architecture and the art of site planning, study of the relation between landscape and architectural design; design of exterior spaces as they relate to and complement building designs; theoretical and historical background of landscape design, site analysis, environmental issues, and plant materials

Course Ojective: To introduce the fundamentals of landscape architecture and the art of site planning in architectural objectives. 

Learning Outcome

1.To describe the fundamentals of landscape design.

2. To survey and evaluate the site.

3. To describe parameters which affect art of site planning.

4. To describe and demonstrate site planning strategies in Landscape design 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Introduction to Fundamentals of landscape architecture

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Landscape and Architecture
 

Introduction to Relation between landscape and architectural design

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
History of Landscape architecture
 

Theoretical and historical background of landscape design, site analysis, environmental issues, and plant materials

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Landscape elements and classification
 

Landscape elements and classification,Landform, plant life, microclimate; land use and land preservation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Elements and methods of landscape design
 

Elements and methods of landscape design,Study of aesthetic and functional values.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Site planning
 

The art of site planning, arranging structures on the land and shaping the spaces between.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
The parameters affecting design strategies
 

The site, the user and the program; the techniques of surveys – field surveys, ariel photographs; sensing landscape and its materials – managing micro climate, noise and soil, plants and ground cover; services; earth work and utilities, access to site

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Application of design strategies
 

It may concern a small cluster of houses, a single building and its grounds, or something as extensive as a small community built in a single operation. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Burns, C., & Kahn, A. (2005). Site Matters: Design Concepts, Histories and Strategies. New York and London: Routledge.

2. Lynch, K., & Hack, G. (1984). Site Planning. Library of Congress Cataloguing. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Ashihara, Y. (1970). Exterior Design in Architecture. NY: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 10 Marks

CIA 2 - 15 Marks

CIA 3 - 20 Marks

Attendance - 5 Marks

Total CIA - 50 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks 

ARC534 - BUILDING SERVICES III (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The course is an introduction to mechanical ventilation systems in buildings outlining the air-conditioning methods and equipment, Architectural requirements of mechanical ventilation in different types. It also introduces the study of acoustics; Behaviour of sound in enclosed spaces and its calculations; Acoustical design requirement for different room types; Introduction to environmental noise control.  

Course Objective: - To develop the knowledge and skills required for understanding the mechanical services and acoustics in building and their integration with architectural design. 

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: - To explain, calculate the requirements and configure the mechanical ventilation systems and layouts for various building types; To suggest and discuss acoustical solutions for different types of rooms; To describe the fundamentals of environmental noise and noise control in buildings. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Mechanical Ventilation
 

Need for mechanical ventilation in buildings like Basement, Kitchen, and Toilet & Parking etc. Guide lines as per NBC/ASHRAE and Types of ventilation systems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Air-conditioning
 

Definition, Psychometric requirements, Air & Refrigeration cycles, heating system, Load Calculations, Zoning and Air Distribution. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Air Conditioning systems
 

Window, Split, centralized air-conditioning system with Water & Air-Cooled Chillers, Air Handling Units, Types of ducting design, preferred locations of the equipment.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Critical air conditioning
 

Clean Rooms, Server. & Hub Rooms, UPS Rooms, Operation Theaters etc. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Design-1
 

Design of air-conditioning system for a Small Shop and a for Residential & Small Office. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Room Acoustics defects and measurement techniques
 

Echoes, focusing of sound, dead spots, flutter echo. Room resonances, small enclosures, room modes, standing waves. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to the study of acoustics
 

Nature of Sound, basic terminology, decibel scale, threshold of audibility and pain, masking, sound and distance, inverse square law. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Rooms for speech and music
 

Effect of RT and SNR on speech and music, AI, STI, RASTI, Speech intelligibility. Sound reinforcement systems and background noise masking systems.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Room Acoustics
 

History of Greek, Roman theatres. Reflection, Diffusion, Diffraction, reverberation, Absorption. Calculation of reverberation time using Sabine's and Eyring's formulae. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Design and Detailing for Acoustics of Multipurpose halls (Site visit and studio component)
 

Case studies of acoustically designed and treated multipurpose halls. Design of a multipurpose hall for optimum acoustics - drawings and construction details of acoustical treatment. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Acoustical Materials and Corrections
 

Absorptive materials - NRC value, porous materials, panel absorbers, membrane absorbers, diffusers, cavity or Helmholtz resonators. Adjustable acoustics and variable sound absorbers. Acoustical correction and retrofits to existing spaces. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Acoustical Design recommendations
 

Halls for speech and music. Raked Seating, Use of IS code 2526 - 1963. Home theatres, recording studios, open plan offices, speech privacy issues and sound attenuation. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Industrial Noise
 

Sources of industrial noise - impact, friction, reciprocation, air turbulence and other noise. Methods of reduction using enclosures and barriers -Case study of industrial buildings. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to environmental noise control
 

Types of noise - indoor, outdoor noise, airborne and structure borne noise, noise transmission, Mass Law, Transmission loss. Noise from ventilating systems. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Urban Soundscape
 

Introduction to Urban noise climate, Noise sources - Air traffic, Rail traffic, Road traffic, Seashore and inland. Traffic planning against outdoor noise. Role of architects in shaping the urban soundscape. Sustainable design strategies in building acoustics.  

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Constructional measures of noise control (studio component)
 

Construction details of composite walls, double walls, floating floors, wood-joist floors, plenum barriers, sound locks, etc. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Means of noise control in buildings
 

Maximum acceptable noise levels, Enclosures, Barriers, Sound insulation, STC ratings, Sound Isolation. Noise measurement using SLM. Idea of sick building syndrome. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. 'Principles of Refrigeration' by Roy 3 Dosat

2. 'Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Data Hand book' by Manohar Prasad

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. 'Refrigeration and Air Conditioning' by Don Kundwar

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 10 Marks 

CIA 2 -15 Marks

CIA 3 -20 Marks

Attendance - 05 Marks

Total CIA-50 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

Total - 100 Marks

ARC551 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN V (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The studio would primarily interpret the idea of an institution as an interplay of contextual factors, programmatic interpretations and the architectural language at a range of scales. Contextual factors like site, surroundings, and landscape are introduced, along with the development of an architectural language that emerges from the integration of design details with larger concepts and architectural programme. It also includes a preliminary introduction to fundamentals of working drawings as technical drawing in the process of construction  

Course Objective:  To integrate environmental characteristics and the principles of site planning in the process of developing an architectural programme and form; To engage a process of sustainable re-development of abused landscapes in architectural education 

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: -  

1. To document, evaluate and interpret landscape through contextual analysis 

2. To interpret and integrate program for design in specific site conditions.

3. To innovate and apply the large span structure into design

4. To develop technical working drawing in construction

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Study on vagaries of landscape : Selection of site
 

Selection of site with specific landscape characteristics or environmental issues – contoured sites, abused landscapes like quarry, contested forest tracts within cities; An in depth understanding of the landscape characteristics and its vagaries 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Site narratives
 

 Explore and identify landscape elements, systems, processes or parameters that structure the site – both physical and experiential across scales; Evaluate and develop natural patterns of site structure

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:24
Site walks and Photo essays
 

Site walks, Photo essays and both manual and advanced tools and soft wares may be used for site data collection and analysis. Workshops and lectures suggested for a holistic understanding and knowledge of current discourses on the subject. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:21
Discourse on the idea of an institution
 

A critical review of the altering ideas of an institution

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:21
Context study
 

Selection of an appropriate or suitable campus premise for the context study. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:21
Case visits and Literature review
 

Case visits and Literature review on Campuses; a structured analysis 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:21
Interrelationships of functions and activity patterns
 

Evolve interrelationships of functions and activity patterns, form and space, hierarchies, architectural response to site and programmatic premise of the case. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:21
Nature of Projects
 

Centres for environmental education and research, Social welfare, empowerment and research centres, Centre for alternative medicine and material research, Centre for liberal arts and science.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:21
Campus Design
 

The design premise – an informed integration of program and specific site conditions for the design exploration 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:21
Process, Development and Demonstration
 

Process, Development and Demonstration of design through working models and drawings. Community outreach projects suggested. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:24
Working Drawing and appropriate application of large span structures
 

Introduction to fundamentals of Working drawings.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:24
Application of a large span
 

Appropriate application of a large span structure in design.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:24
working drawings - 1 Detail
 

Development of a basic set of working drawings for any selected part.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Books on principles of Design of theory of Design to be studied and applied. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Ashihara, Y. (1970). Exterior Design in Architecture. NY: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.

2. Burns, C., & Kahn, A. (2005). Site Matters: Design Concepts, Histories and Strategies. New York and London: Routledge.

3. Lynch, K., & Hack, G. (1984). Site Planning. Library of Congress Cataloguing. 

Evaluation Pattern
  • CIA 1 - 25 Marks - Evaluation would be based on the participation, creativity & comprehension and representation of the exerecises based on workshops, guest lectures and studio exercises assigned.
  • CIA 2 - 50 marks - Evaluation of the contextual study would be based on the participation, creativity & comprehension and represetation of the exerecises based on travel & site study, literature & case studies and studio exercises assigned, to integrate preliminary study and site study.
  • CIA 3 - 75 Marks - Evaluation of the Exploration of architectural language would be based on the participation in the studio and creativity of the Design & its development.
  • Total CIA - 150 Marks
  • ESE (Viva-Voce) - 150 Marks
  • TOTAL MARKS - 300

ARC552 - BUILDING STRUCTURES V (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The course is an introduction to design explorations on alternative structural design solutions for a given horizontal long span structure. 

Course Objective: To integrate structural design learning with architectural objectives and to test various alternatives of design for a horizontal long span structure. 

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome:  

1. To explore structural design alternatives for a horizontal long span building within a given set of parameters and for lateral loads based on IS codes. 2. To apply the learnings from structural system design for long span structures. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to the Structural design Project
 

Design for an Airport terminal building of dimension 75M X 300M using horizontal system. Selection of Horizontal structural systems including load calculation based on Building Codes and Standards (indicative).  

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Design of Portal Frame Structure System
 

Design of two-dimensional rigid frames that have a rigid joint between column and beam. General framing arrangement of Portal frame for 75M X 300M building, basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction
 

Horizontal or Long Span Structures 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Structural Analysis and Design to satisfy Building Codes and Standards
 

Determine the general loads to be considered in the design of the structure, based on the type of occupancy specified for each area. a) Gravity loading: Dead and Live load calculation based on IS 875 (Part 1&2) b) Seismic loading: Seismic loading calculation based on IS 1893 Code Static Analysis Procedure c) Wind loading: Wind loading calculation based on Indian Standard I.S. 875 (Part3). 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:19
Design of Arch and Vault Structures
 

Design of curved structural member spanning two points, of masonry, concrete or steel and used as the roofing systems of large span buildings. Design of Arch and Vault arrangement for spanning 75M X 300M building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation.  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:19
Design of Dome Structures
 

Domes as polar arrays of curved structural systems in masonry, concrete, steel with glass cladding, their structural strength and properties as roofing systems of large column-free spans. Design of dome(s) for spanning 75M X 300M building, basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Cable and Suspension Structures
 

Design for long-span systems using Cable and suspension systems. Design cable suspended roof to span 75M X 300M building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Vierendeel truss design
 

Truss design with rectangular or square assembly of members with rigid joints capable of resisting bending. Moments. General framing arrangement of Vierendeel truss for 75M X 300M building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Long Span Planar Truss Design
 

Triangular structural system; assembly of simple triangular planar trusses, Planar trusses in roofs and bridges. General framing arrangement of Long Span Truss for 75M X 300M building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Fabric Structure
 

Design of membrane structures of thin flexible fabric covers that provide light-weight free--form roofing system. Design of Fabric roof to span 75M X 300M building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Concrete Shell structure design
 

Design of double curved surfaces formed from warped surface (e.g. hyperbolic parabolic); their properties and strength as light-weight construction for column free large spans. Design of Concrete shell roof to spanning 75M X 300M building, and basic_ load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Space Truss
 

Design of three dimensional trusses, their structural properties and strength due to three-dimensional triangulation. Design of Space Truss roof for spanning 75M X 300M building, and basic load path and total structural weight calculation. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Bechthold, M., & Schodek, D. (2008). Structures, Prentice Hall India; 6th edition.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Works of Felix Candela, Frei Otto and Hassan Fathy  

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 50

ESE (Viva voce) - 50

Total Marks - 100

SL.NO

EVALUATION COMPONENT

DURATION

(MIN)

NATURE OF COMPONENT

VALIDATION

1

CIA 1

-

Closed/Open book

Written Test

2

CIA 2-MID SEMESTER EXAM

120

Closed book

MSE

3

CIA 3

-

Open Book

Drawing Sheets Submission

4

END SEMESTER EXAM

180

Closed book

ESE

ARC553 - DIGITAL GRAPHICS AND ART (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - A lab-based course introducing video, image and vector editing software; scripting; synchronization of sound with patterns generated; Presentation using voice over and production of CD ROMs 

Course Objective: - To develop and apply the knowledge and skills required for communication through interactive audio-visual medium in architecture.

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: - To Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the use of digital tools, techniques and communication through interactive audio-visual medium in architecture.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction
 

Introduction to Digital Graphics Technology concepts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Production
 

Photography and Video Production 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Animation
 

Animation Techniques and Presentation Authoring 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Principles of Editing
 

 Animation and Video editing 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Production-1
 

Demonstration of a project.  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Effective Communication
 

Digital composition, 3D Animation and Special effects, Art of Story Boarding and Direction 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Production-2
 

Demonstration of a project. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Books and tutorials on principles and techniques of audio-visual digital tools to be studied and applied. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NPTEL and Mooc(Massive Open Online Courses) on Photo and Video Editing.

1. Introduction to Film Studies by IIT Madras

2. Visual Communication by IIT Bombay

- Module 3: Photography

- Module 6: Animation

- Module 7: Film and Video

3. Enhancing Photos for Complete Beginners by Udemy.

4. Photography Masterclass : A complete guide to Photography by Udemy.

Evaluation Pattern

TOTAL CIA - 50 Marks

ESE (Viva voce)- 50 Marks

TOTAL MARKS - 100

ARC631 - MATERIALS AND METHODS IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION VI (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The course gives an introduction to building material glass in architectural construction. It details advanced foundations; Advanced methods of construction using new technology; Sliding and folding door window; Sky lights in steel and glass; Alternative wall construction technologies.

1.      Material vocabulary module includes glass in architectural construction.

2.      Constructive grammar of building elements detail foundations with mat and pile foundations, Earth retaining structures; Advanced methods of construction using CAD, CAM and 3D Printing; Sliding and folding door window details in wood, steel and aluminium; Sky lights in steel and glass; Alternative wall construction technologies such as sandwich panel, and PUF.

3.      Their intrinsic relationship to a building system syntax.

4.      A detailed Case study, preparation of construction drawings, market surveys, factory visits and site visits to buildings under construction are essential.

Course Objective: - To develop the ability to describe, document and appreciate architectural expression of construction with advanced materials and technologies.

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: -

1.      To describe the properties of glass, its manufacturing methods and the assembly of it to modules of doors and windows, structural glazing and skylights.

2.      To describe methods of construction used in advanced foundation design.

3.      To analyze and infer from documentation of a case study on sliding and folding door and innovate its construction detail.

4.      To write a term paper on the opportunities of prefabrication in India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Glass as a building material
 

Glass manufacturing in various types like plate, tinted, decorative, reinforced, laminated glass block, fiber glass, glass murals, partially colored glass, etching of glass and its applications in building industry for both exteriors and interiors. Glass fabrication techniques, fiber reinforced composite materials and products.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Frameless glass doors and windows and partitions
 

1.      Fixing and fabrication details.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Point supported glazing
 

Fixing and fabrication details 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Structural Glazing and cladding
 

Fixing and fabrication details 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Aluminum sliding and folding doors and partitions
 

1.      Principles and methods of construction and detailing.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Wooden sliding and folding doors and partitions
 

1.      Principles and methods of construction and detailing.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Steel sliding and folding doors and partitions
 

1.      Principles and methods of construction and detailing.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Prefabrication in India
 

1.      Advantages and relevance in the Indian context. Prefabrication: Design, analysis and manufacture processes. Study of one example.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Alternative wall technologies
 

Sandwich panel walls, PUF panels etc. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Skylight in steel and glass
 

1.      Principles and methods of construction and detailing.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Earth retaining structure
 

Selection, Design, Construction of retaining structures including gravity, cantilever, sheet pile, and anchored earth and mechanically stabilized earth (reinforced earth) walls. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Advanced foundation
 

1.      Mat foundations, Pile foundations; different types of piles, precast piles, cast-in-situ piles in wood concrete and steel.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Pile foundation construction
 

1.      method of driving piles, Sheet piling, pile caps, etc.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to advanced methods of Building construction
 

1.      CAD /CAM fabrication and 3D printing

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Chudley , R., & Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. Prentice Hall, 4 edition.

2.      Emmitt , S., & Gorse, C. (2009). Barry's Introduction to Construction of Buildings. Wiley-Blackwell.

3.      Mckay, W. (2012). Building Construction. Pearson India.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Deplazes, A. (2005). Constructing Architecture Materials Processes Structures A Handbook. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Publishers for Architecture.

2.      Francis Mallgrave, H. (2004). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts; Practical Aesthetics. Los Angeles.

3.      Frampton, K. (2001). Studies in Tectonic Culture. Cambridge.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Practical) - 50 Marks

ESE (Theory) - 50 Marks

TOTAL MARKS - 100

ARC632 - HOUSING AND HUMAN SETTLEMENT PLANNING (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The course is an introduction to Elements and characteristics of human settlements; origins; determinants and their evolution through the course of history; Settlements as expression of political aspirations; Various planning concepts in urban, rural and regional level development plans in the context of India; Changing scenario in the context of Globalization. The course also outlines social housing post WW II; Issues concerning housing in the Indian Context; its production and standards the processes involves in housing project development; Case studies and post occupancy evaluation.

Course Objective: - To give an introduction to the discipline of planning human settlements and the challenges of housing scenario in India

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: - To illustrate the evolution of human settlements and the issues concerned; To describe the social housing scenario in India and the criteria to evaluate it.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Human settlements
 

Types of settlements; its origin and evolution; the idea of a city with case examples.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Globalisation and the altering cities
 

Land use planning and its implications; Urbanisation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Theory of Planning
 

Theory of Planning enunciated by Ebenezer Howard, Patrick Geddes, Soria Y Mata, Doxiadis, Le-Corbusier, Clarence Stein, Clarence Arthur Perry, Hilberseimer – their relevance to Indian conditions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Components of a settlement
 

Activity pattern and land use, traffic and road network, density of population and population distribution. Central business district of a city, other business districts, urban nodes, rest of the city, fringe area and suburbs. Growth and aging of various parts of the city particularly the CBD the problems caused due to this including slums, internal spatial structure of cities – concentric zone theory, sector theory, multiple nuclei concept and work-home concept.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to social housing in India
 

Social Housing post WW II; Issues concerning housing in the Indian Context; Various agencies involved in the production of housing; Factors that influence housing affordability; Various schemes and policies of the government in the housing sector; Standards and guidelines for housing; Housing design typologies and the processes involves in housing project development; Case studies and post occupancy evaluation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Simon Eisner, Arthur Gallion & Stanley Eisner, Urban Pattern, VNR, New York, 1993

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Clara Greed, Introducing Town Planning, Longman, Scientific and Technical, Harlow, 1973

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: 10 marks

CIA II: 15 marks

CIA III: 20 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

ESE: 50 marks

Total: 100 marks

ARC633 - SPECIFICATIONS, ESTIMATION AND COSTING (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The course is an introduction to estimation, writing specifications and preparing Bill of Quantities. It involves preparation of BOQ with abstract and detailed specifications for various materials and items of work used in various building types, infrastructure and services.

Course Objective: - To develop the necessary skills for estimation, writing the specifications as well as prepare Bill of Quantities for various types of buildings.

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: - To estimate and cost different types of buildings; To prepare BOQ for buildings, infrastructure and services.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Estimation
 

Need for estimation, relationship between choice of materials, their specifications, Bill of Quantities (BOQ), project costing, project quality/cost/ time management. Centre line method.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Specifications
 

How to arrive at abstract and detailed specifications for various materials leading to 'items of work' used in construction. Including influence and impact of local and national building codes on specifications. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Mandatory tests & Safety Measures in Specifications
 

Procedures, frequency and submission of results as part of specifications and their inclusion in the BOQ for different materials document. Integrating workers' safety and material security into specifications.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Bill of Quantities (BOQ)
 

Why and how to build flexibility, resilience and redundancy in BOQ. Format for BOQ.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Costing
 

Reasons for rate variation - study of government rates (CPWD/ Karnataka PWD Schedule of Rates) and market rates. Concept of inflation and its effect on costing.eg. Escalation clause, extra items, variations. Lift & lead.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Detailed rate analysis of building
 

Basic knowledge of items as per current schedule of rates (CSR) of local PWD. Percentages (based on thumb rule calculations) of various bulk materials used in construction like cement, steel, rubble, metal, sand, brick, tiles etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Project 2:
 

Detailed specifications writing and estimation of Bill of Quantities (BOQ) for an office interior work.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to sequence of construction activity
 

Project time, Labour, Materials costing and Impact of delay in project on costing.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Project 1
 

Detailed specifications writing and estimation of Bill of Quantities (BOQ) for an RCC framed structure.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Project 3
 

Detailed specifications writing and estimation of Bill of Quantities (BOQ) for a Water supply and sanitary work including overhead tanks and Sump tanks.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Billing requirements
 

Role of the architect in monitoring the specifications follow-up for quality control, the measurement book (MB), RA bills, interim and final checking and certification of works on site based on the BOQ and terms of contracts.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Project 4
 

Detailed specifications writing and estimation of Bill of Quantities (BOQ) for a typical residential layout plan with roads, culverts, pavements, electrical work etc.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

"Estimating and Costing" by S K Dutta

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 "Estimating" by S C Rangawala

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: 10 marks

CIA II: 15 marks

CIA III: 20 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

ESE: 50 marks

Total: 100 marks

ARC634 - PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE - I (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The lecture course introduces to the ideas of Profession and Practice in the field of Architecture. It gives a general overview of the Building Industry, Contract Management and Tender.

Course Objective: - To understand the responsibilities & liabilities of the Profession; To understand the process of Contract management.

Learning Outcome

Course Outcome: - To give a descriptive overview of the Architectural Profession and Practice and the building industry in general; To describe the types and procedures involved in tendering and contract.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Profession
 

Idea of profession and essential differences among profession, trade and business. Its essential tenets, duties and liabilities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Profession of Architecture
 

Types and extent of services offered by architects, scale of fees, stages of payment, and contract between client and architect.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Code of Professional Conduct
 

Architects Act of 1972. Role of Council of Architecture and the Indian Institute of Architects in the functioning of the Profession.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Architectural Practice-1
 

Types of Architectural firms, proprietorship, partnership, associate ship. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of firm. Basic accounting procedures. Taxes and implications of service tax.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Architectural Practice-2
 

Various means of building client base and gaining projects. Architectural competitions, guidelines of COA, procedure of conduct of such competitions.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Contract Management
 

 Overview of procedures in contract management with a focus on Architect's role.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Building Industry
 

General overview of the industry. Various participants and dimensions of building industry. Finance, statutory controls, construction procedures, enforcement issues related to building industry and the role of architect, employer, and contractor.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Tender-1
 

Procedure of calling for tender, documents necessary for tendering process. Tender document and its content. Types of tenders, suitability of different types to various categories of projects. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of tender. Tender notices, opening, scrutiny, process of selection and award.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Tender-2
 

Architect's role in tender process. Essential characteristics of Tender Notice, Earnest Money Deposit, Security Deposit, Retention Amount, Mobilization Amount and Bonus & Penalty Clauses.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Types of Insurance and Fire Insurance
 

Types of Insurance and Fire Insurance.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Contract
 

General Principles, types of contract, definitions of various terms used in the contract document. Contract document, contents and sections dealing with various aspects of contract management. Conditions and Scope of Contract and the role of an architect in ensuring a positive completion of a contract. Architect's role in the contract and vested authority.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Tender issues
 

Various issues arising out of tendering process and the role of an architect in maintaining objectivity in the process.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Professional Practice for Architects & Engineers by Roshan Namavathi.

2. Legal and Contractual Procedures for Architects by Bob Greenstreet.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. AJ Legal Handbook

2. Professional Practice by KG Krishnamurthy and SV Ravindra, PHI Learning, India 2013

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I: 10 marks

CIA II: 15 marks

CIA III: 20 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

ESE: 50 marks

Total: 100 marks

ARC641A - APPROPRIATE BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - Appropriate technologies and cost-effective technologies; technologies as evolved from contexts through the practice of International architects and Indian architects; Systems and techniques developed in research labs.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to specialized areas of architecture

Learning Outcome

Ability to describe appropriate and cost effective technologies used in different contexts.

Ability to chose an appropriate technology of construction in a given context.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Appropriate Building Technologies
 

Appropriate technologies and cost-effective technologies

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Evolution of Technology
 

Technologies as evolved from contexts through the practice of International architects and Indian architects.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Research in Appropriate Building Technologies
 

Systems and techniques developed in research labs, etc.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Practical Handbook on BUILDING CONSTRUCTION by A Nabhi Publication

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Building construction illustrated by Francis D K Ching

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 10 Marks

CIA 2 - 15 Marks

CIA 3 - 20 Marks

Attendance - 5 Marks

Total CIA - 50 Marks

ESE- 50 Marks

Total - 100 Marks

 

ARC641B - EARTHQUAKE RESISTANT ARCHITECTURE (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - Fundamentals of Earthquake and the basic terminology; Historical experience; Site Planning and Performance of Ground and Buildings; Seismic codes and building configuration; Seismic design and detailing of non-engineered construction; Seismic design and detailing of RC and steel buildings; Design of non-structural elements; architectural design for Seismic resistance. The detailed course plan of the elective and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to specialized areas of architecture.

Learning Outcome

 To describe the fundamentals of Earthquake Design.

To design a seismic resistant structure.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Fundamentals and Introduction to Earthquake Resistant Architecture
 

Fundamentals of Earthquake and the basic terminology; Historical experience; Site Planning and Performance of Ground and Buildings.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Seismic Codes and policies
 

Seismic codes and building configuration.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Seismic Design
 

Seismic design and detailing of non-engineered construction; Seismic design and detailing of RCC and steel buildings; Design of non-structural elements; architectural design for Seismic resistance.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures” by Aggarwal P

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Design of Earthquake Resistant Structures: Basic Theory of Seismic Stability” by S V Polyakov

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 10 Marks

CIA 2 - 15 Marks

CIA 3 - 20 Marks

Attendance - 5 Marks

Total CIA - 50 Marks

ESE- 50 Marks

Total - 100 Marks

ARC641C - INTERIOR DESIGN (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - An intrduction to vocabulary of interior design; Overview of interior and furniture design and design movements through history; various components of interior space and treatment and finishes; Interior lighting, Interior landscape and furniture. Design based studio exercises on ergonomics, materials and working parameters. The detailed course plan of the electives and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to specialized area of interior design in architecture.

Learning Outcome

Ability to design the interior of a given space using the principles of ergonomics and material sensibility

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
History of Interior Design
 

Vocabulary of interior design; Overview of interior and furniture design and design movements through history.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Components of Interior Design
 

Introduction to various components of interior space and treatment and finishes; Interior lighting, Interior landscape and furniture.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Design exercise
 

Design based studio exercises on ergonomics, materials and working parameters.

Text Books And Reference Books:

The Interior Design Reference & Specification Book: Everything Interior Designers Need to Know Every Day

Human dimension and interior space

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Interior Design Reference Manual

David Kent Ballast, 1992

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 10 Marks

CIA 2 - 15 Marks

CIA 3 - 20 Marks

Attendance - 5 Marks

Total CIA - 50 Marks

ESE- 50 Marks

Total - 100 Marks

ARC641D - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN WITH STEEL (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - To understand the design potential of steel as a material in construction and the inherent structural benefits of the material. To inform the various components of steel as structural and aesthetic design element thru various case studies. To familiarize the best practices of steel as a construction material.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to specialized areas of designing with steel in architecture.

Learning Outcome

1. Ability to define the challenges of advanced dsign of Steel structures

2. Ability to critique and anlyse a selected case.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Design with Steel
 

To understand the design potential of steel as a material in construction and the inherent structural benefits of the material

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Case studies
 

To inform the various components of steel as structural and aesthetic design element thru various case studies.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Steel as a construction material
 

To familiarize the best practices of steel as a construction material.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Architecture Design in Steel by Peter Trebilcock and Mark Lawson

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Fundamentals of Structural steel design by M L Gambhir

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 10 Marks

CIA 2 - 15 Marks

CIA 3 - 20 Marks

Attendance - 5 Marks

Total CIA - 50 Marks

ESE- 50 Marks

Total - 100 Marks

ARC641E - THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF BUILDINGS (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The elective course is an advanced course on thermal perfrmance of buildings. The detailed course plan of the elective and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to advanced thermal analysis toolssed in architecture.

Learning Outcome

1. Ability to critique the various parameters affecting the thermal performance of buildings.

2. To analyse the thermal performance of a given case.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction
 

Introduction to thermal performance of Buildings

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Case study
 

Case studies of various designs to understand critique the thermal performance of buildings.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Case Analysis of a project
 

Analysis of the thermal performance of a selected case

Text Books And Reference Books:

Thermal Performance of Buildings by Jacob Francis Van Straaten

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Thermal Energy Systems: Design and Analysis” by Steven G Penoncello

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 10 Marks

CIA 2 - 15 Marks

CIA 3 - 20 Marks

Attendance - 5 Marks

Total CIA - 50 Marks

ESE- 50 Marks

Total - 100 Marks

ARC641F - MAPPING TECHNIQUES (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The Course is an introduction to Mapping Techniques and Tools used in Architectural studies and its explorations. The detailed course plan of the elective and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose the students to fundamental levels of Mpping Technwques in architectural studies.

Learning Outcome

1. Ability to critique different techniques of Mapping.

2. Ability tomap a given case.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Mapping techniques
 

History and types of Mapping techniques, Introduction to Cartography

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Techniques and Tools of Mapping
 

Introduction to Mappings tools, Case studies of different mapping techniques to critique each of the mapping techniques.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Mapping exercise
 

Using the learnt mapping techniques work on mapping the architecture design site.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Geospatial Analysis: a Comprehensive Guide to Principles, Techniques and Software Tools by De Smith, M. J., Goodchild, M. F., & Longley, P. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Beyond Mapping Compilation Series by Barry,J.K

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 10 Marks

CIA 2 - 15 Marks

CIA 3 - 20 Marks

Attendance - 5 Marks

Total CIA - 50 Marks

ESE- 50 Marks

Total - 100 Marks

ARC641G - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: - The Course is an introduction to Architectural Research and its methodologies. It addresses the challenges of Qualitative Research and Quantitative Research.The detailed course plan of the elective and the modus operandi of teaching will be taken up by the faculty-in-charge.

Course Objective: - To expose students to research in architecture.

Learning Outcome

Ability to define a problem and hypothesis statement.

Ability to develop a research design for a selected case.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction
 

Introduction to Research Methodology, Types of Research Methodologies, Research Design in Qualitative Research

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Case Analysis
 

Reading sessions of Research Papers , Analysis of the Research  Papers to understand the Methodology adopted for writing.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Writing a Research Paper
 

An attempt to write a Research Paper on an Architecture topic.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Research Methods by Nicholas Walliman

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Research Methodology: A Step-by-Step Guide for Beginners

By Ranjit Kumar

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 10 Marks

CIA 2- 15 Marks

CIA 3- 20 Marks

Attendance 05 Marks

Total CIA - 50 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

ARC651 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VI (2017 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:300
Credits:9

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The studio would primarily introduce to the most sensitive unit of development, the neighbourhood. The course exposes the socio-cultural environmental- infrastructural aesthetic, and normative aspects of neighbourhood planning and design. Field surveys of living environments, discourses on mass housing typology, study of residential open space typology, study of indigenous resource management strategies and discussions on participatory approaches of housing design would be dealt in detail.

Course Objective:  To understand the implications of the design variable Density in Architectural design; To engage a process of sustainable resource management in neighbourhood planning; To integrate the issues of domestic ritual, form and open spaces in the design and planning of neighbourhood.

Learning Outcome

1.     To define and understand density as a design variable in neighbourhood design

2.     To study, innovate and integrate typologies of housing and residential open spaces.

3.     To innovate and apply indigenous resource management strategies into neighbourhood design

4.    To develop necessary communication skills to conduct field surveys and participatory processes of community-based study and design  

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:21
Study on indigenous resource management strategies
 

1.       Selection of a critical resource for community livingsuch as environmental resources - water, food, waste etc., infrastructural resources – soft mobility, water ways etc;

2.   A detailed study, mapping and documentation of the resource selected, collective management strategies and derived devices.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Field surveys of a selected community
 

Experience and identify critical issues with regard to people’s living environments; develop patterns and typologies of built and communal open spaces, efficiency of open spaces, needs of privacy, ideas of extended living areas, movement and accessibility.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Methods
 

Site walks, Photo essays and both manual and advanced tools and soft wares may be used for field data collection and analysis. Workshops and lectures suggested for a holistic understanding and knowledge of current discourses on the subject.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Programmatic premise
 

 Evolve interrelationships of functions and activity patterns, form and space, hierarchies, architectural response to site and programmatic premise of the case.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:22