Department of
SCHOOL-OF-EDUCATION






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Education
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EDU131 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION 4 3 100
EDU132 CURRICULUM PROCESSES 4 3 100
EDU133 ASSESSMENT AND LEARNING 4 3 100
EDU134 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 3 100
EDU135 FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH 4 3 100
EDU136 THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE 2 2 100
EDU141A TEACHING AND LEARNING IN HISTORY 4 3 100
EDU141B TEACHING AND LEARNING IN ECONOMICS 4 3 100
EDU141C TEACHING AND LEARNING IN CHEMISTRY 4 3 100
EDU141D TEACHING AND LEARNING IN MATHEMATICS 4 3 100
EDU141E TEACHING AND LEARNING IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 4 3 100
EDU141F TEACHING AND LEARNING IN BIOLOGY 4 3 100
EDU141G TEACHING AND LEARNING IN PHYSICS 4 3 100
EDU141H TEACHING AND LEARNING IN BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT 4 3 100
EDU141I TEACHING AND LEARNING IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 4 3 100
2 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EDU211 CREATIVITY, ACTIVITY AND SERVICE 1 2 50
EDU212 THEATRE IN EDUCATION 1 1 100
EDU213 SPORTS AND YOGA 1 1 100
EDU214 COMPUTER TRAINING 1 1 100
EDU215 EXTENDED ESSAY 1 2 50
EDU232 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN EDUCATION 4 3 100
EDU233 GENDER, SCHOOL AND SOCIETY 2 2 50
EDU234 PERSONAL SAFETY AND SEXUALITY 2 2 50
EDU235 THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE 2 2 100
EDU241B TEACHING AND LEARNING IN ECONOMICS 4 3 100
EDU241C TEACHING AND LEARNING IN CHEMISTRY 4 3 100
EDU241D TEACHING AND LEARNING IN MATHEMATICS 4 3 100
EDU241E TEACHING AND LEARNING IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 4 3 100
EDU241F TEACHING AND LEARNING IN BIOLOGY 4 3 100
EDU241G TEACHING AND LEARNING IN PHYSICS 5 4 100
EDU241H TEACHING AND LEARNING IN BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT 4 3 100
EDU241I TEACHING AND LEARNING IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 4 3 100
EDU281 INTERNSHIP 6 7 100
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EDU381 SUMMER INTERNSHIP 4 2 100
EDU382 INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOLS - PHASE II 6 12 200
4 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EDU411 SPORTS AND YOGA 1 1 0
EDU431 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT 4 03 100
EDU432 ICT IN EDUCATION 4 3 100
EDU433 INCLUSIVE EDUCATION 2 2 50
EDU434 SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES OF EDUCATION 4 2 50
EDU435 GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING 2 2 50
EDU444A STATISTICS IN EDUCATION 4 1 50
EDU444B PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION 2 2 50
        

  

Assesment Pattern

Attendance   

The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows 

95%-100%         : 05 marks 

90%-94%           : 04 marks 

85%-89%           : 03 marks 

80%-84%           : 02 marks

76%-79%           : 01 mark 

The courses which do not follow the above pattern are discussed below: 

  • HED (Holistic education): Objective type online examination will be given 
  • TOK (Theory of Knowledge): Presentation for 25 marks, Essay  (1600 words) 25 for marks 
  • CAS (Creativity, Activity, Service): CAS experience will be checked and graded 
  • Method of Evaluation for EDU 141-I & EDU 241-I: Teaching and Learning in Computer Science 

    CIA 1: To be decided based on participant dynamics.  

    CIA 2: Mid-semester Examination 

    CIA 3: To be decided based on participant dynamics. 

    End-semester (Internal Examination): Computer programming (Practical) 

     

    Method of Evaluation for EDU 141-I & EDU 241-I: Teaching and Learning in Computer Science 

    CIA 1: To be decided based on participant dynamics.  

    CIA 2: Mid-semester Examination 

    CIA 3: To be decided based on participant dynamics. 

    End-semester (Internal Examination): Computer programming (Practical) 

     

    Method of Evaluation for EDU 231: Professional Learning 

    CIA 1: To be decided based on participant dynamics.  

    CIA 2: Three blog posts of minimum 500 words each and a reflective short paper 

    CIA 3: Wikipedia articles: Each in English and another Indian language.  End-semester: Short paper of 3000 words and a written test 

     

     

    Method of Evaluation for EDU 233: Extended Essay  

    Presentation and Submission of Extended Essay of 4000 words as per the prescribed format. For details refer SOE Extended essay handbook. 

    Method of Evaluation for EDU 271: Internship  For details refer SOE Internship policy. 

    EDU 136 and EDU 235: Theory of knowledge 

    Presentation = 25 Marks, TOK Essay = 25 Marks 

    Students are expected to choose a topic of their interest (Individual/group), research and make a presentation. 

    Students are expected to write a 1600 words essay. Essay topics are to be taken by IB DP website released in September. Essay should be free from plagiarism. It will be assessed by an internal faculty and if required by an external evaluator from other universities running IBEC DP level programme. 

    Question Paper Format for End semester examination 

    Format for all core courses and core electives except for EDU 136, EDU 271, EDU 231, 233, 234, 235, EDU 141-I, and EDU 241-I. 

    Part A-15 Marks x 4 questions: Answer any 4 out of 6 = 60 Marks Part B-05 Marks x 8 questions: Answer any 8 out of 10 = 40 Marks 

    for details  of 3rd and 4th semesters evaluation refer SOE Assessment and SOE Examination policy

Examination And Assesments

 

Assessment  

CIA –I 

CIA II  

(Mid semester 

Exam) 

CIA III 

Attendance 

End semester Exam 

Actual marks 

(10 marks) 

50 marks (2 hours) 

(10 marks) 

(5 marks) 

100 marks (3 hours) 

Converted marks 

10 

25 

10 

50 

 

Total marks 

50 

50 

Percentage 

50% 

50% 

Department Overview:
School of Education is set up as a premier department for teacher training to mould future secondary school teachers. Apart from a two-year Bachelor of Education, MA (Educational Psychology), Master of Philosophy in Education and Doctoral Programmes (PhD) in Education is also offered. The vision of the department is achieved through the implementation of an innovative curriculum. Curriculum is designed to prepare competent and professional educationists, who will be able to play diverse roles in the field of education. A variety of value added programmes are also included in the curriculum.
Mission Statement:
VISION The vision of the School of Education is to insculpt proficient educators who will be able to provide leadership in educational institutions. MISSION School of Education is an excellent training centre for aspiring educationists to be asset to the society in a dynamic environment. To mould tomorrow?s Academic Leaders. To develop teachers who are knowledgeable, collaborative, and caring?reflecting a strong moral framework of integrity and compassion. To acquaint studen
Introduction to Program:
The Bachelor of Education programme known as B.Ed., is a professional programme that prepares students in pre-service education for upper primary or middle level( classes VI-VIII), secondary level (classes IX-X) and senior secondary level (classes XI-XII). The programme shall be offered for a duration of two academic years, which can be completed in a maximum of three years from the date of admission to the programme. Candidates with at least fifty percent marks either in the Bachelor?s Degree and/or in the Master?s Degree in Sciences/ Social sciences/ Humanities, Bachelor?s Degree in Engineering or Technology with specialisation in Science and mathematics with 55% marks or any other qualification equivalent thereto, are eligible for admission to the programme.
Program Objective:
Programme Objectives Understand principles of learning and teaching and apply these principles to their own practice Articulate their own personal theory of learning Design coherent learning activities that focus on planning for active learning and teaching Use approaches to teaching and learning appropriately to help learners to learn more effectively Develop their reflective practice skills to help them to evaluate and develop their own practice

EDU131 - INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course creates the awareness on the part of the students about the Education system at national and international levels.  This course will also help the students in acquiring the knowledge of educational Schools of thought. The student teachers will understand the need for developing a sound understanding of philosophical bases of international baccalaureate education. Students also acquire the knowledge of principles and processes of teaching, learning and current pedagogical practices in international baccalaureate education. Educational thoughts of great thinkers and their influence in the society are also discussed to motivate the teacher trainees to useful reflections about their role as teachers.

 

Course Objectives:

 

The students will acquaint themselves with the education system at the national and international levels and also enable the students to develop an understanding of the process of Education at national and international levels. The course aims at the creation of visionaries of education with sound educational philosophy with a profound philosophical quest in knowledge from an educational perspective. The students will be able to to develop the attitude and capacity of raising fundamental questions concerning theory and practice of education and gain insight into the contributions of great philosophers in order to discover the assertions, assumptions and its educational implications.  

 

Learning Outcome

After the course completion, students will be able to

     Comprehend and evaluate the essence of Theory of Knowledge

     Compare and contrast philosophical viewpoints of Education

     Critically analyze the Philosophy of international education

     Recognize the various schools of philosophical thoughts from a comparative perspective

     Compare the syllabi of IB, ICSE, CBSE and State Boards

     Research and review the existing theory of knowledge and its scope

     Map the curricular features of International Baccaulerate

     Critically appraise the contemporary educational philosophy

     Analyze the issues of educational philosophy and propose solutions to the same

 Demonstrate the essential knowledge and skills to perform competently as an IB teacher

     Comprehend the intellectual, social and psychological aspects of their IB work with learners and synthesize theory and practice

     Understand the key concepts of IB curriculum policy formation and IB curriculum development

     Evaluate and use constructive criticism of their own work and of the institutions in which they teach

     Develop theoretical and practical understandings of the International Baccalaureate; and

     Demonstrate an understanding of curriculum delivery modes of the IB as a model for professional learning.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Education
 

Meaning, nature, and scope of education. Vedic, Buddhist, Jain, and Islamic Education System. Individual  and social aim of education. Functions of Education – at individual level, national level, and global level.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Philosophy and Education
 

Meaning and Functions of Philosophy; Branches of Philosophy: Metaphysics, Epistemology and Axiology; Relationship between Philosophy and Education with respect to teacher, student, curriculum, and teaching. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Philosophical Schools of Thought
 

Idealism, Naturalism, Marxism, Realism and Pragmatism; Indian educational Thinkers: Mahatma Gandhi, Swami Vivekananda, Aurobindo and Rabindranath Tagore. Western educational thinkers: Jean Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, Montessori

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to International Baccalaureate Education
 

History of International Baccalaureate; IB key influential educationalists - John Dewey, A.SNeil, Jean Piaget, Jerome Bruner and their key insights contributing to IB. IB influencers – Robert Leach, John Goormaghtigh, Alec Peterson, Kurt Hahn and their key insights contributing to IB. Marie-Thérèse Maurette - Pioneer of International Education, George Walker, Ken Robinson, Mary Hayden, Jeff Thompson ideology to IB.

Theories underpinning IB; Realism, scepticism and arguments from illusion, Issues with knowledge as justified true belief for example the Gettier problem and the regress problem, Constructivism,  Subjectivism and objectivism, Causal theory, idealism, phenomenalism, and perspectivism. IB education, IB mission, IB organization. Educational aim of IB, introduction to PYP, MYP and DP Programmes. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Approaches to Teaching and Learning in International Baccalaureate education
 

Ten attributes of IB learner profile, Approaches to learning; Thinking skills, Communications skills, Social skills,  Self-management skills, and Research skills. Approaches to teaching; based on inquiry, focused on conceptual understanding, developed in local and global contexts, focused on effective teamwork and collaboration,  differentiated to meet the needs of all learners, informed by formative and summative assessment. Academic honesty practices in IB. Conceptual understanding of International mindedness in IB DP.

 

Self Study: IB DP Policies for learner, IB DP Policies for teacher, IB learner resources, IB teacher resources, IB teacher job Description. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

References

Binkley, M, Erstad, O, Herman, J, Raizen, S, Ripley, M and Rumble, M. 2010. “Defining    21st century skills”. http://atc21s.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/1-Defining-21st-Century-Skills.pdf.

Brandt, R. 1995. “Punished by rewards: A conversation with Alfie Kohn”. Educational Leadership. Vol 53, number 1. Pp 13–19.

Brefczynski-Lewis, JA, Lutz, A, Schaefer, HS, Levinson, DB and Davidson, RJ. 2007. “Neural correlates of attentional expertise in long-term meditation practitioners”. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Vol 104, number 27. Pp 11483–11488.

Briner, M. 1999. “What is Constructivism?” University of Colorado at Denver School of Education. http://curriculum.calstatela.edu/faculty/psparks/theorists/501learn.htm. Retrieved June 2013.

Brown, KW, Ryan, RM and Creswell, JD. 2007. “Mindfulness: Theoretical foundations and evidence for its salutary effects”. Psychological Inquiry. Vol 18, number 4. Pp 211–237.

Dewey, J. 1997. Education and experience. New York, USA. Touchstone.

Dreyfus, H and Dreyfus, SE. 2000. Mind over machine. New York, USA. Free Press.

Dweck, CS. 1999. Self-Theories: Their Role in Motivation, Personality, and Development. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Psychology Press.

Dweck, CS. 2008. “Can personality be changed? The role of beliefs in personality and change”. Current Directions in Psychological Science. Vol 17, number 6. Pp 391–394.

Elksnin, LK and Elksnin, N. 1998. “Teaching social skills to students with learning and behaviour problems”. Intervention in school and clinic. Vol 33, number 3. Pp 131–140.

Fasko, D. 2003. “Critical thinking: origins, historical development, future direction”. Critical thinking and reasoning: Current research, theory and practice. Pp 3–20.

Gokhale, A. 1995. “Collaborative Learning Enhances Critical Thinking.” Journal of Technology Education. Vol 7, number 1. PP. 22-30

Hull, D. 1993. Opening Minds, Opening Doors: The Rebirth of American Education. Waco, TX. Center for Occupational Research and Development

International Baccalaureate, What is an IB education? August 2013.

Kaplan, A. 1998. “Clarifying Metacognition, Self-Regulation, and Self-Regulated Learning: What's the Purpose?”. Educational Psychology Review. Vol 27. Pp 447–484.

ation”. Psychological Science. Vol 20, number 5. Pp 645– 653.

Kohn, A. 2000. Punished by Rewards. New York, USA. Houghton Mifflin.

Kolb, DA. 1984. Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, USA. Prentice Hall.

Lagemaat,van de Richard. (2011). Theory of Knowledge for the IB Diploma. Cambridge University Press

Lay, CH and Schouwenburg, HC. 1993. “Trait procrastinations, time management, and academic behaviour”. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality. Vol 84, number 4. Pp 647–662.

Perkins, D. 2010. Making Learning Whole. San Francisco, California, USA. Jossey-Bass.

Peterson, A. 1972. The International Baccalaureate: An experiment in International Education. London. George Harrap.

Ritchhart, R. et al. 2011. Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for all Learners. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass

Walker, G. 2010. The Changing Face of International Education: Challenges for the IB. Cardiff, UK. International Baccalaureate Organization.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Essential Reading

Agarwal, J. C. & Agarwal, S. P. (1992).Role of UNESCO in Educational, Vikas Publishing House, New Delhi.

Anand, C. L. et al. (1983). Teacher and Education in Emerging in Indian Society, NCERT, New Delhi.

Bhatia, Philosophical foundation of Education in India, Jaipur:  Sudha Publications. 2004.

Badami B.S, Philosophical and sociological foundations of Education, Gadag, Vidhyanidhi Publications. 2007.

D.J.O’Connor, An introduction to the Philosophy of Education-London , 1975.

Dewey John ,Democracy and Education, New York: Macmillan company, 1944.

Horne Herman.H. .,The democratic Philosophy of Education, New York: Macmillan company. 1934.

Kilpatric, William.H. , A defense of Philosophy  in Education, Harvard teachers record. 1931.

Murthy .S.K.Philosophical& Sociological foundations of Education, Ludhiana:Tandon Publications. 2000.

Nayar P.R., and Dave P.N.(1982) The teacher Education in Emerging Indian Society,,. New Delhi:  Arora Publications.

Noddings, N. (2012). Philosophy of education.(3rd ed., Vol. 2nd). Colorado: Westview Press.

Siegel, H. (2012). The oxford handbook book of philosophy of education. (1st ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Ozmon, H. (2011). Philosophical foundations of education. (9th ed.) .)New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Recommended Reading

Anand, C.L. (1993) Teacher and Educations in the Emerging Indian Society, New Delhi : NCERT.

Brubacher, John S.(1963) Philosophy of Higher Education, San Francisco, Jossey –Bass 1978

Brubacher, John S. (1962) Modern Philosophies of Education, New York, McGraw Hill Book Company Inc.

Brunacher, John S. (1962), Eclectic Philosophy of Education, New Jersey, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs.

Cahn, S. (2009). Philosophy of education: The essential texts. (1st ed.). Routledge.

Curren, R. (2006). Philosophy of education: An anthology. (1st ed.). Victoria: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Coombs, Philips H. (1985), The World Crisis in Education, New York : Oxford University Press.

Chandra S.S. & Sharma R. K. 2004: Philosophical of Education,The Associated Publication.

Kar, N. K. : (1996) Value Education – A PhilosophicalStudy, The Associated Publication.

Dhavan, M.L. (2005) :Philosophy of Education, Delhi, Editor, Isha Books.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE)                                       :          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II)                                   :          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)                :           25%

                                        Total                                   :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam                         :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam                         :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 

CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks.

CIA-I and CIA-III: Continuous Internal Assessment

 

Continuous Internal Assessment I

CIA- I will be in two components - Written (reports) Group or Individual - Viva or Presentation may also be conducted

 

Continuous Internal Assessment III

The following methods may be adopted

Multiple choice based test.

Practical Activity

Presentation/Viva

Group Discussion

 

Attendance 

The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows

95%-100%         : 05 marks

90%-94%           : 04 marks

85%-89%           : 03 marks

80%-84%           : 02 marks

76%-79%           : 01 mark

EDU132 - CURRICULUM PROCESSES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course descriptionThis course is offered as a core course in the first semester of the B.Ed programme. It introduces the students to a variety of theoretical perspectives, principles and philosophies in Education. It helps the students acquire knowledge on curriculum designs, development and evaluation. It engages the students in practices of international mindedness and inquiry-based learning.

 

 

Course objectivesThis course will help the learner to develop an understanding of the importance of philosophical, psychological and sociological bases for school Curriculum. It will enable the learner to describe the essential elements comprising the curriculum framework of DP. It will help demonstrate and apply the principles of curriculum construction in various curriculum models.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: The learner will be able to:

Analyse the importance of philosophical, psychological and sociological bases for Indian school Curriculum

Apply and evaluate the principles of curriculum construction

Understand the curriculum processes in the international baccalaureate diploma programme

Recognise and practice IB curriculum framework

Practice the pedagogical principles underpinning international education 

Develop and practice professional competencies in educational settings

 

  

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Unit- 1 Introduction to Curriculum
 

Meaning and concept of curriculum, curriculum reforms in Indian school education, 

 

Philosophical foundations of Indian school curriculum; Sociological foundations of Indian school curriculum; Role of Indian society, culture, social change on curriculum. Psychological foundations of Indian school Curriculum; Role of learning theories and its curricular implications. Principles of Curriculum Construction, Types of curriculum. 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to International Curriculum
 

Curriculum framework in International Baccalaureate (IB) programmes: Primary year programme (PYP), Middle year programme (MYP), and Diploma Programme (DP). IB curriculum as a continuum from PYP to DP. IB DP programme standards and practices. Principles of learning underpinning the IB curriculum. Structure of IB curriculum; DP curriculum framework logo, DP subject logo, IB Diploma Programme model and its constituent parts, Core elements of IB curriculum: Extended essay, Theory of Knowledge, Creativity, Activity and Service, Role of subject groups, learner profile attributes, and DP core elements in developing international mindedness. Working with MY IB for DP curriculum related resources. Impact of IB curriculum on student learning and on matters of worldview. Critiquing the IB curriculum. IB Language policy. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Curriculum Development
 

Tyler model of Curriculum Development: Taba model of curriculum development. 

Curriculum Design – ABC (Articulation, Balance and Continuity). Types of Curriculum 

 

Design: Subject-Centered, Activity-cum-Experience Centered, Undifferentiated and Differentiated, interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary curriculum-Curriculum Development: Stages-planning, designing, Implementation, and evaluation. A Glance at School Curriculum of State Board, CBSE, ICSE, IGCSE, and IB.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Curriculum Evaluation
 

Taught curriculum, written curriculum, and assessed curriculum of IB. Concept of curriculum evaluation: comprehensive and cooperative enterprise, Evaluation an Integral part of the Curriculum - Criteria for evaluating, curriculum - Tools for curriculum evaluation. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Instructional Design
 

Instructional design, Principles of instructional design, Types of instructional design: Backward design, ASSURE model, curricular mapping. Relationship between published subject aim, curricular aim, instructional objective and task analysis.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.    Das, R.C. (2007). Curriculum and Evaluation.New Delhi: NCERT. 

 

2.    Avinash, C. (2006). Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Education.New Delhi: 

Sterling Publishers.

3.   Wolf ,P(2007).Curriculum Evolution process,Overview,University of Guelphs. 

4.   Saad (2007).Curriculum Designer,Macmillan .New York.

5.   Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. 2011. Understanding by Design® Guide to Creating High Quality Units. Alexandria, VA. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ACSD)  

6.  Puentedura, R. 2013, SAMR: A Contextualised Introduction (accessed online at  http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/archives/2013/10/25/SAMRAContextualizedIntroduc tion.pdf)  

 

 

7.    Bergmann, J. and Sams, A. 2012. Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education.  

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.   Erickson, L. 2012. Concept-based teaching and learning. IB Position Paper. 

2.   Perkins, D. 2010. Making Learning Whole. San Francisco, California, USA. Jossey-Bass. 

3.    Prince, M. 2004. “Does active learning work? A review of the research”. Journal of Engineering Education. Vol 93, number 3. Pp 223–231. 

4.    Quigley, C, Marshall, JC, Deaton, C, Cook, MP and Padilla, M. (2011). “Challenges to Inquiry Teaching and Suggestions for How to Meet Them”. Science Educator. Vol 20, number 1. Pp 55-61. 

5.    Trilling, B and Fadel, C. 2009. 21st Century Skills: Learning for Life in our Times. San Francisco, California, USA. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

6.   National Council of Teachers in English (2011). Lesson Plans and Teaching Resources. Retrieved from http://www.ncte.org/lessons 

7.    Zimmerman, BJ and Schunk, D (eds). 1989. Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement. New York, USA. Springer-Verlag

8.   Dell, R.C. (1996).Curriculum Improvement: Decision Making & Process. (6thed.). London: Allyn& Bacon, Inc.  

9.    Diamond, R.M. (1999).Designing & Improving Courses & Curricula in Higher Education : A systematic Approach. California :Jossey Bass Inc. Publishers. 

 

10. Lindall, C.M., Cox, R.C. &Bolvin, J.D.(2001).Evaluation as a Tool in Curriculum Development.Rand Mac Nally. 

Evaluation Pattern

tudents are evaluated on Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each course carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE):          50% 

Mid Semester exam (CIA II):          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 25%

                                        Total :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam          :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam           :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. 

End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria. 

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 

CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks.

 

 

CIA-I and CIA-III: Continuous Internal Assessment

 

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

EDU133 - ASSESSMENT AND LEARNING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This core course offered in the first semester. It brings out the relationship between teaching, learning and assessment. It creates an understanding on the assessment of learners understanding.  It trains the student teacher in numerous ways of formative and summative assessments with respect to regional and national school programmes and international baccalaureate diploma programme. Furthermore, the student teacher would gain knowledge and computations skills of basic descriptive statistics needed for analysis of assessments.  

Course Objectives

The course develops in the students an understanding of the assessment practices in national and international schooling. It familiarizes them with domain based assessment practices. The students would be trained in developing effective assessment tasks and instruments. Furthermore, students would be equipped with computational skills of descriptives statistics.

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course student will be able to:

●      Describe the fundamental concepts of assessment

      ●      Explain assessment practices in national and international schools.

      ●      Evaluate the assessment of TOK, EE, CAS as per IB DP.

      ●      critically analyse subject wise assessment practices in IB DP

      ●     develop assessment tools.

      ●     develop skills and competencies in constructing and using rubrics.

  • ·         Compute various descriptive statistics

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Fundamental concepts of Assessments
 

Level of Knowledge– Conceptual and Working Knowledge

 

Measurement and Evaluation, Principles of assessment, Assessment for learning, Assessment as learning, and assessment of learning, Formative assessment, Summative assessment, Norm referenced testing, Criterion referenced testing, Internal assessment, External assessment. Assessment based on Bloom’s taxonomy, Peer Assessment, Performance Assessment- GRASPS model.  Assessment in Annual scheme, semester scheme, trimester scheme. Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation (CCE), Open book exam, Online Examination, Credit and grading system.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Tests and assessment tools
 

Level of Knowledge– Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Concept, Construction, and uses of Teacher made Test (Unit test), Standardized Test, Diagnostic Test. Characteristics of a Good assessment Tool; Validity, Reliability, Objectivity, and Utility. Construction of Test Items – Essay type, Short Answer type, Objective type- Multiple choice, Fill in the blanks, True or False, Matching type. Qualitative tools-Anecdotal record, interview. Quantitative Tools- Rating scale, Checklist.

 

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Designing assessment tasks and feedback
 

Class quiz- construction of e-quiz and quiz, Worksheet- construction, Construction of analytical and reflective type questions, Home assignment, Rubrics: meaning, types, and construction, Unit test procedures in IB DP. Using LMS/Moodle for formative assessment. Assessment Portfolios, working with thinking, Predicting students grade in IB. Concept of Feedback-Types of Feedback-teacher feedback, peer feedback, performance feedback. Parents feedback practices at IB. Student feedback practices at IB.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Assessment in International Baccalaureate Education
 

Assessment of TOK presentation, TOK essay assessment rubric. Extended essay assessment rubric, EE viva voce, TOK and EE assessment matrix. Academic honesty in assessment. Maximum and minimum points for IB Course certificate, non-regular IB diploma, and IB Diploma certificate. CAS experience authenticating procedure. Subject wise internal and external assessment ratios and points. Subject wise Mark boundaries. Assessment of student whom language of instruction is not mother tongue, Assessment of special educational needs students,  Support system required of inclusive education. Subject wise Summative assessments for standard and Higher levels. IB examination regulations. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Statistics in Assessment- Descriptive Statistics
 

Need and Importance of Statistics in Education; Tabulation of Data -Frequency Distribution Table; Descriptive Statistics- Measures of Central Tendencies-Mean, Median, Mode-Meaning, Computation for grouped and ungrouped data, uses; Measures of Variability-Range, Standard Deviation, Quartile deviation-Meaning, Computation for grouped and ungrouped data, uses; Interpretation based on Measures of central tendencies, Measures of Variability; Percentiles.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

References

 

Binkley, M, Erstad, O, Herman, J, Raizen, S, Ripley, M and Rumble, M. 2010. “Defining 21st century skills”. http://atc21s.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/1-Defining-21st-Century-Skills.pdf.

 Fall, R, Webb, N and Chudowsky, N. 1997. “Group discussion and large-scale language arts assessment: Effects on students’ comprehension”. CSE Technical Report 445. Los Angeles, California, USA. CRESST.

Gallagher, T. 1991. “Language and social skills: Implications for assessment and intervention with school-age children”. In T Gallagher (ed), Pragmatics of language: Clinical practice issues. Pp 11–41. San Diego, California, USA. Singular Press.

Hattie, J. 2009. Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement . New York, USA. Routledge.

Hembree, R. 1988. “Correlates, causes, effects and treatment of test anxiety”. Review of Educational Research. Vol 58. Pp 7–77.

Saner, H, McCaffrey, D, Stecher, B, Klein, S and Bell, R. 1994. “The effects of working in pairs in science performance assessments”. Educational Assessment. Vol 2, number 4. Pp 325–338.

Schulz, C. 2011. Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error. London, UK. Portobello Books.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Essential Reading

Aggarwal, J.C. (2003). Essentials of Examination System Evaluation Tests and Measurement, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.

Coolidge, Frederick L. (2013). Statistics- A Gentle Introduction-3rd edition. New Delhi:SAGE Publications Pvt Ltd.

Datta, N. C. (2006). Educational Psychology and Evaluation. Hyderabad: Universities Press Pvt. Ltd.

Garret, H.E. (1971).Statistics in Psychology and Education. Bombay: Vakils Feller, Simons Pvt. Ltd.

Pathak (2012).Measurement and Evaluation in Education, New Delhi, Pearson Education.

Reid, Howard M. (2013). Introduction to Statistics-Fundamental Concepts and Procedures of Data Analysis. New Delhi: SAGE Publications Pvt Ltd.

 

 

Recommended Reading

Care, Esther, McGaw, Barry & Griffin, Patrick (2012).Assessment and Teaching of 21st CenturySkills. New York: Springer

Gardner, John(2012). Assessment and Learning -2ndedition. New Delhi: SAGE PublicationsIndia Pvt. Ltd.

Patel, N. R. (2001). Educational Evaluation- Theory and Practice. Mumbai: HimalyaPublishingHouse.

Rao, V. K. (2006). Perspectives in Educational Evaluation. New Delhi: Common Wealth Publishers.            .

Sharma, R.A. (2004). Essentials of Measurement in Education and Psychology (4th ed.). SuryaPublication.

Singh, B. (2004). Modern Educational Measurement and Evaluation System, New Delhi: AnmolPublication Pvt. Ltd.

Swaprupa, R.T. (2004). Educational Measurement and Evaluation. New Delhi: Discovery Publishing House,

Vashisht, S.R. (2004). Theory of Educational Measurement. New Delhi: Anmol Publications.

www.712educators.about.com/od/rubrics/Rubrics_Writing_and_Grading_Rubrics.htm

www.rubricbuilder.on.ca/links.html

Evaluation Pattern

Method of Evaluation BEd

 

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE)                                       :          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II)                                   :          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)                :           25%

                                        Total                                   :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam                         :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam                         :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 

EDU134 - EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Description

This course is offered as general paper in the first semester. It develops the knowledge of psychological methods and its application in the educational context. It enhances the views of a teacher towards the pupils in a positive way viz., Intelligence, Individual differences, Interest, Attention, Attitude, Memory etc. It helps to develop teachers attitude and retain healthy atmosphere in the class room.

Learning Objectives

 

At the end of the course student will be equipped  with knoweldge of learning theories and tools and techniques of meaurement of personality and IQ. They will be able to communicate and manage the class well.

 

    

Learning Outcome

 

     To recognize characteristics of  adolescents 

     To able to use different techniques of testing IQ.

     To Differentiate  kinds of personality

     To Explainthe meaning, nature and various theories of learning.

     To understand the cognitive psychology of learner.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Meaning and Scope of Educational Psychology
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual and Basic

 

Meaning and Scope of Educational Psychology; Methods of Educational Psychology- Observation, Case Study, Experimentation, Meaning, Steps, Uses and Limitations;

Need of Educational Psychology to the teacher.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Learners as a Developing Individual
 

Level of Knowledge – Application

 

Different stages of growth in man- Concept of Growth and Development; Adolescents Psychology - Meaning, Characteristics, Various developments viz., Physical, Mental, Social and Emotional; developmental tasks of adolescents -Piaget 's  stages of cognitive development; Mental Health- Meaning, Causes for mental ill health, role of a teacher in fostering mental health.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Understanding the Difference between the Learners
 

Level of Knowledge – Comprehension                                                             

 

Individual differences- Meaning and factors- heredity and environment; Differences between individual learners, learning style, self-concept, self-esteem, attitude, aptitude, skills and competencies, interest Intelligence- Meaning , different types of test with examples, IQ and its  distribution; Multiple Intelligence by Howard Gardner; Emotional Intelligence- concept, dimensions and its importance; Gifted children- Meaning, Nature, Identification, Educational programmes for gifted children; Educationally Backward Children– meaning, characteristics, causes and remedial instruction; Creativity - meaning, characteristics of creative children, role of teachers and parents in fostering creativity.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Personality
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual

 

Personality- Meaning and Classification; Structure of Personality- Sigmund Freud's theory; Assessment of Personality - Subjective, Objective and Projective techniques; Role of a teacher in moulding personality.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Theoretical Perspectives of Learning
 

Level of Knowledge – Theoretical                                                                      

 

Learning - Meaning and  Nature; Learning Theories of learning -Trial and Error leaning  theory and laws of learning; Classical conditioning theory and its educational implications; Operant conditioning theory and its educational implications; Gestalt theory and its educational implications; Gagne's  hierarchy of learning and its educational implications;  Constructivism – meaning and types- Cognitive constructivism – Piaget’s theory of cognitive development and social constructivism- Vygotsky theory of cognitive development and its educational implications; Concept formation; Concept learning - meaning, types, approaches to teach concepts; Learning in constructivist’s perspective.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Factors Affecting Learning
 

Level of Knowledge – Comprehension

 

Maturation- Meaning and Educational Implications; Motivation- Meaning and Techniques to motivate the students, Abraham Maslow’s theory of motivation; Memory- meaning, process - registration, retention, recall and recognition and types -STM and LTM; Transfer of learning – meaning, types and its educational implications; Biological and hereditary factors influencing learning- Attention, interest, and readiness as factors influencing scholastic learning.

Text Books And Reference Books:

References

Brown, KW, Ryan, RM and Creswell, JD. 2007. “Mindfulness: Theoretical foundations and evidence for its salutary effects”. Psychological Inquiry. Vol 18, number 4. Pp 211–237.

Campbell, RL and Svenson, LW. 1992. “Perceived level of stress among university undergraduate students in Edmonton, Canada”. Perceptual and Motor Skills. Volume 75, number 2. Pp 552–554.

CASEL. 2013. “Social and Emotional Core Competencies”. http://www.casel.org/social-and-emotionallearning/core-competencies.

Chambers, R, Lo, BCY and Allen, NB. 2008. “The impact of intensive mindfulness training on attentional control, cognitive style, and affect”. Cognitive Therapy and Research. Volume 32, number 3. Pp 303–322.

Claxton, G. 2008. What’s the Point of School? Oxford, UK. OneWorld Publications.

Costa, A. and Lowery, L. 1989. Techniques for Teaching Thinking. (Pacific Grove, CA. Midwest).

Cumming, TM. 2010. “Using technology to create motivating social skills lessons”. Intervention in School and Clinic. Vol 45, number 4. Pp 242–250.

de Bruin, AB, Thiede, KW, Camp, G and Redford, J. 2011. Generating keywords improves metacomprehension and self-regulation in elementary and middle school children. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. Vol 109, number 3. Pp 294–310.

Deci, EL, Koestner, R and Ryan, RM. 1999. “A meta-analytic review of experiments examining the effects of extrinsic rewards on intrinsic motivation”. Psychological Bulletin. Vol 125. Pp 692–700.

Deci, EL. 1975. Intrinsic Motivation. London, UK. Plenum Press.

Derry, SJ and Murphy, DA. 1986. “Designing systems that train learning ability: from theory to practice”. Review of Educational Research. Vol 56, number 1. Pp 1–39.

Dewey, J. 1997. Education and experience. New York, USA. Touchstone.

Dreyfus, H and Dreyfus, SE. 2000. Mind over machine. New York, USA. Free Press.

Dweck, CS. 1999. Self-Theories: Their Role in Motivation, Personality, and Development. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Psychology Press.

Dweck, CS. 2008. “Can personality be changed? The role of beliefs in personality and change”. Current Directions in Psychological Science. Vol 17, number 6. Pp 391–394.

Elksnin, LK and Elksnin, N. 1998. “Teaching social skills to students with learning and behaviour problems”. Intervention in school and clinic. Vol 33, number 3. Pp 131–140.

Fasko, D. 2003. “Critical thinking: origins, historical development, future direction”. Critical thinking and reasoning: Current research, theory and practice. Pp 3–20.

Gokhale, A. 1995. “Collaborative Learning Enhances Critical Thinking.” Journal of Technology Education. Vol 7, number 1. PP. 22-30

Gustavson, A and Nall, HC. 2011. “Freshman Overconfidence and Library Research Skills: A Troubling Relationship?” College & Undergraduate Libraries. Vol 18, number 4. Pp 291–306.

Hattie, J, Biggs, J and Purdie, N. 1996. “Effects of learning skills interventions on student learning: a metaanalysis”. Review of Educational Research. Vol 66, number 2. Pp 99–136.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Essential Reading

Aggarwal, J. C. (2006). Psychology of Learning and Development. New Delhi: Shipra Publishing House Ltd.

Bhatnagar, A. B. (1996). Advanced Educational Psychology. Meerut: Loyel Book Depot.

Chauhan, S. S. (1987). Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House, Pvt. Ltd.

Dandapani, S. A. (2003). Text Book of Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Anmol Publication.

Das, R. C., & Vital, (1984). Curriculum and Evaluation. New Delhi: NCERT.

Gagne, R. M. (1987). The Conditions of Learning.(3rd ed.). New York: Tinchart and Winston Inc.

Kossyln, S. M., & Rosenberg, R. S. (2001). Psychology: The brain, the person, the world. Needham Heights: Pearson Education Company.

Kundu, C. L., &Tuttoo, D. N. (1985).Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

MangalS.K(2013). Advanced Educational Psychology, Prentice Hall Publications,:New Delhi

Munn, N. L. (1967). Introduction to psychology. Calcutta: Oxford & IBH Publishing Company.

Passi, B. K., Goel, D. R., &Senapathy, H. K. (2004).Piagetian Teaching Model for Cognitive Development. Agra: Model Printers.

Somashekar T V(2006) Educational Psychology, NirmalaPrakashana; Bangalore

 

Recommended Reading

Harasim, L. (2012). Learning theories and online technologies. (1st ed., pp. 1-201). New York: Taylor & Francis Group. Retrieved from http://www.amazon.com/Learning-Theory-Online-Technologies-Harasim-ebook/dp/B0073V0ZOA

Nevid, J. (2009). Essentials of psychology concepts and applications. (3rd ed., pp. 383-418). Belmont: Macmillan company. Retrieved from https://books.google.co.in/books?id

Evaluation Pattern

Method of Evaluation BEd

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE)                                       :          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II)                                   :          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)                :           25%

                                        Total                                   :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam                         :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam                         :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 

 

EDU135 - FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description : 

This core course is offered in the first semester for 3 credits. This course introduces students to Research, types of research, and all the basics in educational research. It introduces the essential elements of good research, and gives practice to do research and enables students to be able to make presentations and publications of the same.

 

Course Objectives:  

Students are able to understand the foundations of educational research and learn Research Methods and Methodology in Education To develop insight on types and methods of educational research. the course helps to understand the necessity of review of literature and develop the skills to construct and use different kinds of tools and techniques of collecting Data. The course enables the students to formulate and test hypothesis and  also  understand the innovations in education through research. 

 

Learning Outcome

Course outcome

       To recognize the foundations of educational research.

       To develop insight on types and methods of educational research.

●   To decriminate on types and methods of educational research.

       To discuss the necessity of review of literature.

       Todevelop different kinds of tools and techniques of collecting Data.

       To describe the fundamentals of sampling theory and techniques.

       To identify various measurement and scaling techniques.

       To enable the students to evaluate the innovations in education through research.

       To enable them to immitate the necessary skills in research.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Research
 

Research–meaning-purpose; Types of Research- Pure, Applied, Historical, Descriptive and Experimental. Review of related literature- purpose and need at different stages of research; Variables - Concept, nature, characteristics and types; Inter relationship of different variables; Hypothesis - Concept, importance, characteristics and forms - formulation and testing.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:13
Data tools and Sampling Techniques
 

Population-Concept; Sampling- Concept and need, characteristics of good sample; Sampling Methods-Probability sampling and non-probability sampling – Focus on Sampling techniques. Techniques and Tools of Data Collection-Measurement Scales, Questionnaires, Inventories, Attitude Scales, Observations, Interview, Rating scales, check lists. Action research- meaning-Steps involved in Action research-Importance of Action research

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Analysis and Interpretation of Data
 

Concepts: Qualitative and Quantitative analysis, Parametric and Non-parametric tests,  Levels of significance, confidence-limits and intervals, Degrees of freedom, Tests of significance of difference between means-one and two tailed tests, Errors in Research- types of errors- Types I, Type II; Parametric Statistics- t-test, F-test (one way and ANOVA); Non-parametric Statistics- - Chi-square test - uses and computation.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Research Proposal and Report Writing
 

Preparing Research Proposal-format; Preparing Research Synopsis-format; Meaning and Scope of research report-Characteristics and Procedures; Formats of Research Report; Presentation of tables and figures in a research report; Evaluation of research report, criteria for evaluation; Footnotes, References, Bibliography, Appendices - its importance.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 References:

1. Best W.John (1982), Research in Education, Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd., NewDelhi.

2. Festinger L and Katz D (eds) (1953), Research Methods in Behavioral Sciences, Holt,Rinehart and Winston Inc., New York.

3. George A Ferguson (1981), Statistical analysis in Psychology and Education. McGraw-Hill, Kogakusha Ltd., London, Tokyo.

4. Gilbert Sax (1979), Foundations of Educational Research, Prentice Hall Incorporation, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

5. Good, G.V. and Hatt (1965), Research Methods in Social Sciences, New Delhi: TataMcGraw Hill Book Company.

6. Keeves, P., (1990), Educational Research, methodology and Measurement: An International Handbook, Oxford, New York, and Pergamum Press.

7. Kerlinger, Fred N (1969), Foundations of Behavioral Research. Educational and Psychological Inquiry, Holt Rinehart and Winston, New York.

8. Moser and Kalton, (1980), Survey Methods in Social Investigation, London, Heinemann Educational Books Ltd.

 9. Singh A. K. (1997), Tests; Measurement and Research Methods in BehavioralSciences,BharathiBhavan Publishers, Patna.

10. Turney, L. Billy and P.Robb George (1971), Research in Education: an introduction, Dryden Press Inc., Illinois.

11. Van, Dalen, Deobold, B., and Meyer, William J., (1979), Understanding Educational Research: An Introduction. New York, McGraw Hill Co.

12.Guilford J.P. and Benjamin Frnchter (1971), Fundamentals of Statistics in Psychologyand Education Newyork. .

13.Henry E.Garret (1967), Statistics in Psychology and Education,.Vakils, fefferandsimons Pvt., Ltd. Bombay.

14. Arthur, J. (2012). Research Methods and Methodology in Education. SAGE Publications

15. Singh, Amit & Kumar, Dinesh (2013).Elementary Statistical Methods. Patiala: Twenty First Century Publications

16. Sharma, Yogendra K. (2011). Methodology and Techniques of Educational Research. NewDelhi: Kanishka Publishers and Distributors

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Essential Reading

Arthur, J. (2012). Research Methods and Methodology in Education. SAGE Publications

Agarwal ,B.L. (2001). Basic Statistics.New Delhi: New Age National Publishers.

Aggrawal, Y P. (1998). Statistical Methods. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

Best, J.W., &Kahn., J.V. (1992). Research in Education. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India. Pvt.Ltd.

Briggs, A.R.J, Coleman, M. & Morrison, M. (2012).Research Methods in Educational Leadership and Management.SAGE Publications.

Koul, L. (1997). Methodology of Educational Research. New Delhi: Vikash Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.,

Sharma, B.V., Prasad, D.R., & Satyanarayana, P. (1985).Research Methods in Social & Sciences.New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.,

Singh, Amit & Kumar, Dinesh (2013).Elementary Statistical Methods. Patiala: Twenty First Century Publications

Sharma, Yogendra K. (2011). Methodology and Techniques of Educational Research. New

Delhi: Kanishka Publishers and Distributors

 

Recommended Reading

Babbie, E.R.(1982). Survey Research Methods.Wordsworth: Bebont CA.

Best, J.W., & Kahn, J.V. (1992).Research in Education, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Pvt.Ltd..

Buch, M.B. (1980).Second Survey of Research in Education, Ed., Baroda, India: CASE.

Buch. (2006). Surveys of Education Nos. 1,2,3,& 4, New Delhi: NCERT.

Campbell, DT. (1966). Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Designs for Research.Chicago: McNally.

Garrett, H.E. (2008). Statistics in Psychology and Education.Bombay: Vakil, Fiffer& Simons Pvt.Ltd.

Guilford, J.P., &Truchter, B.(1978). Fundamental Statistics in Psychology and Education. New York: McGraw Hill.

Gupta, S. P. (1996).Statistical Methods, New Delhi: Sultan Chand & Sons.

Kerlinger, F.N. (1986) .Foundations of Behavioural Research.New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston,

Kothari, C. R, (1998). Quantitative Techniques. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.

Kumar Ranjith. (2005) Research Methodology: A step by step guide for beginners. New Delhi: Pearson Publication.

MacMillan, J.H., & Schomacher, S., (1989).Research in Education: A Conceptual Introduction. New York: Harper Collins.

Majundar P K. (2005).  Research Methods in Social Science. New Delhi: Viva Books PVT Ltd.

Ravid.R. (2010).Practical Statistics for Educators. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

Singh, Jaspal (2011). Instruments of Social Research. New Delhi: Rawat Publications.

Virk, Jaswant K. (2011). Action Research in Education. Patiala: Twenty First Century Publications.

Wadhwa, B.S. (2013). Research and Statistics in Education. Patiala: Twenty First Century Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for this paper on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. The paper carries maximum 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester exam (ESE)                                       :          50%

Mid Semester exam (CIA II)                                   :          25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)                :           25%

                                        Total                                   :          100%

Written Examination

Mid Semester Exam                         :     50 marks (2 Hours)

End Semester Exam                         :    100 marks (3 Hours)

 

Mid Semester exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. End Semester exam will be reduced to 50 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

(10 marks)

(25 marks)

(10 marks)

(5 marks)

 

CIA-II MSE marks will be reduced to 25 marks.

CIA-I and CIA-III: Continuous Internal Assessment

 

Continuous Internal Assessment I

CIA- I will be in two components - Written (reports) Group or Individual - Viva or Presentation may also be conducted

 

Continuous Internal Assessment III

The following methods may be adopted

Multiple choice based test.

Practical Activity

Presentation/Viva

Group Discussion

 

Attendance 

The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows

95%-100%         : 05 marks

90%-94%           : 04 marks

85%-89%           : 03 marks

80%-84%           : 02 marks

76%-79%           : 01 mark

EDU136 - THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course is offered in the first semester. It introduces learners to the Theory Of Knowledge (TOK) which is one of the components of the Diploma Programme(DP) CORE in International Baccalaurate(IB) schools. The TOK requirement is central to the educational philosophy of the DP.TOK is a course about critical thinking and inquiring into the process of knowing, rather than about learning a specific body of knowledge. TOK and the elective courses should support each other in the sense that they reference each other and share some common goals. The TOK course examines how we know what we claim to know. 

 

Learning Outcome

·       The students will be able to comprehend, accept and strategize multiple perspectives towards knowledge and sources of knowledge, as well as the students will be able to understand the philosophy behind the science of various Ways of Knowing and their ways of argumentations respectively.

·       The students will be able to analyse the different Areas of Knowledge so as to identify and establish connections in order to find solutions to problems. Further, students will be able to internalise the constraints of their Areas of Knowledge, limitations of their studies and will move on with their seeking of truth as long as it either corresponds to the facts or is part of a coherent system or works in practice.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Construction of Knowledge
 

Recognizing perspectives: concept of perspectives, international mindedness cultural and political perspectives, Gaining knowledge: personal knowledge, shared knowledge, experiential knowledge, skills, knowledge claims and knowledge questions. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Ways of knowledge
 

Sense Perception: characters of senses, overcoming limitations, Memory: Kinds of memory, Reasoning: Deductive reasoning, Inductive reasoning, Informal reasoning, Reason and certainty, Language: Language and thought, Language and values, Emotion: The nature of the emotions, Emotions as an obstacle to knowledge, Emotions as a source of knowledge, Faith: subjectivity, certainty and doubt, Imagination: Imagination and creativity in Arts, sciences and history, Intuition: Interactive ways of knowing and overcoming limitation of intuition.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Areas of knowledge
 

The arts, Ethics, History, the Human sciences, the Natural science, Mathematics, Indigenous knowledge and Religious knowledge.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Theory of Truth
 

Seeking truth: Correspondence theory, Coherence theory, Pragmatic theory, belief and scales of “certainty”, Dogmatism and relativism, Truth, Wisdom and Knowledge.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Heydorn, W., & Jesudason, S. (2013). Decoding Theory of Knowledge for the IB Diploma: Themes, Skills and Assessment. Cambridge University Press.

Lagemaat, R. (2015). Theory of Knowledge (for the IB Diploma). 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, p.608

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Moser, P. K. (1998). The Theory of Knowledge: A thematic introduction.

Dombrowski, E., Rotenberg, L., & Bick, M. (2013). Theory of Knowledge. Oxford.

Woolman, M. (2000). Ways of Knowing: An introduction to Theory of Knowledge: for use with the international baccalaureate. IBID Press.

Gerber, W. (1977). Man Is the Measure: A Cordial Invitation to the Central Problems of Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy, 2(3/4), 362-363.

Moore, B. N., & Parker, R. (2009). Critical thinking. Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment details

EDU 136

Theory of Knowledge

Presentation = 25 Marks, TOK Essay = 25 Marks

Students are expected to choose a topic of their interest (Individual/group), research and make a presentation.

Students are expected to write a 1600 words essay. Essay topics are to be taken from IB DP website released in September. Essay should be free from plagiarism. It will be assessed by an internal faculty and if required by an external evaluator from other universities running IBEC DP level programme.

There is no written end semester exam

 

 

 

 

 

Guidelines for academic progression (Promotion criteria)

The student will have to achieve at least 40% marks in this course to graduate.

EDU141A - TEACHING AND LEARNING IN HISTORY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
Course Description and Course Objectives