Department of
PSYCHOLOGY






Syllabus for
Master of Science (Counselling Psychology)
Academic Year  (2020)

 
1 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPC111 ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH SEMINAR 2 2 50
MPC121 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT - I 2 2 50
MPC131 FOUNDATIONS OF COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
MPC132 LIFE-SPAN PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
MPC133 QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS 4 4 100
MPC134 COUNSELLING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES - I (INDIVIDUAL) 4 4 100
MPC151 MULTICULTURAL COUNSELLING SKILLS - I 4 4 100
MPC181 COMMUNITY SERVICE - I 4 2 50
2 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPC211 APPLICATION OF STATISTICS IN BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES 2 2 50
MPC221 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT-II 2 2 50
MPC231 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
MPC232 POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
MPC233 SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS FOR COUNSELLING 4 4 100
MPC234 MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS 4 4 100
MPC235 COUNSELLING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES - II (GROUP) 4 2 100
MPC251 MULTICULTURAL COUNSELLING SKILLS - II 4 4 100
MPC271 RESEARCH PROPOSAL AND SUPERVISION 2 2 50
3 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPC331 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT COUNSELLING 4 4 100
MPC332 COUNSELLING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES - III (COUPLES AND FAMILIES) 4 4 100
MPC351 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT 4 4 100
MPC352 SUPERVISED PRACTICUM 2 4 100
MPC371 RESEARCH SUPERVISION 2 2 50
4 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPC411 INTEGRATED SKILLS TRAINING 4 4 100
MPC441A ASIAN HEALING PRACTICES 2 2 50
MPC441B LIFE COACHING 2 2 50
MPC441C COUNSELLING IN HEALTH SETTINGS 2 2 50
MPC441D CRISIS INTERVENTION AND TRAUMA COUNSELLING 2 2 50
MPC471 COUNSELLING SUPERVISION SEMINAR 2 2 50
MPC481 COUNSELLING INTERNSHIP 0 8 200
MPC482 BLOCK INTERNSHIP 0 2 50
MPC483 DISSERTATION 2 4 100
        

  

Assesment Pattern

See details above

Examination And Assesments

Assessment pattern for PG programmes offered by Department of Psychology

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) for all courses : 70%

End-Semester Examination  (ESE): 30% (30 marks out of 100)

 

Continuous Assessment

The assessment and grading of the students will take place in the following manner:

  • A formative assessment of the competencies is carried out the beginning of the course. This is not graded.
  • Assessment of the acquisition of the competencies is done continuously throughout the course with a minimum of one assessment per month.
  • Two of the assessments are graded for thirty (30) Marks each. (for 4 credit papers)

 

Class engagement: 05 marks

Attendance : 05 marks

 

Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CIA 1 and 2 are conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments within the stipulated time for awarding the marks.

The students have to attain minimum pass marks in each assignment or will have to repeat the assignment within the time stipulated by the department.

Marks scored by the students for CIA will be displayed in the student login within a week after the last date of submission of marks by the faculty. Any discrepancy shall be informed immediately to the faculty concerned for correction of marks.

Students who either fail   or do not appear for   CIA  will have to apply for repeat CIA immediately after publishing the results of each CIA component. Application to be forwarded  through the HoD and Dean to the Office of Examinations and obtain necessary approvals. Number of chances for repeating each CIA is only one

. Students who  fail in the  CIA  in a semester have to apply for CIA repeat of the whole course in the subsequent semester

 

End Semester Examination

  • The End semester (competency) examination for the theory as well as practical courses is held at the end of the semesters .
  • The End semester (competency) examination might take place in the form of written examination, project submission and Viva Voce examination and managed by Office of Examinations
  • Generally the duration of is 2 hours but it may vary for certain courses.
  • Absentee's parents will be alerted through SMS within 1 hour after the commencement of the examination.
  • ESCE for all courses will be conducted for 50 marks and reduced to out of 30 marks
  • Hall ticket with timetable and seating allotment is compulsory for ESCE which can be downloaded from the Student Login or obtained from the department office.
  • Dress code of the University should be followed during the examination days except wearing ties.
  • Permission for admission to the ESCE is granted only if
    • A student has passed in CIA’s for that course with a minimim grade for overall CIA.

o   A student has at least 85% of the attendance in aggregate at the end of the semester.

o   The Vice-Chancellor is satisfied with the character and conduct of the student.

    

For 2 and 8 credit courses, a similar system will be followed with marks adjusted accordingly. All Internships, practicum, seminars and research related courses will follow the same pattern.

Pass Criteria

A student shall pass each course with a minimum aggregate score of 50 marks with minimum of  50%  for CIA and 40 % for ESE. The overall aggregate to pass a semester is 50%.  Student failing a course due to less than minimum in ESE  shall repeat the ESE while his/her internal scores shall remain valid.

All other regulations pertaining to assessment and evaluation are same as other programmes of the CHRIST (Deemed to be University)

 

Percentage

 

Grade

Grade Point-4Point Scale

Grade Point-10Point Scale

 

Interpretation

 

Class

80 and above

A+

4.0

10.00

Excellent

First Class with

Distinction

75 – 79

A

3.75

9.38

Very good

70 – 74

A-

3.50

8.75

Good

First Class

65 —69

B+

3.0

7.50

Good

60—64

B

2.5

6.25

Above Average

55—59

C+

2.0

5.00

Average

Second Class

50 —54

C

1.5

3.75

Satisfactory

40 —49

C-

1.0

2.50

Exempted if Aggregate is more than 50%

 

Pass Class

39 and below

F

0

0.00

Fails

Fail

 

Department Overview:
The Department runs a range of programmes that include Certificate courses, Undergraduate programmes, Post Graduate programmes with three specializations and Research degrees in psychology (M.Phil. and Ph.D.). Through these programmes we encourage students to consider careers and life missions that integrate psychological understanding to life. Our programmes integrate scholarship with professional practise and we offer courses that are cutting edge in the field of psychology. Students who complete programmes in Psychology from the University demonstrate high degrees of self awareness are service oriented and are encouraged to embrace humane values in their vocation. The Department realises its vision to promote high academic standards through a continuous and dynamic curriculum review process based on feedback from peers, professionals, potential employers and students. A variety of student-centred teaching and training pedagogies are practised by the faculty members. Prominent among them are the use of seminars, experiential methodologies, laboratory training, conferences, workshops, field based studies, and film based discussions and interactions with field experts.
Mission Statement:
The Vision of the Department of Psychology is to promote high academic standards and scholarship in psychology, by creating an optimal and enriching learning environment, fostering ongoing professional and personal development and contributing effectively to societal needs.
Introduction to Program:
The Department of Psychology offers two year full-time M.Sc Course in Counselling Psychology. Masters course in Counselling Psychology is an advanced course aimed at competence building among the students from a holistic and an interdisciplinary perspective.
Program Objective:
The main objective is to help the students develop awareness, knowledge and skills in the discipline of Counselling Psychology. In specific the programme aims to train the students to acquire the requisite competencies in the following areas: a) Assessment skills b) Personal development c) Research skills d) Counselling/therapy skills e) Development of ethical behavior in counselling settings

MPC111 - ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH SEMINAR (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This Course will introduce students to the domain of academic writing and its intricacies. Every student, regardless of his or her area of interest, will be called upon to use an academic style of writing at different levels and at various points in time. This course will therefore seek to impart such knowledge about the styles of writing used in the current academic scenario. It will provide students with opportunities in the classroom setting to practice such styles, both individually and in collaboration with others. In doing so, it will allow students to delve deeper into scientific literature, while also preparing them for efforts in research. The insights gained from such a course can be used by students as a foundation in their specialized line of work.

 

Course objectives:

 

  • This course will help the learner to gain a familiarity with different academic writing styles used in contemporary scientific journals.

  • Students will gain better understanding about in-text and reference citations, APA formatting.

  • Students will also be introduced to the concept of plagiarism and its different types to avoid such academic forgery.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Scientifically acknowledge  different sources of information in their writings
  • Write a document in APA format
  • Avoid plagiarism

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Academic Writing
 

An overview of the current status of academic writing and its importance; different approaches and processes; key issues: plagiarism, biases and frequent errors

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Guidelines and rules in Academic Writing
 

Introduction to style and formatting guidelines from the American Psychological Association (APA); specific guidelines pertaining to in-text citations, references, and structures of academic papers

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Reporting
 

Abstract writing; summarization; review of literature; scientific poster presentations; reflective, analytic and descriptive reports; book review; film review; tables and graphs in academic papers.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Experiential Learning as Assessment Strategies
 

Individual/Group presentations on forms and issues in Academic Writing; classroom assignments in generating abstracts, posters, reviews, etc

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association: the official guide to APA style (Seventh edition. ed.). American Psychological Association.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Hartley, J. (2008). Academic writing and publishing: A practical guide. Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

MPC121 - PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized in order to shape students to ultimately serve clients of counselling services effectively. It is necessary to monitor the student’s academic progress in the domains that are both personal and professional. These qualities will enhance their counselling skills. The most important aspect of this process is for  the counsellor to grow as a person and then a professional. This course will help the students to understand their skills and developing new skills to become a professional counselor. Life skills and basic counselling skills will be the focus of this course. 

 Course objectives: This course will help the learner to

  • understand the basic skills needed for a counselor in professional life.
  • understand the Life Skills (personal, cognitive and social skills) model for professional development
  • develop modules for psycho-educational training.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Identify their values, Skills, and beliefs as a Professional counselor.
  • Be more reflective and self- aware
  • To utilize life skills in professional growth.
  • To design training modules on psycho-educational training programmes.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Self-awareness, Self-image, Self-development, / Identity (oldvs. new), Empathy,/  problem solving and decision making,/ Creativity, critical thinking,/ Effective helpers;/ Building relationships. / Practicum: Designing and developing training modules on Psycho-Educational Prevention Programs for adolescents, teachers and parents.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Self-awareness, Self-image, Self-development, / Identity (oldvs. new), Empathy,/  problem solving and decision making,/ Creativity, critical thinking,/ Effective helpers;/ Building relationships. / Practicum: Designing and developing training modules on Psycho-Educational Prevention Programs for adolescents, teachers and parents.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Feltham, C. (2007). Professional skills for counselors – understanding the counseling relationships. Sage publication

Goud, N. & Arko, A. (2006). Psychology and personal growth. Pearson, MA.

Inskipp, F. (2004). Skills training for Counselling. Sage publications. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Evans, T. (2015). Counselling skills for Becoming A wiser Practitioner-Tools, techniques and reflections For building practice wisdom. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Jones, R. N. (2005). Practical counseling and helping skills - text and activities for the life skills counselling model. (5th ed). Sage publications.

Nair. A. Radhakrishnan, (2010). Life Skills Training for Positive Behaviour, Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development, Tamil Nadu

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC131 - FOUNDATIONS OF COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course will give students an insight into topics that provide a foundation for counselling psychology and lays down the ground concepts for their journey towards becoming a professional in this field. It is provided to the students in the first semester and will give them the basic competencies and understanding for future courses as well as internships. Topics covered include, understanding the meaning of counselling, its settings and aspects, the historical roots of this field, an Indian Perspective, ethical components, and current trends. This course is the steppingstone for students to gain a foundation towards understanding their roles and requirements to provide services to those in need of them.

 Course objectives: This course provides students with an understanding of:

  • The counsellor’s roles and responsibilities within evolving practice environments
  • Historical development and its current status of counselling psychology
  • Ethical issues and dilemmas in the field of counselling psychology

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Distinguish between guidance, psychotherapy and counselling
  • State the historical background and development of counselling psychology
  • Critically analyze ethical issues and debates in counselling psychology
  • Assess boundaries of the different types of counselling

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Concept of counselling; Defining features of counselling; Major goals of counselling; Difference between guidance and counselling; Counselling and psychotherapy; Types of counselling; Counselling psychology and other specialties and fields: Distinctiveness and overlap; Training, job setting and activities

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Historic Perspectives
 

Development of the profession: Stages of the development of the profession; Traditional activities of counsellors; Counselling in India

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Counselling Relationship & Ethical and Legal Guidelines
 

The importance of relationship; Components of relationship; Facilitative conditions for the counselling relationship; Ethical issues, Ethical dilemmas, Legal concerns of counsellors

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Current trends in counselling
 

Diversity issues in counselling; Different formats of counselling; Counselling and Liasoning fields; Trauma Counselling, Technological advances in Counselling, Process Oriented Research in Counselling

Text Books And Reference Books:

·     Neukrug, E. (2011). The world of the counselor: An introduction to the counseling profession. Nelson Education.

Bond, T. (1997). Standards and Ethics for counsellors in action. Sage

Charles, G.J., & Bruce, F.R. (1995). Counselling Psychology. Harcourt Brace Publishers

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·      Felthman, C., & Horton, I. (2000). Handbook of Counselling and Psychotherapy. Sage

Robert, G. L., & Marianne, M.H. (2003). Introduction to Counselling and Guidance. Pearson education, Inc.

Sharma, R .N.,& Sharma,R. (2004). Guidance and Counselling in India.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC132 - LIFE-SPAN PSYCHOLOGY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized in order to introduce trainee counsellors to human development across the lifespan with a focus on normal and atypical development, developmental transitions, the socio-economic context of development and wellness at each stage of development. This course looks at life span development through the lenses of social, cognitive and biological theories. The course aims at providing conceptual understanding of healthy development and practical understanding of how to help children, adolescents, and adults address the developmental challenges they face across the life span.  This course provides counselling students with a foundation to conceptualize and apply developmental theory and research.  

 

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to understand

  • Atypical growth and healthy development, and practical understanding of how to help children, adolescents, and adults 
  • Processes of human development and apply this knowledge to understand developmental needs of all diverse age groups
  • Theories of individual development across the lifespan
  • The systemic and environmental factors that affect human development, functioning, and behavior
  • Biopsychosocial and eco-systems model of development across the lifespan.

 

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Describe Systemic and environmental factors that affect human development and functioning
  • Compare and contrast how different theories of development explain changes related to physical, cognitive, social, and emotional influences (such as socio-economic status, gender, special needs, culture, religion, schools, peers, and family) on physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development
  • Apply the developmental theories and specific evidence-based research findings to understand counselling practice and social issues
  • Apply developmental concepts and theories to everyday relationships and situations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Life-Span Development
 

Importance of studying Life-Span Development, Characteristics of life-span development, Nature of Development, Scope of Life span development; Social contexts of lifespan development-ecosystems model. Implications of Lifespan Development for Counselors, need for a developmental perspective 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Biological Processes in Human Development
 

Part 1: Biological Bases to explain Human Development (10 hours)- Heredity-Environment Correlations; Important physical changes; Challenges for psychological development. Bio-psychosocial model of health- Sleep, Eating, Obesity, health, illness and lifestyle issues across the life-span. 

 

Part 2: Endings of Life  (10 hours)-Biological and social theories of aging, Successful aging; Death, Causes for death across life span, Suicide in adolescence and adulthood; Facing one’s own death, coping with the death of someone else.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Cognitive Processes and Development
 

Piaget and Vygotsky’s theory of cognitive development; Age related challenges to cognitive development; Play and play patterns

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Socio-Emotional Processes and Development Across Life Span
 

Development of Emotion, Emotional regulation and Temperament, Attachment and Love: Bowlby, Ainsworth, Sternberg.  Development of Identity: Erickson’s theory; Marcia Identity status; Moral Development, Contexts of moral development: Kohlberg’s theory Parenting; Emerging adulthood and Adult life cycle theories, Fowlers Theory: Arnett, Levinson, quarter and midlife crisis

Text Books And Reference Books:

Berk, L. E. (2016). Exploring lifespan development. Pearson.

Santrock, J.W. (2011). A topical Approach to life-Span Development. Tata McGraw-Hill Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Broderick, P.C., & Blewitt, P. (2010). The life span: Human development for helping professionals. (3rd Ed.). Pearson.

Feldman, R. S. (2015). Discovering the life span. (3rd Eds). Pearson Global Education.

Newman & Newman (2003). Development through life: A Psychosocial Approach. Thomson Wadsworth.  

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC133 - QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course provides an introduction to quantitative research methods and its application in counselling psychology. It gives a comprehensive overview of the different types of research designs, sampling methods, and methods of data collection. The process of quantitative research with special emphasis on experimental design is covered in this course.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner

  • Understand the importance of scientific enquiry in counselling practice
  • Gain familiarity with the process of Quantitative research
  • Provide an overview of the different experimental designs

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • demonstrate skills of designing quantitative research
  • demonstrate skills on collecting quantitative data using various methods
  • conceptualize a research problem
  • understand ethical issues in research

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Foundations of Quantitative Research
 

History of scientific research in psychology; Definition of research; Purpose and need of research in Psychological counselling. Experimental, Exploratory and descriptive research; Ethical issues in psychological counselling research (8 hrs)

Research lab (7 hrs )

1) Review of research article

2) Code of ethics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Process of Quantitative Research
 

Causality and experimentation; Definition and nature of variables; operationally defining variables; Independent variables; Dependent variables; formulation of research problems and hypothesis ; Different types of hypothesis ; Experimental manipulation and control of variables; steps in quantitative research (8 hrs)

Research lab (7 hrs)

1) formulation of research problem and hypothesis

2) proposal lab 1

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Sampling Techniques and Data Collection
 

Population and sample; Basic assumptions Sampling techniques: probability and non- probability sampling; Methods of data collection: observational methods, surveys, questionnaires, interviewing methods, case study methods, and psychometric tests. (8 hrs)

Research lab (7 hrs)

1) Simulation techniques for learning sampling technique and various data collection

methods

2) Skills training seminars

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Experimental Designs
 

Adequate vs Inadequate (faulty) research design; Types of experimental design based on subjects and factors; Within-subjects, between subjects, single-subject, single factor, and factorial design; Sources of error variance and its management in the various types of experimental designs; Mixed design (8 hrs )

Research lab (7 hrs)

1) APA style of writing

2) Skill training seminars on research design

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bordens, K.S., & Abbott, B.B. (2006). Research and design methods: A process approach (6 th ed.). Tata McGraw-Hill Company Limited

Coolican ,H.(2004).Research methods and Statistics in Psychology . Hoddes Arnold

Goodwin, C.J. (2002). Research in psychology: Methods and design (3 rd ed.).  John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Gravetter,F.J.,& Forzana,L.A.B(2009). Research methods for behavioral sciences .Wordsworth cengage learning . 

Kerlinger, N. (1996). Foundations of behavioural research. Prentice Hall

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Aron, A., & Aron, E.N. (1994). Statistics for psychology. Prentice Hall.

Breakwell, G.M., Hammond, S., Fife-Shaw, C., & Smith, J.A. (eds.). (2006). Research methods in psychology (3 rd ed.). Sage.

Cohen, R.J., & Swerdlik, M.E. (2005). Psychological testing and assessment: An introduction to tests and measurement (6 th ed.). McGraw-Hill.

Gravetter, F.J., & Wallnau, L.B. (2002). Essentials of statistics for the behavioral sciences (4 th ed.). Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC134 - COUNSELLING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES - I (INDIVIDUAL) (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course introduces the students to the various theoretical orientations to counselling. The major approaches like Psychoanalytic, Humanistic, Adlerian, Gestalt, Experiential, Cognitive, Behavioural, Multimodal and Integrative approaches are covered in this course. Specific techniques and interventions for each of the approaches are also covered.

Learning Outcome

After the completion of this course, a student will be able to:

1. Understand the various approaches to counselling

2. Implement at least three therapeutic techniques in each approach

3. Critique various approaches to counselling

UNIT 1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I
 

Psychoanalytic psychotherapy: Introduction to Freud and his personality theory, Therapeutic process, Techniques, Application of techniques and procedures, Therapy with diverse populations.

Adlerian psychotherapy: Introduction to Adler and his personality theory, Therapeutic process, Techniques, Application of techniques and procedures, Adlerian therapy with diverse populations

UNIT 2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Person Centred Psychotherapy: Introduction to Carl Rogers and Rogerian theory of personality; Therapeutic process ; Techniques ; Application of techniques and procedures ;Therapy with diverse populations.

Existential therapy: Introduction to Existentialism; Logotherapy - Therapeutic process;Techniques; Application of techniques and procedures; Therapy with diverse populations.

Gestalt Therapy: Introduction to Gestalt therapy; Therapeutic process ;Techniques ; Application of techniques and procedures; Therapy with diverse populations

UNIT 3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 3
 

Behavior Therapy: Introduction to behavioral theories ;Behavioral therapeutic process ; Techniques ; Application of behavioral techniques and procedures ;Therapy with diverse populations.

Lazarus Multimodal Approach to Psychotherapy: Introduction to Multimodal Psychotherapy theory ; Therapeutic process; Application of techniques and procedures ;Therapy with diverse populations.

Cognitive Behavior Modification: Donald Meichenbaum's approach to therapy

UNIT 4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 4
 

Cognitive Therapy: Introduction to Albert Ellis Rational Emotive Behavioral (REBT) theory; Therapeutic process ;Techniques; Application of techniques and procedures; REBT with diverse populations.

Aaron Beck's Cognitive Therapy: Introduction to Aaron Beck's cognitive theory (CT); therapeutic process; Techniques; Application of techniques and procedures ; CT with diverse populations.

Integrative Approach to Psychotherapy: Integration vs. Eclecticism ; An introduction to therapy, techniques and applications.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Corey, G. (2012). Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy (9th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Gilland, B.E., & James, R.K. (1998). Theories and Strategies in Counselling and Psychotherapy. Singapore: Allyn and Bacon. 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Corey,  G.  (2008). Student manual for Theory and Practice of Counselling and Psychotherapy (8th ed.). CA: Brooks/Cole.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)
 

MPC151 - MULTICULTURAL COUNSELLING SKILLS - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This practical course has been conceptualized in order to train students in counselling skills. The developmental model of training is followed. Through this course the students are trained in basic counseling skills, such as attending skills, basic listening sequence, observation skills, along with ethics in a multicultural context through dyad and triad work.

Course objectives : After the completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate Basic Counselling Skills.
  • Reflect more on themselves as developing counsellors.
  • Demonstrate a few counselling techniques.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Recognize Ethical issues in a multicultural context.
  • Understand what multicultural competence entails.
  • Demonstrate Attending Skills.
  • Demonstrate appropriate questioning skills in a counseling session
  • Demonstrate client observation skills.
  • Use encouragers and be skilled in paraphrasing and summarizing.
  • Demonstrate appropriate use of Reflection of feeling.
  • Conduct a brief counseling session integrating all skills learnt appropriately.
  • Gain self-awareness through reflective writing and journaling.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Introduction to counselling skills; Micro skill approach to counselling; Ethics and multicultural issues in counselling.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Attending Behaviours; Questions; Client observational Skills; Encouraging, Paraphrasing and Summarizing.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 3
 

Reflection of Content, Reflection of Feeling

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 4
 

Integrating Listening Skills

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Ivey, A.E., & Ivey, M.B.(2007). Intentional Interviewing and Counselling. Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Evans, D.R., Hearn, M.T., Uhlemann, M.R., & Ivey, A.E. (2008). Essential Interviewing: A Programmed Approach to Effective Communication.  Thomson: Brooks/Cole.
Nelson-Jones, R. (2008). Basic Counselling Skills: A Helper’s Manual. Sage Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC181 - COMMUNITY SERVICE - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: In this course students will spend four hours a week or a total of 30 hours during the semester involved in supervised community service. Students are encouraged to work alongside NGO’s or other professional bodies. Students will engage in activities such as children, adolescents and youth teaching/tutoring, community organization, psychological assessment and mental health awareness. Reflections on their interactions are integral part of this course. Student engagement will be assessed by a supervisor.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner: 

  • To build awareness about the requirements of the society.

  • To identify the needs of underprivileged communities.

  • To create mental health awareness among children, adolescents and youth.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Understand the mental health related and other issues in our society
  • Identify the needs of underprivileged population.
  • Address the mental health issues among various communities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction
 

Community service: The concept, Objectives and Scope; Need for community and Academia (University) interface. The role of psychologist in community service: Social Psychologist, Community Psychologist & Counselor. Outcomes of community service: Personal outcome; Social outcome, Learning outcome and Career outcome.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Fieldwork
 

 

Students in groups will partner with various NGO’s and organizations working in the areas of education, development, interventions and mental health. As part of the course requirement the students will be involved in the community oriented activities of the organizations they affiliate with. The NGO’s or Organizations along with the faculty coordinator will be responsible for the process delivery. These placements will offer students hands-on experiences in working with various issues in community and facilitate meaningful learning.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Reflection
 

Reflection is a core component of Community service. It is a period of critical thinking performed by the student and is based on a specific or overall experience of the student.   It guides students towards greater personal development by coming to a better understanding of their own values, opinions, and assumptions. The types of reflection which can be used are, class discussion, brainstorming, sharing of critical personal and group incidents, directed writings, experiential research paper, student portfolios and so on. The students are expected to discuss in groups at the end of this course using the following guidelines.

Reason for choosing the organization

•The planning phase of service learning initiatives

•Logistics for the initiative of the action

•Stakeholders/beneficiaries

•Execution of the action initiative

•Specific learning outcome

•Evaluation

Text Books And Reference Books:

 America’s Promise—The Alliance for Youth (2004). Connecting Communities with Colleges & Universities.  909 North Washington Street, Suite 400, Alexandria,VA 22314-1556.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bringle, R. G. & Hatcher, J. A. (1996). Implementing Service Learning in Higher Education. The Journal of Higher Education, 67(2), 221-239.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

 

 

 

MPC211 - APPLICATION OF STATISTICS IN BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is offered in the second semester. An understanding in Quantitative Research methods is a pre-requisite for this course. The course covers introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics along with computation skills in descriptive statistics and skills of plotting relevant graphs. Furthermore the course would enable the learners to answer the question on what, when and why various inferential statistics that can be used for quantitative research analysis in Behavioural sciences. Hands on experience in the usage of statistical packages for quantitative analysis is a core component of this course. Completion of this course would equip students to prepare the research proposal and conduct quantitative research with confidence and efficacy.

 

Course objectives: The learner will be able to

  • Explain the various psychological measurements and statistical tools
  • Apply descriptive and inferential statistics in psychological research
  • Identify appropriate statistics based on the nature of hypothesis and variables
  • Use various parametric and non-parametric statistics in analysis of data
  • Develop skills on analyzing quantitative data using software
  • Test hypothesis with SPSS software
  • Interpret the results from quantitative analysis

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to

  • Tabulate data, compute measures of central tendencies and measures of variability
  • Formulate appropriate research questions
  • Generate hypothesis 
  • Use appropriate accurate statistical tests to analyse data
  • Compile assessment data to generate reports
  • Evaluate the findings
  • Effectively use SPSS

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS
 

 

Definition and purpose of psychological statistics; application of statistics in Behavioral science; scale of measurement; Probability distribution and normal curve; Levels of significance, type -I and type -II errors, one-and two-tailed tests; Parametric and non-parametric tests of significance 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
INFERENTIAL STATISTICS
 

Statistical analysis of single - sample study: testing a sample mean by t-test,; Statistical analysis of two- sample experiments: the independent samples t-test, the dependent-sample t-test; Correlation: product- moment, point-biserial, phi, biserial, tetrachoric, spearman’s correlation coefficients; Statistical analysis of complex experiments: analysis of variance - F test (computing and interpreting one-way, two-way ANOVA and their logic); MANOVA and Post-hoc tests. 

 

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Aron, A., Coups, E. J., Aron, E., (2016). Statistics for psychology (6th ed.).  Pearson education.

Coolican ,H.(2004).Research methods and Statistics in Psychology . Hoddes

Arnold Field, P. A. (2013).Discovering Statistics Using IBM SPSS Statistics (4th ed.). SAGE Publications.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Garrett,H.E(2005).Statistics in psychology and Education . Paragon international publishers

Gravetter, F.J., & Wallnau, L.B. (2002). Essentials of statistics for the behavioral sciences (4th ed.).  Wadsworth/Thomson Learning

Bordens, K.S., & Abbott, B.B. (2006). Research and design methods: A process approach (6th ed.).  Tata McGraw- Hill Company Limited.

Cohen, R.J., & Swerdlik, M.E. (2005). Psychological testing and assessment: An introduction to tests and measurement (6th ed.).  McGraw-Hill.

Gravetter, F.J., & Wallnau, L.B. (2002). Essentials of statistics for the behavioral sciences (4th ed.).  Wadsworth/Thomson Learning6. Heiman, G.W. (2001). Understanding research methods and statistics: An integrated introduction for psychology (2nd ed.). Houghton Mifflin Company.

Kerlinger, N. (1996). Foundations of behavioural research. Prentice Hall
King, B.M., & Minium, E.M. (2003). Statistical reasoning in psychology and education (4th ed.). John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Leong, F.T., & Austin, (1996). The psychology research handbook: A guide for graduate students and research assistants. Sage Publications

Levin, J., & Fox, J.A. (2006). Elementary statistics in social research (10th ed.). Pearson Education. McCall, R.B. (2001).
Fundamental statistics for behavioral sciences (8th ed.). Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MPC221 - PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT-II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course is an extension of the professional development course offered in the first semester and encourages students to continue to examine their developing identities as counsellors in training.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to:

  • Explore parts of their self at a deeper level through guided autobiographical reading, having specific life review themes that are shared in a group.
  • Engage in active listening as well as sharing life stories in a group setting.
  • Generate new perspectives on different areas in their lives.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Recognize adaptive strategies and apply it to their current needs and problems.
  • Demonstrate higher levels of self-awareness
  • Listen Empathetically.
  • Engage in reflective writing.
  • Demonstrate higher levels of trust.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Life Review Themes - 1

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Life Review Themes - 2                                                                                    

Text Books And Reference Books:

NA

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MPC231 - QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course provides a theoretical foundation on qualitative research methods. Different methods of collecting qualitative data are discussed. Methods of Qualitative data analysis are also touched upon. Along with courses on research in the first and second semester, this course intends to provide students with the theoretical background to develop their research proposal.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to:

  • Understand the philosophical foundations on which qualitative research methods are based
  • gain familiarity with the conceptual foundations of qualitative research methods in counselling Psychology
  • understand various traditions of qualitative research methodologies in counselling psychology.
  • learn different methods of data collection
  • understand different methods of data analysis in qualitative research methods

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • demonstrate skills on designing qualitative research
  • collect qualitative data using various methods
  • appreciate the importance of interdisciplinary research
  • demonstrate skills on different traditions of qualitative data analysis
  • develop skills on Computer assisted qualitative data analysis
  • demonstrate skills on proposal writing and reporting qualitative research.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Foundations of Qualitative Research
 

Defining qualitative research; Historical development of qualitative research; Key philosophical and methodological issues in qualitative research; Different traditions of qualitative research; Grounded theory, Narrative approach, Ethnography, Action research, and Discourse analysis (8 hrs)

 Research Lab (7 Hrs)

1) Review of different article related to the different traditions of qualitative research

3) Skill taining seminars 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Qualitative Research Design
 

Conceptualizing research questions, issues of paradigm, .Designing samples, Theoretical sampling, Contrasting qualitative with quantitative approach in research process  Issues of Credibility and trustworthiness (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs)

1) Qualitative research proposal  lab

2) Simulated techniques on designing qualitative research

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Methods of Collecting Qualitative Data
 

What is qualitative data? Various methods of collecting qualitative data: participant observation, interviewing, focus groups, life history and oral history, documents, diaries, photographs, films and videos, conversation, texts and case studies (8 hrs)

 Research Lab (7 Hrs)

 1) Simulated techniques on different data collection methods

2)     Skill training seminars

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Analyzing Qualitative Data
 

Different traditions of qualitative data analysis; thematic analysis, Narrative analysis, Discourse analysis, Content analysis (8 hrs)

 

Research Lab (7 Hrs)

 

1)  Qualitative  data analysis software NVivo

2) Reporting qualitative research data 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Mcleod, J. (2011). Qualitative Research in Counseling and Psychotherapy. Sage

Creswell, J. W., & Poth, C. N. (2017). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches. Sage. 

Ritchie, J., Lewis, J., McNaughton Nicholls, C., & Ormston, R. (2014). Qualitative research Practice A  guide for social science students and researchers (2nd ed.). Sage Publication Limited.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bryman,A (Ed.)(2007) Sage Benchmarks in social science research methods Vol.I,Vol.II ,Vol,III,and Vol. IV. Sage Publications

Kvale,S.(Ed.) (1997).Psychology & Post-modernism.Sage Publications 

McGhee, P. (2001). Thinking critically about qualitative research in psychology. In P. McGhee, Thinking psychologically (pp.98-111). Palgrave

Smith,J.A.(ed.)(2003).Qualitative psychology: A practical guide to research methods. Sage.

Smith,J.A., Harre,R., & Langenhove,L.V.(eds.).(1995).Rethinking methods in psychology. Sage.

Willig,C.(2001).Introducing qualitative research in psychology: Adventures in theory and method. Open University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC232 - POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course examines a paradigm shift from pathologies to positive subjective experience and positive individual traits to improve quality of life.  A framework for a science of positive psychology is built on the aim to promote positive relationships which has implications in various areas of psychology.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to

  • gain a familiarity with the context and subject matter of positive psychology
  • understand the application of positive psychology principles in different facets of life.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Acquire insights into their own strengths
  • Utilize the insights to increase their and others’ wellbeing.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Positive Psychology
 

The context and subject matter of positive psychology; Western and Eastern perspectives on Positive Psychology; Theoretical background of positive psychology                                                                                                     

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Positive Emotional and Cognitive States
 

Principles of pleasure; Positive emotions, happiness, subjective wellbeing; emotional states and positive health; emotional intelligence; quality of life; optimism and hope; self efficacy; wisdom and courage; faith; flow and spirituality.

*Field study from an interdisciplinary way.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Promoting Positive Relationships
 

Self and consciousness; mindfulness; positive personal traits; positive coping strategies; positive relationships: Love; Compassion, Forgiveness, Altruism, Gratitude, Empathy.

*Case work, research article review.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Applications of Positive Psychology
 

Ageing, Health, Work, Mental Health and Behavior, Stress Management, Communities- ME/WE balance. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Snyder, C.R. & Lopez, S.J. (2002). Handbook of positive psychology. (eds.). Oxford University Press.
Seligman, M. (1994).  What You Can Change and What You Can’t.  Knopf.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Anderson, N.B. (2003).  Emotional Longevity.  Viking.

Andrews, F.M. and Withey, S.D. (1976).  Social Indicators of Wellbeing.  Plenum Press.

Baltes, P., & Staudinger, U.M. (2000). Wisdom: A metaheuristic (pragmatic) to orchestrate mind and virtue toward excellence. American Psychologist, 55, 122-136.

Bradburn, N. and Caplovitz, D. (1965).  Reports of Happiness.  Aldine.

Buss, D.M. (2000).  The Evolution of Happiness.  American Psychologist, 55, 15-23.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC233 - SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS FOR COUNSELLING (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course familiarizes the students with some of the major theoretical perspectives in social and cultural psychology. Appreciating interpersonal and group level psychological processes in the cultural context, this course analyzes multimodal influences on human behaviour. Applications to counselling will be discussed.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to gain a familiarity with

  • The role of culture in understanding the development of the self and the multidimensional nature of social identities.
  • The processes of social perception and social cognition involved in the way we understand our social world, form attitudes, make attributions, categorize and engage in intergroup comparisons, with specific focus on how these may impact the practice of professional counselling.
  • Theoretical explanations of social behaviours such as prosocial behaviour, aggression and intimate relationships.
  • The social issues prevalent in our cultural context and an understanding of how social psychological theories can be applied to develop scientific and community- oriented solutions , programmes and interventions.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to

  • Understand the social and cultural roots of individual behavior
  • Demonstrate a range of interpersonal skills required in counselling psychology encounters.
  • Examine their own attitudes, behaviors, perceptions, and biases to developing culturally aware approaches to teaching, counselling, and/or administration

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Social Self
 

Development of self; Self and identity: Culture and social identities, diverse identities; Perception of Self and Others; Social cognition; Self-presentation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Social Relationships
 

Social Perception:                                                         

a)Attribution, bias and errors in attribution ; b) Prejudice, Stereotypes and Discrimination; c)Attitudes : attitude organization, methods of attitude change , persuasion and propaganda techniques. 

Social Relationships:

a) Nature, dimensions and dynamics of interpersonal relationships: interpersonal attraction , sexuality and intimacy; diverse and complex relationships, alternate sexualities ;  b)Altruism: influences of helping; long-term helpfulness ; c)Aggression: nature and characteristics; individual differences in aggression ; Violence : sexual harassment, interpersonal violence

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Culture and Behaviour
 

Overview of approaches in the study of culture: Cross cultural psychology, Cultural psychology; Individualistic Vs Collectivistic Cultures ;

a) Diversity in Socialization 

b) Poverty & Deprivation

c) Mental health & psychopathology: Traditional healing methods, Aspects of coping 

d) Acculturation

e) Childhood disability

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social and Cultural Issues
 

Complex worlds and social behaviour ; Social psychology and contemporary issues – globalization, gender and diversity ; Dealing with ethnic minorities – the cultural dimension of individual behaviour ; Social psychology in clinical health settings ; Social psychology at work- application in job satisfaction and performance.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baumeister,R.F. and Bushman, B.J. (2014). Social Psychology and human nature. Third edition. Cengage publishers.

Fraser, C., and Burchell, B. (2001). Introducing Social Psychology.  Polity.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Berry, J.W., Mishra, R.C. & Tripathi, R.C. (Eds). (2003). Psychology in human and social development: lessons from diverse cultures. Sage.

Blaine, B.E. (2013). Understanding the psychology of diversity. Second edition. Sage Publications

Crisp, R.J. and Turner , R.N.(2014).Essential social psychology.  Sage.

Dalal, A.K. and Misra, G. (Eds.) (2002). New directions in Indian Psychology (Vol 1: Social Psychology). (pp.19-49).  Sage.

Dasen, P.R. Berry, J.W. & Sartorius, N. (1988) (Eds.). Health and cross- cultural psychology: toward applications.  Sage.

Gilbert, D.T., Fiske, S.T., and Lindzey. G. (Eds). (1998). The handbook of social psychology (4 th ed.).  Oxford University Press.

Kakar, S. (1982). Shamans, Mystics and Doctors.  Oxford University Press.

Kao, H.S.R., Sinha, D. (Eds.) (1997). Asian perspectives on psychology.  Sage.

Linda, S. (Ed) (2017). Applied social psychology : understanding and managing social problems. Cambridge university press

Lott, B.E. (2010).Multiculturalism and diversity : a social psychological perspective. Wiley-Blackwell

Matsumoto, D. & Juang, L. (2004). Culture and psychology. Thomson Wardsworth.

Pandey, J. (Ed.) (2004). Psychology in India revisited (Vol-3). ND: Sage. 3

Saraswathi, T.S. (Ed). (1999). Culture, socialization and human development.  Sage.

Smith, P.B., Bond, M.H. & Kagitcibasi,C. (2006). Understanding social psychology across cultures.  Sage.

Tuffin, K. (2005). Understanding Critical Social Psychology. Sage.

Vindhya, U. (Ed). (2003).Psychology in India: Intersecting crossroads. Concept publishing company.


Recommended Journal references :
Kapur, R.L. (1994). Violence in India: A Psychological Perspective. D.L.N. Rao Murthy Oration, Indian Journal of Psychiatry, 36(4), 163-169.

Nancy,A.R. (2013). Aversive racism and intergroup contact theories : Cultural competence in a segregated world . Journal of social work education, 49 (4),

p564-579.

Winnifred,R.L.(2009). Collective action and then what?. Journal of social issues, 65 (4); p727-748

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC234 - MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized in order to enable the students to understand the various mental health disorders affecting an individual from infancy to old age.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner

  • understand about international classificatory systems of mental health disorders, diagnostic criteria & clinical manifestations
  • gain an understanding about psycho social aetiology of mental health disorders. 

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Understand various types of mental disorders.
  • Make a provisional diagnosis of psychological conditions using the ICD 10.
  • Clearly differentiate the manifestation of various disorders in children and adults
  • provide the possible causal factors based on the psychosocial profile of the client.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Classification and Psychopathology of Neuro Psychological Conditions.
 

Systems of classification, basic features; DSM 5, ICD-10, similarities, differences and critical evaluation; Dementia, delirium, head injury, epilepsy, other amnesic syndromes

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Psychopathology of Addiction, Psychotic and Personality Disorders.
 

Models of addiction, schizophrenia, delusion, other psychotic disorders. Clinical characteristics, etiology. Clinical characteristics, etiology and theories of cluster A, B and C personality disorders

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Psychopathology of Mood and Anxiety Disorders
 

Depression, bipolar affective disorders; Phobia, GAD, panic, OCD, PSTD, adjustment disorder; Clinical characteristics, etiology.

Dissociative disorder, somatoform disorder, other neurotic disorder

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Disorders of Infancy, Childhood and Adolescence.
 

Specific developmental disorder of scholastic skills; Pervasive developmental disorders Behavioral and emotional disorders; Disorders of social functioning

Text Books And Reference Books:

Barlow, D.H., Durand, M.V. & Hofmann, S.G. (2018). Abnormal Psychology: An Integrative Approach. 8th Ed. Cengage.

Ahuja, N. (2011). A Short Textbook of Psychiatry. Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.

World Health Organization. (1992). ICD-10 Classifications of Mental and Behavioural Disorder: Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines. World Health Organization. 

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). American Psychiatric Association.

Sadock, B.J. & Sadock, V.A. (2003). Kaplan & Sadock’s Synopsis of psychiatry: Behavioral sciences/clinical psychiatry (9th. Ed.). Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Adams, H.E., Sutker, P.B. (2001). Comprehensive handbook of psychopathology (3rd Ed.). Kluwer Academic publishers.

Hecker, S.E. & Thorpe, G.L. (2005). Introduction to clinical psychology: Science, practice & ethics. Pearson Education, Inc.

Millon, T., Blaney, P., & Davis, R.D. (1998). The oxford textbook of psychopathology. Oxford University Press.

Smith, N.W. (2001). Current systems in psychology: History, theory, research & applications. Wadsworth/Thomson learning.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC235 - COUNSELLING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES - II (GROUP) (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This courseis an applied course with a focus on integration of theory and clinical group work, and discussion of clinical, professional, and ethical issues. This course is designed for students to gain group counselling skills and self-awareness about how one’s own qualities, needs, motivations, and values can either facilitate or interfere with one’s effectiveness as a group counsellor.

 Course objectives: This course will help the learner gain familiarity with

  • different types of groups that can be run for different populations
  • the group process, including opening and closing groups, and group dynamics
  • ethical, legal and training issues
  • the application of theoretical approaches in groups

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Plan a group session
  • Open and close a small group
  • Identify group dynamics as they occur within a group
  • Identify the roles they play in group
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of group theory
  • Demonstrate competence in group counselling skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Goals; Functions and Definitions of Group guidance, Group Counselling & Group Therapy; Group vs. Individual Counselling; Types of groups.

Skills training Lab:  

Planning and Starting Groups; Exercises; Therapeutic Forces; Dealing with problem situations in groups.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Using Counselling Theories in Groups
 

REBT, Reality Therapy, Adlerian Therapy, TA, Gestalt Therapy, Solution-Focused Therapy, Trans theoretical Model; Psychodrama.

Skills training Lab:

Attending and Observation Skills; Focusing, pacing, leading and linking skills.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Issues in Group Counselling
 

Co leading, Ethical Considerations; Legal Issues; Training of Group Counsellors

Skills training Lab:

Leadership skills of basic listening sequence; Skills of structuring dimensions and stages of groups.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Application of Group Processes to Special Groups
 

Children, Adolescents, Couples, Older Clients, Addiction Groups, Divorce Groups

Skills training Lab:

Skills and strategies for interpersonal influence; Closing a session or a group.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Jacobs, Ed E., Masson, Robert L., Harvill, Riley L. (2009). Group Counselling: Strategies and skills. Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Corey, Gerald (2000). Theory and Practice of Group Counselling (5th Ed). Brooks/Cole.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Corey, M.S., Corey, Gerald (2006). Groups process and Practice (7th Ed). Thomson: Brooks/Cole.  

Capuzzi, Dave (2002). Approaches to Group Work: A Handbook for Practitioners. Prentice Hall.

Ivey, A.E., Pedersen, P.B. & Ivey, M.B. (2001). Intentional group counselling: A micro skill approach. Wadsworth.

Yalom, LD (1995). The theory and practice of group therapy (4th Ed). Basic books.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC251 - MULTICULTURAL COUNSELLING SKILLS - II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course is a continuation of the Multicultural Counselling Skills Course–I. Here the student is trained in the more advanced skills of influencing and bringing about client change.  The student is also taught different models of problem conceptualization, and treatment planning.

Course objectives : The aim of this course is to learn 

  • Advanced individual counselling skills.

  • To use counselling techniques in applied settings.

  • Conceptualization of client problems and effectively work towards client change and growth.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Demonstrate Confrontation skills .
  • Bring appropriate focus to a counseling session.
  • Demonstrate ability to reflect, interpret and reframe meaning.
  • Demonstrate influencing skills.
  • Conduct a counseling session integrating both basic and advanced counseling skills.
  • Determine their personal style.
  • Conceptualize a case along with treatment plan.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I
 

Review; Confrontation Skills; Focusing the interview; Reflection of Meaning; Influencing Skills – Six Strategies for change.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT II
 

Skill Integration; Integrating Micro skills with Theory; Determining Personal Style & Future Theoretical/ Practical Integration.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT III
 

Case conceptualization using different models

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT IV
 

Treatment Planning

Text Books And Reference Books:

Ivey, A.E., & Ivey, M.B.(2007). Intentional Interviewing and Counselling. Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Evans, D.R. , Hearn, M.T., Uhlemann, M.R., & Ivey, A.E. (2008). Essential Interviewing: A Programmed Approach to Effective Communication.  Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Nelson-Jones, R. (2008). Basic Counselling Skills: A Helper’s Manual. Sage Publications.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC271 - RESEARCH PROPOSAL AND SUPERVISION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is intended to help students develop skills of writing a research proposal and defending it. Students are supported as they progress through the different stages of their research work which include data collection, data analysis and writing up their dissertation.

 

Course objectives:

This course will help the learner to conceptualize a research problem and choose an appropriate research design to carry out the research. It will also provide supervision to students as they progress through the different stages of the research process.

 

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • identify a research problem
  • select appropriate research design to study the problem
  • write a research proposal and defend it
  • collect data in an ethical manner

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
UNIT 1
 

Developing a Research Proposal

Ethical Issues in Research

Supervision of Research Process

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Coolican, H. (2004). Research methods and Statistics in Psychology. Hoddes Arnold

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Garrett, H. E. (2005). Statistics in psychology and Education. Paragon international publishers

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

MPC331 - CHILD AND ADOLESCENT COUNSELLING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course will provide trainee counsellors with the knowledge and application of counselling techniques and skills to work with children and adolescents in a variety of settings: school/ educational, family and community. The course prepares trainee counsellors to address the specific needs of children and adolescents, with emphasis on developmental needs, specific therapeutic interventions, and common emotional issues. Courses including multicultural counselling skills, counselling theories and techniques (individual and groups), and Life span psychology are key foundational and prerequisite courses for this course. This course is taken along with supervised practicum in the third semester to provide students with the opportunity to practice and develop specific skill sets to work with children and adolescents. 

 Course objectives: This course will help the learner to

  • Demonstrate an understanding of issues that may affect the development and functioning of students
  • Understand the principles and skills needed for counselling children and adolescents
  • Gain knowledge and application of evidence-based research and practice in child and adolescent to assist students, families, and educators in using resources that promote informed academic, career, and personal/social choices
  • Understand ethical and legal considerations related specifically to the practice of child and adolescent counselling
  • Coordination, collaboration, referral, and team-building efforts with teachers, parents, support personnel, and community resources to develop promotive and preventive interventions

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to

  • Identify developmental factors that influence counselling children and adolescents.
  • Apply counselling skills and techniques to work with children and adolescents
  • Interpret ethical and legal considerations involved in counselling children and working with their families
  • Describe the various categories of children with special needs, the services and interventions that counsellors can use
  • Develop Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for children and adolescents with special needs
  • Develop study skills and academic advising programs for students
  • Compare and Contrast the theories in career development
  • Apply the knowledge of consultation and collaboration models develop services for children, adolescents, school staff and families

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Counselling Process and Relationship
 

Counselling needs of children and adolescents, locations of needs (School, Family, Residential care, community, at-risk) and Nature of issues (Emotional, behavioural, conduct, developmental, learning). Characteristics of child and adolescent counsellor, therapeutic relation in child and adolescent counselling. Process of child therapy, Internal processes of children and therapeutic change, Child counselling skills, use of play and art with children, Child counselling skills: observation, active listening, dealing with resistance and transference, termination skills.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Counselling in Educational context
 

Specific issues in the educational setting: Dealing with children with Special needs. Behavioural management: functional analysis and techniques of behaviour modification. Individualized educational programmes. Career guidance and counselling: Theories of Career Development, Influences on Career Development.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Learning and Teaching
 

Learning styles: VAK Model, Kolb’s Experiential Model, MBTI Pattern, Honey & Mumford Model, Hemispheric Dominance Model, Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence Model. Study skills and Academic advising: Reading, Writing, Note Making skills, Time Management. Cognitive issues: Factors influencing Attention and Concentration, Remembering, Forgetting; teacher-student relationship, school climate and dealing with issues in teaching and learning  

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
School based interventions and policies
 

Counsellor as Educational Consultant: Consultation Models and Skills, School-based tired interventions- three-level prevention; School counselling models and polices- The ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs; Relevant policies of UNCRC, UNICEF, National level initiatives-NCPCR, NCERT and others that are applicable to school counselling

Text Books And Reference Books:

Santrock, J.W. (2003). Educational psychology. McGraw-Hill.

Geldard, K., Geldard, D., & Foo, R. Y. (2013). Counselling children: A practical introduction. Sage. 

Woolfolk, A. (2007). Educational psychology (10th ed.). Allyn & Bacon.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

American School Counselor Association (2012). The ASCA National Model: A framework for school counseling programs, Third Edition. Alexandria.

Asch, M. (2000). Principles of guidance and counselling (1st ed.). Sarup & Sons

Bowe, F. G. (2000). Birth to five – early childhood special education. Delmar Publishers Inc.

Cohen, L.G., & Spenciner, L.J. (2003). Assessment of children and youth with special needs. Allyn & Bacon.

Ferguson, S. (2002). What parents need to know about children. Dallas, TX: Ludic.

Henderson D.A., Thompson C.L. (2011). Counseling children. Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning.

McClure, F. & Teyber, E. (2003). Casebook in child and adolescent treatment: Cultural and familial contexts. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Naar-King, S., & Suarez, M.  (2011). Motivational interviewing with adolescents and young adults. Guilford. 

Pattison S., Robson M., & Beynon A. (2015). The handbook of counselling children and young people. Sage.

Schmidt, J. (2008). Counseling in schools: Comprehensive programs of responsive services for all students. Allyn and Bacon.

Sharry, J. (2004). Counselling children, adolescents and families: A strengths-based approach. Sage Publications Ltd.

Studer, J.R. (2015). The essential school counselor in a changing society. Sage.

Thompson, C. L., Rudolph, L. B., & Henderson, D. (2010). Counseling children. (8th ed.). Brooks & Cole.

Vernon, A. (2009). Counseling children and adolescents (4th ed.). Denver, CO: Love Publishing.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC332 - COUNSELLING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES - III (COUPLES AND FAMILIES) (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized in order to provide an overview of the different family therapy models. Students will be encouraged to view the historical and cultural contexts within which family and marital therapy (including couples counseling) has emerged.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to  

  • gain a familiarity with historical aspects of family therapies

  • assess and conceptualize dynamics that contribute to or maintain pathology in families

  • plan appropriate interventions to address pathology in families

 

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

Trace the historical development of family therapy

Assess family dynamics in a structured manner

Apply concepts from family system theories to understand family dynamics and thereby develop treatment plans for couples and families.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Historical evolution of the field of marriage and family therapy. Current and Future trends. Foundations of Family Therapy. Early models, Fundamental concepts (Cybernetics, Systems theory, Social constructivism, Attachment theory)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Classical schools: Bowen, Strategic, Structural, Experiential, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive Behavioural.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 3
 

Recent Developments- Post modernism, Feminist critique, Solution focused therapy, Narrative Therapy, Integrative models

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 4
 

Evaluation of Family Therapy, Family therapy research, Empirical foundations and Practice implications

Text Books And Reference Books:

Nichols, P.M & Schwartz C.R (2006).  Family Therapy –concepts and methods, 7th edition, Allyn  and Bacon, Boston, Pearson education, Inc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Carter, B. & McGoldrick, M. (1999). The changing family life cycle. 3rd. Ed. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

McGoldrick, M. & Gerson, R. (1999). Genograms in family assessment. 2nd. Ed. New York: Norton.

Gehart, D.R. Mastering Competencies in Family Therapy: A Practical Approach to Theory and Clinical Case Documentation

Satir.V.(2008) Satir Transformational Systemic Therapy. Publisher: Science & Behavior Books

Steve de Shazer. (1982) Patterns of Brief Family Therapy: An Ecosystemic Approach. Guilford Publications

Napier, A.Y & Whitaker, C. (1988). The Family Crucible: The Intense Experience of Family Therapy

Evaluation Pattern
Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)
 

MPC351 - PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This is a practical course aimed at familiarizing students with different assessment methods including psychological tests. A range of Personality, Intelligence, Aptitude and Achievement tests are covered.

Course objectives: The course is intended to help students 

  • Demonstrate competence in administering, scoring and interpreting a range of psychological tests.

  • Identify relevant tests to be used for specific counselling needs.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Administer and interpret Intelligence tests
  • Administer and interpret Personality measures
  • Administer and interpret Aptitude and Career Interest scales

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 1
 

The purpose of assessment in counselling. Assessment principles. Overview of assessment areas: Initial assessment in counselling – Case history, MSE: Identifying a clients problem using a clinical interview

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Unit 2
 

Intelligence and general ability testing (BKT, Bhatia’s battery, Vineland Social Maturity Scale, Bharatraj Development Schedule). Measuring Achievement and aptitude (DBDA)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3
 

Assessment in career counselling (Comprehensive Interest Schedule), Developmental assessment in counselling and therapy (DCT). Spiritual assessment strategies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Unit 4
 

Appraisal of personality (16PF, MAPS, MBTI, EPQ-R, TAT, SCT, CAT, Rorschach- Demo only)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Test Manuals

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Aiken, L.R., & Groth- Marnat, G. (2006). Psychological Testing and Assessment – twelfth edition. Boston, MA: Pearson.

Anastasi, A. & Urbina, S. (1997). Psychological testing. N.D.: Pearson Education.

Cormier, S.& Cormier, W.H. Interviewing Strategies for Helpers: Fundamental Skills And Cognitive- Behavioural Interventions (Counselling Series). Wadsworth Publishing Co.

Kaplan, R.M. & Saccuzzo, D.P. (2007). Psychological Testing: Principles, Applications, and Issues. Australia: Thomson Wadsworth.

Whiston, S.C (1999). Principles and applications of assessment in counselling, Wadsworth, Belmont. Brooks- Cole

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)
 

MPC352 - SUPERVISED PRACTICUM (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: The students will be at practicum sites 2 days a week. They will engage in  providing counselling services which include, individual counselling, group counselling and psycho-education. Two hours a week they will receive supervision at college in batches of 8-10 students. The students discuss cases seen at their practicum sites and elicit feedback from their peers and supervisors. 

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to gain a familiarity with various counseling skills, including assessment, conceptualization and planning interventions. It will also provide students an insight into transference and countertransference issues they may experience with their clients.

 

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Elicit information from a client and prepare a structured case history and mental status examination report
  • Conceptualize cases using various theoretical perspectives
  • Plan interventions based on case conceptualizations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Unit 1
 

Case presentation and group supervision

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Borders, L D & Brown, L .L (2005) New Handbook for Counselling Supervision, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Jongsma Jr, A.E., Peterson,L. M., & Bruce, T.J. (2006). The complete adult psychotherapy treatment planner, 4th Ed,  Hoboken, NJ. Wiley.

Jongsma Jr, A.E., Peterson,L. M.,Mc Innis, W.P., & Bruce, T.J. (2006). The adolescent psychotherapy treatment planner, 4th Ed,  Hoboken, NJ. Wiley

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30% 

Continuous Internal Assessment

1)  Pre-course self assessment - 10 marks

Write a two page paper assessing yourself as a developing counsellor. The paper should include the following: (a) your strengths as a counsellor in training, (b) learning goals for the semester, (c) counter-transference issues requiring additional examination and work, and (d) theoretical orientation(s) to which you subscribe.

 2) Mid Semester Viva - 20 marks

The viva is based on the students work at their internship site and general counselling knowledge including theories and its application.

3) Group supervision presentation - 15 marks

4) Participation (inputs given to peers during supervision) -10 marks

5) Progress notes and Logs - 10 marks

6) Attendance- 5 marks

End Semester Examination: 

ESE viva - 30 marks

The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 


End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

 

MPC371 - RESEARCH SUPERVISION (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is intended to help students develop skills of writing a research proposal and defending it. Students are supported as they progress through the different stages of their research work which include data collection, data analysis and writing up their dissertation.

 

Course objectives:

This course will help the learner to conceptualize a research problem and choose an appropriate research design to carry out the research. It will also provide supervision to students as they progress through the different stages of the research process.

 

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • identify a research problem
  • select appropriate research design to study the problem
  • write a research proposal and defend it
  • collect data in an ethical manner

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
UNIT 1
 

Developing a Research Proposal

Ethical Issues in Research

Supervision of Research Process

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Coolican, H. (2004). Research methods and Statistics in Psychology. London: Hoddes Arnold

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Garrett, H. E. (2005). Statistics in psychology and Education. New Delhi: Paragon international publishers

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC411 - INTEGRATED SKILLS TRAINING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers 2 main theoretical approaches to counselling such as CAT, CBT,  Satir Model of Transformational change or any other. The student is taught how to assess client issues, conceptualize client problems and provide therapeutic interventions using a particular theoretical framework

Course Objectives:  The course is intended to

  • provide an indepth understanding of two theoretical approaches to counselling 
  • help students gain mastery in using these theories to conceptualize and treat client issues

 

Learning Outcome

At the end  of the course the student will be able to

  • Demonstrate indepth knowledge of two theoretical approaches to counselling
  • Integrate assessment and interventions in counselling from a variety of approaches learnt during the course.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
UNIT I
 

Any three of the below:

Satir Model of Transformational Change

Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT)

Behavior Therapy

Developmental Counselling and Therapy (DCT)

Gestalt Therapy

Transactional Analysis (TA)

Person-Centred Therapy

Psychodynamic Therapy

Cognitive Analytic Therapy

Text Books And Reference Books:

Ryle,A. and Bennet, D. (2007) Case formulation in Cognitive Analytic Therapy ch in Eells,T. (ed) Handbook of Psychotherapy Case Formulation .Guildford Press New York pp 289-313

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Jellema, A. (2002) CAT and Attachment Theory: where are we now? ACAT News Summer 2002 (conference paper)

Ryle, A. (1985) Cognitive Theory, object relations and the self. British Journal of Medical Psychology 58 pp 1-7

Ryle, A. (1995) Cognitive Analytic Therapy: history and recent developments ch in Ryle, A. (ed ) Cognitive Analytic Therapy : Developments in theory and Practice. Wiley London

Simmons, J & Griffiths,R. CBT for beginners. Sage Publications Ltd

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. The ESE is a Viva- Voce examination

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE) 

MPC441A - ASIAN HEALING PRACTICES (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course aims at providing students with an opportunity to understand the philosophical and logical foundations of health and illness conceptualized by Asian healing methods in relation to Western medicine. The course provides students hands on experiences in Yoga and Meditation and an opportunity to understand the possibilities of integrating Asian Healing Practices with Western Medicine.

 Course objectives: This course will help the learner 

  • gain familiarity with Asian Healing Practices.
  • understand philosophical and logical foundations of Asian Healing Practices
  • evaluate the best ways in which Asian Healing Practices has integrated with western medicine.
  • demonstrate the knowledge in any one Asian Healing Practice.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • define the concepts and explain the philosophical and logical foundations of Asian Healing Practices.
  • analyze the strengths and challenges of integrating Asian Healing Practices with western Medicine.
  • exhibit the knowledge and experiences in any one Asian Healing Practices.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Asian Healing Practices
 

Science and scientific reasoning in healing.
Origin and relevance of CAM.
Concepts, Causes, Classification, Diagnosis and Treatment of Health & Illness in Ayurveda.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Indigenous practices
 

Naturopathy, Unani & Siddha and Reiki & Acupuncture.
Indigenous methods of healing – Shamanism, Religious based and Ritual art form based healing methods.
Yoga and Meditation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Nature of Mental Illness- Debates on Psychiatry
 
Philosophical foundation
Problematizing the notion of mental illness
Various conceptions of mental illness
Anti-psychiatry movement
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Asian Healing Practices and Psychotherapy
 

1.   Philosophy for counseling and psychotherapy

Issues of integration

Implications to Health Psychology

Psychotherapy and medical treatment

Text Books And Reference Books:

Furnham, A. (2005). Complementary and alternative medicine: shopping for health in post-modern times. In P. White. (Ed.). Bio psychosocial medicine: an integrated approach to understanding illness. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Cooper, R. (2007). Psychiatry and philosophy of science. Stocks field: Acumen.

Howard, A. (2000). Philosophy for counseling and psychotherapy. Palgrave.

White, P. (Ed.). (2005). Bio psychosocial medicine: an integrated approach to understanding illness. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Inglis, B. & West, R. (1983). The alternative health guide. London: Dorling Kindersley Ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Agarwal, R.S. (2006).  Secrets of Indian medicine. Pondicherry: Sri Aurobindo Ashram.

Sri Aurobindo Ashram. Health and healing in Yoga. (2009). Pondicherry: Sri Aurobindo Ashram.

Sharma, R.K. & Dash, B.(2007). Caraka Samhita. Vol.II. Varanasi: Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC441B - LIFE COACHING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized in order to give students an insight of tackling self-defeating thoughts and replace it with a problem-solving outlook/ solution-focussed approach. It would also equip students to help deal with their clients by developing the skills necessary for addressing these issues. The students would also be exposed to certain tools like CBT and NLP that can be used within the framework of life coaching.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner to

  • Tackle self-defeating thinking patterns with a problem-solving outlook

  • Apply their knowledge in building modules to engage in training to address these needs

  • The student will be able to build training modules to engage within their field of specialization.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Demonstrate competence in applying a problem-solving outlook/ solution-focused approach
  • Examine the various factors and identify the indicators of self-defeating thinking styles
  • Design training modules by analyzing needs and recommending outcomes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Life Coaching
 

The Evolution of Professional coaching and coaching psychology. Integrating positive psychology in coaching. Indian concept in coaching/preventive mode.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Dealing with Troublesome Emotions
 

Overcoming procrastination, Assertiveness, tackling poor time management, handling criticism constructively, taking risks and making better decisions.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
CBT and NLP
 

Cognitive Behaviour Coaching, NLP

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Dryden ,W. and Neenan,M. (2010). Life Coaching .New York: Routledge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Palmer,S. and Whybrow,A. (2010). Handbook of Coaching Psychology. London: Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC441C - COUNSELLING IN HEALTH SETTINGS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course helps counsellor understand their role in health settings.  With a focus on the mind-body connect it helps students understand how psychological wellness is important to pbysical health

Course Objectives:

  • To develop understanding of the nature and significance of health psychology and highlight the importance of social and psychological perspectives of health and science.
  • Understanding behavioural factors, disease prevention and health promotion in the context of holistic philosophy of health.

 

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course students will be able to

  • Use motivational interviewing skills in the context of health care.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to health psychology
 

Core Issues in Health Psychology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Communication in Health Care
 

Motivational Interviewing

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Chronic and Terminal Illness
 

Pain and its impact

CHD

Cancer

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Health Promotion & Health care interventions
 

Relaxation training, meditation, yogasanas

Hypnosis

Biofeedback

Behaviour modification

Cognitive behavioural techniques

Text Books And Reference Books:

Shelley, E. Taylor,(1986) Health Psychology, MGH

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Rollnick, S.,Miller, W.R,& Butlet, C.C  (2008) Motivational Interviewing in Health Care. Guildford Press

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC441D - CRISIS INTERVENTION AND TRAUMA COUNSELLING (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at imparting knowledge on concepts of crisis and trauma. It will provide inputs on stages of crisis and trauma, and skills for dealing with crisis and trauma at personal,interpersonal and community levels. This course will also help the students gain knowledge on techniques relevant to crisis and trauma management and enable the students to understand the clinical outcome of crisis and trauma events so that they are able to plan out strategic interventions accordingly

Course Objectives:

  • To provide the students an opportunity to learn the concept of Crisis and Trauma Counselling - skills training, case management and family education
  • To educate the students on crisis and trauma assessments and legislations related to it

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Understand the concepts and stages of crisis and trauma
  • Evaluate the trauma using Assessment strategies useful in the area of crisis and trauma counseling
  • Create a model of intervention using crisis and trauma theories and approaches

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Crisis and trauma
 

Crisis Phases - Models of Crisis & Assessment ;Trauma Phases - models of trauma & Assessment

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Interventions & Challenges in crisis & trauma management
 

Different models of interventions;Issues and challenges in trauma management

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Briere, J. & Scott, C. (2006). Principles of Trauma Therapy: A Guide to Symptoms,Evaluation, and Treatment. USA: Sage Publications.

2. Dass-Brailsford, P. (2007). A Practical Approach to Trauma: Empowering Interventions. USA: Sage Publications.

3. Gilliland, Burl E. & James, Richard K. (1998). Crisis Intervention Strategies. Brooks/Cole Publishing Company: USA.

4. Bisson JI, Roberts N, Macho G. The Cardiff traumatic stress initiative: an evidence-based approach to early psychological intervention following traumatic

events. Psychiatric Bulletin. 2003;27:145–147.

5. Başoğlu M, Salcıoğlu E, Livanou M, et al. Single-session behavioural treatment ofearthquake-related posttraumatic stress disorder: a randomised controlled trial. J

Trauma Stress. 2005;18(1):1–11. 

6. Bryant RA. Early predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder. BiologicalPsychiatry. 2003;53:789–795.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Levers, L. L. (2012). Trauma counseling: Theories and Interventions. New York: Springer Pub.

2. Briere, J. (2012). Working with trauma: Mindfulness and compassion. In C. K. Germer & R. D. Siegel (Eds.), Wisdom and compassion in psychotherapy (pp. 265 279). NewYork, NY: Guilford.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern:

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

MPC471 - COUNSELLING SUPERVISION SEMINAR (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course description: This course aims at providing group supervision to the counsellor trainees who are practicing in the field. It will follow a small group format where 6-8 students are supervised by one supervisor. Students will be asked to present cases they are seeing in the field.

 Course objectives: This course will help the learner

  • Understand the importance of supervision

  • View client issues with a multiple and wider perspective

  • Understand how their personal lives are influencing and being influenced by their clients and therapy

  • Receive supervision so that they provide an ethical service to their client

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Conceptualize cases using multiple theoretical approaches
  • Recognize issues of transference and countertransference as it occurs
  • Engage in reflective practice

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Supervision
 

Case presentation and Group Supervision

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Borders, L D & Brown, L .L (2005) New Handbook for Counselling Supervision, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Jongsma Jr, A.E., Peterson,L. M., & Bruce, T.J. (2006). The complete adult psychotherapy treatment planner, 4th Ed,  Hoboken, NJ. Wiley.
Jongsma Jr, A.E., Peterson,L. M.,Mc Innis, W.P., & Bruce, T.J. (2006). The adolescent psychotherapy treatment planner, 4th Ed,  Hoboken, NJ. Wiley

 

Evaluation Pattern

Students will be evaluated based on their level of engagement with their clients, their own personal and professional development over the course of the semester and their case presentations.

Total Marks -50

1) Supervisor Evaluation (15 Marks)

2) Site Supervisor Evaluation (15 Marks)

3) Post Course Assessment (15 Marks)

4) Attendance (5 Marks)

*Supervisor Evaluation & Site Supervisor Evaluation is done using a prescribed form.

The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPC481 - COUNSELLING INTERNSHIP (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:450
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:200
Credits:8

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized in order to provide students with a hands-on experience of working with clients. Students will be attached to various agencies where they will be trained and supervised in acquiring counselling skill competencies. They will be mentored by a supervisor at the University also. Students must periodically meet their supervisors, maintain case files and submit four case records at the end of their practicum period.

 Course objectives: This course will help the learner  

  • Gain exposure to dealing with a wide variety of clients

  • Gain experience of real-life issues in the workplace

  • Enhance their counselling skills

 The student must complete a minimum of 450 hours of supervised internship which includes 150 direct hours and 300 indirect hours.

Learning Outcome

Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Demonstrate competence of counselling skills in applied settings.

  • Appreciate and respect the ethical guidelines of organizations with which they work

  • Demonstrate amicable relationship with their colleagues and co-workers

  • Co-ordinate effectively with their supervisors.

  • Effectively conceptualize the client’s concerns, demonstrate and apply counselling skills and write reports

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
Counselling Internship
 

Students will engage in supervised practicum

Text Books And Reference Books:

Borders, L D & Brown, L .L (2005) New Handbook for Counselling Supervision, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Jongsma Jr, A.E., Peterson,L. M., & Bruce, T.J. (2006). The complete adult psychotherapy treatment planner, 4th Ed,  Hoboken, NJ. Wiley.

Jongsma Jr, A.E., Peterson,L. M.,Mc Innis, W.P., & Bruce, T.J. (2006). The adolescent psychotherapy treatment planner, 4th Ed,  Hoboken, NJ. Wiley

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation would be done periodically by the supervisors

Evaluation Pattern: 
Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Total Marks- 200

End Semester Exam (ESE) - Comprehensive Counselling Viva based on 2 cases submitted and practicum (60 marks)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

Continuous Internal Assessment (140 marks)

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. 



An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPC482 - BLOCK INTERNSHIP (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:100
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This is a block placement for short field training. Students are required to search for, examine and carve their niche in the field related to their chosen specialization. The basic purpose is to create awareness for the students so that the career progression of the students and the growth of the discipline can both be realized.

Course Objectives

The course is intended to help students

  • gain exposure to a new population that they may work with
  • integrate all they have learnt and apply it in practice
  • gain confidence in practising as a counselling psychologist

Learning Outcome

After completion of this internship students will be able to

  • choose their career path
  • demonstrate competence in providing counselling services to clients

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:100
UNIT 1
 

Field Placement

Text Books And Reference Books:

NA

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

The students are expected to submit 

1) An interim report (minimum 15 days must be completed), summarising their learning and experiences at the internship site 

2) A certificate of completion as soon as the internship is over. 

Total Marks- 50

MPC483 - DISSERTATION (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: The student engages in original research work and writes a manuscript based on a field study to publish in a nationally/internationally reputed journal. This course help the students to organize learnt concepts, conceptualize and work on short feasible projects by applying their knowledge of research methodology creatively.

Course objectives : 

  • This course will help the learner to gain a familiarity with field research, analysis and discussion writing.

  • It also helps the students to prepare a manuscript based on the field study.

Learning Outcome

 Course outcomes: By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Carry out a field study ,conduct the necessary data analysis and discuss the results. 
  • Prepare a manuscript in scientific format for publication in a nationally/ internationally reputed journal.
  • Present and defend the study

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Dissemination
 

Choosing a journal for publication, writing the manuscript as per journal requirements, sending the manuscript for publication, responding to review from the journal

Text Books And Reference Books:

APA. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Ed.).Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

American Psychological Association (2012), APA guide to electronic references (6th Ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association

Hartley, J. (2008). Academic Writing and Publishing: A Practical Guide. Taylor and Francis. ISBN 0 203927982

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 
Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%
End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Supervisors Feedback: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)
The passing grade for the ESE is 40%
An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)