Department of
ECONOMICS






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Psychology, Sociology, Economics)
Academic Year  (2020)

 
1 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECO131 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 5 4 100
ENG121 ENGLISH - I 3 2 100
FRN121 FRENCH 3 3 100
PSY131 BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - I 5 5 100
SOC131 FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY-I 5 5 100
2 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECO231 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS 5 4 100
ENG221 ENGLISH - II 3 2 100
FRN221 FRENCH 3 3 100
PSY231 BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - II 5 5 100
SOC231 FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY - II 5 5 100
3 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ECO331 FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 5 4 100
ENG321 ENGLISH-III 3 3 100
FRN321 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN321 HINDI 3 2 50
KAN321 KANNADA 3 03 100
PSY331 LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT 5 5 100
PSY351 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS - I 2 2 50
SOC331 CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES 5 4 100
4 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ECO431 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS 5 4 100
ENG421 ENGLISH-IV 3 3 100
FRN421 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN421 HINDI 3 2 50
KAN421 KANNADA 3 03 100
PSY431 BASIC SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 5 5 100
PSY451 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS - II 2 2 50
SOC431 STUDY OF INDIAN SOCIETY 5 4 100
SOC471 SERVICE LEARNING 2 2 50
5 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECO501 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY FOR ECONOMICS 2 2 50
ECO531 STATISTICS AND INTRODUCTORY ECONOMETRICS 4 4 100
ECO541A PUBLIC FINANCE 4 4 100
ECO541B MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR ECONOMICS 4 4 100
PSY531 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541A INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541B SCHOOL AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541C SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541D CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541E INTRODUCTION OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY551 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-I 2 2 50
SOC531 METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH 60 4 100
SOC541A ANALYSIS OF CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS 4 3 100
SOC541B INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY 4 4 100
SOC541C SOCIAL ECOLOGY 4 4 100
SOC541D SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION 4 4 100
6 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECO631 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS 4 4 100
ECO641A ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
ECO641B FINANCIAL ECONOMICS 4 3 100
ECO681 DISSERTATION 0 4 100
PSY632 HEALTH AND WELLNESS 4 4 100
PSY641A POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641B MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641C ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERFACE 4 4 100
PSY641D CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR 4 4 100
PSY641E INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY651 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-II 2 2 50
SOC631 WOMEN AND SOCIETY 4 4 100
SOC641A STUDY OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS 4 4 100
SOC641B SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATION 4 4 100
SOC641C SOCIOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT 4 4 100
SOC641D MEDIA AND SOCIETY 4 4 100
        

          

  

Assesment Pattern

The pattern for the Mid-exam is as follows:

Section A: 1 compulsory question for 10 marks

Section B: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each quest he pattern for the exam is given below:

The pattern for the End exam is given below:

 Section A: Attempt any 5 questions from the 8 options given. Each answer carried 20 marks 

  

Examination And Assesments

The evaluation pattern is as follows:   

    

Continuous Internal Assessment or CIA constitutes a total of 50 marks. The distribution is as follows:

 

  • CIA I is a 10 marks assignment 
  • CIA II is the 2 hour long Mid semester Examination (50 marks reduced to 25 mark weightage) conducted during August/January 
  • CIA III carries 10 marks and is based on an assignment that is set for the course. 
  • Attendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE) is conducted at the end of the semester. This is a 3 hour long exam for a weightage of 50 marks 

 

  

Department Overview:
The Department of Sociology was one of the first to be established at Christ College, now CHRIST (Deemed to be University), Bangalore, in 1969. Ever since the inception of the department it has been at the forefront of innovations in the pursuit of academic excellence. The Department was the first to offer a Master?s Program in Sociology. It was among the first few to offer Master of Philosophy (MPhil) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) programs within the University. The department offers Sociology in the BA (Sociology) of Arts (BA) Program. Sociology is also offered for the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) and Bachelor of Hotel Management (BHM). Department also handle courses on Population Studies and Social Problems for the University Studies Abroad Consortium, (USAC). USAC provides efficient and responsible programs where students studying abroad can accumulate credits for the basic requirements of their Bachelors Program.
Mission Statement:
Vision : The Vision of the Department of Sociology is to promote globally competent scholars who are grounded in knowledge and have the ability to use this to transform the world they live in. This Vision is deployed in all the programs that the Department handles. Promote pursuit of academic excellence globally within a dynamic academic environment ? To facilitate the development of socially sensitive holistic minds ? Cultivate professionals with critical insights ? Encourage academic r
Introduction to Program:
The Course in Sociology which is part of BA (Sociology) aims to provide a systematic introduction to Sociology. It lays emphasis on the theoretical and methodological foundations of Sociology. Equal importance is given to a systematic introduction to Sociology as a discipline, Classical Sociological Theories and Sociological studies in India. Contributions of eminent Indian Sociologists and substantial themes of Indian Society are included in the syllabus.
Program Objective:
Programme Objectives: ? To facilitate the development of socially sensitive holistic minds ? To cultivate professionals with critical insights ? To encourage academic research balanced by fieldwork and internships ? To impart comprehensive learning through classroom-based and extramural activities. ? To mould tomorrow's leadersProgramme Objectives This programme intends to: ? enable the student to engage with social surroundings from a sociological perspective and the objective vantages of Psychology and Economics ? develop an analytical and conceptual frame for the student to professionally study and understand human social realities ? help the student to develop a foundational understanding of research and career options in Sociology as well as in Psychology and Economics ? equip the student to understand the nuances of human existence in societies ? provide an insight into the multidisciplinary paradigms emerging in the field of social sciences Programme Outcomes (PO) for Bachelor of Arts (BA) at CHRIST By the end of the programme students should be able to: PO1. Academic expertise: Exhibit knowledge of the discipline Identify and explain seminal pieces of work in the area Conduct guided academic inquiries in various areas of interest in the chosen discipline Apply theoretical notions into practice in different forms PO2.Critical Thinking: Recognize the social structures underlying our society Identify the implications of th

Assesment Pattern

See above details

Examination And Assesments

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) for all courses : 50%

End-Semester Examination  (ESE): 50% (50 marks out of 100)

 Continuous Assessment

The assessment and grading of the students will take place in the following manner:

  • A formative assessment of the competencies is carried out the beginning of the course. This is not graded.
  • Assessment of the acquisition of the competencies is done continuously throughout the course with a minimum of one assessment per month.
  • Two of the assessments are graded for twenty (20) Marks each. (for 4 credit papers)
  • Mid semetser examination graded out of 25 Marks (25 out of 50)

Attendance : 05 marks

 

Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CIA 1 and 2 are conducted by the respective faculty in the form of different types of assignments within the stipulated time for awarding the marks.

The students have to attain minimum pass marks in each assignment or will have to repeat the assignment within the time stipulated by the department.

Marks scored by the students for CIA will be displayed in the student login within a week after the last date of submission of marks by the faculty. Any discrepancy shall be informed immediately to the faculty concerned for correction of marks.

Students who either fail   or do not appear for   CIA  will have to apply for repeat CIA immediately after publishing the results of each CIA component. Application to be forwarded  through the HoD and Dean to the Office of Examinations and obtain necessary approvals. Number of chances for repeating each CIA is only one

. Students who  fail in the  CIA  in a semester have to apply for CIA repeat of the whole course in the subsequent semester

 

End Semester Examination

  • The End semester (competency) examination for the theory as well as practical courses is held at the end of the semesters .
  • The End semester (competency) examination might take place in the form of written examination, project submission and Viva Voce examination and managed by Office of Examinations
  • Generally the duration of is 2 hours but it may vary for certain courses.
  • Absentee's parents will be alerted through SMS within 1 hour after the commencement of the examination.
  • ESCE for all courses will be conducted for 50 marks and reduced to out of 30 marks
  • Hall ticket with timetable and seating allotment is compulsory for ESCE which can be downloaded from the Student Login or obtained from the department office.
  • Dress code of the University should be followed during the examination days except wearing ties.
  • Permission for admission to the ESCE is granted only if
    • A student has passed in CIA’s for that course with a minimim grade for overall CIA.

o   A student has at least 85% of the attendance in aggregate at the end of the semester.

o   The Vice-Chancellor is satisfied with the character and conduct of the student.

    

For 2 and 8 credit courses, a similar system will be followed with marks adjusted accordingly. All Internships, practicum, seminars and research related courses will follow the same pattern.

Pass Criteria

A student shall pass each course with a minimum aggregate score of 50 marks with minimum of  50%  for CIA and 40 % for ESE. The overall aggregate to pass a semester is 50%.  Student failing a course due to less than minimum in ESE  shall repeat the ESE while his/her internal scores shall remain valid.

All other regulations pertaining to assessment and evaluation are same as other programmes of the CHRIST (Deemed to be University)

Department Overview:
One of the first departments to be founded in Christ (Deemed to be University), the Department of Psychology has grown in leaps and bounds with innovations in curriculum, pedagogy and ground-breaking initiatives. The Vision of the Department of Psychology is to promote high academic standards and scholarship in psychology, by creating an optimal and enriching learning environment, fostering on going professional and personal development and contributing effectively to societal needs. The Department in Delhi NCR campus was initiated in 2019 and runs a range of programmes that include Certificate courses, Undergraduate programmes, Post Graduate programmes with two specializations and Research degree in psychology (Ph.D.). Through these programmes we encourage students to consider careers and life missions that integrate psychological understanding to life. Our programmes integrate scholarship with professional awareness are service oriented and are encouraged to embrace humane values in their vocation.
Mission Statement:
The Vision of the Department of Psychology is to Promote High Academic Standards and Scholarship in Psychology, by Creating an Optimal and Enriching Learning Environment, Fostering Ongoing Professional and Personal Development and Contributing Effectively to Societal Needs. The Department realises its vision to promote high academic standards through a continuous and dynamic curriculum review process based on feedback from peers, professionals, potential employers and students. A variety of s
Introduction to Program:
BA Psychology, Sociology, English (PSEng) is a three-year triple major programme. The program combines three disciplines which are Psychology, Sociology and English to give students a flavour of both social sciences and humanities and develop their scientific and aesthetic capabilities. The discipline of Psychology is aimed at introducing students to the fundamental processes underlying human behaviour. Students are exposed to various fields of psychology such as Developmental Psychology, Social Psychology, Abnormal Psychology and specific electives. Practical applications of psychology are also demonstrated through experiments, service-learning and experienced through internships. Students are also made aware of the scientific nature of the discipline by engaging in research projects. The discipline of Sociology lays emphasis on the theoretical and methodological functions of Sociology. Equal importance is given to a systematic introduction to the sociological studies in India. Contributions of eminent Indian sociologists and substantial themes of Indian Society are explored. The students are exposed to divergent perspectives with Sociology and acquire the necessary skills to understand various social phenomena through the perspectives of Sociology. Literature is an important cultural product of a society or a nation. Hence, the study of literature offers insights into the worldviews of different societies. This course begins with traditional British literature to the prese
Program Objective:
rogram Objective: Objectives of the programme- This programme intends to -Familiarize students to the discipline of Psychology, give them the necessary exposure to develop an interest in these disciplines and enable them to choose one of these for further studies -Enable students to appreciate the different branches and emerging fields in the three major subjects -Help them understand the fundamental processes, theoretical and methodological foundations in Psychology, Sociology and English, and cover contributions of eminent philosophers in the respective disciplines Programme outcomes: By the end of the programme, students will be able to? -Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of theory and research in the general domains of psychology, sociology and English? - Compare and contrast the major perspectives in the three disciplines? - Apply the principles of psychology and sociology to real-life issues. - Identify problems in psychological and sociological domains and choose appropriate methods to study them - Critically analyse the psychological and sociological phenomenon. - Reason critically, write cogently, construct and deconstruct ideas and arguments, and verbalize opinions and judgments

ECO131 - PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Develop the conceptual foundations and analytical methods used in micro economics; Familiarize the students with the basics of consumer behaviour, behaviour of firms and market equilibrium; Analyse the market structures of perfect competition, oligopoly and monopolies; Introduce the game theory and welfare economics

Learning Outcome

  • Understand that economics is about the allocation of scarce resources and how that results in trade-offs.
  • Understand the role of prices in allocating scarce resources in market economies and explain the consequences of government policies in the form of price controls.
  • Appreciate positive as well as normative view points on concepts of market failure and the need for government intervention.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Micro Economics and the Theory of Consumption
 

Ten principles of economics: How people make decisions, how people interact and how the economy as a whole works- Role of observations and theory in economics- Role of assumptions- Role of Economic models- Wants and resources; Problem of choice, Production Possibility Frontier; Opportunity costs.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Demand and supply
 

Law of demand, Reasons for the downward slope of the demand curve. Exceptions to the law; Changes in demand; Elasticity of Demand- Degrees of price elasticity with diagrams; Factors determining price elasticity, methods of measurement. Income elasticity demand; Cross elasticity demand; Laws of supply, Changes in supply- Consumers, Producers and the Efficiency of the Markets: Consumer‟s surplus (Marshall), Producer surplus and Market efficiency- Externalities and Market inefficiency- Public goods and common resources.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Theory of Production and Cost
 

Production function; Law of Variable proportions; Laws of returns, Economies of scale; Producer's Equilibrium with the help of iso-quants and iso-cost lines. Cost function - Important cost concepts. Short run and long run cost analysis (traditional theory) Modern theory of cost- Long run and short run - Revenue analysis - AR and MR.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:19
Product Pricing and Factor Pricing
 

Market structure. Perfect competition, Price and output determination. Role of time element in market price determination. Monopoly- Price output determination, Price discrimination Monopolistic Competition. Price and Output determination. Selling costs. Product differentiation. Wastes in monopolistic competition. Oligopoly Price determination (collusive pricing, price leadership), Features of Duopoly and Monopsony

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Theory of Consumer Choice and New Frontiers in Microeconomics
 

Cardinal utility analysis; Law of diminishing marginal utility; Consumer's surplus (Marshall), Ordinal utility analysis. Indifference curves- Properties, consumer's equilibrium, Price effect, Income Effect and substitution effect. New Frontiers in Microeconomics: Introduction to concepts of Asymmetric Information, Political economy, Behavioral Economics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. N. Gregory Mankiw (2012). Principles of Microeconomics, 4th Edition, Cengage Learning India.

2. Lipsey, R.G. and K.A. Chrystal (1999), Principles of Economics (IX Ed.), Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Ramsfield, E. (1997), Micro Economics (IX edition), W.W Norton and company, New York.

2. Pindyck and Rubinfield (2009), Micro Economics (VII edition), Pearson Education.

3. Ray,N.C.(1975), An Introduction to Micro economics, Macmillan company of India Ltd, New Delhi.

4. Samuelson, P.A. and W.D. Hague (1972), A textbook of Economic Theory, ELBS Longman group, London.

5. H.L. Ahuja, Principles ofMicroeconomics, S.Chand, New Delhi.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 1: 20 marks.

CIA - 2: Mid Semester Examination - 50 marks; 2 hours.

CIA - 3: 20 marks.

ENG121 - ENGLISH - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Learning Outcome

·         Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities and politics

 

·         Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

 

·         Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

 

·         Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 1 1. The Happy Prince By Oscar Wilde 2. Shakespeare Sonnet 18
 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
unit 2
 

1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer

2. What Solo Travel Has Taught Me About the World – and Myself -ShivyaNath- Blogpost

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
unit 3
 

1. Thinking Like a Mountain

By Aldo Leopold

2. Short Text: On Cutting a Tree

By Gieve Patel

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
unit 4
 

1. Violence in the name of God is Violence against God

By Rev Dr Tveit

 

2. Poem: Holy Willie's Prayer

By Robert Burns

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Paragraph writing

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
unit 5
 

1. The Story of B24

By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 2. Short Text: Aarushi Murder case 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
unit 6
 

1.Long text:My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

2. short text: Why You Should Never Aim for Six Packs

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
unit 7
 

1.Long Text: Sir Ranjth Singh- Essay by SouravGanguly

2. Short text: Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
visual text
 

Visual Text: Before the Flood

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addfitional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks online and 50 marks written exam

ENG121N - ENGLISH - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

ENGlogue is an English language course book for the students of first year of undergraduate courses studying in Christ University. The book that covers both Semesters I and II is built around fourteen contemporary themes, with each unit including two interesting and engaging reading texts. The texts are meant to trigger not just the desired language-learning behaviors but also to engage the students in thinking about various pertinent issues concerning the world around them. Each unit also includes teaching and tasks based on vocabulary, reading, writing and speaking. The overall objective of the book is to provide students with hands-on learning of language skills, equipping them not only for their immediate academic needs but also for their future professional careers.

  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  •  To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information
  • To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes
  • To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning
  • To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning
  • To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expression.
  •  To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Learning Outcome

  • Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities and politics
  • Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes
  • Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class.
  • Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Beauty
 
  1. The Happy Prince By Oscar Wilde
  2. Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Travel
 
  1. Why We Travel- Pico Iyer
  2. What Solo Travel Has Taught Me About the World and Myself - ShivyaNath
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Environment
 
  1. Thinking Like a Mountain- Aldo Leopold
  2. On Cutting a Tree-  Gieve Patel

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paragraph writing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Religion
 
  1. Violence in the name of God is Violence against God - Rev Dr Tveit
  2. Leave this Chanting and Singing and Telling of Beads- Rabindra Nath Tagore

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Crime
 
  1. The Story of B24 by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  2.  Aarushi Murder case
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Health and Fitness
 
  1. My Story- Nicole DeFreece
  2. Why You Should Never Aim for Six Packs- Kinnari Jariwala
Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Sports
 
  1. Sir Ranjth Singh- Sourav Ganguly
  2. Casey at the Bat- Ernest Lawrence Thayer

 

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
Visual Text
 

Before the Flood

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Additional material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

CIA 2=50

CIA 3= 20

ESE= 50 marks online and 50 marks written exam

FRN121 - FRENCH (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the UG program

Learning Outcome

Enhancement of linguistic competencies and sharpening of written and oral communicative skills.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 1- I Discover
 

Lesson 1: Good Morning, How are you?

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 1 - I discover
 

Lesson 2: Hello, My name is Agnes.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 2- Culture : Physical and Political france
 

Lesson 1: Who is it?

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 2- Culture: Physical and Political France
 

Lesson 2: In my bag , I have......

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Les Fables de la Fontaine
 

1. La cigale et la fourmis

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Visual Text
 

A French Film 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 3- Viideo Workshop: He is cute!
 

Lesson 1 : How is he?

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
Les Fables de la Fontaine
 

2. Le renard et le corbeau

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 3- Video Workshop: He is cute
 

Lesson 2: Hello?

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Cocton, Marie-Noelle. Génération A1. Paris : Didier, 2016 

2.      De Lafontaine, Jean. Les Fables de la Fontaine. Paris, 1668

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Thakker, Viral. Plaisir d’écrire. New Delhi : Langers International Pvt. Ltd., 2011

2. French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignment & MOODLE Testing (Quiz)

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Role Play / Theatre and DELF Pattern: Reading & Writing

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

 

PSY111N - ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized keeping in mind the professional and personal skill set that undergraduate students need to be equipped with for academic excellence. This section will orient the student towards effective studying strategies, academic writing skills, time management and planning methods. The skills will be developed via classroom individual and group activities and discussions. It will familiarize the students with the APA style of writing, referencing as well as reviewing academic texts. This course will help the learner to gain familiarity with efficient methods of managing academic challenges, improve their study method as well as gain better awareness and understanding regarding themselves. By working with both personal and academic skills, the objective of this coursework is to ensure better adaptability and functioning in the academic and social world.

The objectives of the two sections are as follows:

  • To develop students’ skills, techniques and strategies in order to carry out university studies in an effective way, which includes being as autonomous as possible
  • Use APA format and referencing style, quick and effective reading of academic texts and journal articles, critically reviewing journal articles
  • Device systematic study plans by utilizing self-testing methods, along with a timeline
  • To build students’ self-confidence and positive thinking to achieve success at university and after graduation

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Develop effective notes making methods
  • Read and review academic texts
  • Demonstrate better study strategies
  • Demonstrate skills of APA writing and referencing style
  • Create a better time management skills and deal with procrastination
  • Enhance presentation skill

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Basic Study Skills
 

Note Making- Note Making methods, Note making during lectures, Studying with notes; Understanding Academic Texts- Reading academic texts effectively; Critically reviewing academic texts (books, journal articles etc.). APA style of writing- Basic APA formatting for articles, proposal and presentations, APA referencing style, Academic writing skills.  Study Strategies

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding and Planning your learning
 

Learning styles, Developing a study plan, Learning techniques. Presentation Skills- Body language and communication skills, Modes of presentation, Presenting the information effectively, Time management- Dealing with procrastination, Managing distractions, Breaking down tasks, Designing timelines and setting incremental deadline.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • APA. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Ed.).Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Hartley, J. (2008). Academic Writing and Publishing: A Practical Guide. Taylor and Francis. ISBN 0 203927982
  • American Psychological Association (2012), APA guide to electronic references (6th Ed.).Washington, DC: American Psychological Association
  • Paul, R., & Elder, L. (2013). Critical thinking: Tools for taking charge of your professional and personal life. Pearson Education.
  • Creme, P., & Lea, M. (2008). Writing at university: A guide for students. McGraw-Hill Education (UK).
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - class involvement (15 marks)

CIA II - Individual Reflective reports (20 marks)

CIA III - Activity-based assignment  (15 marks).

PSY131 - BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to the study of basic psychological processes offered to the first-semester undergraduate students of psychology. It is an introductory paper that gives an understanding of the field of psychology, scope, and multiple perspectives and disciplines that provide a holistic picture of human behaviour. Students will learn the key concepts, classic examples, and modern and practical applications of fundamental psychological theories, methods, and tools. Emphasis is on the basic psychological processes of personality, learning, consciousness, motivation and emotion. This course allows them to learn the basics and demonstrate the skills that a student needs to move on to the more specific and in-depth psychology courses that follow. This course will help the learner to learn about

  • The world of Psychology with a brief historical sketch of the science of psychology, multiple perspectives and recent trends in the field.
  • The biological basis of behaiour
  • The fundamental processes underlying human behaviour such as learning, motivation, emotion, personality
  • Ethics in studying human behaviour and using them in academic assignments. Students will have an opportunity to develop skills such as writing, making presentations and using technology for academic purposes and teamwork.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Explain psychological concepts, including fundamental concepts, principles, theoretical perspectives, overarching themes, and arguments from across a range of psychology content domains like learning, personality, motivation, emotion and consciousness to various situations and contexts.
  • Critically evaluate the different schools of thought in psychology
  • Define the basic biological process that influence behaviour
  • Analyse methods of scientific inquiry, evidence-based thinking, and critical thinking skills to psychological phenomena and examples of psychological science
  • Write assignments and make presentations demonstrating basic knowledge of APA (American Psychological Association) style.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History and Schools of Thought
 

In this unit, we will examine the history of Western psychological theorizing from its beginnings in ancient Greece, through to the schools and perspectives of psychology including Structuralism, Functionalism, Psychodynamic, Biological, Behavioristic, Gestalt, Cognitive, Cross-cultural, Humanistic and Evolutionary. The aim is both to build a familiarity with psychology’s intellectual origins and to foster an awareness of its many false steps, dead-ends, and alternative pathways to gain a better appreciation of the social, cultural, and, above all, psychological influences on the theorizing of psychologists. Students will be able to define psychology and understand what psychologists do and identify the major fields of study and theoretical perspectives within psychology and know their similarities and differences. In the end, students will gain a better appreciation of why contemporary psychology takes the shape it does.

  1. Describe the evolution of psychology and the major pioneers in the field
  2. Identify the various approaches, fields, and subfields of psychology along with their major concepts and important figures
  3. Describe the value of psychology and possible careers paths for those who study psychology
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Biological basis of behaviour
 

Explain the biological perspective of psychology as it applies to the role of the nervous system and endocrine system in regard to behaviour and mental processes. Identify and describe the important structures of these systems. It is an introductory survey of the relationship between human behaviour and brain function.

  1. The interaction between biological factors and experience
  2. Methods and issues related to biological advances
  3. To develop an understanding of the influence of behaviour, cognition, and the environment on the bodily systems.
  4. To develop an appreciation of the neurobiological basis of psychological function and dysfunction. 

Laboratory Demonstration: Biofeedback/ EEG/ Eye-tracking

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Learning
 
This unit introduces students to the principles of learning and how those principles can be used to modify human behaviour. Explain the behavioural perspective of psychology and relate classical and operant conditioning concepts to student-generated scenarios. The course emphasizes the application of learning theories and principles. Topics include reinforcement, extinction, punishment, schedules of reinforcement, stimulus discrimination, prompting and fading, stimulus-response chaining, generalization, modelling, rule-governed behaviour, problem-solving, latent learning, observational learning, insight learning, concept learning, general case instruction, and stimulus equivalence.  
 
Laboratory Demonstration: Trial and Error learning, Habit Interference, Maze Learning 
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Personality
 

This unit is an introduction to the psychological study of human personality, broadly speaking and more specifically in terms of how we may understand individual differences in personality and the personalities of individual persons. Personality psychologists use empirical methods of behavioural and clinical science to understand people in biological, social, and cultural contexts. Students will learn the strengths and weaknesses of the major personality theories, as well as how to assess, research and apply these theories. As much as possible, application to real-life situations will be discussed.

  1. Identify the various perspectives that are common in the area of personality psychology and critically evaluate each in terms of its explanatory and predictive power.
  2. Theories and perspectives of personality development: psychoanalytic, humanistic, trait, and social-cognitive.
  3. Understand classic and current empirical measurement tools and approaches to investigation for personality assessment in psychological and clinical science
  4. To develop an understanding of the concept of individual differences with the goal to promote self-reflection and understanding of self and others.

 Laboratory Demonstration: Sentence completion test, NEO-PI, Type A/B

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Motivation and Emotion
 

The unit will explain how behaviour is energized and directed by the complex mixture of motives and emotions and describe the various theories that have been developed to explain motivation and emotion.

  1. Explain motivation, how it is influenced, and major theories about motivation
  2. Describe hunger and eating in relation to motivation, obesity, anorexia, and bulimia
  3. Describe sexual behaviour and research about sexuality
  4. Explain theories of emotion and how we express and recognise emotion

Laboratory Demonstration: Level of motivation, Achievement motivation, 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Weiten, W. (2014). Psychology: Themes and Variations (Briefer Version, 9th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

King, L. A. (2010). Experience Psychology. McGraw-Hill.

Gazzaniga, Heatherton, Halpern (2015). Psychological Science, 5th Edition, Norton.

Feldman.S.R.(2009).Essentials of understanding psychology ( 7th Ed.) Tata Mc Graw Hill.

Baron, R.A and Misra, G. (2014). Psychology (Indian Subcontinent Edition).Pearson Education Ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

 CIA (CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT)    

  •  CIA I –Written Assignment /Individual Assignment  - Total Marks 20     
  •  CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                        - Total marks 50                          
  •  CIA III –Activity-based Assignment                        - Total marks 20
  •   CIA I + II + III                                                      = 90 /100 = 45/50 
  •   Attendance                                                            = 5 marks 
  •  Total                                                                      = 100 = 50 

End Semester Examination : Total Marks=100=50

Question paper pattern

  •  Section A        Brief, concepts, definitions, applications               2 marks x 10 = 20
  •  Section B         Short Answers: Conceptual/Application                5 marks x 4   = 20
  •  Section C        Essay Type: Descriptive/Conceptual                       15 marks x 3 = 45
  •  Section D        Compulsory: Case Study (Application)                    15 X 1           = 15

PSY131N - BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES-I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the study of basic psychological processes offered to the first-semester undergraduate students of psychology. It is an introductory paper that gives an understanding about the field of psychology, scope, and the multiple perspectives and disciplines that provide a holistic picture of human behaviour. Students will learn the key concepts, classic examples, and modern and practical applications of fundamental psychological theories, methods, and tools. Emphasis is on the basic psychological processes of personality, learning, consciousness, motivation and emotion. This course allows them to learn the basics and demonstrate the skills that a student needs to move on to the more specific and in-depth psychology courses that follow.

Course Objective: This course will help the learner to learn about following:

  • The world of Psychology with a brief historical sketch of the science of psychology, multiple perspectives and recent trends in the field.
  • The fundamental processes underlying human behaviour such as learning, motivation, emotion, personality and states of consciousness
  • Ethics in studying human behaviour and using them in academic assignments. Students will have an opportunity to develop skills such as writing, making presentations and using technology for academic purposes and teamwork.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  • Explain psychological concepts, including fundamental concepts, principles, theoretical perspectives, overarching themes, and arguments from across a range of psychology content domains like learning, personality, motivation, emotion and consciousness to various situations and contexts.
  • Critically evaluate the different schools of thought in psychology
  •  Analyse methods of scientific inquiry, evidence-based thinking, and critical thinking skills to psychological phenomena and examples of psychological science
  • Write assignments and make presentations demonstrating basic knowledge of APA (American Psychological Association) style.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History and Schools of Thought
 

In this unit, we will examine the history of Western psychological theorizing from its beginnings in ancient Greece, through to the schools and perspectives of psychology including Structuralism, Functionalism, Psychodynamic, Biological, Behavioristic, Gestalt, Cognitive, Cross-cultural, Humanistic and Evolutionary. The aim is both to build a familiarity with psychology’s intellectual origins and to foster an awareness of its many false steps, dead-ends, and alternative pathways to gain a better appreciation of the social, cultural, and, above all, psychological influences on the theorizing of psychologists. Students will be able to define psychology and understand what psychologists do and identify the major fields of study and theoretical perspectives within psychology and know their similarities and differences. In the end, students will gain a better appreciation of why contemporary psychology takes the shape it does.

  1. Describe the evolution of psychology and the major pioneers in the field
  2. Identify the various approaches, fields, and subfields of psychology along with their major concepts and important figures
  3. Describe the value of psychology and possible careers paths for those who study psychology
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Learning
 

This unit introduces students to the principles of learning and how those principles can be used to modify human behaviour. Explain the behavioural perspective of psychology and relate classical and operant conditioning concepts to student-generated scenarios. The course emphasises the application of learning theories and principles. Topics include reinforcement, extinction, punishment, schedules of reinforcement, stimulus discrimination, prompting and fading, stimulus-response chaining, generalisation, modelling, rule-governed behaviour, problem-solving, latent learning, observational learning, insight learning, concept learning, general case instruction, and stimulus equivalence. 

Laboratory Demonstration: Trial and Error learning, Habit Interference, Maze Learning

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Personality
 

This unit is an introduction to the psychological study of human personality, broadly speaking and more specifically in terms of how we may understand individual differences in personality and the personalities of individual persons. Personality psychologists use empirical methods of behavioural and clinical science to understand people in biological, social, and cultural contexts. Students will learn the strengths and weaknesses of the major personality theories, as well as how to assess, research and apply these theories. As much as possible, application to real-life situations will be discussed.

  1. Identify the various perspectives that are common in the area of personality psychology and critically evaluate each in terms of its explanatory and predictive power.
  2. Theories and perspectives of personality development: psychoanalytic, humanistic, trait, and social-cognitive.
  3. Understand classic and current empirical measurement tools and approaches to investigation for personality assessment in psychological and clinical science
  4. To develop an understanding of the concept of individual differences with the goal to promote self-reflection and understanding of self and others.

 Laboratory Demonstration: Sentence completion test, NEO-PI, Type A/B

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
State of Consciousness
 

Describe different states of consciousness and how these can vary across different situations (i.e., higher-level consciousness, lower-level consciousness, altered state of consciousness, and no consciousness). Topics including sleep, meditation, dreams, jet-lang and drug abuse will be discussed to illustrate the states of consciousness. Outline the different parts of sleep. Apply and evaluate strategies for getting a better night’s sleep.

  1. Describe consciousness and biological rhythms
  2. Describe what happens to the brain and body during sleep
  3. Explain how drugs affect consciousness
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Motivation and Emotion
 

The unit will explain how behaviour is energised and directed by the complex mixture of motives and emotions and describe the various theories that have been developed to explain motivation and emotion.

  1. Explain motivation, how it is influenced, and major theories about motivation
  2. Describe hunger and eating in relation to motivation, obesity, anorexia, and bulimia
  3. Describe sexual behaviour and research about sexuality
  4. Explain theories of emotion and how we express and recognise emotion

Laboratory Demonstration: Level of motivation, Achievement motivation

Text Books And Reference Books:

Weiten, W. (2014). Psychology: Themes and Variations (Briefer Version, 9th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

King, L. A. (2010). Experience Psychology. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Gazzaniga, Heatherton, Halpern (2015). Psychological Science, 5th Edition, Norton.

Feldman.S.R.(2009).Essentials of understanding psychology ( 7th Ed.) New Delhi : Tata Mc Graw Hill.

 

Baron, R.A and Misra, G. (2014). Psychology (Indian Subcontinent Edition).Pearson Education Ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT)    

CIA I –Written Assignment /Individual Assignment - Total Marks 20     

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination - Total Marks 50                          

CIA III –Activity-based Assignment - Total Marks 20 

Attendance -5 Marks 

CIA I + II + III+ Attendance = 100 Marks= 50 % Weightage

End Semester Examination : 100 Marks = 50 % Weightage

SOC131 - FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY-I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The two papers offered during the first and the second semesters of the BA program will introduce students to Sociology as a social science distinct in its approach. It will also encourage the students to inculcate the Sociological perspective even as they are introduced to the subject matter and the methods of study adopted by the discipline. During the first semester students will be introduced to the origins of Sociology, its founding fathers and the theoretical perspectives.

Course Objectives:

  • To develop sociological imagination that will help students to rethink how social systems operate through individuals

  • To gain a comprehensive understanding of some of the major topics studied by sociologists

Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcome:

By the end of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Define and use a range of key sociological concepts

  • Demonstrate an understanding of  the emergence of the academic discipline of sociology

  • Apply sociological perspectives to the social world around them

  • Identify and differentiate between major theoretical perspectives and micro perspectives

  • Critique the nature of Social institutions that shape social structure

UNIT-1
Teaching Hours:10
Sociology as a discipline
 

1. Sociological perspective

2. Theoretical orientations

a. Structural Functionalist perspective

b. Conflict perspective

c. Micro perspectives

UNIT-2
Teaching Hours:15
Social structure and groups
 

1.       Community, Association and Institution  

2.       Status and role

3.       Power and authority

4.       Groups : Primary, Secondary

UNIT-3
Teaching Hours:20
Culture and Socialization
 

1. Components of culture

a. Values

b. Norms

c. Beliefs

2. Culture shock, ethnocentrism and xenophobia

3. Culture and change

4. Agents of Socialization

UNIT-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Institutions I
 

1. Family

2. Education

3. Religion

UNIT-5
Teaching Hours:15
Social Institutions II
 

1. Economy

2. Politics

3. Law

Text Books And Reference Books:

Fulcher, J. & J Scott. (2007). Sociology.(3rd ed.). OUP.

Haralambos, M. & R.M.Heald. (2006). Sociology: Themes and Perspective. London: Harper Collins.

Henslin, J. (2009). Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach. (10thed.).USA: Pearson.

Jayaram, N. (1988). Introductory Sociology. Madras: MacMillan.

Macionis, J.  (1996). Sociology. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Miner, H. (1956). Body ritual among the Nacirema. American Anthropologist, 1956, 58(3), 503-507

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bauman, Z. (1990). Thinking Sociologically. London: Blackwell

Berger, P. (1966). An Invitation to Sociology – A Humanist Perspective. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Mills, C W. (1967). The Sociological Imagination. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Nisbet, R. (1967). The Sociological Tradition. London: Heinemann.

Williams, R. (1976). Key words. London: Fontana Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

·         Continuous Internal Assessment or CIA constitutes a total of 50 marks. The distribution is as follows:

§  CIA I is a 10 marks assignment and involves the adoption of any one or two of the following methods: written Assignment, Book/Article review, group presentations, symposium, group task, Individual seminars, Quiz, and class test.

§  CIA II is the 2 hour long 25 mark Mid semester Examination (50 marks reduced to 25 mark weightage) conducted during August/January 

The pattern for the exam is as follows:

Section A: Attempt any 3 questions out of the 5/6 options given. Each question carries 5 marks

Section B: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 10 marks

Section C: This section has 1 compulsory question that carries 15 marks

§  CIA III carries 10 marks and is based on an assignment that is set for the course. 

§  Attendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 

·  End Semester Examination (ESE) is conducted at the end of the semester. This is a 3 hour long exam for a weightage of 50 marks

                      The pattern for the exam is given below:

Section A: Attempt any 6 questions out of the 9 options given. Each question carries 5 marks

Section B: Attempt any 4 questions out of the 6 options given. Each question carries 10 marks

                         Section C: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 15 marks

SOC131N - FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY-I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The two papers offered during the first and the second semesters of the BA program will introduce students to Sociology as a social science distinct in its approach. It will also encourage the students to inculcate the Sociological perspective even as they are introduced to the subject matter and the methods of study adopted by the discipline. During the first semester students will be introduced to the origins of Sociology, its founding fathers and the theoretical perspectives.

 

Course Objectives:

        To develop sociological imagination that will help students to rethink how social systems operate through individuals

To gain a comprehensive understanding of some of the major topics studied by sociologists

Learning Outcome

By the end of this course, the student will be able to:

        Define and use a range of key sociological concepts

        Demonstrate an understanding of  the emergence of the academic discipline of sociology

        Apply sociological perspectives to the social world around them

        Identify and differentiate between major theoretical perspectives and micro perspectives

        Critique the nature of Social institutions that shape social structure

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Sociology as a Discipline
 
  1. Sociological perspective
  2. Theoretical orientations

a.       Structural Functionalist perspective

b.      Conflict perspective

c.       Micro perspectives

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Social Structure and Groups
 

                                                         

  1. Community, Association and Institution  
  2. Status and role
  3. Power and authority
  4. Groups : Primary, Secondary

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Culture and Socialization
 

     Components of culture

a.       Values

b.      Norms

c.       Beliefs

 

  1. Culture shock, ethnocentrism and xenophobia
  2. Culture and change
  3. Agents of Socialization
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Institutions - I
 
  1. Family
  2. Education
  3. Religion
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Social Institutions - II
 
  1. Economy
  2. Politics
  3. Law
Text Books And Reference Books:

Fulcher, J. & J Scott. (2007). Sociology.(3rd ed.). OUP.

Haralambos, M. & R.M.Heald. (2006). Sociology: Themes and Perspective. London: Harper Collins.

Henslin, J. (2009). Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach. (10thed.).USA: Pearson.

Jayaram, N. (1988). Introductory Sociology. Madras: MacMillan.

Macionis, J.  (1996). Sociology. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Miner, H. (1956). Body ritual among the Nacirema. American Anthropologist, 1956, 58(3), 503-507

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bauman, Z. (1990). Thinking Sociologically. London: Blackwell

Berger, P. (1966). An Invitation to Sociology – A Humanist Perspective. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Mills, C W. (1967). The Sociological Imagination. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Nisbet, R. (1967). The Sociological Tradition. London: Heinemann.

Williams, R. (1976). Key words. London: Fontana Publications.

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1(20)

MSE* (CIA2) (50)

CIA3(20)

ESE**(100) 3 hr

Attendance

Weightage

10

25

10

50

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

ECO231 - PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

It aims at providing a systematic introduction to mainstream approaches to the study of macroeconomics in the current century. It has been designed in such a way that it stimulates awareness on macroeconomic challenges and policy management in progressive nations. It also aims at developing the ability for objective reasoning about macroeconomic issues.

Learning Outcome

  • It provides the student a strong foundation in macroeconomics and helps in understanding the policy implications in emerging economies.
  • It helps in understanding the contribution of various macroeconomic schools and in evaluating their policy prescriptions.
  • It enables the student to evaluate the pros and cons of different macroeconomic policies in real situations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Measuring a Nation's Income and Cost of Living
 

Economy’s Income and Expenditure: Measurement of GDP, components of GDP, real versus nominal GDP, the GDP Deflator. The Consumer Price Index: calculation of CPI, GDP deflator versus the CPI, correcting the economic variables for the effects of inflation, real versus nominal interest rates- Production and Growth-Unemployment and its Natural Rate

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Goods and Money Market
 

Saving and Investment in the National Income Accounts. The Market for Loanable Funds; Policy changes and impact on the market for loanable funds. Meaning and functions of Money. Banks and Money supply; Money creation with 100 per cent Reserve Banking and Fractional Reserve Banking. Central Bank tools of Monetary Control. Classical Theory of Inflation; Classical Dichotomy and Monetary Neutrality. Velocity and Quantity Equation; Fisher Effect. Costs of Inflation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Open - Economy Macroeconomics: Basic Concepts
 

 The International Flows of Goods and Capital – The Prices for International Transactions: Real and Nominal Exchange Rates – A first Theory of Exchange – Rate Determination: Purchasing Power Parity.

 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Aggregate Demand, Aggregate Supply & Influence of Monetary and Fiscal Policy on Aggregate Demand
 

Three key facts about economic fluctuations. Short run Economic Fluctuations: Aggregate Demand Curve, Aggregate Supply Curve and the two causes of economic fluctuations. Monetary Policy influence on Aggregate Demand. The Theory of Liquidity Preference. Fiscal Policy influence Aggregate Demand: The Multiplier Effect and Crowding – out Effect.  Stabilisation Policy and Active versus Automatic Stabilisers.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:18
Short Run Trade-Off between Inflation and Unemployment
 

Philips Curve and shifts in Philips Curve: The Role of Expectations, shifts in Philips Curve and the Role of Supply Shocks. The Cost of reducing Inflation. Rational Expectations and the possibility of costless disinflation.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Six Debates over Macroeconomic Policy
 

Monetary and Fiscal Policy – pros and cons. Handling Recession: higher spending versus tax cuts. Monetary Policy: rule versus discretion; Central Bank: zero inflation. Balanced Budget debate. Tax Law reformation for savings debate.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Mankiw, Gregory N (2012). Principles of Macroeconomics, 6th Edition, Cengage Learning India.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  1. Sloman, John, (2006). Economics, 6th Ed., Pearson Education.
  2. Ackley,  G.  (1976). Macroeconomics, Theory  and  Policy, Macmillan Publishing Company, New York.
  3. Day.A.C.L.(1960). Outline of Monetary Economics, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
  4. Heijdra,B.J. and F.V.Ploeg (2001). Foundations of Modern Macro economics, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  5. Lewis, M.K. and P.D. Mizan (2000). Monetary Economics, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
  6. Shapiro, E. (1996). Macro economics Analysis, Galgotia Publications, NewDelhi.
  7. Dillard, D.(1960), The Economics of John Maynard Keynes, Crossby Lockwood and Sons, London.
  8. Hanson, A.H. (1963). A Guide to Keynes, McGraw Hill, New York.
  9. Keynes, J.M. (1936). The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, Macmillan, London.
  10. Farmer, Roger.(2001). Macro economics, II Edition. ISBN.
  11. Stanley Fischer and Rudiger Dornbusch. Macro Economics, London. MacGraw-Hill.
 
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 : 20 Marks

CIA II : 50 Marks (Mid Semester Examination).  Time: 2 Hours

CIA III : 20 Marks

ESE      : 100 Marks (End Semester Examination).  Time: 3 Hours

ENG221 - ENGLISH - II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Learning Outcome

·         Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities and politics

·         Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

·         Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

·         Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
food
 

1.  Long text:    Witches’ Loaves

O Henry

2.   Short text:  Portion size is the trick!!!

By Ranjani Raman

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Presentation skills

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Fashion
 

1.Long text: In the Height of Fashion-Henry Lawson

 

2. short text: Crazy for Fashion- BabatundeAremu

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Report writing

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Group Discussion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Architecture
 

1.    long text:  Bharat Bhavan

By Charles Correa

2.   Short text:  The Plain Sense of Things

By Wallace Stevens

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Management
 

1.Long Text: The Amazing Dabbawalas of Mumbai- ShivaniPandita

 

2. Short Text:

If

By Rudyard Kupling

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Interview skills and CV writing

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
History
 

1.    Long tet: Whose Ambedkar is he anyway?

           By KanchaIlaiah

 

2. Short text: Dhauli

By JayantaMahapatra

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Developing arguments- debating

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Letter writing and email writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
War
 

1.    Long text: An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

By Ambrose Bierce

2.     Short text: Strange meeting

By Wilfred Owen

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Ethics of writing on social media platforms

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Social Media
 

1.Long text: Facebook and the Epiphanator: An

End to Endings?

            By Paul Ford

2. Short text:  'Truth in the time of Social Media' by Girish Balachandran

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
visual text
 

BBC Documentary- Dabbawalas

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

teacher manual and worksheets that teachers would provide. Listening skills worksheets.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1- 20

MSE-50

CIA3- 20

ESE- 50 online and 50 written

FRN221 - FRENCH (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the UG program

Learning Outcome

Enhancement of linguistic competencies and sharpening of written and oral communicative skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 4- Culture: A country of Vacations
 

Lesson 1: Hobbies

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 4- Culture: A country of Vacations
 

Lesson 2: The routine

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Poem
 

1. Demain dès l'aube - Victor Hugo

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 5 - I discover
 

Lesson 1 : Where to shop?

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 5: I discover
 

Lesson 2: Discover and Taste

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Visual Text
 

A French Film

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 6- Culture: Gourmet Countries
 

Lesson 1: Everyone is having fun

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
Poem
 

2. Le Lac - Alphonse de Lamartine

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
Chapter 6- Culture: Gourmet countries
 

Lesson 2: Daily routine of Teenagers

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.  Cocton, Marie-Noelle. Génération A1. Paris : Didier, 2016 

2.   Poèmes : Demain dès l'aube par Victor Hugo & Le Lac par Alphonse de Lamartine (contenu rédigé sur ligne)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Thakker, Viral. Plaisir d’écrire. New Delhi : Langers International Pvt. Ltd., 2011

2.      French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignment & MOODLE Testing (Quiz)

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 –DELF Pattern: Listening and Speaking /Role Play / Theatre

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

PSY231 - BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is conceptualised to help students understand basic cognitive processes as they affect the individual. The course introduces students about different cognitive concepts such as perception, memory, attention, intelligence, language and thought in the various manifestations of the study of mind and behaviour. It introduces the basic framework on how psychologists scientifically study and understand the cognitive processes through various quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry. The course also takes through the various applications on how the human mind works in different situations and in our everyday life such as the applications of human memory in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and modern machines. Students will have the opportunity to examine these concepts from multiple psychological perspectives and to reflect upon the applicability of these concepts. This course will help the learner learn about

  1. How people perceive, learn, represent, remember and use information.
  2. To develop an understanding of the influence of behaviour, cognition, and states of consciousness and behaviour.
  3. To appreciate the use of various models, theories and methods in understanding cognitive processes.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able to:

  1. Define the basic cognitive process that influence behaviour
  2. Explain how the influence of behaviour, cognition, and the environment affects behaviour.
  3. Compare and contrast various models, theories and methods in understanding cognitive processes.
  4. Apply these concepts to explain everyday life events and situation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Sensation and Perception
 

An introduction to the study of the human senses and perceptual processes. We will trace what happens to the physical stimulus as our sensory systems analyze it to produce complicated perceptions of the world around us. We will explore the fact that many complex perceptual phenomena draw upon explanations at the physiological, psychological, and cognitive levels. Topics on sensory perception in non-human animals may also be covered. Data gathered from psychophysical research and studies of both humans, and other animals will be discussed. The unit will review the mechanisms and principles of operation of vision, hearing, touch, taste and smell.

  1. Differentiate between sensation and perception
  2. Explain the process of vision and how people see colour and depth
  3. Explain the basics of hearing, taste, smell, touch, pain, and the vestibular sense
  4. Define perception and give examples of gestalt principles and multimodal perception

 Laboratory Demonstration: Illusion experiment, Depth Perception, Colour Blindness test, Dexterity test 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Memory and Forgetting
 

The unit is designed to provide a comprehensive account of modern experimental and theoretical approaches to the study of human memory. The course integrates experimental findings with neuropsychological and neurophysiological data and illustrates how basic concepts can illuminate phenomena such as organic and functional amnesia, childhood memory, and everyday forgetting.

  1. Describe and differentiate the various types of learning and memory and the brain regions that underlie these different processes.
  2. Evaluate their understanding of course materials through tests and assignments
  3. Discuss empirical research in the field of memory.
  4. Evaluate their own learning and understand how to improve their learning and memory in different settings.

Laboratory Demonstration: Digit Span, Memory Drum

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Intelligence
 

The unit will help the student explain how psychologists approach the study of intelligence, how intelligence is defined and measured, the problems associated with measurement and how heredity and environment affect intelligence.

  1. The measurement and assessment of intelligence.
  2. Biological and environmental influences on intelligence.
  3. Concepts and nature of Individual differences
  4. Describe intelligence theories and intelligence testing

Laboratory Demonstration: Ravens Test for Intelligence, Creativity

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Cognitive Processes
 

The unit introduces the basic cognitive perspective of psychology and describes key aspects that represent cognition. Contemporary theory and research are surveyed in such areas as attention, pattern and object recognition, knowledge representation, language acquisition and use, reasoning, decision making, problem-solving, and creativity. Applications in artificial intelligence and human/technology interaction are also considered. Students will learn to apply and evaluate the different problem-solving strategies, and different types of psychological assessments study cognitive process. They will be able to outline the strengths and limitations of each concept.

  1. Define cognition and explain the role of concept formation, problem-solving, reasoning
  2. Describe the role language plays in communication and thought
  3. Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence

Laboratory Demonstration: Concept formation, Creativity,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
States of Consciousness
 

Describe different states of consciousness and how these can vary across different situations (i.e., higher-level consciousness, lower-level consciousness, altered state of consciousness, and no consciousness). Topics including sleep, meditation, dreams, jet-lang and drug abuse will be discussed to illustrate the states of consciousness. Outline the different parts of sleep. Apply and evaluate strategies for getting a better night’s sleep.

  1. Describe consciousness and biological rhythms
  2. Describe what happens to the brain and body during sleep
  3. Explain how drugs affect consciousness
Text Books And Reference Books:

Weiten, W. (2014). Psychology: Themes and Variations (Briefer Version, 9th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

King, L. A. (2010). Experience Psychology. McGraw-Hill.

Gazzaniga, Heatherton, Halpern (2015). Psychological Science, 5th Edition, Norton.

Feldman.S.R.(2009).Essentials of understanding psychology ( 7th Ed.) Tata Mc Graw Hill.

Baron, R.A and Misra, G. (2014). Psychology (Indian Subcontinent Edition).Pearson Education Ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (CONTINUOUS INTERNAL ASSESSMENT)    

  •  CIA I –Written Assignment /Individual Assignment  - Total Marks 20     
  •  CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                        - Total marks 50                          
  •  CIA III –Activity-based Assignment                        - Total marks 20
  •   CIA I + II + III                                                      = 90 /100 = 45/50 
  •   Attendance                                                            = 5 marks 
  •  Total                                                                      = 100 = 50 

End Semester Examination : Total Marks=100=50

Question paper pattern

  •  Section A        Brief, concepts, definitions, applications               2 marks x 10 = 20
  •  Section B         Short Answers: Conceptual/Application                5 marks x 4   = 20
  •  Section C        Essay Type: Descriptive/Conceptual                       15 marks x 3 = 45
  •  Section D        Compulsory: Case Study (Application)                    15 X 1           = 15

SOC231 - FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY - II (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course introduces the students to the premise of social inequality and forms of stratification and social change. The students will be encouraged to use the sociological imagination that they have developed during the previous semester to comprehend these different aspects of their social reality. The students are also introduced to Conformity and Deviance, Social Demography, Urbanization and Social Change.

 

 

Course Objectives:

  • To have an enhanced vision of the significance of sociological perspective and the difference it makes in our understanding of society
  • Identify and discuss specific areas of study within Sociology

Learning Outcome

By the end of this course, the students will be able to:

  • Critically review different perspectives that help us understand social processes and social structures ad the changes therein
  • Apply the knowledge gained from social theories to analyze systems of social stratification
  • Analyse the demographic processes that impact society

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
Social Stratification
 

1.      Basis of social stratification

2.      Social Mobility

3.      Forms of social stratification:

a.      Sex and gender

b.      Race and ethnicity

c.       Caste

d.      Class

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Conformity and Deviance
 

1.      Introduction to Conformity and Deviance

2.      Theories of Deviance

a.      Structural Functionalist Perspective

b.      Conflict Perspective

c.       Symbolic Interactionist Perspective

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
Social Demography
 

1.      Population: Size, structure and composition

2.      Demographic Theories: Malthus, Demographic Transition

3.      Demographic processes:

a.      Fertility

b.      Mortality

c.       Migration

4.      Urbanization

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Change
 

1.      Concepts of Social Change

2.      Theories of social change

3.      Types and causes

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Readings:

Bhende, A. & Kanitkar, T. (2000). Principles of Population Studies.(9th ed.) Mumbai: Himalaya Publishing House.

Fulcher, J. & J Scott. (2007). Sociology. (3rded). OUP.

Haralambos, M. & R.M.Heald. ( 2006). Sociology: Themes and Perspective. London: Harper Collins.

Henslin, J. (2009). Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach.(10thed.). USA:Pearson.

Macionis, J. (2012). Sociology. Pearson Education.

Premi. (1983). Social Demography. Delhi: South Asia Books.

Visual Texts:

India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart (2007)

A Man Called "Bee": Studying the Yanomamo (1975)

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings:

Bauman, Z. (1990). Thinking Sociologically. London: Blackwell

Berger, P. (1966). An Invitation to Sociology – A Humanist Perspective. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Mills, C W. (1967). The Sociological Imagination. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Nisbet, R. (1967). The Sociological Tradition. London: Heinemann.

Williams, R. (1976). Key words. London: Fontana Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

·         Continuous Internal Assessment or CIA constitutes a total of 50 marks. The distribution is as follows:

§  CIA I is a 10 marks assignment and involves the adoption of any one or two of the following methods: written Assignment, Book/Article review, group presentations, symposium, group task, Individual seminars, Quiz, and class test.

§  CIA II is the 2 hour long 25 mark Mid semester Examination (50 marks reduced to 25 mark weightage) conducted during August/January 

The pattern for the exam is as follows:

Section A: Attempt any 3 questions out of the 5/6 options given. Each question carries 5 marks

Section B: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 10 marks

Section C: This section has 1 compulsory question that carries 15 marks

§  CIA III carries 10 marks and is based on an assignment that is set for the course. 

§  Attendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 

·  End Semester Examination (ESE) is conducted at the end of the semester. This is a 3 hour long exam for a weightage of 50 marks

                      The pattern for the exam is given below:

Section A: Attempt any 6 questions out of the 9 options given. Each question carries 5 marks

Section B: Attempt any 4 questions out of the 6 options given. Each question carries 10 marks

                        Section C: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 15 marks

 

AEN321 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This course is taught in the second year for students from different streams, namely BA, BSc

 

and BCom. If the first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ

 

University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian voices in English and Indian

 

regional literatures in translation for the Additional English students of the first year, the

 

second year syllabus intends to take that project a little further and open up the engagement

 

of the students to texts from across the world. The syllabus - selection of texts will

 

concentrate on readings from South Asian, Latin American, Australian, Canadian, and Afro-

 

American. It will voice subaltern concerns of identity, gender, race, ethnicity and problems of

 

belongingness experienced by humanity all over the globe.

 

The syllabus will extend the concerns of nation and nationality and marginalization,

 

discussed within the Indian context to a more inclusive and wider global platform. We have

 

consciously kept out ‘mainstream’ writers and concentrated on the voices of the subalterns

 

from across the world. There is an implicit recognition in this project that though the aspects

 

of marginalization and the problems facing subalterns are present across cultures and

 

nations, the experiences, expressions and reflections are specific to each race and culture.

 

The course will address these nuances and specificities and enable our students to become

 

more aware and sensitive to life and reality around them. This will equip the students, who

 

are global citizens, to understand not just the Indian scenario, but also situate themselves

 

within the wider global contexts and understand the spaces they will move into and negotiate

 

in their future.

 

There is a prescribed text book Blends: Voices from Margins for the second year students,

 

compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

Course Objectives

 

The course objectives are

 

 to enable students to look at different cultures through Literature

 

 to help students develop an understanding of subaltern realities and identity politics

 

 to inculcate literary sensibility/taste among students across disciplines

 

 to improve language skills –speaking, reading, writing and listening

 

 to equip the students with tools for developing lateral thinking

 

 to equip students with critical reading and thinking habits

 

 to reiterate the study skills and communication skills they developed in the previous

 

year and extend it.

Learning Outcome

The students will become

 

 more culturally, ethically, socially and politically aware citizens of the world..

 

 it will enable students to become aware of the nuances of cultures, ethnicities and

 

other diversity around them and become sensitive towards them.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Children?s Novel
 

TetsukoKuroyanagi: Tottochan: The Little Girl at the Window12

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Short Story
 

Liliana Heker : “The Stolen Party

 

 Higuchi Ichiyo: “Separate Ways”

 

 Harukki Murakami "Birthday Girl"

 

 Luisa Valenzuela: “I’m your Horse in the Night”

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Poetry
 

Poetry 12 Hrs

 

 Silvio Curbelo: “Summer Storm”

 

 Nancy Morejon: “Black Woman”

 

 Ruben Dario: “To Roosevelt”

 

 Mina Asadi: “A Ring to me is a Bondage”

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Essay
 

Essay 9Hrs

 

 Amy Tan: “Mother Tongue

 

 Linda Hogan: “Waking Up the Rake”

 

 Isabelle Allande: “Open Veins of Latin America”

Text Books And Reference Books:

Blends Book II

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Oxford Encyclopeadia on Latin American History

Diary of Anne Frank

Elie Wiesel "Night"

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: A written test for 20 marks. It can be an Open Book test, a classroom assignment, an

 

objective or descriptive test pertaining to the texts and ideas discussed in class.

 

CIA2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 works

 

CIA 3: This is to be a creative test/ project in small groups by students. They may do

 

Collages, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes, presentations, debates,

 

charts or any other creative test for 20 marks. This test should allow the students to explore

 

their creativity and engage with the real world around them and marks can be allotted to

 

students depending on how much they are able to link the ideas and discussions in the texts

 

to the world around them.

 

Question Paper Pattern

 

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

 

Section A: 4x5= 20

 

Section B: 2x15=30

 

Total 50

 

End Semester Exam: 3 hrs

 

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

 

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

 

Total 50

ECO331 - FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is intended to give an understanding of the theoretical perceptions of economic growth and development together with the forces bringing about them. It also helps to broaden the awareness of the challenges in the developmental process and thus motivate the students towards the thought process of alternative solutions.

Learning Outcome

The students will

1. Gain conceptual base in Economic Dvelopment and Growth.

2. Familiarise with key models and theories in Dvelopment and Growth.

3. Gain insight in to the key issues of economic development.

4. Get awareness of the approaches to development efforts.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Meaning of Development and Relevant Concepts
 

Distinction between Growth and Development; PQLI; Human Development Index; Gender Development Index; Sen’s Capabilities Approach; Environmental Sustainability and Development; Common Characteristics of Developing Nations; Alternative Measures of Development.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Growth Models and Empirics
 

The Harrod-Domar model; the Solow model and its variants; Theories of endogenous growth with special reference to Romer’s model; the Big Push Theory and Lebenstence Theory of Critical Minimum Efforts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Approaches to Development
 

Balanced and Unbalanced Growth; Low Income Equilibrium Trap; Dual Economy Models of Lewis

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Poverty, Inequality and Development
 

Measurement of Poverty – Absolute and Relative; Head-Count Index and Poverty Gap Indices; Policy options for Alleviation of Poverty; Measurement of Income Inequality; Economic Growth and Income Inequality – Kuznet’s Inverted Hypothesis, Impact of Inequality on Development.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Urbanization and Informal Sector
 

Causes and effects of urbanization; Harris-Todaro Model of Rural-Urban Migration; Migration and Development; Policies for the Urban Informal Sector; Women in the Informal Sector; the Microfinance Revolution.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:13
Planning for development
 

Economic planning; Shadow prices, project evaluation and cost-benefit analysis; Concept of capital output ratio; Economic planning and price mechanism.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Todaro, Michael, P. and Stephen. C. Smith, (2015). Economic Development, Pearson Education, (Singapore) Pvt. Ltd., Indian Branch, Delhi.
  2. Ray, Debraj (2014), Development Economics, Seventh impression, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
  3. Lekhi, R. K. (2016), The Economics of Development and Planning, Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Abhijit Banerjee, Roland Benabou and Dilip Mookerjee, Understanding Poverty, Oxford University Press, 2006.
  2. Amartya Sen, Development as Freedom, Oxford University Press, 2000.
  3. Basu, K. Analytical Development Economics: The Less Developed Economy Revisited. (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1997)
  4. Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy, Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  5. Partha Dasgupta, Economics: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, 2007.
  6. Robert Putnam, Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy, Princeton University Press, 1994.
  7. Thirlwall, A.P. Growth, and Development with Special Reference to Developing Economies (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006) 8th Edition.
  8. Basu, K. 2012, editor, The New Oxford Companion to Economics in India, Oxford University Press
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 and 3 consists of 20 marks each. CIA 2 (Mid-semester) carries 50 marks.

ENG321 - ENGLISH-III (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

  • T English is offered as a course for all the students in BA, BSc and BCom, classes in the third and fourth semesters. The aim is to strengthen the communication skills, and particularly study skills of the learners further, through adequate practice and exposure to good examples of writing, thought, ideas and human values. In addition, they will be trained in study skills through tasks in academic genres such as message, letter, essay, data interpretation etc. It aims to not only equip learners with skills but also sensitize them towards issues that concern human life in today’s globalised context. The course content is selected to meet the requirements of the departmental goal of “empowering the individual to read oneself, the social context and the imagined”; institutional goal of ensuring “holistic development”; and the national goal of creating competent and valuable citizens. The primary objective of this course is to help learners develop appropriate employability skills and demonstrate suitable conduct with regards to communication skills. The units are organised in order to help the learners understand the academic and workplace demands and learn by practice.

  • To enable learners to develop reading comprehension for various purposes

  • T To enable learners to develop writing skills for academic and professional needs

  • T To enable learners to develop the ability to think critically and express logically

  • To enable learner to communicate in a socially and ethically acceptable manner

  • T To enable learners, to read, write and speak with clarity, precision and accuracy

Learning Outcome

 

  • Identify deviant use of English both in written and spoken forms

  • Recognise the errors of usage and correct them

  • Recognise their own ability to improve their own competence in using the language

  • Understand and appreciate English spoken by people from different regions

  • Use language for speaking with confidence in an intelligible and acceptable manner

  • Understand the importance of reading for life

  • Develop an interest in reading

  • Read independently unfamiliar texts with comprehension

  • Read longer texts, compare and evaluate them

  • Summarise texts and present orally or in writing

  • Understand the importance of writing in academic life

  • Write simple sentences without committing errors of spelling and grammar

  • Plan a piece of writing using drafting techniques

  • Ability to communicate effectively in speech and in writing

  • Ability to use better vocabulary to communicate effectively

  • Lead and participate in seminars and group discussions more effectively and with increased confidence

  • Communicate more fluently and accurately in academic discussion

  • Manage (determine the meaning of and record for personal use) unknown general academic and subject specific vocabulary

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to university grammar
 

Subject verb agreement

Tenses

Preposition 

Voices 

 

Clauses 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Strategies for Reading
 

Skimming and scanning 

Strategies of reading

Reading and understanding reports

Reading content/ texts of various kinds 

Inferencing skills

Academic vocab

Academic phrases

Professional expression

 

Study skills- library and referencing skills (organising reading, making notes, managing time, prioritising)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Strategic writing for academic purpose
 

Mind mapping

Organising ideas

Accurate usage of vocabulary 

Paragraph strategy

Cohesion and sequencing (jumbled sentences to paragraph)

Extended writing 

Formal and informal writing

Reports (all types including illustration to report and report to illustration and/or graphs, charts, tables and other statistical data)

Proposal writing (for projects, for research)

Academic essays/ articles

Persuasive writing, extrapolative writings

Case study writing

Executive summaries

Editing, proofreading skills 

 

Resume vs CV

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Listening and Oral communication
 

Self-introduction

Body language

Talks, speeches and presentations

Conversation

Telephone conversation

Meetings

Group discussion

 

Seminar / conference presentation

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Business communication
 

Principles of communication

Process of communication

Types of communication

 

Barriers in communication

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue -2 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NIL

Evaluation Pattern

Proposed and pending for approval

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Classroom assignment/test/ written or oral tasks for 20 marks keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes. 

CIA 2: Mid-semester portfolio submission for 50 marks. 

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any creative assignments. 



Question Paper Pattern         

 

Mid Semester: Portfolio submission – 50 marks

Mid semester evaluation- portfolio submission (portfolios of classes will be exchanged and evaluated) 

End- semester 50 marks exam / portfolio



End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

5x10=50 

 

Total                   50

 

FRN321 - FRENCH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the Arts, Science and Commerce UG program

Learning Outcome

Enhancement of linguistic competencies and sharpening of written and oral communicative skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 1
 

To perform a tribute: artist, work, you are going to…..

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 2
 

Towards a working life

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 3
 

France Seen by...

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 4
 

Mediamania

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme
 

Act 1, 2 & 3

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.        Berthet, Annie, Catherine Hugot et al. Alter Ego + A2. Paris : Hachette, 2012

2.      Gonnet, Georges. Molière- Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme .Paris : Hachette, 1971

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Lichet, Raymond., Puig Rosado. Ecrire à tout le monde. Paris : Hachette, 1980

2.      French websites like Bonjour de France, FluentU French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN321 - HINDI (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The detailed text book “Shambook” is a Khanda Kavya written by Jagdeesh Gupta. To improve the creative writing skills, Nibandh, Kahani and Kavitha lekhan are included.Bharathiya chitrakala is also a part of the syllabus to improve the knowledge aboutIndian paintings.

Learning Outcome

Students will be expose to different forms of poetry especially, Khanda Kaviya and make them understand the contemporary socio-political issues. By learning about the India painting and legendary artists of Indian painting, students come across the richness of theIndian painting.Creative writing module will help the students to improve their analitical and writing skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
Shambooh
 

Khanda Kavya “Shambook” [Poetry] By:Jagdeesh Gupta. Pub: Raj Pal & Sons

 

Level of knowledge:Analitical    

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Creative writing
 

Nibandh lekhan, Katha lekhan, Kavitha lekhan.

Level of knowledge:Conceptual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Bharathiya chithrakala -parampara evam pramukh kalakar