Department of
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS STUDIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts in Media Studies, Economics, Political Science
Academic Year  (2018)

 
1 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECOB131 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 5 5 100
ENGB121 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION I 3 3 100
IDC 161 A READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION 3 3 100
IDC 161 B GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES 3 3 100
IDC 161 C INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY 3 3 100
IDC 161 D ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION 3 3 100
IDC 161 E MEDIA LITERACY 3 3 100
IDC 161 F CINEMATOGRAPHY 3 3 100
IDC 161 G SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
IDC 161 H A LIFE WORTH LIVING - FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING 3 3 100
IDC 161 I MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT 3 3 100
IDC 161 J INTRODUCTION TO EXISTENTIALISM 3 3 100
IDC 161 K TOURISM,CULTURE,AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
IDC 161 L CONFLICT MANAGEMENT AND PEACE 3 3 100
IDC 161 M ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST 3 3 100
IDC 161 N SCIENCE OF WELLNESS 3 3 100
IDC 161 O ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 3 100
MST 151 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN MEDIA 2 2 50
MST131 INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION 5 4 100
POLB 131 POLITICAL THEORY 5 4 100
2 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECOB231 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS 5 5 100
ENGB221 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION II 3 3 100
IDC261 A READING CITYSCAPES: BANGALORE HISTORIES 3 3 100
IDC261 B READING THE CYBERSPACE: PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE 3 3 100
IDC261 C ECONOMICS AND LITERATURE 3 3 100
IDC261 D DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
IDC261 E INTER-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION 3 3 100
IDC261 F ACOUSTIC PHONETICS 3 3 100
IDC261 G APPLIED ETHICS-A MULTICULTURAL APPROACH 3 3 100
IDC261 H GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE 3 3 100
IDC261 I COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES 3 3 100
IDC261 J LITERATURE REVIEW FOR RESEARCH 3 3 100
IDC261 K THE POLITICS OF MEMORY: THE MAKINGS OF GENOCIDE 3 3 100
IDC261 L APPRECIATING AESTHETICS 3 3 100
IDC261 M HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS 3 3 100
MST251 PHOTOGRAPHY 2 2 50
MST252 MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATION 5 5 100
POLB231 MAJOR POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES 5 4 100
3 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECOB331 FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 5 4 100
MST 331 DEVELOPMENT COMMUNICATION 5 4 100
MST 341 MEDIA SEMIOTICS 3 3 100
MST 351 WRITING FOR MASS MEDIA 3 3 100
POLB331 INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS - I 5 4 100
POLB341 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECOB431 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS 5 5 100
MST431 A MEDIA RESEARCH METHODS 3 3 100
MST431 B RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 3 3 100
MST451 AUDIO - VISUAL PRODUCTION 4 4 100
POLB431 INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS - II 5 4 100
POLB442 POLICY RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS 3 3 100
5 Semester - 2016 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECOB531 STATISTICS AND RESEARCH METHODS IN ECONOMICS 4 4 100
ECOB541A FINANCIAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
ECOB541B MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR ECONOMICS 4 4 100
MEP 581 INTERNSHIP 0 2 50
MST 541 A MEDIA AND GENDER 4 4 100
MST 541 B MEDIA AND HUMAN RIGHTS 4 4 100
MST 551 DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION 4 4 100
POLB531 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 4 4 100
POLB541A COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS:UK AND USA 4 4 100
POLB541B CONCEPTS AND THEORIES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 4 4 100
6 Semester - 2016 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECOB631 INDIAN ECONOMY 4 03 100
ECOB641 A ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
ECOB641 B INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS 4 4 100
MEP 681 DISSERTATION 1 4 100
MST641 A ADVERTISING 60 4 100
MST641 B PUBLIC RELATION 4 4 100
MST642 A FILM STUDIES 4 4 100
MST651 A SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGEMENT 4 4 100
POLB631 ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 4 4 100
POLB641 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 4 4 100
        

  

Assesment Pattern

70% CIA and 30% ESE

Examination And Assesments

Students are to undergo continuous internal assessments that amounts upto 70% of the assessments. An end-of-semester examination for 50 marks will account for 30%of the assessment.

Department Overview:
The undergraduate Department of Media Studies aims to provide a firm foundation for the students to either directly get into journalism and related areas in media or make a foray into higher studies. The programmes are a combination of theory and practice, though tilted towards building a strong theoretical foundation on which to build a career in media.
Mission Statement:
The Department of Media Studies combines communication and journalism to create a theoretical, professional, and applied approach to communication studies within a structured yet free environment to enhance student?s personal and professional lives.
Introduction to Program:
The Department of Media Studies at Christ University offers bachelor's program in three subject i.e. triple major in Media, Economics and Political Science with the objective of providing an understanding of significance of media in politics, economics and social responsibility. The program is aimed to provide students with historical understanding of media and its impact on individuals and societies. "Media" includes all forms of mass media - print, television, radio, film and new media. The program emphasizes several interrelated approaches to the study of media especially with Economics and Political Science. Develop advanced critical thinking skills in written analysis of text and visual media objects. Draw on a rigorous combination of theory, analysis and development of original ideas along with theoretical and critical inquiry into how media shape our understandings of reality; the dynamic interrelationship of media industries, policies and publics. MEP course seeks to develop critical media literacy skills that students will apply not only in other disciplines, but as citizens and media consumers. The course stresses on learning to make valid connections among different disciplines and bodies of knowledge. The course curriculum has a unique blend of class-room teaching and hands-on training with the sole objective of churning out fully-trained media professionals. The educational objective is to train students with an excellent communication skills and create industry
Program Objective:
Understanding of media history with reference to India ? Use communication theory to analyze and evaluate individual, group, and mass media messages for how they work ? Create communicative materials that incorporate communication theory, audience analysis, and rhetorical and persuasive strategies. ? Reading press releases/broadcast coverage and assessing if stories are favourable or negative ? Undertake language and content editing, making presentations and writing reports ? Be sensitive to and respectful of cultural differences, environment and gender in media practices. ? Study trends in social media, research popular social media platforms, study emerging social media tools and observe how often those platforms and tools are used

ECOB131 - PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·     

·       To develop the conceptual foundations and analytical methods used in micro economics; familiarize the students with the basics of consumer behaviour, behaviour of firms and market equilibrium.

To analyse the market structures of perfect competition, oligopoly, and monopolies; introduce the welfare economics.

 

 

 

Learning Outcome

·       Understand that economics is about the allocation of scarce resources and how that results in trade-offs.

·       Understand the role of prices in allocating scarce resources in market economies and explain the consequences of government policies in the form of price controls.

Appreciate positive as well as normative view points on concepts of market failure and the need for government intervention.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Micro Economics and the Theory of Consumption
 

Ten principles of economics: How people make decisions, How people interact and how the economy as a whole works; Role of observations and theory in economics; Role of assumptions; Role of economic models; Wants and resources; Problem of choice: Production Possibility
Frontier, Opportunity costs.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Demand and Supply
 

Law of demand: Reasons for the downward slope of the demand curve, Exceptions to the law,
Changes in demand; Elasticity of demand: Degrees of price elasticity with diagrams, Factors determining price elasticity, methods of measurement; Income elasticity demand; Cross elasticity demand; Laws of supply: Changes in supply; Consumers, Producers, and the Efficiency of the Markets: Consumers’ surplus (Marshall), Producers’ surplus and market efficiency; Externalities and market inefficiency; Public goods and common resources.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Theory of Consumer Choice
 

Ordinal utility analysis; Indifference curves: Properties, consumers’ equilibrium, Price effect, Income Effect, and substitution effect.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Theory of Production and Cost
 

Production function: Law of Variable proportions, Laws of returns, Economies of scale; Producer’s Equilibrium with the help of iso-quants and iso-cost lines; Cost function; Important cost concepts:Short run and long run cost analysis (traditional theory), Modern theory of cost: long run and short run, Revenue analysis AR and MR.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:20
Product Pricing and Factor Pricing
 

Market structure: Perfect competition, Price, and output determination; Role of time element in market price determination. Monopoly; Price output determination, Price discrimination; Monopolistic competition: Price and output determination; Selling costs; Product differentiation; Wastes in monopolistic Competition; Oligopoly price determination (collusive pricing and price leadership), Features of Duopoly and Monopsony.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
New Frontiers in Microeconomics
 

New Frontiers in Microeconomics: Introduction to concepts of Asymmetric information, Political
economy, Behavioural Economics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Mankiw, N. Gregory, Thomason South western, 2004 – Principles of Microeconomics

2.     Pindyk, R. S., & Rubinfeld, D. L. (2013). Microeconomics. (8th ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education.

3.     Douglas Bernheim and Michael D. Whinston (2009). Microeconomics, Tata McGraw-Hill (India).

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Ramsfield, E. (1997), Microeconomics (IX edition), W.W Norton and company, New York.

2.     Samuelson, Paul A and William D Nordhaus (2010), Economics, 19th Edition, McGraw-Hill Companies.

3.     Koutsoyiannis, A. (1979).  Modern Microeconomics. London: Macmillan Press.

4.     Lipsey, R.G. and K.A. Chrystal (1999), Principles of Economics (IX Ed.), Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE*(CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

ENGB121 - ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION I (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

English Language and Composition course is an intensive program for two semesters for all the students of the BA/BSc programmes  (ENGH, EPH, ECOH, JOUH, PSYH, MEP) that introduces students to a wide range of expository works in order to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of a graduate level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. It would provide students with the opportunity to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and the subjects in texts.

The purpose of the course is to enable students to read analytically, formulate arguments based on the readings, and respond by composing articulate essays that utilize advanced elements of sentence structure, syntax, style, purpose, and tone. Thus, by the use of rhetorical principles, students will learn how to become critical thinkers, and apply that knowledge to their writing by revising and improving their essays, as well as critiquing and editing peer essays. In addition, students will be required to thoroughly research relevant topics, synthesize information from a variety of sources, and document their knowledge in a cogent well written report. Also, as the course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in multiple mediums, including visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, comic strips, music videos, and TED talks; students would develop a sense to comprehend how resource of language operates in any given text. While the first semester focusses on understanding principles of rhetoric through multiple texts, the second semester is more thematic in nature familiarizing students with texts from multiple disciplines, especially in the context of India.

As part of the course students are expected to maintain a writing journal to monitor their progress in writing.

Course Objectives

To enable students to:

 

  • Analyse and interpret samples of good writing by identifying and explaining an author’s use of rhetorical strategies and techniques
  • Analyze both visual and written texts.
  • Apply effective strategies and techniques in their own writing
  • Create and sustain arguments based on reading, research, and/or personal experience;
  • Demonstrate understanding and mastery of English Language as well as stylistic maturity in their own writings
  • Produce expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that introduce a complex central idea and develop it with appropriate evidence drawn from primary and/or secondary source material, cogent explanations, and clear transitions;
  • Move effectively through the stages of the writing process with careful attention to inquiry and research, drafting, revising, editing, and review;
  • Write thoughtfully about their own process of composition
  • Revise a work to make it suitable for a different audience
  • Communicate effectively in different medium by developing their LSRW skills.

Learning Outcome

Learning Outcome

·         Enable students to become an Independent critical thinker, who are aware of the power of language.

·         Enable students to become excellent communicators of the language.

·         Equip students with necessary skills for graduate course and for career.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Language of Composition
 

The unit will focus on understanding Rhetoric and Various Rhetoric situations. The aim is to assert the idea that rhetoric is always contextual and there is a link between the speaker, audience and what the content of the text is. This will enable students to understand the significance of context while analyzing and composing a text.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Written Texts
 

Focus of the unit would be to introduce multiple ways of analysis, close reading, and usage of argumentative statements and diction.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Visual Texts
 

The unit will focus on how to read visual text and the impact it has on audience.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Determining Effective and Ineffective Rhetoric
 

The unit will engage with the questions on why few texts are effective rhetorical pieces as opposed to others.  Few texts would be analyzed to look at different rhetorical situation, and how it is effective and ineffective in persuading the audience/ reader.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
From Reading to Writing
 

By carefully reading the viewpoints of others and considering a range of ideas on an issue, one develops a clearer understanding of our own beliefs — a necessary foundation to writing effective arguments. The unit will focus on analyzing elements of argument as a means of critical thinking and an essential step toward crafting argumentative essays. The unit will focus on making an argument and supporting it by synthesising multiple sources. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      In order to access the prescribed texts for the course an online repository or an anthology would be shared with the students.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

It is a collection of texts and hence the teacher would recommend the texts to students. 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern:

CIA 1: 20 Marks

CIA 2: 50 Marks, written Mid-Semester Examination

CIA 3: 20 Marks

ESE: Written Exam testing on the skills of reading and writing.

IDC 161 A - READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This common core course aims to provide a basic introduction to understanding discourses of science and technology as represented in select science fiction. The course will help students understand some of the basic questions about the human condition that are raised, debated and negotiated in and through the representative fiction. Keeping the contemporaneity of issues today, the course will also emphasize how there is a crucial intersection of various ideas that cut across several disciplines with regard to technology and life, thereby making it crucially relevant to engage with it in the contemporary context. Anyone interested in questions of science, fiction and human condition may choose this course.

Objectives:

·         To introduce students to the field of science fiction

·         Help students identify and raise questions through these works of fiction some relevant questions in the contemporary context

·         To direct students towards realising the intersection of various issues raised across different disciplines.

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

·         Make clear and well-informed points about understanding science fiction as a reflection of the human condition today

·         Recognise the issues and debates raised as being interdisciplinary in nature, and hence engage with the form at a more critical level

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction
 

This unit will provide students a basic overview of science fiction through some critical and conceptual lens. The New Critical Idiom Series, Science Fiction, would be used here to introduce aspects of SF to students. Locating the interdisciplinarity of the domain would be central in this module. Reference material would be handed out by the course instructor.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Negotiating ?Reason?
 

This unit will raise crucial debates in and around questions of ‘science’ and ‘reason’. The unit will also help students recognize the importance of raising these questions from various disciplinary points of view, an important one being philosophy.

·         Isaac Asimov short story “Reason”

·         Select Episodes of the series Stranger Things

·         The Matrix

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
SF and technology
 

This unit will engage with how technology becomes a crucial part of negotiating SF. What are the fundamental concerns that Sf raises regarding technology and the human condition? How does technology come to be framed within SF? How is gender and sexuality framed within discourses of SF? How does SF address the anxieties of technology and future would be some of the questions engaged with here. Any one of the following novels may be taken up for discussion along with the viewing suggestion given below.

·         Aldous Huxley Brave New World

·         William Gibson, Neuromancer

·         Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake

·         “Hated in the Nation” from Black Mirror Season 3

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Indian Science Fiction
 

This unit will engage with the science fiction in the Indian context. One of the main points of discussion would be to understand how Indian SF writers have engaged with tropes of SF that we are familiar with and what kind of an ‘India’ is imagined thereof which has implications socially, politically and culturally.

·         Vandana Singh “Delhi”

Sumit Basu Turbulence

Text Books And Reference Books:

Compilation

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Hollinger, Veronica. “Contemporary Trends in Science Fiction.” Science Fiction Studies.No. 78, Vol. 26, 1999.

Bell, David and Barbara M. Kennedy. Eds. The Cybercultures Reader. Routledge, 2000. (Excerpts)

Carey, Peter. What is Post-humanism? Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - Evaluation Pattern

Individual Assignment

Group Assessment

Mid Semester

20

20

25

Mid Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

2X10=20

1X15=15

1X15=15

50

End Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

2X10=20

1X15=15

1X15=15

50

IDC 161 B - GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:  

This course will introduce students to the major theoretical and applied debates as well as major moral puzzles and challenges in the field of global ethics. Ethics is gaining ground as an important humanities intervention in a fast-changing world. A course one thics is often an added advantage for students as it helps them shape a socially awre perspective of the social reality. Drawing on interdisciplinary perspectives and thematic issues in the fields of international politics, business, communications and law, the course will challenge students to reflect on major ethical theories and traditions as well as core problems such as corporate governance, global distributive justice, the ethics of making and sustaining peace, media ethics and legal dimensions of ethics. By combining the works of both classic and contemporary philosophers with contemporary applied global issues, students will be able to critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ‘good global citizenship’.  

Learning Objectives: On completing the course, students will be able to:  

● Open-mindedly consider different viewpoints in moral controversies. ● Identify the strengths and weaknesses of different philosophical and popular arguments on the various topics. ● Demonstrate understanding of the major moral philosophical approaches and techniques in moral reasoning. ● Formulate and critically assess personal positions/convictions.  

Learning Outcome

Learning Outcomes: On the completion of the course, students will be equipped with: 

❖ Analytical skills – High level of analytical skills; ability to critically assess relevant theoretical approaches and factual ethical dilemmas; abilities to apply theoretical and conceptual knowledge to real-life ethical challenges and ability to carry out independent piece of work (position paper) using a wide range of sources and present a personal analysis on an ethical Dilemma.

❖ Critical skills – The general ability to critically compare, contrast and synthesise major theories and concepts and to apply them in a creative manner to conceptual debates and real-life ethical challenges; critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ‘good global citizenship’. 

❖ Communication skills – Ability to communicate and persuade effectively on a particular ethical position in oral and/or written form; correct language as well as bibliographic and referencing system. 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Global Ethics: Conceptual Definitions, Historical Origins & Present Challenges Introduction to the course Ethics, Morals and Values Cultural Relativism vs Universalism (case study) 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
ETHICAL THEORIES
 

Rationalist Ethical Theories Contractualist ethics Deontological Ethics Utilitarian Ethics Discourse ethics, Alternatives to Ethical Rationalism Virtue Ethics Feminist & Care Ethics Postmodernist Ethics 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Applying Ethical Theories
 

Ethics of International Aid and Development: Humanitarian Aid in Conflict Zones Global Distributive Justice and Global Poverty: Models for International Economic Justice Ethics of War: Torture in Abu Ghraib (Case Study)  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Ethics of Making and Sustaining Peace
 

Rohingya Issues: Are humanitarian interventions justified? The case study of Myanmar/Burma Global Environmental and Climate Ethics: Trade Agreements and Global Environmental Ethics Global Business Ethics and Arms Trade: The Ethics of Capitalism (Film Inside Job) 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Ethics of International Law
 

Natural Resources Extraction from the Kimberley process towards universal legislation (Movie: Blood Diamond),  Global Journalism Ethics, Digital Media Ethics and Whistleblowing Practices: Snowden and Whistleblowing Ethical Implications of Emerging Technologies: Genetics, stem cell and embryo research: Embryo research and women’s rights 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hutchings, K. (2010) Global Ethics. An Introduction, Polity: Cambridge  

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Copp, D. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory, Oxford: OUP 

Graham, G. (2008) Ethics and International Relations, 2nd Edition. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

LaFollette, H. (ed.) (2003) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Practice, Oxford: OUP 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Class Test for 20 marks

Mid Semester exam: Written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Application of select approaches to contemporary moral controversies for 20 marks

End-of Semester exam: Written exam for 50 marks 

IDC 161 C - INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of institutions and the informal economy in a global context. The discourse examines the informal economy through the lens of institutional economics. The aim is to acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention. 

 

Course Objectives

This course will:

·       introduce students to the institutions and institutional change through major concepts in institutional economics;

·       discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory and measurement;

·       examine the linkages of formal and informal economy;

·       train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss these complex ideas.

 

 

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • understand the concepts and some of the theoretical discourses in the study of institutional change and informal economy;
  • examine how the formal and informal economies are no longer separate watertight compartments but function together as an interactive system;
  • effectively communicate these complex ideas through written and oral presentation.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Institutions and Institutional Change
 

Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance; Informal Constraints; Formal Constraints; The Path of Institutional Change. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Elements of Institutional Economics
 

Contracts and Property Rights: the Concepts of Exchange and Property, Critique of the Utilitarian Calculus; Transaction Costs, Bargaining Power; Markets as Institutions; Firms and Markets. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Informality: Concepts, Theory and Measurement
 

Bureaucratic Form and the Informal Economy; The Relevance of the Concepts of Formality and Informality: A Theoretical Appraisal; Formal and Informal Enterprises: Concepts, Definition, and Measurement Issues in India. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Linking the Formal and Informal Economy
 

Rethinking Informal Economy: Linkages with the Formal Economy and the Formal Regulatory Environment; Technology and Informality. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Empirical Studies in Institutional Change and Informality
 

The Impact of Regulation on Growth and Informality: Cross-Country Evidence; Blocking Human Potential: How Formal Policies Block the Economy in the Maputo Corridor; Enforcement and Compliance in Lima’s Street Markets: The Origins and Consequences of Policy Incoherence towards Informal Traders. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Readings

Alston, L. J., Eggertsson, Eggertsson, T., & North, D. C. (Eds.). (1996). Empirical Studies in Institutional Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Guha-Khasnobis, B., Kanbur, R., & Ostrom, E. (Eds.). (2006). Linking the Formal and Informal Economy: Concepts and Policies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Misztal, B. (2002). Informality: Social theory and Contemporary Practice. Routledge.

North, D. (1990). Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance. Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic performance. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings

Arias, O., Fajnzylber, P., Maloney, W., Mason, A., Perry, G., & Saavedra - Chanduvi, J. (2007). Informality: Exit and Exclusion. Washington: The World Bank.

Harriss, J. (2006). Power Matters: Essays on Institutions, Politics, and Society in India. New York: Oxford University Press.

Mehta, P. B., & Kapur, D. (2005). Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Nayyar, D. (Ed.). (2002). Governing Globalization: Issues and Institutions. Oxford University Press.

Oviedo, A. M. (2009). Economic Informality: Causes, Costs, and Policies: A Literature Survey of International Experience. Country Economic Memorandum (CEM).


 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Course title

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Institutions and Informal Economy

70%

30%

CIA - Evaluation Pattern

Group Assignment

Group Presentation

Mid Semester

20

20

25

IDC 161 D - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2018 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies.

This course will:

  • consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption
  • acquaint students to significant debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption
  • analyse corruption in emerging economies through various case studies
  • discuss issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing corruption as erosion of trust and abuse of power
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • appreciate that nuances in the way corruption is defined and understood in different economies
  • analyse the cause and  consequences of corruption
  • examine some of the policies reforms aimed at tackling corruption
  • investigate some impacts of corruption on emerging economies
  • effectively communicate complex ideas through written and oral presentation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries?, Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: the Role of Institutions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption?  Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anticorruption Device

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Corruption in Emerging Economies
 

The Impact of Corruption on Entry Strategy: Evidence from Projects in Emerging Economies; Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies; Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies

Text Books And Reference Books: