Department of
BUSINESS-STUDIES-AND-SOCIAL-SCIENCES






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Business Administration (Tourism and Travel Management)
Academic Year  (2020)

 
1 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA131 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 4 4 100
BBA132 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING 4 4 100
BBA133 MICRO ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BBAT134 FUNDAMENTALS OF TOURISM 4 4 100
BBBA111 SOCIAL SENSITIVITY SKILLS 2 2 100
BBS191 A SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
BBS191 B A LIFE WORTH LIVING - FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING 3 3 100
BBS191C MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT 3 3 100
BBS191D CYBER SECURITY FOR THE MILLENNIAL GENERATION 3 3 100
BBS191E TOURISM, CULTURE, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
BBS191F DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION AND ITS IMPACT ON SOCIETY 3 3 100
BBS191G TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE 3 3 100
BECH191A INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY 3 3 100
BECH191B ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION 3 3 100
BEN121 LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT-I 3 3 100
BENG191 B GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES 3 3 100
BENG191A READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION 3 3 100
BHIS191A ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST 3 3 100
BMED191A MEDIA LITERACY 3 3 100
BMED191B UNDERSTANDING THE VISUAL LANGUAGE OF CINEMA 3 3 100
BPOL191A PEACE AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT 3 3 100
BPOL191B GLOBAL POWER POLITICS 3 3 100
BPOL191C FUNDAMENTALS OF PUBLIC POLICY 3 3 100
BPSY191A SCIENCE OF WELLNESS 3 03 100
BPSY191B ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA231 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR 4 4 100
BBA232 BUSINESS STATISTICS 4 4 100
BBA233 MACRO ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BBAT234 INDIAN TOURISM PRODUCTS AND GEOGRAPHY 4 4 100
BBBA211 EXPRESSIVE SKILLS 2 2 100
BBS291A APPLIED ETHICS-A MULTICULTURAL APPROACH 3 3 100
BBS291B GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE 3 3 100
BBS291C COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES 3 3 100
BBS291D MAHATMA AND MANAGEMENT 3 3 100
BBS291E SACRED GAMES AND THE RULE OF LAW 2 3 100
BBS291F CONSUMPTION AND CULTURE IN INDIA 3 3 100
BECH291A ECONOMICS AND LITERATURE 3 3 100
BECH291B DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
BEN221 LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT-II 3 3 100
BENG291A READING CITYSCAPES: BANGALORE HISTORIES 3 3 100
BENG291B READING THE CYBERSPACE: PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE 3 3 100
BHIS291A THE POLITICS OF MEMORY: THE MAKINGS OF GENOCIDE 3 3 100
BMED291A INTER-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION 3 3 100
BMED291B AUDIO CONSUMPTION IN EVERYDAY LIFE 3 03 100
BPOL291A POLITICS IN INDIA 3 3 100
BPSY291A APPRECIATING AESTHETICS 3 3 100
BPSY291B HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS 3 3 100
EVS221 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 0 2 100
3 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBBAT311 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT 4 4 100
BBBAT331 TOURISM MARKETING 4 4 100
BBBAT332 TOURISM BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT 4 4 100
BBBAT333 COST AND MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING 4 4 100
BBBAT334 EVENT PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT 4 4 100
BBBAT335 BUSINESS ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BSDBS312 KNOWLEDGE ACQUISITION SKILLS 2 1 50
4 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBBAT431 TRAVEL AGENCY AND TOUR OPERATIONS 4 4 100
BBBAT432 BUSINESS FINANCE 60 4 100
BBBAT433 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 4 4 100
BBBAT434 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 4 4 100
BBBAT435 BANKING AND INSURANCE 4 4 100
BBBAT436 BUSINESS STATISTICS 4 4 100
BSDBS412 KNOWLEDGE APPLICATION SKILLS 2 1 50
5 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBBAT531 GLOBAL TOURISM GEOGRAPHY I 4 4 50
BBBAT532 TAXATION LAW 4 4 100
BBBAT533 E-BUSINESS 4 4 100
BBBAT541B DESTINATION MANAGEMENT 4 4 100
BBBAT542B CONSUMER BEHAVIOR IN TOURISM 4 4 100
BBBAT543B SUSTAINABLE TOURISM 4 4 100
BBBHT541 A SECURITY ANALYSIS AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 4 4 100
BBBHT542A GLOBAL BUSINESS FINANCE 4 4 100
BBBHT543 A FINANCIAL MODELLING AND DERIVATIVES 4 4 100
BBBHT581 INTERNSHIP 3 2 50
BSDBS512 SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS 1 3 3 100
6 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBAT631 GLOBAL TOURISM GEOGRAPHY II 4 4 100
BBAT632 BUSINESS LAW 4 4 100
BBAT633 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT 4 4 100
BBAT641 B LEISURE AND RECREATION MANAGEMENT 4 4 100
BBAT642 B AVIATION AND TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT 4 4 100
BBAT643 B INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION 4 4 100
BBAT681 PROJECT 3 3 100
BBHT641 A STRATEGIC COST MANAGEMENT 4 4 100
BBHT642 A PROJECT APPRAISAL 4 4 100
BBHT643 A MERGERS AND ACQUISITION 4 4 100
BSDBS612 SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS II 2 0 100
        

  

Assesment Pattern

In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in a paper.

Examination And Assesments
Evaluation Pattern
 

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries a maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

 

End Semester Exam (ESE)

30%

Mid Semester Exam (CIA-II)

25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- I & III)

40%

Attendance

05%

Total

100%

 

·                     

Department Overview:
Tourism Studies offers BBA (Tourism and Travel Management), Master of Tourism and Travel Management (MTTM), M.Phil and doctoral program in Tourism and Travel Management. We are committed to the overall development of an individual through academic excellence, professional competence, personal, interpersonal and societal skills. With a focus on greater Academia and stronger Industry relations, we emphasize on research and development . We are an Authorized Training Centre of IATA/UFTAA and offers international travel and tourism training programs. We are also a member of the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) since 2015
Mission Statement:
Vision: Our vision is to be an institution of excellence developing leaders serving enterprises and society globally. Mission: Our mission is to develop socially responsible business leaders with the spirit of inquiry through academic and industry engagement.
Introduction to Program:
The Under Graduate Program in Tourism B Com Tourism and Travel Management was introduced in the year 2002. The Program was renamed as BBA (Tourism and Travel Management) in the year 2015 Driven with a strong and sound set of core values, we always endeavour to empower students to face the challenges in the rapidly growing travel, tourism and hospitality industry. Tourism Studies organizes lectures, seminars, workshops, symposia and conferences to prepare the students to meet the requirements of the tourism industry. It provides opportunities for students to connect with various bodies and associations within the tourism industry so that they are equipped professionally in the vocation of tourism.
Program Objective:
Program Educational Objective (PEOs): 1. Graduates possessing subject knowledge, analytical ability and skills to manage businesses 2. Graduates exhibiting a spirit of inquiry, innovation and ability to solve problems in a dynamic business environment. 3. Graduates with value-based leadership skills, entrepreneurial capabilities and global awareness serving enterprises and society. Program Outcomes: 1. Social Responsibility and Ethical Sensitivity 2. Functional Knowledge and Application 3. Communication 4. Problem Solving 5.Sustainable Tourism Management Orientation

BBA131 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This subject is a comprehensive learning on what management is all about and different schools of thoughts on management. It gives a clear understanding of management practices and the various functions of management and also gives away the principles of management developed by eminent management thinkers. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of planning, organizing, staffing, motivation, leadership, controlling and to offer orientation to the recent dynamics of managerial practice.

Course Objectives: This course attempts to introduce the basic concepts, functions and processes of management and it enables students to develop competencies and knowledge to become an effective manager.

Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcomes: On having completed this course student should be able to:

CLO1   Identify the basic activities which any manager will conduct in the organization.

CLO2   Appreciate the role of general management for the success of an organization.

CLO3   Enhance their managerial ability and professional skills.

CLO4   Analyze the managerial issues they will have to tackle in the competitive environment.

CLO5   Explore the latest trends in the field of management.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
 

Definition – nature, process and significance of management –Role of managers – Managerial Skills and Roles - Evolution of Management Thought : Classical Management Approaches, Behavioural Management Approaches, Quantitative Management Approaches, Modern Management Approaches -  Management as a Science or Art - Management as a profession- Administration and Management- Functions of Management – Functional Areas of Management. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PLANNING AND DECISION MAKING
 

Planning - Nature and Importance of Planning- Types of Plans - Levels of Planning - Steps in planning - Making Effective Plans- Objectives and Management By Objective (MBO) –Management By Exception (MBE) -  Policy and Strategy- Forecasting and Decision Making - Nature of decision making - Types of decisions – Decision Making Process – Rational Perspectives and Behavioural Aspects of decision making.          

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
ORGANIZING
 

Organizing - Nature and purpose - Principles of Organization - Types of Organization - Organisational Structure and Design – Line, Staff and functional authority – Conflict between Line and Staff – Overcoming the Line-Staff Conflict. Committees, Departmentation - Span of control – Authority, Responsibility and Accountability - Principles of Delegation - Steps - Centralization Vs Decentralization – Factors determining the degree of Decentralization of authority.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
STAFFING
 

Staffing - Nature and Purpose of staffing – Importance of staffing – Components of Staffing - Manpower planning - Recruitment and Selection - Training and Development - Performance

Appraisal.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
DIRECTING
 

Directing – Nature of Directing function - Principles – Importance of Effective Direction – Motivating people at work – Motivation theories: Early theories, Contemporary theories – Morale Building – Job Satisfaction - Effective Communication skills for directing – Barriers of communication.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
CONTROLLING AND SUPERVISION
 

Controlling - Concept, Nature and Importance - Essentials of Control - Requirements of an Effective Control System – Behavioural Implications of Control – Techniques of Managerial control - Co-ordination – Need for co-ordination – Types of Co-ordination - Techniques of Coordination - Cooperation. Supervision – Position of a supervisor – Qualities of a good supervisor – Key Man – Man in the middle – Middle marginal man – Human relations specialist – Essential requirements of effective supervision.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
CONTEMPORARY ISSUES AND CHALLENGES IN MANAGEMENT OF 21st CENTURY
 

Leadership and change, Total quality management, Work force diversity, Globalization and innovation, Enterprise mobility, How to manage and control virtual teams, creating an ethical workplace.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Daft, R. L. (2009). Principles of Management (1st edition), Cengage Learning.

2.      Gupta, R.S., Sharma, B.D., & Bhalla. N.S. (2011). Principles & Practices of Management (11th edition). New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers.

3.      Williams. Management, (International edition) South-western Cengage Learning.

4.      John R. Schermerhorn. Management, Wiley-India

5.      Koontz, H., &Weihrich, H.  Essentials of Management, McGraw Hill Publishers.

6.      L M Prasad, (2007). Principles and Practices of Management, Himalaya Publishing House

7.      Rao, P.S. (2009). Principles of Management, Himalaya Publishing House.

Moshal, B.S. Principles of Management, Ane Books.

Evaluation Pattern
Evaluation Pattern
Component of Final Grade Max Marks per Component Weightage towards Final Grade Total Marks per Component in Final Grade
CIA-I 30 15% 15
CIA-II 50 25% 25
CIA-III 30 15% 15
End – Term 100 40% 40
Attendance 5 5% 5
Total     100

BBA132 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Any organisation which deals with money or money’s worth needs to record every transaction that it enters into. This course is essential for all individuals exposed to financial information in the workplace and involved in the preparation or use of company financial statements.It intends to introduce basic accounting principles and practices. It also deals with subsidiary books maintained in business organizations. The students will have knowledge about the fundamental accounting processes such as journalizing, ledger posting, preparation of trial balance and final accounts in sole trading business. It also deals with providing an overview of accounting standards and IFRS. This course will be useful for all those who are desirous of having an understanding and application of financial dynamics of the business and become successful financial managers/entrepreneurs.

Learning Outcome

  • To provide an understanding of application of various principles and practice of Accounting.
  • To demonstrate the knowledge on the process of accounting cycle and basic steps involved in Accounting
  • To extend the knowledge of systematic maintenance of books of accounts to real life business.
  • To interpret Annual Financial statements of Sole proprietorship form of business.
  • To outline the need for Accounting standards and IFRS.

Text Books And Reference Books:
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
Evaluation Pattern
Evaluation Pattern
Component of Final Grade Max Marks per Component Weightage towards Final Grade Total Marks per Component in Final Grade
CIA-I 30 15% 15
CIA-II 50 25% 25
CIA-III 30 15% 15
End – Term 100 40% 40
Attendance 5 5% 5
Total     100

BBA133 - MICRO ECONOMICS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Business environment is an integral part of the economic system. This course helps in the economic way of thinking which aids in establishing a connection between unlimited wants and limited resources available to an individual, firm and the society.This course deals with the application of economic analysis in formulation of business decisions. In this context, the course deals with demand, supply, pricing, theory of consumer choice and theories of production. 

 

Course Objectives

 

  • To describe how economic trade-offs and social values impact business decisions
  • To understand the causes and consequences of different market conditions
  • To explain the theory of consumer choice using the utility concepts
  • To apply the concept of equilibrium to firms
  • To apply the theory of production and cost while making business decisions
  • To evaluate the efficiency and inefficiency of the markets from the point of view of consumers and the producers

 

 

Learning Outcome

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Illustrate society's trade-offs by using Production Possibility Frontier 
  • Explain how consumers maximise total utility within a given income using the utility concepts
  • Explain the effect of shifts in market supply and demand curves on price and quantity produced by firms
  • Demonstrate the relationship between cost and production functions
  • Examine the effects of negative and positive externalities and examine the real-world externality situations
  • Compare and contrast the pricing mechanism and output determination under different market conditions

Text Books And Reference Books:
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
Evaluation Pattern
Evaluation Pattern
Component of Final Grade Max Marks per Component Weightage towards Final Grade Total Marks per Component in Final Grade
CIA-I 30 15% 15
CIA-II 50 25% 25
CIA-III 30 15% 15
End – Term 100 40% 40
Attendance 5 5% 5
Total     100

BBAT134 - FUNDAMENTALS OF TOURISM (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This paper introduces the important concepts and terminologies of tourism and their usage. It explains the emerging trends and changing scenario of tourism industry. It also elucidates the impacts and motivations of travel and tourism

Course Objectives:

  • To provide an understanding of various concepts of tourism
  • To explain the different travel motivations of the tourists
  • To identify the major and minor tourism and supply components
  • To discuss the concepts and demand in tourism and the use of statistics and research to analyze the demand for the tourism market
  • To evaluate various impacts of tourism on economic, environmental and socio-cultural
  • To elaborate on the future of tourism with regard to emerging trend and issues

Learning Outcome

  • Demonstrate on Various concepts and nature of tourism
  • Explain different concepts and theories on travel motivations
  • Identify the major tourism and supply components
  • Analyze the demand for tourism market using statistics and research as a tool
  • Evaluate the positive and negative impacts of tourism on the economy, socio-cultural and environment of the destination
  • Elaborate on the future of tourism with regard to emerging trends and issues

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Nature and Concept of Tourism
 

Definition, Origin and growth of tourism; Characteristics of Tourism, Interrelationships and classifications Tourism System; Typologies of tourists, Distinction between travellers, visitor, tourists, excursionists and transit visitor. History of Tourism, Famous Travelers –Tourism Deterrents War, Political and Civil Unrest, Inadequate Facilities, Non-Accessibility, International and national growth; Development of tourism in India, Sargent committee, Tourist Information offices, Formation of Ministry of Tourism, Setting up of Department of Tourism, developments that have taken place, and the present position. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Travel Motivations
 

Why do people travel, travel for business, travel for pleasure, romance of pleasure travel, changing perspective of pleasure, need for change, travel for health, travel for seeking knowledge, Vagabondage, Trip and fun, pleasures for pre and post travel, travel and second/holiday homes, travel as a challenge, travel as a means to sharpen perspectives, travel and the social perspective, holidaying as a cultural norm, to travel or no to travel- importance of motivation, travel as a satisfier of needs or wants, needs, wants and motives,  Tourist learning process, motivation for travelling/ tourism, tourists with no or constrained choice, studies on travel motivations, Gray’s interpretations, Lundberg’s View; Educational and cultural motives, relaxation and pleasure, ethnic and others, MacIntoshCategorisation, Robinson’s Classifications; relaxation and refreshment of body and mind, health, pleasure, curiosity and culture, Interpersonal reasons, spiritual purpose, Professional or Business reasons, Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs model and travel motivations, Plog’s psychographics classification of tourists and travel motivations;  Alo centric motivation, Near-Alo centric Motivations, Mid centric Motivations, Near- Psycho centric and Psycho centric Motivations, Travel Motivations as related to Demographics.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Components of Tourism
 

Major and Minor Components of Tourism: Attraction, Accommodation, Accessibility, Amenities, Activities; Ancillary components; geographical elements, Types of Travel: Leisure, Cultural Tourism, VFR, Corporate, Incentive, Wildlife, Adventure, Pilgrimage, Education, Ecotourism, Study and analysis, International – Domestic – Regional Tours   Tourism Components and Supply; Supply components, Natural resources, Built environments, Operating sectors, Matching supply with demand.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Tourism Demand
 

Managing Tourism demand; Definition, Concepts, Demand Schedule, Measuring Demand for Tourism, Tourism Demand Determinants and Forecasting - Determinants of Demand for Tourism, Suppress Demand for Tourism, Forecasting Tourism Demand.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Impacts of Tourism
 

Economic- The generation of economic impacts by tourist spending, leakages of expenditure, out of local economy, measurement of economic impact, multiplier concept, types of multiplier, methodological approaches, weakness and limitations of multiplier model, policy implication of multiplier analysis. Environmental Impacts- Environmental impact assessment, EIA process, environmental auditing, environmental action programmes. Socio- Cultural Impacts- Nature of socio-cultural impact of tourism approaches to the study of socio-cultural impact of tourism, tourism developmental process, psychological basis of tourism development, sociological basis of tourism development, general negative socio- cultural impacts of tourism, specific negative socio-cultural impacts of tourism, general positive socio-cultural impacts associated with tourism, methods of measuring the socio- cultural impacts of tourism

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Approaches to the study of tourism
 

Product approach, institutional approach, managerial approach, geographical approach, sociological approach, historical approach, economic approach, inter-disciplinary approach. Sociology of tourism; Effects on the individual, effects on the family, effects on the society, life characteristics and travel, emergence of group travel patterns, social(subsidized)tourism, Barriers to travel.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:10
Emerging Trends in Tourism
 

Changing scenario of the tourism industry- SMERFS- tourists with special needs and differently abled tourist- emerging types of tourism- tourism distribution system- online travel agents- zero percent commission era- Government initiatives for tourism.

The future of tourism: The external environment for tourism; future drivers, social drivers of change, safety, security and risk, climate change, human resources for tourism, future drivers of the tourism system, future tourism product markets

Text Books And Reference Books:

Walker, R., & Harding, K. (2010). Tourism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Tan, E. S., Yeoh, B. S., & Wang, J. (2010). Tourism management and policy: Perspectives from Singapore. Singapore: World Scientific Pub.

Barwick, J., & Barwick, J. (2011). Tourism. Abbotsford, Vic.: Echidna.

Hannam, K., &Ateljevic, I. (2007). Backpacker tourism: Concepts and profiles. Clevedon, UK: Channel View Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Component

Weightage

CIA I

20%

CIA II

25%

CIA III

20%

End Semester Examination

30%

Attendance

5%

Total

100%

BBBA111 - SOCIAL SENSITIVITY SKILLS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course develops social sensitivity skill, a practice by which an individual can observe, identify, and understand the indications from socio-cultural contexts and social interactions or relationships. Social sensitivity allows students to be respectful of people around them and their respective environment. Social sensitivity combines emotional, social, and adaptive intelligence and helps students to fully prepare for ‘new normal’ expectations from all walks of life, especially business.

Course Objectives:

 

1)      To create self-awareness on social and cultural diversity and individuality

 

2)      To sensitize in responsible and meaningful behaviour with multicultural people and/or milieu

Learning Outcome

CLO1 Develop listening, observing, interactive and participative skills

  

CLO2 Develop empathy, objective analysis, and self-reflection

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:13
Capacity building
 

UNIT–I                                                                                                                       10 Hrs

 

Level of Knowledge: Basic

Capacity building – how to listen, how to observe, how to interact, how to participate, how to develop ‘we-feeling’, how to understand ‘other’, how to solve problems.

 

EVALUATION–I                                                                                                       3 Hrs

Individual Activity

Capturing Lifestory – Choose a person you like and ask him/her to narrate the lifestory to you. Record it and convert into text exactly (verbal and nonverbal cues - voice, tone, emotions, pause, etc.). Now interpret (without any judgment) his/her lifestory in your own words and present it in the class.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:17
Relationship building
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

 

Relationship building – emotional intelligence, social intelligence, adaptive intelligence, mindfulness, daily reflection, acceptable and respectful behaviour, positive and helping attitude, constructive criticism and feedback.

 

EVALUATION–II                                                                                                         3 Hrs

Group Activity (2 member team)

Exchanging Culture– Choose a classmate from a very different cultural background than your own. Interact with each other and learn about each other’s culture. Make notes on the cultural differences and cultural shock (if any) with thoughtful understanding. Present each other’s culture as a team in the class - highlighting uniqueness in your friend’s culture, breaking stereotypes and identity labelling of his/her culture.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Theresa Cheung. The Sensitivity Code: Life strategies for thriving in an overwhelming world. London, Thread Publication, 2020 (editions in Paperback, Kindle, Audiobook).

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Martin M. Antony and Richard P. Swinson. The Shyness and Social Anxiety Workbook: Proven, Step-by-Step Techniques for Overcoming Your Fear. Oakland: Canada, New Harbinger Publications, Inc., 2017 (editions in Paperback, Kindle).

Evaluation Pattern

EVALUATION–I                                                                                                       3 Hrs

Individual Activity

Capturing Lifestory – Choose a person you like and ask him/her to narrate the lifestory to you. Record it and convert into text exactly (verbal and nonverbal cues - voice, tone, emotions, pause, etc.). Now interpret (without any judgment) his/her lifestory in your own words and present it in the class. ( 50 Marks)

EVALUATION–II                                                                                                         3 Hrs

Group Activity (2 member team)

 

Exchanging Culture– Choose a classmate from a very different cultural background than your own. Interact with each other and learn about each other’s culture. Make notes on the cultural differences and cultural shock (if any) with thoughtful understanding. Present each other’s culture as a team in the class - highlighting uniqueness in your friend’s culture, breaking stereotypes and identity labelling of his/her culture.

 

BBS191 A - SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To create a sense of ownership of issues related to CSR, Environment and sustainability of businesses.

Understand the basic concept of Sustainable Development (SD), the environmental, social and economic dimensions.

To teach how to critically analyze, evaluate and judge competing perspectives on the challenge of creating a sustainablefuture.

To understand the Sustainable development challenge for companies, their responsibility and their potentials for action.

Learning Outcome

Concern for society and nature

Ability to create sustainable organizations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Meaning and Scope, Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability, Sustainability Terminologies and Meanings, why is Sustainability an Imperative, Sustainability Case Studies, Triple Bottom Line (TBL)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Sustainable Development Strategy
 

Reasons to adopt sustainable strategy by firms, tools used by the firm to implement their sustainable development strategies, evaluation of firm’s commitment to sustainable strategies by the stakeholders.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Environmental Management Systems:
 

Using Standards, Certification and other Systems to further SD goals Introduction, Global management systems exist to guide firms in establishing and implementing a strategy,how do these various approaches, including certification, encourage sustainable business practices.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Sustainable Future
 

Establishing priorities for sustainable future, Role of women in sustainability, Challenge of creating a green economy, Sustainability crisis in 21st century, failures of global capitalism, transforming global capitalism, creating a restorative economy.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Corporate Sustainability Reporting Frameworks
 

Global Reporting Initiative Guidelines, National Voluntary Guidelines on Social, Environmental and Economic Responsibilities of, Business, International Standards, Sustainability Indices, Principles of Responsible Investment, Challenges in Mainstreaming Sustainability Reporting, Sustainability Reporting Case Studies

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Balachandran V, & Chandrashekharan V, (2011). Corporate Governance, Ethics and social responsibility, PHI.

2.      Concepts of Environmental Management for Sustainable Development

3.      Baxi C. V & Rupamanjari Sinha Ray, (2012). Corporate Social Responsibility: A Study of CSR Practices in Indian Industry, Vikas Publishing House.

4.      Corporate Goverance – Badi N. V, Vrinda Publications, 2012.

5.      Fernando A. C, (2011). Corporate Governance: principles, policies and practices, Pearson.

6.      Ghosh B. N, (2012). Business Ethics and Corporate Governance , Tata McGraw-Hill.

7.      Keshoo Prasad, Corporate Governance -, PHI.

8.      Lawrence and Weber, (2010). Business and Society, Tata McGraw-Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten (2010). Business ethics, Oxford.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Written assignment on cases relating to sustainability practices followed in any country. (No country should be repeated) (20 marks)

CIA 2 - Mid sem Class exam (25 marks)

CIA 3 - Group presentation and report for pre allotted topics.(20 marks)

End sem - Class exam (30 marks)

BBS191 B - A LIFE WORTH LIVING - FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To examine health in its truest sense, one must explore beyond the limits of medicine to engage a much wider set of questions embracing social, cultural, political, economic, moral and spiritual aspects of human experience. The course focuses on the knowledge and skills that students require to lead a healthy, productive and balanced life.

 

Learning Outcome

On completing the course, students will be able to:

  • Explain health as a multi-dimensional and dynamic concept, which necessarily integrates individual, societal, biomedical, spiritual, cultural and historical influences, and how this relates to health issues encountered in everyday life.
  • Assess the inter-relatedness of health perceptions and practices across cultures.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to health
 

Health of individuals and communities – The significance of determinants of health and how these raise or lower the health of individuals and communities - Health promotion to improve health - Personal and popular attitudes and beliefs and their impact on decision making - self-management - interpersonal and key consumer health skills - Factors influencing health, and actions and strategies to protect and promote health, through investigation and inquiry processes.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Food and Values
 

Philosophy of food, Values – Three different types of values, Meat – Is it wrong to eat animals?Hunger – Do we have a duty to help starving people? - Drugs – Why is it wrong to take drugs? - GM food – How should food technology be regulated? - Capitalism – Food, globalization, and equality - Art – Can food be art? What is art? - Taste – Is taste entirely subjective? - Science – Can science explain conscious taste experiences? -Eating – Eat to live, or live to eat

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Nutrition
 

Balanced diet & Nutrition, Macro and micro nutrients – Nutritive and non nutritive components of diet – Eating for weight control – healthy weight – The pitfalls of dieting – food intolerance and food myths – Food supplements for adolescents. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Physical Education
 

Concept of physical education – Meaning – definition – aims – objectives of physical education and fitness – Need & importance of fitness – Types of fitness – Health related physical fitness – performance related physical fitness – physical activities and health benefits - Activities for developing physical fitness

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Sleep
 

What is sleep? – The phylogeny of sleep – Developmental course of sleep – Dreams- Functions of sleep – Daytime sleepiness and alertness – Sleep disorders.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Safety education and health promotion
 

Principles of accident prevention – health and safety in daily life – health and safety at work – first aid and emergency care – common injuries and their management

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:9
Spirituality, Religion and Social Change
 

Meaning of life - Meaning of death- Indian Rituals, symbols, and myths - Spirituality, altruism and moral justice - Resources to deal with stress, temptations, disappointments and failures, social oppression, the loss of possessions and of loved ones, and with one’s own death. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Indian Journals of health and well being

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

As prescribed by the facilitator

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1, Mid sem, CIA 3, End sem - 100 Marks

BBS191C - MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The Mahabharata of the great Maharishi Veda Vyasa is a treasure trove of knowledge, principles and paradigms. It is written that what is not in the Mahabharata will not be found elsewhere. Written nearly thousands of years ago, the Mahabharata is as yet a source of knowledge, especially modern management principles.In essence it highlights the victory of Dharma in times of Adharma.This subject is a comprehensive learning on management lessons which can be inferred from the great epic. It gives a clear understanding and comparison of management Principles, practices and the various functions of management with the epic. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of management. It also deals with behavioral issues in the individual processes, group and interpersonal processes.

Course Objectives:

  •  Discuss the epic by summarizing the various parvas/units in class in accordance with the management concept
  •  Review and make a critical estimate of the epic with a focus on morals, ethics, legal and management concepts
  • To develop competencies and knowledge of students to become effective professionals

Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcome: Students will get to know team work and group dynamics

  • Students will get to know determination and hard work and its implication on business decision
  • Students will be able to appreciate the role of general management for the success of an organization.
  • This subject will enable them to enhance their Moral, social, ethical and professional skills
  • To understand the manner in which strategic and competitive advantage is developed

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Mahabharatha
 

The older generations-The Pandava and Kaurava princes- Lakshagraha (the house of lac)

Establishment of the kingdom-Administration and Management principles

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Marriage and Building of New city
 

Marriage to Draupadi- An event study approach.

Indraprastha-A new beginning- Pressure for change – Change process, Types of change, Factors influencing change, Resistance to change

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
The Big Game
 

The dice game- Cooperative strategies & Reasons for strategic alliances-

Exile and return- Risks and costs of strategic alliances

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
The battle at Kurukshetra
 

The battle at Kurukshetra - Strategic Planning and Management- levels at which strategy operates- Event approaches to strategic decision making,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Post Kurukshetra
 

The end of the Pandavas- Succession Planning,Authority and Responsibility

The reunion Organizing- Choosing the organizational structure

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Rao, V.S.P., & Krishna, V.H., (2011). Strategic Management: Text and Cases. New Delhi: Excel Books.

Pratap Chandra Roy ,The complete Mahabharata translated into English prose directly from the original sanskrit text.(1st Edition) oriental publishing co.

Source: Jaya - An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

C Rajagopalachari (2017). Mahabharata (63rdedition), Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 10 Marks

MSE   30 Marks

CIA 3 10 Marks

End Assesment 50 Marks

BBS191D - CYBER SECURITY FOR THE MILLENNIAL GENERATION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Any individual can have a real-time video conversation with someone on the other side of the planet, one can send and receive money without even taking out their wallet, and even can post content online that reaches millions of people in a matter minutes. Unfortunately, the same technology that enables all this new freedom and convenience also exposes us to new security threats that we've never encountered. Malware that infects your computer and watches everything you do, phishing scams that steal private information from millions of people - today's digital world is a criminal's playground. It makes the process of stealing money or even stealing someone's entire identity way more efficient. Hence it becomes very important to protect yourself and your private data from cyber intruders. This course outlines a step-by-step roadmap that one can follow to build a tight wall of security around your digital life.

Course Objectives:

This course gives the background needed to understand basic cyber security. Students will be introduced to the world of spyware, phishing, malware, spam, social engineering, hacking and other common internet spying techniques. Students will also learn the intervention methods in securing themselves in cyber space.

Learning Outcome

  • To understand how to identify online scams.
  • To develop the right mindset and habits for securing themselves from intruders.
  • To learn how to secure their online browsing.
  • To learn how to create super passwords and how to manage them.
  • To practice cyber security skills in real world scenarios.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Cyber security
 

Why security matters – The importance of multi-layer security – the most common security threats – The dark side of Internet – The world of malware – phishing – social engineering – scams – hacking –cyber warfare.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Mindset and Habits
 

Developing the right mindset and habits for security – the importance of skepticism – avoiding malicious sites and applications – Tools needed to browse the Internet securely - why software updates matter – knowing (and limiting yourself).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Smartphone security
 

Why mobile security matters – setting up a passcode lock –importance of password security – best practices – using password manager- managing third-party app permissions – locating a lost or stolen smartphone.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Multi-factor authentication and Connected apps
 

Framework – types of mobile two-factor authentication – Two-Factor authentication: Google, Facebook, Twitter and other services - danger of rogue connected apps – managing connected apps on Google and Facebook – managing browser extensions/add-ons – staying secure with connected apps and extensions.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Encryption
 

Encryption definition – How SSL (HTTPS) protects your passwords and private data - encrypting your web traffic with a virtual private network (VPN) – encrypting computer's hard drive – encrypting smartphone – firewalls – antivirus.

Text Books And Reference Books:

·     Graham,James., Howard,Richard., & Olson,Ryan. (2011). Cyber Security Essentials. USA: CRC Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Lalit,Gulab Chandra. (2014). Cyber security threats: An emerging challenge. New Delhi: Mohit Publications.

·        Arora, A. (2014). Information Warfare and Cyber Security. Jaipur: Book Enclave.

·       Santanam, R., Sethumadhavan, M., & Virendra, M. (2011). Cyber security, cybercrime and cyber forensics: Applications and perspectives. Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.

·         Ahamad, F. (2013). Cyber Law and Information Security. New Delhi: Dreamtech Press.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 20 marks

CIA II - 25 marks

CIA III - 20 marks

End Semester - 30 marks

Attendance - 05 marks

BBS191E - TOURISM, CULTURE, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Course presents several of the operational projects implemented by, or with the support of UNESCO, to illustrate how cultural tourism policies developed in the spirit of the principles and values contained in the texts, standard-setting instruments, declarations and recommendations adopted by UNESCO, are put into practice.

To open a debate on the complex questions that surround the relations between culture and tourism, tourism and development, and tourism and dialogue among cultures.

Learning Outcome

  • To use Tourism as an instrument to bring individuals and human communities into contact
  • To understand the role of cultures and civilizations in facilitating dialogue among cultures
  • To recognise the capacity of Tourism in assisting the world’s inhabitants to live better together and thereby contribute to the construction of peace in the minds of men and women

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction, Key Themes and Issues in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Finding Meaning through Tourism, Tourism as a World of Paradoxes, The Centrality of Experiences, Changing Contexts and Emerging Challenges in the Context of Development

Culture, Heritage and Diversity as Tourism Resources, Understanding Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism, Cultural Tourism as a Means of Economic Development, Developing the Cultural Supply Chain, Exploitation of Culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism as a Vehicle for Inter-Cultural Dialogue
 

Tourist – Host Encounters, The Role of Routers / Intermediaries / Media, Tourism – Tourist Education, Cross Cultural Understanding

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism and Environmental Protection
 

Introduction to the Natural Environment, Tourism and the Spirit of Nature, Fragile and Vulnerable Ecosystems, Cultural Implications of Mobilizing Natural Resources for Tourism, From Ecotourism to Integrated Tourism

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Issues of Governance in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Developing Structures to Develop and Manage Tourism and Culture, Complexities and Challenges of Policy Making in Tourism and Culture, Responsibilities / Tensions and Actions, The Gender Dimension, Stakeholders and Collaborations

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Preservation and Mobilization of Cultural Resources
 

Cultural Tourism Itinerary, Raising Awareness about the Fragility of Heritage Sites, Education for Lasting Tourism

Case Studies from The Palestinian Territories, Central America, Western Africa, Mauritania and Angkor

Economic Empowerment and poverty Alleviation, Sustainable Tourism Development Strategy, Forging Innovative and Inter-Disciplinary Approaches, Indigenous Resource Management Systems, Empowering Communities through Tourism

Case Studies from The Aral Sea Basin, Local Effort in Asia and Pacific (LEAP), Mountainous Regions of Central and South Asia

Dissemination of Knowledge and Reconciliation with the Past, Local and Indigenous Knowledge Systems in a Global Society (LINKS), UNESCO’s Actions in the field of Tourism, Culture and Development

Case Studies on UNESCO’s Conventions, Seminars and Universal Declarations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Mobilizing Nature for Sustainable Tourism
 

Capacity Building and Youth Poverty Alleviation through Tourism and Heritage (PATH)

Case Studies on Sao Paulo’s Green Belt Biosphere Reserve

Text Books And Reference Books:

Appadurai A. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Conceptual Platform. In K. Stenou (ed.) UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 9-16.

Appadurai A. (2003) Modernity at Large. Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.

Boumedine R. S. and Veirier L. (2003) Towards a Strategy for the Sustainable Development of Tourism in the Sahara in the Context of Poverty Eradication. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Cohen E. (2004) Contemporary Tourism. Diversity and Change. Elsevier, London.

Hemmati, M. ed. (1999) Women’s Employment and Participation in Tourism, Report for UN Commission on Sustainable Development 7th Session. UNED.

Intergovernmental Conference on Cultural Policies for Development (1998) Final Report. (Also referred to as Stockholm Action Plan). UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

International Labour Organisation (2001) Human resources development, employment and globalization in the hotel, catering and tourism sector (Report for discussion at the Tripartite Meeting on Human Resources Development, Employment and Globalization in the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Sector, Geneva, ILO).

Komla E.E. and Veirier L. (2004) Tourism, Culture and Development in West-Africa: For a Cultural Tourism Consistent with Sustainable Development. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Posey D.A. (Ed) (1999) Cultural and Spiritual Values of Biodiversity. A Complementary Contribution to the Global Biodiversity Assessment. Intermediate Technology Publications, London (on behalf of United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Nairobi).

Robertson, R. (1990) Mapping the Global Conditions: Globalization as the Central Concept. In M. Featherstone (ed.) Global Culture: Nationalism, Globalization and Modernity. Sage, London, pp. 15-30.

Steck B., Strasdas W., and Gustedt, E. (1999) Tourism in Technical Co-operation. A guide to the conception, planning and implementation of project-accompanying measures in regional rural development and nature conservation. GTZ, Eschborn.

Tour Operators’ Initiative for Sustainable Tourism Development (2004) Supply Chain Engagement for Tour Operators: Three Steps towards Sustainability. UNEP-Sustainable Tourism, Paris.

Winkin Y. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Pool of Ideas for Implementation. In K. Stenou (ed.)

UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 17-60.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism – From an Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (20 Marks)

CIA 2 - Mid Semester Examination (25 Marks)

CIA 3 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Integrated Tourism by Mobilizing Natural Resources” (20 Marks)

Final Submission - An Individual Activity supported by Written Submission on “Designing a Structured Plan to Develop and Manage Sustainability through Tourism and Culture; An Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (30 Marks)

BBS191F - DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION AND ITS IMPACT ON SOCIETY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course deals with interaction between technology, its transformation and the impact it has in today's society. an interdisciplinary course giving overview about the various business models, platforms companies use for creating values among the people and initiatives taken by government related to technology for nation building. This course engage the students to confront the realities brought by disruptive technologies and the change in lifestyle of society.

COURSE OBJECTIVE

 This course attempts to be more effective in dealing with digital transformation and its impact on society.

Learning Outcome

  • Understand the evolving technologies and platforms used by business
  • Analyze the impact of technology on day-day life
  • Aware about initiatives by government for nation building

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction & Platform Trends
 

Digital Transformation in the global enterprise, Digital business ecosystem, Multi-sided platform Business- Two sided platform Mediated Networks, Management challenges for Networked Business, Difference between platform and merchant models-Digital Business Models, Value co-creation, Data Business, Data Security.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Managing Disruptive Technologies
 

Disruptive innovation-Transformation enabled by business analytics, Machine learning management, Internet of Things-AI& Human Intelligence, Cloud computing, Social media and social content strategies, Digital transformation in selected industry sectors.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy
 

Enterprise system-business achieving operational excellence, business achieving customer intimacy, challenges faced by enterprise application, next generation enterprise applications.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Technology & Nation Building
 

Indian government DST Agenda, Major development programs in technology in India, Contribution of technology in leveraging nation development.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
IT & Society
 

Information technology and society- an introduction, Social shaping of Technology, Globalization and domestication, Social implications of online data, IT intervention and changes in lifestyle-Baby boomers, GenX, GenY, GenZ.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Baron, Naomi S. Always On: Language in an Online and Mobile World. 2008. New York: Oxford University Press.
  2. Gutmann, Michael (2001), Information Technology and Society, https://www.zurich.ibm.com/pdf/news/Gutmann.pdf
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Winning the Race with Ever Smarter Machines, Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson,
  2. Sloan Management Review, Winter 2012, pp. 53-60. (HBS)
  3. Alibaba and the Future of Business (HBR, Zeng, Sept-Oct. 2018)
  4. Nintendo Game On!Ivey 2016: W16600
  5. Voice War: Hey Google vs. Alexa vs. Siri (HBS 2018: 718519)
  6. Hatsune Miku: Japanese virtual idol ignites global value co-creation (Ivey, 2015: W14631)
  7. Carolina Healthcare System: Consumer Analytics (HBS 2015: 9-515-060)
  8. Digitalization at Siemens (HBS 2017: 9-717-428)
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 20 marks

CIA II - 25 marks

CIA III - 20 marks

End Semester - 30 marks

Attendance - 05 marks

BBS191G - TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Technological development has contributed many innovations and ease of life for the human beings. However it has also generated problems .This course is offered to provide the basic knowledge of technology and the uses of technology in different areas of life basically hospitals and banks. The course focuses on identifying the technological benefits and finding solutions to the challenges generated by the technology in daily life. The course will be offered with an intention of enabling the students to visit the different institutions and to identify the technological needs and develops .Finally the course creates awareness about the dangerous of continuous usage of technology.

Course Objectives:

·         To know the history of technological developments in the daily life.

·         To Understand the impact of technology in different areas  of society

·         To identify the technological progress in the health care centre of Bangalore City.

·         To identify the technological progress in the Financial Institutions functioning in   Bangalore.

·         To find the solutions to the tech based problems of day to day life.

Learning Outcome

·         Clear understanding of technology and its impact on daily life.

·         Practical knowledge of technological developments in the health and banking sector

·         Solution to the problems originated by the tech addiction.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Technology and Life
 

Meaning- Definitions- evolution of technology-growth in the use of technology in daily life. Disruptive technologies transforming life, business and global economy- Disruptive technology trends in recent years. live reports and cases

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Impact of technology on daily life
 

Overview of Impact of technology on- Business-Society-Education-Agriculture-Banking-Health Care –Positive and negative impacts

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Technology and Health Care
 

Instruments requited in the field of Hospitals-Identify the different technologies used in the different hospitals –Need for new technology and the Plans of the Institutions to acquire-Identifying the affordable health services from the perspective of individuals.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Technology and Financial Services
 

Introduction to the different digital services offered by the banks and financial institution- Identify the different technologies used in the city- most demanded services-scope for introduction of new technical support by the banks and financial institutions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Future of Well-Being in a Tech-Saturated World
 

Themes about the future of well-being and digital life-The benefits of digital life

Concerns over harms-Effects on technology on the youths of today-Tech Experts big predications-Solutions to the technology driven daily life problems

Text Books And Reference Books:

The People Vs Tech: How the internet is killing democracy (and how we save it) v By by Jamie Bartlett

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

New Thinking: From Einstein to Artificial Intelligence, the Science and Technology at Transformed Our World by by Dagogo Altraide

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1, 2, 3 and End sem - 100 Marks

BECH191A - INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of institutions and the informal economy in a global context. The discourse examines the informal economy through the lens of institutional economics. The aim is to acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention.  

 

Course Objectives

This course will:

 

  • introduce students to the institutions and institutional change through major concepts in institutional economics;

  • discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory and measurement;

  • examine the linkages of formal and informal economy;

  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss these complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • understand the concepts and some of the theoretical discourses in the study of institutional change and informal economy;

  • examine how the formal and informal economies are no longer separate watertight compartments but function together as an interactive system;

  • effectively communicate these complex ideas through written and oral presentation.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Institutions and Institutional Change
 

Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance; Informal Constraints; Formal Constraints; The Path of Institutional Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Elements of Institutional Economics
 

Contracts and Property Rights: the Concepts of Exchange and Property, Critique of the Utilitarian Calculus; Transaction Costs, Bargaining Power; Markets as Institutions; Firms and Markets

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Informality: Concepts, Theory and Measurement
 

Bureaucratic Form and the Informal Economy; Formal and Informal Enterprises: Concepts, Definition, and Measurement Issues; Linking the Formal and Informal Economy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Empirical Studies in Institutional Change and Informality
 

CASE STUDIES: The Impact of Regulation on Growth and Informality: Cross-Country Evidence; Blocking Human Potential: How Formal Policies Block the Economy in the Maputo Corridor; Enforcement and Compliance in Lima’s Street Markets: The Origins and Consequences of Policy Incoherence towards Informal Traders

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Readings

Alston, L. J., Eggertsson, T., & North, D. C. (Eds.). (1996). Empirical Studies in Institutional Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Guha-Khasnobis, B., Kanbur, R., & Ostrom, E. (Eds.). (2006). Linking the Formal and Informal Economy: Concepts and Policies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Misztal, B. (2002). Informality: Social theory and Contemporary Practice. Routledge.

North, D. (1990). Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic PerformanceInstitutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings

Arias, O., Fajnzylber, P., Maloney, W., Mason, A., Perry, G., & Saavedra-Chanduvi, J. (2007). Informality: Exit and Exclusion. Washington: The World Bank.

Harris, J. (2006). Power Matters: Essays on Institutions, Politics, and Society in India. New York: Oxford University Press.

Mehta, P. B., & Kapur, D. (2005). Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Nayyar, D. (Ed.). (2002). Governing Globalization: Issues and Institutions. Oxford University Press.

Oviedo, A. M. (2009). Economic Informality: Causes, Costs, and Policies: A Literature Survey of International Experience. Country Economic Memorandum (CEM).

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

Institutions and Informal Economy

45%

50%

5%

 

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

 

End Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

 

BECH191B - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies.

This course will:

  • consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption
  • acquaint students to significant debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption
  • analyse corruption in emerging economies through various case studies
  • discuss issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing corruption as erosion of trust and abuse of power
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • appreciate that nuances in the way corruption is defined and understood in different economies
  • analyse the cause and  consequences of corruption
  • examine some of the policies reforms aimed at tackling corruption
  • investigate some impacts of corruption on emerging economies
  • effectively communicate complex ideas through written and oral presentation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries?, Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: the Role of Institutions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption?  Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anticorruption Device

Text Books And Reference Books:

Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in Private Sector.Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187-203.

Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The readings mentioned as essential are to be followed.

Evaluation Pattern

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

The Economics of Corruption

45%

50%

5%

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment