Department of
BUSINESS-STUDIES-AND-SOCIAL-SCIENCES






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Journalism Honours)
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBS191C MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT 3 3 100
BBS191D INTRODUCTION TO EXISTENTIALISM 3 3 100
BBS191E TOURISM, CULTURE, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
BECO191A INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY 3 3 100
BECO191B ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION 3 3 100
BENG121 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION I 3 3 100
BENG191A READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION 3 3 100
BHIS191A ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST 3 3 100
BJOH131 INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION 5 5 100
BJOH132 PRINT JOURNALISM 1.0 5 5 100
BJOH151 PHOTOGRAPHY 4 4 100
BJOH161 INDIAN ECONOMY 4 4 100
BMED191A MEDIA LITERACY 3 3 100
BMED191B CINEMATOGRAPHY 3 3 100
BPOL191A CONFLICT MANAGEMENT AND PEACE 3 3 100
BPOL191B GLOBAL POWER POLITICS 3 3 100
BPOL191C STATE AND TERRORISM 3 3 100
BPSY191A SCIENCE OF WELLNESS 3 3 100
BPSY191B ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 3 100
SDJO112 SOCIAL SENSITIVITY SKILLS 2 0 50
2 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBS291A APPLIED ETHICS-A MULTICULTURAL APPROACH 3 3 100
BBS291B GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE 3 3 100
BBS291C COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES 3 3 100
BECO291A ECONOMICS AND LITERATURE 3 3 100
BECO291B DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
BENG221 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION II 3 3 100
BENG291A READING CITYSCAPES: BANGALORE HISTORIES 3 3 100
BENG291B READING THE CYBERSPACE: PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE 3 3 100
BHIS291A THE POLITICS OF MEMORY: THE MAKINGS OF GENOCIDE 3 3 100
BJOH231 MEDIA, CULTURE AND SOCIETY 5 05 100
BJOH241 JOURNALISTIC ETHICS 4 4 100
BJOH251 WRITING FOR PRINT MEDIA 5 5 100
BJOH261 INDIA FROM 1947 TO 2000'S 5 5 100
BMED291A INTER-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION 3 3 100
BMED291B ACOUSTIC PHONETICS 3 03 100
BPOL291A LITERATURE REVIEW FOR RESEARCH 3 3 100
BPSY291A APPRECIATING AESTHETICS 3 3 100
BPSY291B HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS 3 3 100
SDJO212 EXPRESSIVE SKILLS 2 0 50
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BJOH331 COMMUNITY JOURNALISM 5 5 100
BJOH341A ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATION 5 05 100
BJOH341B CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY 5 5 100
BJOH351 BROADCAST MEDIA 5 5 100
BJOH352 AUDIO-VISUAL PRODUCTION 4 4 100
BJOH381 INTERNSHIP I 0 02 50
BSEL 311 SERVICE LEARNING I 2 2 50
SDJO312 KNOWLEDGE ACQUISITION SKILLS 2 0 50
4 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BJOH431 DEVELOPMENT COMMUNICATION 5 5 100
BJOH432 RESEARCH METHODS 4 4 100
BJOH441 MEDIA SEMIOTICS 4 4 100
BJOH442 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY 60 4 100
BJOH451 SHORT FILM MAKING 4 4 100
BJOH452 DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION 5 5 100
BSEL411 SERVICE LEARNING II 2 2 50
SDBS 412 KNOWLEDGE APPLICATION SKILLS 2 1 100
SDJO412 KNOWLEDGE APPLICATION SKILLS 2 0 50
5 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BJOH531 GLOBAL MEDIA AND POLITICS 5 5 100
BJOH532 MEDIA LAW 5 5 100
BJOH533 NEW MEDIA JOURNALISM 5 5 100
BJOH541A FILM APPRECIATION 4 4 100
BJOH541B SPORTS JOURNALISM 4 4 100
BJOH551 DIGITAL MEDIA AND PRODUCTION 4 4 100
BJOH581 INTERNSHIP II 0 2 50
SDJO512 SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS 1 2 0 50
6 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BJOH631 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 5 5 100
BJOH632 A COMMUNICATION AND ADVOCACY 5 5 100
BJOH632 B MEDIA AND GENDER 75 5 100
BJOH634 MEDIA ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BJOH651 DATA JOURNALISM 4 4 100
BJOH681 DISSERTATION 2 4 100
SDJO612 SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS 2 2 0 50
        

  

Assesment Pattern

70% CIA and 30% ESE

Examination And Assesments

CIA 1 = 20 marks; MSE: 50 marks (25% weightage); CIA 3 = 20 marks; ESE: 50 marks (30%weightage)

Department Overview:
The undergraduate Department of Media Studies aims to provide a firm foundation for the students to either directly get into journalism and related areas in Media or make a foray into higher studies. The programmes are a combination of theory and practice, though tilted towards building a strong theoretical foundation on which to build a career in Media.BA Media Studies with Economics and Political Science, and BA (Journalism Honours) will provide the students with a varied set of options depending on their objectives. However, the department aims to inculcate among its students a critical engagement of the word of media, with the aim of molding them into responsible and social citizens of the nation.
Mission Statement:
Mission: To equip learners to harness the power of communication for societal upliftment and professional excellence Vision: To create a democratic space that can foster critical thinking and ethical practices in the area of communication research and incubation
Introduction to Program:
The syllabus for this programme is designed to give the student a theoretical base to specialize in journalism in the final two semesters. In the first two semesters, the emphasis is to locate Journalism in the broader field of communication and provide a background in the social sciences- political science, economics and sociology. The art and science of reporting and editing is aimed at strengthening the knowledge base and imparting skills necessary to survive in the field of written communication. Special emphasis is given in the fourth semester to the fields of broadcast and print. The field of journalism has seen a great many changes in recent years. With globalization, there has been an exponential growth of educational institutions offering Journalism as part of their curriculum.
Program Objective:
To have sound grounding in various aspects of journalism: theoretical and practical. To train students to become journalists who help define communication. To help create a common understanding rooted in contemporary reality. To create industry oriented talent pool who are able to fulfil demanding managerial, networking and organizational duties in a wide range of positions in the area of journalism.

BBS191C - MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The Mahabharata of the great Maharishi Veda Vyasa is a treasure trove of knowledge, principles and paradigms. It is written that what is not in the Mahabharata will not be found elsewhere. Written nearly thousands of years ago, the Mahabharata is as yet a source of knowledge, especially modern management principles.In essence it highlights the victory of Dharma in times of Adharma.This subject is a comprehensive learning on management lessons which can be inferred from the great epic. It gives a clear understanding and comparison of management Principles, practices and the various functions of management with the epic. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of management. It also deals with behavioral issues in the individual processes, group and interpersonal processes.

Course Objectives:

  •  Discuss the epic by summarizing the various parvas/units in class in accordance with the management concept
  •  Review and make a critical estimate of the epic with a focus on morals, ethics, legal and management concepts
  • To develop competencies and knowledge of students to become effective professionals

Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcome: Students will get to know team work and group dynamics

  • Students will get to know determination and hard work and its implication on business decision
  • Students will be able to appreciate the role of general management for the success of an organization.
  • This subject will enable them to enhance their Moral, social, ethical and professional skills
  • To understand the manner in which strategic and competitive advantage is developed

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Mahabharatha
 

The older generations-The Pandava and Kaurava princes- Lakshagraha (the house of lac)

Establishment of the kingdom-Administration and Management principles

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Marriage and Building of New city
 

Marriage to Draupadi- An event study approach.

Indraprastha-A new beginning- Pressure for change – Change process, Types of change, Factors influencing change, Resistance to change

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
The Big Game
 

The dice game- Cooperative strategies & Reasons for strategic alliances-

Exile and return- Risks and costs of strategic alliances

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
The battle at Kurukshetra
 

The battle at Kurukshetra - Strategic Planning and Management- levels at which strategy operates- Event approaches to strategic decision making,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Post Kurukshetra
 

The end of the Pandavas- Succession Planning,Authority and Responsibility

The reunion Organizing- Choosing the organizational structure

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Rao, V.S.P., & Krishna, V.H., (2011). Strategic Management: Text and Cases. New Delhi: Excel Books.

Pratap Chandra Roy ,The complete Mahabharata translated into English prose directly from the original sanskrit text.(1st Edition) oriental publishing co.

Source: Jaya - An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

C Rajagopalachari (2017). Mahabharata (63rdedition), Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 10 Marks

MSE   30 Marks

CIA 3 10 Marks

End Assesment 50 Marks

BBS191D - INTRODUCTION TO EXISTENTIALISM (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to the primary figures and themes of existentialism. Although Jean-Paul Sartre was one of the few thinkers who readily adopted the word “existentialism” (along with de Beauvoir and Marcel), the term eventually was used to describe the entire tradition of European thought that dominated the first part twentieth-century, and focused on the analysis of human existence. The readings in the course will focus on three groups of thinkers: the nineteenth-century precursors to existentialism (Dostoyevsky, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche), the German thinkers who laid the groundwork for existential thought (Kafka, Heidegger, Jaspers), and the French thinkers who were most identified with the movement (Sartre, de Beauvoir, Camus). The lectures and discussions will focus primarily on a close reading of the selected primary texts.

Learning Outcome

·         To enable students to understand life and discover meaning in life

·         To incite  critical thinking among students to search for meaning

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Existentialism
 

Nineteenth-Century Precursors to Existentialism:  Pascal, Dostoyevsky,

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The Existentialism Philosophy
 

Kierkegaard: Fear and Trembling, Nietzsche: The Will to Power, The Critique of Morality, Nihilism, The Transvaluation of Values

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
German Existentialism: Kafka, Heidegger, Jaspers
 

Kafka: Three Parables, Heidegger: The Way Back into the Ground of Metaphysics, Jaspers: Existenzphilosophie

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
French Existentialism: Sartre, de Beauvoir, Camus
 

Sartre: Being and Nothingness, Negation, In-Itself, For-Itself, Freedom and Anguish, Bad Faith, Being-for-Others, De Beauvoir: The Second Sex, introduction, Myth and Reality, The Independent Woman, Sartre: Existentialism is Humanism, Camus: The Myth of Sisyphus

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
The Death Camps
 

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz and implications of existentialism in the contemporary word. The relevance of Existentialism today.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

·         In Kaufmann, W. (1956). Existentialism: From Dostoevsky to Sartre. New York: Meridian Books.

 

·         Kierkegaard, S., Evans, C. S., & Walsh, S. (2006). Fear and trembling. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

·         Sartre, J.-P. (1966). Being and nothingness: An essay on phenomenological ontology. New York: Washington Square Press.

 

·         Beauvoir, Simone de, 1908-1986. (2009). The second sex. London :Jonathan Cape,

 

·         Levi, P., Woolf, S. J., & Roth, P. (1996). Survival in Auschwitz: The Nazi assault on humanity.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reynods, Jack, Understanding Existentialism, Chesham, 2006

Evaluation Pattern

Book Review : 10 Marks

Drama (On the theme of Existetialism) - 30 Marks

Mid Semester : 20 Marks

End Semester: 30 Marks

BBS191E - TOURISM, CULTURE, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Course presents several of the operational projects implemented by, or with the support of UNESCO, to illustrate how cultural tourism policies developed in the spirit of the principles and values contained in the texts, standard-setting instruments, declarations and recommendations adopted by UNESCO, are put into practice.

To open a debate on the complex questions that surround the relations between culture and tourism, tourism and development, and tourism and dialogue among cultures.

Learning Outcome

  • To use Tourism as an instrument to bring individuals and human communities into contact
  • To understand the role of cultures and civilizations in facilitating dialogue among cultures
  • To recognise the capacity of Tourism in assisting the world’s inhabitants to live better together and thereby contribute to the construction of peace in the minds of men and women

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction, Key Themes and Issues in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Finding Meaning through Tourism, Tourism as a World of Paradoxes, The Centrality of Experiences, Changing Contexts and Emerging Challenges in the Context of Development

Culture, Heritage and Diversity as Tourism Resources, Understanding Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism, Cultural Tourism as a Means of Economic Development, Developing the Cultural Supply Chain, Exploitation of Culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism as a Vehicle for Inter-Cultural Dialogue
 

Tourist – Host Encounters, The Role of Routers / Intermediaries / Media, Tourism – Tourist Education, Cross Cultural Understanding

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism and Environmental Protection
 

Introduction to the Natural Environment, Tourism and the Spirit of Nature, Fragile and Vulnerable Ecosystems, Cultural Implications of Mobilizing Natural Resources for Tourism, From Ecotourism to Integrated Tourism

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Issues of Governance in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Developing Structures to Develop and Manage Tourism and Culture, Complexities and Challenges of Policy Making in Tourism and Culture, Responsibilities / Tensions and Actions, The Gender Dimension, Stakeholders and Collaborations

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Preservation and Mobilization of Cultural Resources
 

Cultural Tourism Itinerary, Raising Awareness about the Fragility of Heritage Sites, Education for Lasting Tourism

Case Studies from The Palestinian Territories, Central America, Western Africa, Mauritania and Angkor

Economic Empowerment and poverty Alleviation, Sustainable Tourism Development Strategy, Forging Innovative and Inter-Disciplinary Approaches, Indigenous Resource Management Systems, Empowering Communities through Tourism

Case Studies from The Aral Sea Basin, Local Effort in Asia and Pacific (LEAP), Mountainous Regions of Central and South Asia

Dissemination of Knowledge and Reconciliation with the Past, Local and Indigenous Knowledge Systems in a Global Society (LINKS), UNESCO’s Actions in the field of Tourism, Culture and Development

Case Studies on UNESCO’s Conventions, Seminars and Universal Declarations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Mobilizing Nature for Sustainable Tourism
 

Capacity Building and Youth Poverty Alleviation through Tourism and Heritage (PATH)

Case Studies on Sao Paulo’s Green Belt Biosphere Reserve

Text Books And Reference Books:

Appadurai A. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Conceptual Platform. In K. Stenou (ed.) UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 9-16.

Appadurai A. (2003) Modernity at Large. Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.

Boumedine R. S. and Veirier L. (2003) Towards a Strategy for the Sustainable Development of Tourism in the Sahara in the Context of Poverty Eradication. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Cohen E. (2004) Contemporary Tourism. Diversity and Change. Elsevier, London.

Hemmati, M. ed. (1999) Women’s Employment and Participation in Tourism, Report for UN Commission on Sustainable Development 7th Session. UNED.

Intergovernmental Conference on Cultural Policies for Development (1998) Final Report. (Also referred to as Stockholm Action Plan). UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

International Labour Organisation (2001) Human resources development, employment and globalization in the hotel, catering and tourism sector (Report for discussion at the Tripartite Meeting on Human Resources Development, Employment and Globalization in the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Sector, Geneva, ILO).

Komla E.E. and Veirier L. (2004) Tourism, Culture and Development in West-Africa: For a Cultural Tourism Consistent with Sustainable Development. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Posey D.A. (Ed) (1999) Cultural and Spiritual Values of Biodiversity. A Complementary Contribution to the Global Biodiversity Assessment. Intermediate Technology Publications, London (on behalf of United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Nairobi).

Robertson, R. (1990) Mapping the Global Conditions: Globalization as the Central Concept. In M. Featherstone (ed.) Global Culture: Nationalism, Globalization and Modernity. Sage, London, pp. 15-30.

Steck B., Strasdas W., and Gustedt, E. (1999) Tourism in Technical Co-operation. A guide to the conception, planning and implementation of project-accompanying measures in regional rural development and nature conservation. GTZ, Eschborn.

Tour Operators’ Initiative for Sustainable Tourism Development (2004) Supply Chain Engagement for Tour Operators: Three Steps towards Sustainability. UNEP-Sustainable Tourism, Paris.

Winkin Y. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Pool of Ideas for Implementation. In K. Stenou (ed.)

UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 17-60.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism – From an Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (20 Marks)

CIA 2 - Mid Semester Examination (25 Marks)

CIA 3 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Integrated Tourism by Mobilizing Natural Resources” (20 Marks)

Final Submission - An Individual Activity supported by Written Submission on “Designing a Structured Plan to Develop and Manage Sustainability through Tourism and Culture; An Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (30 Marks)

BECO191A - INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of institutions and the informal economy in a global context. The discourse examines the informal economy through the lens of institutional economics. The aim is to acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention.  

 

Course Objectives

This course will:

 

  • introduce students to the institutions and institutional change through major concepts in institutional economics;

  • discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory and measurement;

  • examine the linkages of formal and informal economy;

  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss these complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • understand the concepts and some of the theoretical discourses in the study of institutional change and informal economy;

  • examine how the formal and informal economies are no longer separate watertight compartments but function together as an interactive system;

  • effectively communicate these complex ideas through written and oral presentation.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Institutions and Institutional Change
 

Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance; Informal Constraints; Formal Constraints; The Path of Institutional Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Elements of Institutional Economics
 

Contracts and Property Rights: the Concepts of Exchange and Property, Critique of the Utilitarian Calculus; Transaction Costs, Bargaining Power; Markets as Institutions; Firms and Markets

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Informality: Concepts, Theory and Measurement
 

Bureaucratic Form and the Informal Economy; Formal and Informal Enterprises: Concepts, Definition, and Measurement Issues; Linking the Formal and Informal Economy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Empirical Studies in Institutional Change and Informality
 

CASE STUDIES: The Impact of Regulation on Growth and Informality: Cross-Country Evidence; Blocking Human Potential: How Formal Policies Block the Economy in the Maputo Corridor; Enforcement and Compliance in Lima’s Street Markets: The Origins and Consequences of Policy Incoherence towards Informal Traders

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Readings

Alston, L. J., Eggertsson, T., & North, D. C. (Eds.). (1996). Empirical Studies in Institutional Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Guha-Khasnobis, B., Kanbur, R., & Ostrom, E. (Eds.). (2006). Linking the Formal and Informal Economy: Concepts and Policies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Misztal, B. (2002). Informality: Social theory and Contemporary Practice. Routledge.

North, D. (1990). Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic PerformanceInstitutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings

Arias, O., Fajnzylber, P., Maloney, W., Mason, A., Perry, G., & Saavedra-Chanduvi, J. (2007). Informality: Exit and Exclusion. Washington: The World Bank.

Harris, J. (2006). Power Matters: Essays on Institutions, Politics, and Society in India. New York: Oxford University Press.

Mehta, P. B., & Kapur, D. (2005). Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Nayyar, D. (Ed.). (2002). Governing Globalization: Issues and Institutions. Oxford University Press.

Oviedo, A. M. (2009). Economic Informality: Causes, Costs, and Policies: A Literature Survey of International Experience. Country Economic Memorandum (CEM).

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

Institutions and Informal Economy

45%

50%

5%

 

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

 

End Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

 

BECO191B - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies.

This course will:

  • consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption
  • acquaint students to significant debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption
  • analyse corruption in emerging economies through various case studies
  • discuss issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing corruption as erosion of trust and abuse of power
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • appreciate that nuances in the way corruption is defined and understood in different economies
  • analyse the cause and  consequences of corruption
  • examine some of the policies reforms aimed at tackling corruption
  • investigate some impacts of corruption on emerging economies
  • effectively communicate complex ideas through written and oral presentation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries?, Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: the Role of Institutions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption?  Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anticorruption Device

Text Books And Reference Books:

Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in Private Sector.Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187-203.

Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The readings mentioned as essential are to be followed.

Evaluation Pattern

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

The Economics of Corruption

45%

50%

5%

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

End Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

 

BENG121 - ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

English Language and Composition course is an intensive program for two semesters for all the students of the BA/BSc programmes  (ENGH, EPH, ECOH, JOUH, PSYH, MEP) that introduces students to a wide range of expository works in order to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of a graduate level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. It would provide students with the opportunity to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and the subjects in texts.

 

The purpose of the course is to enable students to read analytically, formulate arguments based on the readings, and respond by composing articulate essays that utilize advanced elements of sentence structure, syntax, style, purpose, and tone. Thus, by the use of rhetorical principles, students will learn how to become critical thinkers, and apply that knowledge to their writing by revising and improving their essays, as well as critiquing and editing peer essays. In addition, students will be required to thoroughly research relevant topics, synthesize information from a variety of sources, and document their knowledge in a cogent well written report. Also, as the course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in multiple mediums, including visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, comic strips, music videos, and TED talks; students would develop a sense to comprehend how resource of language operates in any given text. While the first semester focusses on understanding principles of rhetoric through multiple texts, the second semester is more thematic in nature familiarizing students with texts from multiple disciplines, especially in the context of India.

 

As part of the course students are expected to maintain a writing journal to monitor their progress in writing.

 

 

Course Objectives

To enable students to:

       Enable students to become Independent critical thinker, who are aware of the power of language.

       Enable students to become excellent communicators of the language.

       Equip students with necessary skills for graduate course and for career.

Learning Outcome