Department of
BUSINESS-STUDIES-AND-SOCIAL-SCIENCES






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Economics Honours)
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BAL111N POLITICAL THEORY- I 4 4 100
BAL132N ENGLISH 4 4 100
BAL143N PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BAL164N LEGAL METHODS 5 4 100
BAL165N INDIAN LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY 5 4 100
BAL166N LAW OF TORTS 5 4 100
BBS191C MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT 3 3 100
BBS191D INTRODUCTION TO EXISTENTIALISM 3 3 100
BBS191E TOURISM, CULTURE, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
BECH131 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 5 5 100
BECH132 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS-I 5 5 100
BECH133 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF INDIA FROM 1750 TO 1947 5 5 100
BECH141 INTRODUCTION TO THE PHILOSOPHY OF ECONOMICS 3 3 100
BECO191A INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY 3 3 100
BECO191B ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION 3 3 100
BENG121 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION I 3 3 100
BENG191A READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION 3 3 100
BHIS191A ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST 3 3 100
BMED191A MEDIA LITERACY 3 3 100
BMED191B CINEMATOGRAPHY 3 3 100
BPOL191A CONFLICT MANAGEMENT AND PEACE 3 3 100
BPOL191B GLOBAL POWER POLITICS 3 3 100
BPOL191C STATE AND TERRORISM 3 3 100
BPSY191A SCIENCE OF WELLNESS 3 3 100
BPSY191B ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 3 100
SDEC112 SOCIAL SENSITIVITY SKILLS 2 00 50
2 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BAL211N POLITICAL THEORY- II 4 4 100
BAL232N LAW AND LITERATURE 5 4 100
BAL243N INSTITUTIONAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BAL264N LEGAL LANGUAGE AND LEGAL WRITING 5 4 100
BAL265N LAW OF CONSUMER PROTECTION AND MOTOR VEHICLES ACT 5 4 100
BAL2E1N HUMAN RIGHTS 5 4 100
BAL2E4N LAW AND MEDICINE 5 4 100
BAL2E5N LAW, POVERTY, AND DEVELOPMENT 5 4 100
BBS291B GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE 3 3 100
BBS291C COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES 3 3 100
BECH231 INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS 5 5 100
BECH232 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS-II 5 5 100
BECH233 STATISTICS FOR ECONOMICS - I 5 5 100
BECH241 GENDER ECONOMICS 3 3 50
BECO291A ECONOMICS AND LITERATURE 3 3 100
BECO291B DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
BENG221 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION II 3 3 100
BENG291A READING CITYSCAPES: BANGALORE HISTORIES 3 3 100
BENG291B READING THE CYBERSPACE: PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE 3 3 100
BHIS291A THE POLITICS OF MEMORY: THE MAKINGS OF GENOCIDE 3 3 100
BMED291A INTER-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION 3 3 100
BMED291B ACOUSTIC PHONETICS 3 03 100
BPSY291A APPRECIATING AESTHETICS 3 3 100
BPSY291B HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS 3 3 100
SDEC212 EXPRESSIVE SKILLS 2 00 50
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BECH331 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS 5 5 50
BECH332 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS 5 5 100
BECH333 STATISTICS FOR ECONOMICS - II 5 5 100
BECH341A HEALTH ECONOMICS: THEORY AND APPLICATION 4 4 100
BECH341B FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BECH361 INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 4 4 100
BECH362 CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
SDEC312 KNOWLEDGE ACQUISITION SKILLS 2 0 50
4 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BECH431 FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 5 4 100
BECH432 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 5 5 100
BECH433 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS 5 5 100
BECH441A ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY 4 4 100
BECH441B LABOUR ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BECH461 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 4 4 100
BECH462 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
SDEC412 KNOWLEDGE APPLICATION SKILLS 2 0 50
5 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BECH531 INDIAN ECONOMY 5 5 100
BECH532 APPLIED ECONOMETRICS 5 5 100
BECH533 PUBLIC ECONOMICS 5 5 50
BECH554 HEALTH ECONOMICS: THEORY AND APPLICATION 4 4 100
BECH555 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 4 4 100
BECH556 APPLIED STATISTICS 4 4 100
BECH581 INTERNSHIP 0 2 50
SDEC512 SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS 1 2 0 50
6 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BECH631 FINANCIAL ECONOMICS 5 5 100
BECH632 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS: THEORY AND APPLICATION 5 5 50
BECH633 INDUSTRIAL ECONOMICS 5 5 100
BECH641 LABOUR ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BECH642 ECONOMICS OF LAW 4 4 100
BECH681 DISSERTATION 0 4 100
SDEC612 SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS 2 2 0 50
        

          

  

Assesment Pattern

The Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) will be assessed for seventy per cent weightage and the End Semester Examination (ESE) for thirty per cent weightage. The practical courses and the common core courses will be assessed out of hundred marks in various components including attendance. The Mid Semester and End Semester written examination question pattern consists of questions divided into two or three sections with short answers, short essays and long essays.

Examination And Assesments

The evaluation is divided into two components: Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) including Mid Semester Examination (MSE), and the End Semester Examination (ESE).

Department Overview:
Under the School of Business Studies and Social Sciences, CHRIST (Deemed to be University) Bannerghatta Road Campus, the Economics Cluster, which later became the Cluster of Economics and Political Science in 2019, was formed in 2016 out of the parent Department of Economics. The Cluster consists of a faculty pool with rich experience in teaching, research and consultancy. The cluster has over eighteen full-time faculty members with specialisation in Monetary and Financial Economics, Environmental Economics, Behavioural Economics, Industrial Economics, Informal Economy, Public Administration, International Relations, Political Ideologies and so on, involving in advanced research.
Mission Statement:
Vision Establish an identity as a cluster of a high standard in teaching and research in Economics and Political Science. Mission Equip students with advanced knowledge and skill sets to address real-world socio-economic and political problems and undertake cutting edge research on contemporary issues related to the same.
Introduction to Program:
The BA Economics Honours Programme with non-core subjects Psychology and Political Science and integrated courses in Sociology and History is designed to produce graduates trained in the application of knowledge in economics to real-life economic, financial, ethical and analytical problems encountered in the economy. It is structured to provide the students with the skills and professional acumen to become key players in the economy irrespective of their future job places and task diversification they would take up. The programme may enable the students to effectively apply their knowledge and skills to situations of economic, institutional and policy making both in governance and industry. The programme has a rigorous focus on quantitative techniques and research methods which will orient the students in dealing with economic problems with a practical and analytical approach. The diversity and the spread of the programme ensure that the students receive sufficient experience of the current issues and crises of the world especially that of the emerging economies.
Program Objective:
Programme Objectives: - To train the students in the fundamental theories in economics - To provide skills in academic research and economic analysis - To expose the students to the real world economic experiences through service learning - To develop the competency to design economic policies - To mould holistically developed individuals Programme Outcomes: On completion of the BA Honours programme in Economics: - The students will gain familiarity with historical and contemporary developments in the discipline of Economics. - The students will have the necessary knowledge of interdisciplinary areas. - Students will be able to analyse and evaluate economic policies. - Students will gain problem-solving, interpretative and decision-making skills. - Students will attain the competency to understand regional, national and global issues from the economic perspective. - The students will have advanced knowledge of discipline-specific areas of Economics. - Students will be trained in advanced practical areas of data analysis, report generation and critical thinking. - Students will be eligible for higher education at leading institutions in the world. - The students will be professionally equipped to take up careers in the corporate and public sector.

Assesment Pattern
  • Continues internal assessments for theory course 50%
  • End semester examination 50%
Examination And Assesments
  • Continues internal assessments for theory course 50%
  • End semester examination 50%
Department Overview:
The School of Law, CHRIST (Deemed to be University) (SLCU),Delhi NCR , is approved by the Bar Council of India to conduct the B.A., LL.B. course (Honours). The school offers a five-year integrated law program, the successful completion of which will earn the student a B.A., LL.B. degree (Honours) to be awarded by CHRIST (Deemed to be University). In addition to the mandatory courses over the ten semester program, The School of Law, CHRIST (Deemed to be University) has introduced for the benefit of its students numerous other value-added courses and programs aimed at putting the student on par with standard of legal education imparted at the best international universities. In this School of Law, knowledge of law is imparted by a teaching - learning process; teaching is supplemented by a variety of skills, such as skills in advocacy, legal writing, research, management of time. The courses are specifically designed keeping in mind the latest development in the field of law. The course is oriented towards the industry and is aided by an advisory board which is comprised of some of the leading lights in the legal fraternity. Special emphasis on ethics, life skills and holistic education will empower the students to achieve integrity and look forward to effective contribution to the society.
Mission Statement:
To create and pro actively generate in depth legal knowledge in the student community so that they can transfer their knowledge acquired to the larger benefits of the society in accordance with professional ethics and values.
Introduction to Program:
The students are introduced to political theory and economics other than law subjects. The objective is to provide in depth knowledge in systems of Governance along with legal subjects.
Program Objective:
Demonstrate an understanding of the working of the legal system in India Apply knowledge gained to the socio-legal problems in the society Transfer acquired knowledge for the larger benefit of the society Work efficiently and effectively individually and in-group assignments Reflect on one?s own learning and performance and benefit from the feedback obtained Accurately identify researchable areas and independently research on them Use relevant primary and secondary legal sources Retrieve quality legal material accurately using conventional and e-resources Judge critically the merits of an argument Present arguments in a logical and articulate manner Justify decisions based on sound legal reasoning Represent best interests of the client in a professional and ethical manner

BAL111N - POLITICAL THEORY- I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims at introducing the philosophical ideas underlying constitution and other branches of law. Knowledge of these ideas will enable the students to understand the legal principles in a better way.

Unit 1 will deal with the contributions of Greek thinkers and the evolution of concepts like democracy and justice.

Unit 2 will deal will the impact of Medieval thinkers and their contributions to political thought.

Unit 3 will deal with the renaissance and modern political thinkers social contract theories that attempt to explain the origin of the state.

Unit 4 will deal with the prominent thinkers of liberal and conservative thought.

Unit 5 will deal with the writings of Hegel, Karl Marx and the revisionist thinkers.

Unit 6 Will deal with contemporary political thought in India.

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the students will be in a position to:

  • comprehend key ideas of all major political thinkers, both western and Indian.
  • establish connection between law and philosophy and 
  • articulate their ideas clearly and concisely with a marked change in their analytical capabilities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
CLASSICAL THINKERS: THE GREEK THINKERS
 

Socrates – Paradoxes, Idea of Athenian Democracy, Political Philosophy. 

Plato- The idea of the Republic, Private property, justice, censorship, freedom and autonomy.

Aristotle – Views on human nature, constitutions, ethics, theory of justice, natural law.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
MEDIEVAL THINKERS: CICERO, ST AUGUSTINE AND THOMAS AQUINAS
 

Cicero – The rhetorical foundations of society, Statesmanship, Republican rule,

St. Augustine- Free Will and Just War,

Thomas Aquinas: Commentaries on Aristotle, political order and Just war.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
MODERN THINKERS: RENAISSANCE PERIOD AND SOCIAL CONTRACT THEORIES
 

Introduction to Renaissance.

Machiavelli’s contributions in The Prince, idea of politics, Realism.

Thomas Hobbes – Contractarianism, Agency and Authorization, The non-resistance Compact between subjects

John Locke – The idea of Social Contract, equality and natural law, property, limited government, toleration and rule of law

Jean Rousseau – The state of nature, natural law and natural rights, the general will, the problem of freedom.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
EDMUND BURKE, J.S.MILL AND JEREMY BENTHAM
 

Edmund Burke: Sovereignty and Constitutionalism, political obligation, natural law

J.S. Mill: Liberty, freedom of speech, women’s rights and economic democracy

Jeremy Bentham: Utilitarianism

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
HEGEL, KARL MARX AND REVISIONIST THINKERS
 

G.W. F. Hegel: Hegel’s dialectic, atheism and liberal democracy

Karl Marx – The Hegelian influence, alienation, critique of the Modern State, ideology, forces and relations of production, influence of Marx today.

Revisionists: Edward Bernstein and the social democrats.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
CONTEMPORARY INDIAN POLITICAL THOUGHT
 

Hindu political thought, Raja Rammohan Roy, Ranade, Jawaharlal Nehru, Mahatma Gandhi and B. R. Ambedkar.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Arendt, Hannah. The Human Condition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1958. Print.

2. Berlin, Isaiah, and Isaiah Four essays on liberty Berlin. Liberty:Incorporating Four Essays on Liberty. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.

3. Machiavelli, Niccolo, and M. Lerner. The Prince and the Discourses. NewYork: Modern Library, 1950.

4. Mill, John Stuart. Considerations on Representative Government. Peoples edition. ed. [S.l.]: Longmans, 1894.

5. Mill, John Stuart, and Colin Heydt. Utilitarianism. New ed. / edited by Colin Heydt. ed. Peterborough, Ont.: Broadview; London: Eurospan [distributor], 2011.

6. Nozick, Robert. Anarchy, State, and Utopia. Oxford: Blackwell, 1974. Print.

7. Pantham, Thomas, and Deutsch, Kenneth (eds.) Political Thought in Modern India, Safe Publications, New Delhi, 1986

8. Rawls, John. Political Liberalism. Expanded ed. New York; Chichester: Columbia University Press, 2005.

9. Rawls, John..A Theory of Justice. Rev. ed. ed. Cambridge, Mass. ; London: Belknap, 1999.

10. Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, and G. D. H. Cole. On the Social Contract. Dover Thrift ed. Mineola, N.Y.: Dover ; [Newton Abbot : David & Charles, distributor], 2003.

11. Smith, Adam. The Wealth of Nations. [London]: Everyman's Library, 1991. Print.

12. Smith, Adam, and Ryan Patrick Hanley. The Theory of Moral Sentiments. 250th anniversary ed. New York, N.Y.: Penguin Books, 2009.

13. Weber, Max, and Stephen Kalberg. The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Arendt, Hannah. The Human Condition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1958. Print.

2. Berlin, Isaiah, and Isaiah Four essays on liberty Berlin. Liberty: Incorporating Four Essays on Liberty. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.

3. Foucault, Michel. Discipline and Punish : The Birth of the Prison. 2nd Vintage Books ed. New York: Vintage Books, 1995.

4. Machiavelli, Niccolo, and M. Lerner. The Prince and the Discourses. New York: Modern Library, 1950.

5. Mill, John Stuart. Considerations on Representative Government. Peoples edition. ed. [S.l.]: Longmans, 1894.

6. Mill, John Stuart, and Colin Heydt. Utilitarianism. New ed. / edited by Colin Heydt. ed. Peterborough, Ont.: Broadview; London: Eurospan [distributor], 2011.

7. Nozick, Robert. Anarchy, State, and Utopia. Oxford: Blackwell, 1974. Print.

8. Rawls, John. Political Liberalism. Expanded ed. New York; Chichester: Columbia University Press, 2005.

9. Rawls, John.. A Theory of Justice. Rev. ed. ed. Cambridge, Mass. ; London: Belknap, 1999.

10. Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, and G. D. H. Cole. On the Social Contract. Dover Thrift ed. Mineola, N.Y.: Dover ; [Newton Abbot : David & Charles, distributor], 2003.

11. Smith, Adam. The Wealth of Nations. [London]: Everyman's Library, 1991. Print.

12. Smith, Adam, and Ryan Patrick Hanley. The Theory of Moral Sentiments. 250th anniversary ed. New York, N.Y.: Penguin Books, 2009.

13. Weber, Max, and Stephen Kalberg. The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I

CIA-II

CIA-III

END SEM EXAMINATION

BAL132N - ENGLISH (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The course will focus on strengthening the grammatical skills of students, which in turn will help them in speaking and writing clearly and effectively, using the English Language. Articles from newspapers and magazines on contemporary issues, will be used as samples for language practice, within the class room. Students will also engage in reading sessions, so as to get acquainted with different styles of writing, comprehend complicated pieces, critique issues and think independently. The course will also use language as a medium to sensitize students and generate discussions about various socio-political issues, through regular discussions.

 

Course objectives:

Tofacilitate the students in enhancing their reading, writing, comprehension and oral communication skills. The course will also help the students in having a sound grasp over the language and to clearly and effectively communicate using the written language. The oral skills of students too get honed, as they get trained in making power point presentations in a professional way. Reading exercises and discussions will facilitate in developing their analytical and critical thinking skills.

Learning Outcome

1. Understand the essentials of effective oral communication and power point presentation skills and do it in a more professional way.

2. Apply analytical and critical thinking skills while reading long passages.

3. Writing answers to questions in a systematic way.

4. Contribute creative thoughts and ideas on issues evolving through readings in class.

5.Construct meaningful paragraphs adhering to the rules of grammar.

6. Apply the rules of punctuation correctly, while writing.

7. Draft letters, write essays and Research papers (at a very basic level), adhering to the rules of academic writing.

8. Apply the rules of grammar, while constructing sentences and paragraphs.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
BASIC GRAMMAR
 

Parts of speech, tenses, subject-verb agreement, articles.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
SENTENCE STRUCTURE
 

Different types of sentences and their grammatic formats, organizing ideas into grammatically correct sentences, punctuation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
COMPREHENSION
 

Working on Comprehension passages to develop  reading, comprehending and writing skills of students – factual and inferential passages.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
VOCABULARY
 

Antonyms, synonyms, appropriate use in sentences and paragraphs.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
PARAGRAPH WRITING
 

Rearranging sentences into proper paragraphs, error analysis, expansion of an outline, précis writing, writing short paragraphs on specific topics.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
PRESENTATION SKILLS
 

Characteristics of effective presentations, the voice in presentation, body language, modes of presentation, use of visual aids, their benefits, types of visual aids, how to prepare visual aids, dos and don’ts, coordination between speech and visual aids during presentation, listening skills, role of audience.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:10
DESCRIPTIVE WRITING
 

Different types of descriptive writing, letters, different types of letters.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. English Grammar Composition and Usage- J.C Nesfield. Macmillan India.

2. Objective English – Edgar Thorpe, Showick Thorpe. Pearson Education.

3. Grammar Builder- Amin. A, Eravelly.R, Ibrahim.F.J. CUP

4. Advanced English Grammar- Hewings, Martin.CUP

5. Essential English Grammar- Murphy, Raymond. CUP

6. Effective Presentation skills – Steve Mandel

7. Powerful Presentation skills – Debra Smith

8. Powerful Presentation Skills – Dennis Becker.

9. Communication Skills – Leena Sen

10. English Vocabulary in Use – McCarthy & O’Dell.

11. Explorations –A course in reading, thinking and communication skills – Oranee Jansz.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. English Grammar Composition and Usage- J.C Nesfield. Macmillan India.

2. Objective English – Edgar Thorpe, Showick Thorpe. Pearson Education.

3. Grammar Builder- Amin. A, Eravelly.R, Ibrahim.F.J. CUP

4. Advanced English Grammar- Hewings, Martin.CUP

5. Essential English Grammar- Murphy, Raymond. CUP

6. Effective Presentation skills – Steve Mandel

7. Powerful Presentation skills – Debra Smith

8. Powerful Presentation Skills – Dennis Becker.

9. Communication Skills – Leena Sen

10. English Vocabulary in Use – McCarthy & O’Dell.

11. Explorations –A course in reading, thinking and communication skills – Oranee Jansz.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- Written Test for 20mks, based on topics covered in Unit1

Accurate application of the rules of grammar – 10mks

(Parts of Speech-2mks, Tenses-3mks, Articles -2, Subject-verb agreement -3mks

Clarity in the concepts of grammar -5mks

Clear and effective written communication -5mks

CIA 2 – Mid Sem Exams for 50mks

Grammar -25mks

Accurate application of the rules of grammar – 15mks

Clarity in the concepts of grammar -5mks

Clear and effective written communication -5mks

Comprehension Passage – 25mks

Reading and accurate comprehension of ideas -10mks

Analytical, critical thinking and originality of thought -5mks

Rules of Grammar -5mks

Clear and effective written communication – 5mks

CIA 3 -20mks

A. Power Point Presentations:

Depth of research in content -8mks

Effective use of slides and audio-visual aids -4mks

Audience interaction, ability to clarify doubts, efficient handling of the session – 3mks

Timing – 2mks

Clear and effective oral communication – 3mks

B. Online Courses:

Written/Oral assignment submissions, based on depth of content, regularity of submissions -10mks

Effective use of language, peer evaluation -5mks

Certificates/grades – 5mks

50-60 - 1mk

61-70 - 2mks

71 - 80 – 3mks

81-90 - 4mks

>90 - 5mks

D. Essay: Depth of Content, conceptual clarity -10mks

Adherence to rules of academic writing – 5mks

Creative contribution (ideas, thoughts) – 5mks

D. Research Paper:

Depth of research, content clarity – 10mks

Originality of thought/analysis – 5mks

Citations and References -3 mks

Adherence to format/clear and effective articulation -2mks

E. Book Review:

Summary – 2mks

Analysis – 4mks

Critical Appreciation – 7mks

Originality – 4mks

Citatations/References – 3mks

BAL143N - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course primarily deals with the basic concepts and theories of Micro Economics and is divided into 7 units. The first unit is titled Introduction to Economics and will introduce the fundamental concepts, terms and terminologies used in microeconomic analysis. Unit 2 (Theory of Demand and Supply) discusses the most important analytical tools of economics-demand, supply and equilibrium, along with different types and degrees of elasticity and their measurements. Unit 3 (Theory of Costs, Production and Revenue) combines the traditional economic theories pertaining to Production, Costs and Revenue. Unit 4 (Consumer and Producer Behavior) deals with the various theories of Consumer and Producer behavior and the analytical tools used by both economic entities in the determination of utility and profit. Unit 5 (Behavior of the Firm) extensively deals with the different kinds of markets and how price and output is determined in different market models. Unit 6 (Public Finance and Taxation) is from the domain of Pubic Economics and is designed to give elementary inputs in the areas of fiscal policy, public expenditure and taxation. Finally, Unit 7 (Macro Economic Variables and Policies) introduces the basic macroeconomic concepts and variables and their measurement, and the contemporary debates of Macroeconomics.

The course is specifically designed for students with no formal background or a little acquaintance with Economics-with a major thrust on Micro Economics. A good grasp of Micro Economics is vital for economic decision making, for designing and understanding public policy from a legal perspective, and more generally for appreciating how a modern economy functions. The main objective of the course is to give the students with a clear understanding of the basic concepts, tools of analysis and terminologies used in Economics, which will facilitate their understanding of various legal phenomena and their economic implications. The course will also prepare the students to undertake Institutional Economics and Law & Economics in their 2nd and 4th semester respectively by providing a strong theoretical foundation of Micro Economics. The emphasis is to provide the subject matter in a manner that is easy to understand and the aim is to make the exposition clear and accessible as well as lively and engaging-with a minimal reliance on mathematics.

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the students will be able to

- Define and describe the fundamental principles and concept of Economics

- Apply the analytical tools of Economics used in legal analysis

- To evaluate the importance of economic analysis in policy making and advisory functions

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS
 

A.    Economics: the world around you:

What is economics?

Definitions of economics: - scarcity, choices, Rational Self-Interest

The economic approach: positive and normative analysis, microeconomics and macroeconomics

B.     History of Economic thoughts: Mercantilism, Classical economics, Keynesian economics

C.     Choice, Opportunity Costs, and Specialization

Opportunity costs: tradeoffs and decisions at the margin, The Production possibilities Curve

D.    Interdependence and gains from trade: international trade theories like absolute and comparative advantage.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
THEORY OF DEMAND AND SUPPLY
 

A.    Markets: definition

B.     Demand: Law of demand, demand schedule, demand curve, individual demand, market demand, factors affecting demand.

C.     Supply: Law of supply, supply schedule, supply curve, individual supply, market supply, factors affecting supply

D.    Equilibrium: Putting demand and supply together

E.     Elasticity of demand and Supply

Government policies- Price controls: - Rent controls, Minimum wage, Evaluating Price Controls. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
COSTS AND REVENUE
 

A.    Types of costs: Economic and Accounting costs, Opportunity costs, Fixed and Sunk costs, Total and variable costs, average and marginal costs, Short-run and Long-run cost functions,

B.     Total revenue, marginal revenue, average revenue and breakeven point.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
CONSUMER AND PRODUCER BEHAVIOR
 

A.    Law of diminishing marginal utility

B.     Indifference curve analysis: consumers equilibrium

C.     Isoquants: producers’ equilibrium

D.    Law of variable proportions

E.     Returns to scale.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
BEHAVIOUR OF THE FIRM
 

A.    Firms in a competitive market: price and output determination.

B.     Monopoly: price and output determination.

C.     Monopolistic competition: price and output determination.

D.    Oligopoly: collusive and non-collusive

E.     Market for factors of production: labor market and wage rate determination.

F.      Pricing practices: different types of pricing adopted by firms

G.    Mergers and Acquisition

H.    Government Regulation

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
PUBLIC FINANCE AND TAXATION
 

A.    Public finance:- public expenditure and its importance, effects of public expenditure on growth and distribution

B.     Public revenue: What is tax, classification of taxes, characteristics of a good tax system, problem of equity in taxation,

C.     Incidence of taxation: shifting the burden of tax

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
MACROECONOMICS VARIABLES AND POLICIES
 

A.    National Income: real GDP, nominal GDP, per capita GDP.

B.     Unemployment: types of unemployment.

C.     Inflation: types and causes of inflation

D.    Economic policies: monetary and fiscal policy

E.     Debates Over Macroeconomic Policies

Text Books And Reference Books:

Mankiw,G–Principles of Economics-2ndEdition (2004)- SouthWest Publishers.

Samulson and Nordhaus - Economics –18th Edition (2004)- McGraw Hill. Inc.

Parkin, Michael - Macroeconomics, 7th Edition (2004)- PrenticeHall.

Miller, R.L. – Economics Today -14th Edition (2005) - AddisonWesley.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

William Boyes and Michael Melvin- Textbook of economics – 6th edition (2009)-biztantra (Indian edition).

Salvatore, Dominick .Microeconomics-Theory and Applications. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 4th Edition.

Pindyck, S Robert, Rubinfeld L Daniel and Mehta, L Prem. Microeconomics, New Delhi: Pearson Prentice Hall, 7th Edition.

Evaluation Pattern

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

                                                                                                TOTAL 100%

BAL164N - LEGAL METHODS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

A lawyer is most often faced with the primary task of problem solving and advising on the course of action most suited to the interests of the client. The problem may be complex in nature and may involve different branches of law. It will require sieving the material facts from the immaterial ones. Learning where and how to find the law is as important as the substantive study of various laws. The understanding of facts is critical to the process of identifying favourable precedents and distinguishing the case at hand from other authoritative rulings, which are not in direct support of one’s proposition. The strength of a legal argument lies in the thoroughness of the research, which must also be clearly presented, in writing and orally.

Learning Outcome

On completion of the first module students will be able to distinguish between the different types of laws. On completion of the second module students will be able to tell the different sources of law and their relationship inter se. On completion of the third module students will be able to discuss the important the fundamental concepts underlying the Indian law. On completion of the fourth module students will be able to read, analyse and understand legal writings, and to narrate the reasoning employed by judges in their judgements. On completion of the fifth module students will be able to read judgements, and to analyse and understand the principles laid down in them. On completion of the sixth module students will be able to understand the meaning of research and the steps involved in legal research. They will also apply some basic statistical methods to analyse data.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
MEANING AND CLASSIFICATION OF LAWS
 

Meaning and definition; Functions of law; Classification of laws: Public and Private Law, Substantive and Procedural Law, Municipal and International Law.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
SOURCES OF LAW
 

Meaning; Primary and Secondary sources; Custom; Precedent- Categories of precedents, dissenting and concurring opinion, overruling of judgments, Article 141 of the Constitution; stare decisis, Ratio decidendi- Tests to determine ratio decidendi, obiter dictum; Legislations, Juristic writings; Justice, Equity and Good Conscience, International law as a source of Municipal Law.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
LEGAL REASONING
 

Legal materials – Case law, Case Briefing; Statutes, Reports, Journals, Manuals, Digests etc.; Use of Law Library; Importance of legal research;

New Dimensions in Legal Research- Use of Online Databases and e-resources; Techniques of Legal Research; Legal writings and citations; Judicial Reasoning; Analogizing – the application of principles laid down in similar cases, static and dynamic analogy; Case Synthesis.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
READING AND ANALYSIS OF JUDGEMENTS AND STATUTES
 

Reading and analysis of various landmark judgements in Constitutional Law, Criminal Law and the Law of Torts; FILAC and IRAC methods; Reading and Understanding of Statues- Aids to the interpretation of Statute (Internal and External Aids).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
LEGAL RESEARCH
 

Research – Meaning – Reflective thinking – Dewey-Kelly system – Doctrinal and Non-doctrinal Methods – Basic statistical tools.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
BASIC CONCEPTS OF INDIAN LEGAL SYSTEM
 

Constitution as the Basic Law; Rule of Law; Separation of Powers; Delegated Legislation; Judicial system in India- Hierarchy of Courts in India, Jurisdiction of Courts (Territorial, Pecuniary, Subject Matter); Fora and Tribunals-Alternative Dispute Resolution Methods, Arbitration, Negotiation, Mediation and Conciliation, LokAdalats.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. A.V. Dicey, An introduction to the Study of the Law of Constitution, Universal Law Publishing Co., 10th edn. 4th Indian Reprint, 2003

2. B S Hansai, A Critical Study of ADR System: Special Focus on LokAdalat in India

3. Benjamin Cardozo, Nature of Judicial Process, Universal Law Publishing Co., 9th Indian Reprint 2011

4. Bodenheimer, Jurisprudence; , Universal Law Publishing Co., 7th Indian Reprint, 2011

5. C K Takwani, Lectures on Administrative Law, 4th Edition, 2008, Eastern Book Company.

6. David Ingram, Law-Key Concepts in Philosophy, Continuum International Publishing Group, 1st edn. 2006

7. Friedmann, Law in a Changing Society, Universal Law Publishing Co. 4th Indian Reprint 2008

8. G. W. Paton, A Textbook of Jurisprudence, Oxford University Press, 2007

9. H. Patrick Glenn, Legal Tradition of the World, Oxford University Press, 1st edn., 2000

10. Jacqueline M Nolan Haley, ADR in a Nutshell, 2nd Edition, 2001, West Group

11. Kulshreshta, Landmarks in Indian Legal and Constitutional History, Eastern Book Co., 8th edn. Reprint 2006

12. Lakshminath, Precedent in Indian Law, Eastern Book Co., 3rd edn., 2009.

13. M.V. Pylee, Select Constitutions of the World, Universal Law Publishing Co., 3rd edn., 2012.

14. Mani Tripathi, Introduction to Jurisprudence and Legal Theory, Allahabad Law Agency, 2011.

15. P J Fitzgerald, Salmond on Jurisprudence, Universal Law Publishing, 2004;

16. Rattan Singh, Legal Research & Methodology, Lexis Nexis, 1st edn., 2013

17. S K Vermam&AfzalWani, Legal Research and Methodology, Indian Law Institute, 2nd edn., 1st Reprint 2006

18. S.R. Myneni, Legal Systems in the World, Asia Law House, 1st edn., 2007

19. Sharon Hanson, Legal Method and Reasoning, Cavendish Publishing Ltd., 2nd edn, 2003

20. Steven J Burton, An Introduction to Law and Legal Reasoning, Wolters Kluwer Publishers Co., 1st edn., 2007.

21. Sukumar Roy, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Eastern Law House, 1st edn., 2012

22. T. K. Sinha, Textbook on Legal Methods, Legal Systems and Research, 1st Edition, 2010, Universal Law Publishing Co. Ltd.

23. V D Mahajan, Jurisprudence and Legal Theory, Eastern Book Co., 5th edn., Reprint 2010

24. William Glanville, Learning the Law, 15th edn. Sweet and Maxwell, 2011.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. A.V. Dicey, An introduction to the Study of the Law of Constitution, Universal Law Publishing Co., 10th edn. 4th Indian Reprint, 2003

2. B S Hansai, A Critical Study of ADR System: Special Focus on LokAdalat in India

3. Benjamin Cardozo, Nature of Judicial Process, Universal Law Publishing Co., 9th Indian Reprint 2011

4. Bodenheimer, Jurisprudence; , Universal Law Publishing Co., 7th Indian Reprint, 2011

5. C K Takwani, Lectures on Administrative Law, 4th Edition, 2008, Eastern Book Company.

6. David Ingram, Law-Key Concepts in Philosophy, Continuum International Publishing Group, 1st edn. 2006

7. Friedmann, Law in a Changing Society, Universal Law Publishing Co. 4th Indian Reprint 2008

8. G. W. Paton, A Textbook of Jurisprudence, Oxford University Press, 2007

9. H. Patrick Glenn, Legal Tradition of the World, Oxford University Press, 1st edn., 2000

10. Jacqueline M Nolan Haley, ADR in a Nutshell, 2nd Edition, 2001, West Group

11. Kulshreshta, Landmarks in Indian Legal and Constitutional History, Eastern Book Co., 8th edn. Reprint 2006

12. Lakshminath, Precedent in Indian Law, Eastern Book Co., 3rd edn., 2009.

13. M.V. Pylee, Select Constitutions of the World, Universal Law Publishing Co., 3rd edn., 2012.

14. Mani Tripathi, Introduction to Jurisprudence and Legal Theory, Allahabad Law Agency, 2011.

15. P J Fitzgerald, Salmond on Jurisprudence, Universal Law Publishing, 2004;

16. Rattan Singh, Legal Research & Methodology, Lexis Nexis, 1st edn., 2013

17. S K Vermam&AfzalWani, Legal Research and Methodology, Indian Law Institute, 2nd edn., 1st Reprint 2006

18. S.R. Myneni, Legal Systems in the World, Asia Law House, 1st edn., 2007

19. Sharon Hanson, Legal Method and Reasoning, Cavendish Publishing Ltd., 2nd edn, 2003

20. Steven J Burton, An Introduction to Law and Legal Reasoning, Wolters Kluwer Publishers Co., 1st edn., 2007.

21. Sukumar Roy, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Eastern Law House, 1st edn., 2012

22. T. K. Sinha, Textbook on Legal Methods, Legal Systems and Research, 1st Edition, 2010, Universal Law Publishing Co. Ltd.

23. V D Mahajan, Jurisprudence and Legal Theory, Eastern Book Co., 5th edn., Reprint 2010

24. William Glanville, Learning the Law, 15th edn. Sweet and Maxwell, 2011.

Evaluation Pattern

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation         – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                         – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                           – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                 – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                         – 50%

                                                                        TOTAL 100%

BAL165N - INDIAN LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to help students to understand the historical background of the Indian Legal System. This course shall play a pivotal role in creating interest amongst students in the furtherance of their careers in the discipline of law. Working in and around the episteme of the statutory law enacted, amended and repealed by the majoritarian notions of justice are often debated on matters relating to their interpretation in the judicial discourse. A practitioner of law is expected to understand and appreciate the history of different institutions of law, their working and impact on the legal system as such. At the same time, it is also viable for the practitioner to have a certain perspective over the politics of the history of law. The Law commission reports and developments through the British India period will help students to know the intricacies of Law in India. The course also discusses the constitutional history along with the history of the general legal system. It is pertinent to grasp the historical developments that led to the enactment of the constitution.

The objective of the course is to familiarize the students with the origin of common law system in India. This course traces the legislative history back to 1600 and its evolution through different periods under different Governor Generals. The main objective is to enlighten the students about the historical background of legislations in civil, criminal and constitutional Law and relate it to contemporary period. It also focuses the court system during colonial period and the cases heard by it. The learning of the Court system and how it has been revamped in different times to the needs of the society will help the students to find out its importance in present day judicial system.

Learning Outcome

On completion of this course, the students will be acquainted with the history behind British settlements in India, the judicial process involved in Madras, Bombay and Calcutta through the East India Company. The students will be able to explain the different Court structure in different periods under different Governor Generals. Further, it helps the students to compare and contrast with the present legal and constitutional system. The origin of Law Commission and its working since its inception will provide an insight to the students to introspect and analyze the present model. The different judicial plan under different regulating Act will enable the students to critically appraise the present legal and judicial system.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
THE EAST INDIA COMPANY AND ITS EARLY SETTLEMENTS IN INDIA
 

Historical background of East India Company, Settlements at Surat, Madras, Bombay and Calcutta. Judicial system in the settlements.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
ESTABLISHMENT OF CROWN?S COURTS IN INDIA
 

Charter of 1726, Main Features of the Charter, Mayor’s Courts under the Charters of 1687 and 1726; Working of the Charter, Courts for the Natives.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
BEGINNING OF THE ADALAT SYSTEM.(WARREN HASTINGS)
 

 Judicial Plan of 1772 and 1774, Judicial Plan of 1780 and its working, reforms by Sir Impey; Reforms in the Administration of Criminal Justice under Warren Hastings).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
SUPREME COURTS AT CALCUTTA, MADRAS AND BOMBAY
 

Regulating Act of 1773; Functioning and the difficulties faced by the Supreme Court at Calcutta.; Raja Nand Kumar Case; The Patna Case; The Kasijora Case.  Changes introduced by the Act of Settlement of 1781.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
ADALAT SYSTEMS UNDER LORD CORNWALLIS
 

The Judicial Plan of 1793 – General features, Reorganization of Courts, Other Reforms. Evaluation of the Plan of 1793, Reforms by Lord Hastings under the Plan of 1793.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
HIGH COURTS AND THE PRIVY COUNCIL
 

The Act of 1861 and the establishment of High Courts in India,  Jurisdiction of the High Courts, The Working of the Privy Council; Appraisal of the Privy Council.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
LAW AND ITS CODIFICATION
 

The Charter Act of 1833 and the First Law Commission; The Charter Act of 1853 and the Second, the Third and the Fourth Law Commissions, Development of Personal Laws during the British period: Personal Laws and Legislation, Adjudication, Legal works on personal laws

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:10
CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF INDIA
 

The Minto Morley Reforms of 1908; the Government of India Act 1919 (the Central Government, the Provincial Governments, the Provincial Executive – the Diarchy) The Government of India Act 1935 (Federal Government, the federal court and the Provincial Government); Constitutional Developments after the Act of 1935 (The Cripps Mission, the Wavell Plan, the Cabinet Mission of 1946 and the Mountbatten Plan); Indian Independence Act, 1947.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Debates of Constitutional Assembly.

2. Jain, M. P. Outlines of Indian Legal History. Delhi: Lexis Nexis. 7th Edition

3. Gandhi, B. M. V. D. Kulashreshta’S Landmarks in Indian Legal and Constitutional History.

4. Cowell, Herbert. The History and Constitution of the Courts and Legislative Authorities in India, 6th Ed. Calcutta: Rev. S. C. Bagehi, Macker, Spink, 1936.

5. Ilbert, Courtney Sr. The Government of India, 2nd ed. London: Oxford University Press, 1907.

6. Keith A. B. A Constitutional History of India, 1600-1935, 2nd ed. Allahabad: Central Depot, 1961.

7. Speeches and Documents on the Indian Constitution 1945 -1947 (2 Vols.) London OUP, 1957.

8. Pylee, M. V. Constitutional History of India (1600-1950). Bombay: Asia 1967.

9. Fourth Report of the Law Commission

10. Supreme Court Bar Association v. Union of India (1998) 4 SCC 409

11. V. Sudeer v. Bar Council of India, AIR 1999 SC 1167

12. The Rule of Law in a Free Society, A Report of the International Congress of Jurists, New Delhi, 1959

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. M.P. Jain – Outlines of Indian Legal History, Dhanwantra Mechanical and Law Book House, Delhi.

2. V.D. Kulashreshta’s Landmarks in Indian Legal and Constitutional History by, by B.M.Gandhi.

3. Dr. M.P.Singh, Outlines of Indian Legal & Constitutional History.

Evaluation Pattern

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation         – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                         – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                           – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                 – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                         – 50%

                                                                                   TOTAL 100%

BAL166N - LAW OF TORTS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

With rapid industrialization, tort action came to be used against manufacturers and industrial units for products injurious to human beings. Presently, the emphasis is on extending the principles not only to acts, which are harmful, but also to failure to comply with standards that are continuously changing due to advancement in science and technology. Product liability is now assuming a new dimension in developed economics.

Unit 1 introduces students to the law of torts and to the principles of tortuous liability and distinguishes torts from crimes and breaches of contract. Unit 2 is designed to make the students know and understand various defences available to the defendant in a suit for torts. Unit 3 is to introduce the students to the concept of locus standi and of disability and immunity. Unit 4 is designed to acquaint the students with the circumstances under which one person may be liable for the wrongs done by another and with the concepts of employer and employee relationship and the concept of individual agency, as well as with the doctrine of sovereign immunity. Unit 5 is to acquaint students with the different torts against persons and personal relationships and the circumstances in which a person is liable for committing such torts. Unit 6 is to acquaint students with the different torts against properties and the circumstances in which a person is liable for committing such torts. Unit 7 acquaints students with the mental elements involved in a tort, especially negligence, the extent of liability and the liabilities of different professional for negligence. Unit 8 is designed to acquaint the students with the concept of no fault liability. Unit 9  is designed to acquaint the students with the different remedies available to the victim of a tort and the circumstances in which they are available.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Understand the constituents of tort and general principles
  • Provide an in-depth clarity about various defences available against tortious liability
  • Enhance the clarity in understanding the concept of locus standi for actions in tort
  • Acquaint with principle of tortious liability for torts committed by others, principle of respondent superior, the principles of unintentional tort of negligence.

Learning Outcome

On the successful completion of the Course, Students would be able to 

  • Distinguish tort from crime, breach of contract
  • Identify the requisites for a wrongful act to be classified as a tort
  • Identify the situations when employer, principal, State are liable for torts committed by employee, agent or public officer
  • Appraise real-world problems and determine whether defendant can justify the tortious act on grounds of defence
  • Analyze set of circumstances and determine who can sue and who can be sued in tortious actions

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
EVOLUTION DEFINITION, NATURE, SCOPE AND OBJECTS OF LAW OF TORTS
 

Nature of law of torts, meaning and definitions of tort, Law of Tort and Law of Torts, Constituents of tort-damnum sine injuria and injuria sine damno; Tort distinguished from crime and breach of contract; Changing scope of law of torts: Principles of Liability – Fault; Wrongful intent; Negligence; Liability without fault; Place of motive in torts.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
DEFENCES IN ACTIONS FOR TORTS
 

Justification – Volenti non fit injuria; Necessity, private and public; Plaintiffs default; Act of God; Inevitable accident; Private defense; Statutory authority; Judicial and quasi-judicial acts; Parental and quasi-parental authority, Waiver and acquiescence, Release; Accord and Satisfaction.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:3
STANDING AND CAPACITY
 

Who may sue – aggrieved individual – class action – social action group; Statutes granting standing to certain persons or groups, Who can be sued and who cannot be sued.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
VICARIOUS LIABILITY
 

Basis, scope and justification; Express authorization; Ratification; Abetment; Special Relationships: Master and servant – arising out of and in the course of employment – who is master? – the control test – who is servant? – borrowed servant – independent contractor and servant, distinguished; Principal and agent; Corporation and principal officer, Doctrine of Sovereign Immunity.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
TORTS AGAINST PERSONS AND PERSONAL RELATIONS
 

Assault, battery, False imprisonment; Defamation – libel, slander including law relating to privileges E-defamation; Marital relations, parental relations, master and servant relations; Malicious prosecution.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
WRONGS AFFECTING PROPERTY
 

Trespass to Land, Trespass ab initio, Dispossession; Nuisance: Definition, Essentials and Types; Acts Which Constitute Nuisance – Obstructions of Highways, Pollution of Air, Water, Noise, and Interference with Light and Air. Movable property - Trespass to goods, Detinue, Conversion, Torts against Business interests, Injurious falsehood, Misstatements, Passing off.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
NEGLIGENCE
 

Basic concepts, Theories of negligence, Standards of care, duty to take care, carelessness, inadvertence, Doctrine of contributory negligence, Res ipsa loquitor and its importance in contemporary law; Liability due to negligence: different professionals; Liability of common carriers for negligence; Product liability due to negligence: liability of manufacturers and business houses for their products. Nervous shock.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
STRICT LIABILITY AND ABSOLUTE LIABILITY
 

The rule in Rylands v. Fletcher, Liability for harm caused by inherently dangerous industries. Development of Law beyond Strict Liability, Absolute Liability M. C. Mehta v. UoI.

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
LEGAL REMEDIES
 

Legal remedies, Award of damages – simple, special, punitive. Unliquidated Damages – Remoteness of damage-foreseeability and directness, Shortened Expectation of Life, Injunction, Specific restitution of property; Extra-legal remedies- self-help, re-entry on land, re-caption of goods, distress damage pheasant and abatement of nuisance.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.    1.      Oughton, David and Harvey, Barbara, Law of Torts, Oxford University Press, 8th Edition, 2015.

 

 

2.      Singh, Guru Prasanna. Ratanlal & Dhirajlal's Law of Torts, 26h ed. New Delhi: Wadhwa & Co, 2013.

 

3.      Jones, Michael A. Text book on Torts. New Delhi: Lawman. 1995.

 

4.      Lakshminath, A. and Sridhar M. Ramaswamy lyer's Law of Torts, 10th ed. New Delhi: Lexisnexis, 2007.

 

5.      Weir, Tony. Introduction to Tort Law, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

 

6.      Pillai, P. S. A. Law of Tort. 9th ed. Lucknow: Eastern Book-Co., 2004.

 

7.      Dugdale, Anthony, ed. Clerk & Lindsell on Torts, 19th ed. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2006.

 

8.      Howarth, D. R., Hepple Howarth, and Mathews. Tort: Cases & Materials. London: Oxford University Press, 2005.

 

9.      Weir, Tony. Case book on Tort. 10th ed. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2004.

 

10.  Rogers, W. V. H. Winfield & Jolowicz on Tort, 7th ed. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2006.

 

11.  Harpwood, Vivenne. Law of Tort. London: Cavendish, 1994.

 

12.  Giliker, Paula. Tort. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2008.

 

13.  Rogers, W. V. H. Winfield & Jolowicz on Tort. 7th ed. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2006.

 

14.  Brazier, Margaret. Street on Torts. 9th ed. London: Butterworths,1993.

 

15.  Epstien, Richard. Torts. New York: Aspen Law & Business,1999.

 

16.  Samuel, Geoffrey. Tort: Cases & Materials. 2nd ed. London: Sweet  & Maxwell, 2007.

 17.  Rogers, W. V. H. Tort. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2002.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.   1.      Oughton, David and Harvey, Barbara, Law of Torts, Oxford University Press, 8th Edition, 2015.

 

 

2.      Singh, Guru Prasanna. Ratanlal & Dhirajlal's Law of Torts, 26h ed. New Delhi: Wadhwa & Co, 2013.

 

3.      Jones, Michael A. Text book on Torts. New Delhi: Lawman. 1995.

 

4.      Lakshminath, A. and Sridhar M. Ramaswamy lyer's Law of Torts, 10th ed. New Delhi: Lexisnexis, 2007.

 

5.      Weir, Tony. Introduction to Tort Law, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

 

6.      Pillai, P. S. A. Law of Tort. 9th ed. Lucknow: Eastern Book-Co., 2004.

 

7.      Dugdale, Anthony, ed. Clerk & Lindsell on Torts, 19th ed. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2006.

 

8.      Howarth, D. R., Hepple Howarth, and Mathews. Tort: Cases & Materials. London: Oxford University Press, 2005.

 

9.      Weir, Tony. Case book on Tort. 10th ed. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2004.

 

10.  Rogers, W. V. H. Winfield & Jolowicz on Tort, 7th ed. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2006.

 

11.  Harpwood, Vivenne. Law of Tort. London: Cavendish, 1994.

 

12.  Giliker, Paula. Tort. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2008.

 

13.  Rogers, W. V. H. Winfield & Jolowicz on Tort. 7th ed. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2006.

 

14.  Brazier, Margaret. Street on Torts. 9th ed. London: Butterworths,1993.

 

15.  Epstien, Richard. Torts. New York: Aspen Law & Business,1999.

 

16.  Samuel, Geoffrey. Tort: Cases & Materials. 2nd ed. London: Sweet  & Maxwell, 2007.

 17.  Rogers, W. V. H. Tort. London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2002.

Evaluation Pattern

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation         – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                         – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                           – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                 – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                         – 50%

                                                                                                TOTAL 100%

BBS191C - MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The Mahabharata of the great Maharishi Veda Vyasa is a treasure trove of knowledge, principles and paradigms. It is written that what is not in the Mahabharata will not be found elsewhere. Written nearly thousands of years ago, the Mahabharata is as yet a source of knowledge, especially modern management principles.In essence it highlights the victory of Dharma in times of Adharma.This subject is a comprehensive learning on management lessons which can be inferred from the great epic. It gives a clear understanding and comparison of management Principles, practices and the various functions of management with the epic. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of management. It also deals with behavioral issues in the individual processes, group and interpersonal processes.

Course Objectives:

  •  Discuss the epic by summarizing the various parvas/units in class in accordance with the management concept
  •  Review and make a critical estimate of the epic with a focus on morals, ethics, legal and management concepts
  • To develop competencies and knowledge of students to become effective professionals

Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcome: Students will get to know team work and group dynamics

  • Students will get to know determination and hard work and its implication on business decision
  • Students will be able to appreciate the role of general management for the success of an organization.
  • This subject will enable them to enhance their Moral, social, ethical and professional skills
  • To understand the manner in which strategic and competitive advantage is developed

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Mahabharatha
 

The older generations-The Pandava and Kaurava princes- Lakshagraha (the house of lac)

Establishment of the kingdom-Administration and Management principles

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Marriage and Building of New city
 

Marriage to Draupadi- An event study approach.

Indraprastha-A new beginning- Pressure for change – Change process, Types of change, Factors influencing change, Resistance to change

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
The Big Game
 

The dice game- Cooperative strategies & Reasons for strategic alliances-

Exile and return- Risks and costs of strategic alliances

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
The battle at Kurukshetra
 

The battle at Kurukshetra - Strategic Planning and Management- levels at which strategy operates- Event approaches to strategic decision making,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Post Kurukshetra
 

The end of the Pandavas- Succession Planning,Authority and Responsibility

The reunion Organizing- Choosing the organizational structure

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Rao, V.S.P., & Krishna, V.H., (2011). Strategic Management: Text and Cases. New Delhi: Excel Books.

Pratap Chandra Roy ,The complete Mahabharata translated into English prose directly from the original sanskrit text.(1st Edition) oriental publishing co.

Source: Jaya - An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

C Rajagopalachari (2017). Mahabharata (63rdedition), Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 10 Marks

MSE   30 Marks

CIA 3 10 Marks

End Assesment 50 Marks

BBS191D - INTRODUCTION TO EXISTENTIALISM (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to the primary figures and themes of existentialism. Although Jean-Paul Sartre was one of the few thinkers who readily adopted the word “existentialism” (along with de Beauvoir and Marcel), the term eventually was used to describe the entire tradition of European thought that dominated the first part twentieth-century, and focused on the analysis of human existence. The readings in the course will focus on three groups of thinkers: the nineteenth-century precursors to existentialism (Dostoyevsky, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche), the German thinkers who laid the groundwork for existential thought (Kafka, Heidegger, Jaspers), and the French thinkers who were most identified with the movement (Sartre, de Beauvoir, Camus). The lectures and discussions will focus primarily on a close reading of the selected primary texts.

Learning Outcome

·         To enable students to understand life and discover meaning in life

·         To incite  critical thinking among students to search for meaning

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Existentialism
 

Nineteenth-Century Precursors to Existentialism:  Pascal, Dostoyevsky,

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The Existentialism Philosophy
 

Kierkegaard: Fear and Trembling, Nietzsche: The Will to Power, The Critique of Morality, Nihilism, The Transvaluation of Values

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
German Existentialism: Kafka, Heidegger, Jaspers
 

Kafka: Three Parables, Heidegger: The Way Back into the Ground of Metaphysics, Jaspers: Existenzphilosophie

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
French Existentialism: Sartre, de Beauvoir, Camus
 

Sartre: Being and Nothingness, Negation, In-Itself, For-Itself, Freedom and Anguish, Bad Faith, Being-for-Others, De Beauvoir: The Second Sex, introduction, Myth and Reality, The Independent Woman, Sartre: Existentialism is Humanism, Camus: The Myth of Sisyphus

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
The Death Camps
 

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz and implications of existentialism in the contemporary word. The relevance of Existentialism today.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

·         In Kaufmann, W. (1956). Existentialism: From Dostoevsky to Sartre. New York: Meridian Books.

 

·         Kierkegaard, S., Evans, C. S., & Walsh, S. (2006). Fear and trembling. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

·         Sartre, J.-P. (1966). Being and nothingness: An essay on phenomenological ontology. New York: Washington Square Press.

 

·         Beauvoir, Simone de, 1908-1986. (2009). The second sex. London :Jonathan Cape,

 

·         Levi, P., Woolf, S. J., & Roth, P. (1996). Survival in Auschwitz: The Nazi assault on humanity.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reynods, Jack, Understanding Existentialism, Chesham, 2006

Evaluation Pattern

Book Review : 10 Marks

Drama (On the theme of Existetialism) - 30 Marks

Mid Semester : 20 Marks

End Semester: 30 Marks

BBS191E - TOURISM, CULTURE, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Course presents several of the operational projects implemented by, or with the support of UNESCO, to illustrate how cultural tourism policies developed in the spirit of the principles and values contained in the texts, standard-setting instruments, declarations and recommendations adopted by UNESCO, are put into practice.

To open a debate on the complex questions that surround the relations between culture and tourism, tourism and development, and tourism and dialogue among cultures.

Learning Outcome

  • To use Tourism as an instrument to bring individuals and human communities into contact
  • To understand the role of cultures and civilizations in facilitating dialogue among cultures
  • To recognise the capacity of Tourism in assisting the world’s inhabitants to live better together and thereby contribute to the construction of peace in the minds of men and women

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction, Key Themes and Issues in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Finding Meaning through Tourism, Tourism as a World of Paradoxes, The Centrality of Experiences, Changing Contexts and Emerging Challenges in the Context of Development

Culture, Heritage and Diversity as Tourism Resources, Understanding Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism, Cultural Tourism as a Means of Economic Development, Developing the Cultural Supply Chain, Exploitation of Culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism as a Vehicle for Inter-Cultural Dialogue
 

Tourist – Host Encounters, The Role of Routers / Intermediaries / Media, Tourism – Tourist Education, Cross Cultural Understanding

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism and Environmental Protection
 

Introduction to the Natural Environment, Tourism and the Spirit of Nature, Fragile and Vulnerable Ecosystems, Cultural Implications of Mobilizing Natural Resources for Tourism, From Ecotourism to Integrated Tourism

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Issues of Governance in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Developing Structures to Develop and Manage Tourism and Culture, Complexities and Challenges of Policy Making in Tourism and Culture, Responsibilities / Tensions and Actions, The Gender Dimension, Stakeholders and Collaborations

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Preservation and Mobilization of Cultural Resources
 

Cultural Tourism Itinerary, Raising Awareness about the Fragility of Heritage Sites, Education for Lasting Tourism

Case Studies from The Palestinian Territories, Central America, Western Africa, Mauritania and Angkor

Economic Empowerment and poverty Alleviation, Sustainable Tourism Development Strategy, Forging Innovative and Inter-Disciplinary Approaches, Indigenous Resource Management Systems, Empowering Communities through Tourism

Case Studies from The Aral Sea Basin, Local Effort in Asia and Pacific (LEAP), Mountainous Regions of Central and South Asia

Dissemination of Knowledge and Reconciliation with the Past, Local and Indigenous Knowledge Systems in a Global Society (LINKS), UNESCO’s Actions in the field of Tourism, Culture and Development

Case Studies on UNESCO’s Conventions, Seminars and Universal Declarations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Mobilizing Nature for Sustainable Tourism
 

Capacity Building and Youth Poverty Alleviation through Tourism and Heritage (PATH)

Case Studies on Sao Paulo’s Green Belt Biosphere Reserve

Text Books And Reference Books:

Appadurai A. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Conceptual Platform. In K. Stenou (ed.) UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 9-16.

Appadurai A. (2003) Modernity at Large. Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.

Boumedine R. S. and Veirier L. (2003) Towards a Strategy for the Sustainable Development of Tourism in the Sahara in the Context of Poverty Eradication. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Cohen E. (2004) Contemporary Tourism. Diversity and Change. Elsevier, London.

Hemmati, M. ed. (1999) Women’s Employment and Participation in Tourism, Report for UN Commission on Sustainable Development 7th Session. UNED.

Intergovernmental Conference on Cultural Policies for Development (1998) Final Report. (Also referred to as Stockholm Action Plan). UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

International Labour Organisation (2001) Human resources development, employment and globalization in the hotel, catering and tourism sector (Report for discussion at the Tripartite Meeting on Human Resources Development, Employment and Globalization in the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Sector, Geneva, ILO).

Komla E.E. and Veirier L. (2004) Tourism, Culture and Development in West-Africa: For a Cultural Tourism Consistent with Sustainable Development. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Posey D.A. (Ed) (1999) Cultural and Spiritual Values of Biodiversity. A Complementary Contribution to the Global Biodiversity Assessment. Intermediate Technology Publications, London (on behalf of United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Nairobi).

Robertson, R. (1990) Mapping the Global Conditions: Globalization as the Central Concept. In M. Featherstone (ed.) Global Culture: Nationalism, Globalization and Modernity. Sage, London, pp. 15-30.

Steck B., Strasdas W., and Gustedt, E. (1999) Tourism in Technical Co-operation. A guide to the conception, planning and implementation of project-accompanying measures in regional rural development and nature conservation. GTZ, Eschborn.

Tour Operators’ Initiative for Sustainable Tourism Development (2004) Supply Chain Engagement for Tour Operators: Three Steps towards Sustainability. UNEP-Sustainable Tourism, Paris.

Winkin Y. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Pool of Ideas for Implementation. In K. Stenou (ed.)

UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 17-60.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism – From an Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (20 Marks)

CIA 2 - Mid Semester Examination (25 Marks)

CIA 3 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Integrated Tourism by Mobilizing Natural Resources” (20 Marks)

Final Submission - An Individual Activity supported by Written Submission on “Designing a Structured Plan to Develop and Manage Sustainability through Tourism and Culture; An Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (30 Marks)

BECH131 - PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is designed to expose the students to the basic principles of microeconomic theory. The emphasis will be on thinking like an economist and the course will illustrate how microeconomic concepts can be applied to analyze real-life situations.

Course Objectives

  • Understand that economics is about the allocation of scarce resources and how that results in trade-offs.
  • Understand the role of prices in allocating scarce resources in market economies and explain the consequences of government policies in the form of price controls.
  • Appreciate positive as well as normative view points on concepts of market failure and the need for government intervention.

Learning Outcome

  • The students will acquainted with the basic principles of microeconomic theory.
  • They will be able to think like economists.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Exploring the subject matter of Economics
 

Why study economics? Scope and method of economics; the economic problem: scarcity and choice; the question of what to produce, how to produce and how to distribute output; science of economics; the basic competitive model; prices, property rights and profits; incentives and information; rationing; opportunity sets; economic systems; reading and working with graphs.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Supply and Demand: How Markets Work, Markets and Welfare
 

Markets and competition; determinants of individual demand/supply; demand/supply schedule and demand/supply curve; market versus individual demand/supply; shifts in the demand/supply curve, demand and supply together; how prices allocate resources; elasticity and its application; controls on prices; taxes and the costs of taxation; consumer surplus; producer surplus and the efficiency of the markets.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The Households
 

The consumption decision - budget constraint, consumption and income/price changes, demand for all other goods and price changes; description of preferences (representing preferences with indifference curves); properties of indifference curves; consumer‘s optimum choice; income and substitution effects; labour supply and savings decision - choice between leisure and consumption.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
The Firm and Perfect Market Structure