Department of
BUSINESS-STUDIES-AND-SOCIAL-SCIENCES






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Economics Honours)
Academic Year  (2019)

 
1 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBS191C MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT 3 3 100
BBS191D INTRODUCTION TO EXISTENTIALISM 3 3 100
BBS191E TOURISM, CULTURE, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
BECH131 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 5 5 100
BECH132 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS-I 5 5 100
BECH133 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF INDIA FROM 1750 TO 1947 5 5 100
BECH141 INTRODUCTION TO THE PHILOSOPHY OF ECONOMICS 3 3 100
BECO191A INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY 3 3 100
BECO191B ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION 3 3 100
BENG121 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION I 3 3 100
BENG191A READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION 3 3 100
BHIS191A ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST 3 3 100
BMED191A MEDIA LITERACY 3 3 100
BMED191B CINEMATOGRAPHY 3 3 100
BPOL191A CONFLICT MANAGEMENT AND PEACE 3 3 100
BPOL191B GLOBAL POWER POLITICS 3 3 100
BPOL191C STATE AND TERRORISM 3 3 100
BPSY191A SCIENCE OF WELLNESS 3 3 100
BPSY191B ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 3 100
SDEC112 SOCIAL SENSITIVITY SKILLS 2 00 50
2 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBS291A APPLIED ETHICS-A MULTICULTURAL APPROACH 3 3 100
BBS291B GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE 3 3 100
BBS291C COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES 3 3 100
BECH231 INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS 5 5 100
BECH232 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS-II 5 5 100
BECH233 STATISTICS FOR ECONOMICS - I 5 5 100
BECH241 GENDER ECONOMICS 3 3 50
BECO291A ECONOMICS AND LITERATURE 3 3 100
BECO291B DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 3 100
BENG221 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION II 3 3 100
BENG291A READING CITYSCAPES: BANGALORE HISTORIES 3 3 100
BENG291B READING THE CYBERSPACE: PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE 3 3 100
BHIS291A THE POLITICS OF MEMORY: THE MAKINGS OF GENOCIDE 3 3 100
BMED291A INTER-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION 3 3 100
BMED291B ACOUSTIC PHONETICS 3 03 100
BPOL291A LITERATURE REVIEW FOR RESEARCH 3 3 100
BPSY291A APPRECIATING AESTHETICS 3 3 100
BPSY291B HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS 3 3 100
SDEC212 EXPRESSIVE SKILLS 2 00 50
3 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BECH331 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS 5 5 50
BECH332 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS 5 5 100
BECH333 STATISTICS FOR ECONOMICS - II 5 5 100
BECH341A HEALTH ECONOMICS: THEORY AND APPLICATION 4 4 100
BECH341B FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BECH361 INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 4 4 100
BECH362 CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
SDEC312 KNOWLEDGE ACQUISITION SKILLS 2 0 50
4 Semester - 2018 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BECH431 FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 5 4 100
BECH432 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 5 5 100
BECH433 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS 5 5 100
BECH441A ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY 4 4 100
BECH441B LABOUR ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BECH461 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 4 4 100
BECH462 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
SDEC412 KNOWLEDGE APPLICATION SKILLS 2 0 50
5 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BECH531 INDIAN ECONOMY 5 5 100
BECH532 APPLIED ECONOMETRICS 5 5 100
BECH533 PUBLIC ECONOMICS 5 5 50
BECH554 HEALTH ECONOMICS: THEORY AND APPLICATION 4 4 100
BECH555 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 4 4 100
BECH556 APPLIED STATISTICS 4 4 100
BECH581 INTERNSHIP 0 2 50
SDEC512 SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS 1 2 0 50
6 Semester - 2017 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BECH631 FINANCIAL ECONOMICS 5 5 100
BECH632 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS: THEORY AND APPLICATION 5 5 50
BECH633 INDUSTRIAL ECONOMICS 5 5 100
BECH654 LABOUR ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BECH655 ECONOMICS OF LAW 4 4 100
BECH681 DISSERTATION 0 4 100
SDEC612 SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS 2 2 0 50
        

  

Assesment Pattern

The Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) will be assessed for seventy per cent weightage and the End Semester Examination (ESE) for thirty per cent weightage. The practical courses and the common core courses will be assessed out of hundred marks in various components including attendance. The Mid Semester and End Semester written examination question pattern consists of questions divided into two or three sections with short answers, short essays and long essays.

Examination And Assesments

The evaluation is divided into two components: Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) including Mid Semester Examination (MSE), and the End Semester Examination (ESE).

Department Overview:
Under the School of Business Studies and Social Sciences, CHRIST (Deemed to be University) Bannerghatta Road Campus, the Economics Cluster, which later became the Cluster of Economics and Political Science in 2019, was formed in 2016 out of the parent Department of Economics. The Cluster consists of a faculty pool with rich experience in teaching, research and consultancy. The cluster has over eighteen full-time faculty members with specialisation in Monetary and Financial Economics, Environmental Economics, Behavioural Economics, Industrial Economics, Informal Economy, Public Administration, International Relations, Political Ideologies and so on, involving in advanced research.
Mission Statement:
Vision Establish an identity as a cluster of a high standard in teaching and research in Economics and Political Science. Mission Equip students with advanced knowledge and skill sets to address real-world socio-economic and political problems and undertake cutting edge research on contemporary issues related to the same.
Introduction to Program:
The BA Economics Honours Programme with non-core subjects Psychology and Political Science and integrated courses in Sociology and History is designed to produce graduates trained in the application of knowledge in economics to real-life economic, financial, ethical and analytical problems encountered in the economy. It is structured to provide the students with the skills and professional acumen to become key players in the economy irrespective of their future job places and task diversification they would take up. The programme may enable the students to effectively apply their knowledge and skills to situations of economic, institutional and policy making both in governance and industry. The programme has a rigorous focus on quantitative techniques and research methods which will orient the students in dealing with economic problems with a practical and analytical approach. The diversity and the spread of the programme ensure that the students receive sufficient experience of the current issues and crises of the world especially that of the emerging economies.
Program Objective:
Programme Objectives: - To train the students in the fundamental theories in economics - To provide skills in academic research and economic analysis - To expose the students to the real world economic experiences through service learning - To develop the competency to design economic policies - To mould holistically developed individuals Programme Outcomes: On completion of the BA Honours programme in Economics: - The students will gain familiarity with historical and contemporary developments in the discipline of Economics. - The students will have the necessary knowledge of interdisciplinary areas. - Students will be able to analyse and evaluate economic policies. - Students will gain problem-solving, interpretative and decision-making skills. - Students will attain the competency to understand regional, national and global issues from the economic perspective. - The students will have advanced knowledge of discipline-specific areas of Economics. - Students will be trained in advanced practical areas of data analysis, report generation and critical thinking. - Students will be eligible for higher education at leading institutions in the world. - The students will be professionally equipped to take up careers in the corporate and public sector.

BBS191C - MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The Mahabharata of the great Maharishi Veda Vyasa is a treasure trove of knowledge, principles and paradigms. It is written that what is not in the Mahabharata will not be found elsewhere. Written nearly thousands of years ago, the Mahabharata is as yet a source of knowledge, especially modern management principles.In essence it highlights the victory of Dharma in times of Adharma.This subject is a comprehensive learning on management lessons which can be inferred from the great epic. It gives a clear understanding and comparison of management Principles, practices and the various functions of management with the epic. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of management. It also deals with behavioral issues in the individual processes, group and interpersonal processes.

Course Objectives:

  •  Discuss the epic by summarizing the various parvas/units in class in accordance with the management concept
  •  Review and make a critical estimate of the epic with a focus on morals, ethics, legal and management concepts
  • To develop competencies and knowledge of students to become effective professionals

Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcome: Students will get to know team work and group dynamics

  • Students will get to know determination and hard work and its implication on business decision
  • Students will be able to appreciate the role of general management for the success of an organization.
  • This subject will enable them to enhance their Moral, social, ethical and professional skills
  • To understand the manner in which strategic and competitive advantage is developed

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Mahabharatha
 

The older generations-The Pandava and Kaurava princes- Lakshagraha (the house of lac)

Establishment of the kingdom-Administration and Management principles

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Marriage and Building of New city
 

Marriage to Draupadi- An event study approach.

Indraprastha-A new beginning- Pressure for change – Change process, Types of change, Factors influencing change, Resistance to change

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
The Big Game
 

The dice game- Cooperative strategies & Reasons for strategic alliances-

Exile and return- Risks and costs of strategic alliances

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
The battle at Kurukshetra
 

The battle at Kurukshetra - Strategic Planning and Management- levels at which strategy operates- Event approaches to strategic decision making,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Post Kurukshetra
 

The end of the Pandavas- Succession Planning,Authority and Responsibility

The reunion Organizing- Choosing the organizational structure

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Rao, V.S.P., & Krishna, V.H., (2011). Strategic Management: Text and Cases. New Delhi: Excel Books.

Pratap Chandra Roy ,The complete Mahabharata translated into English prose directly from the original sanskrit text.(1st Edition) oriental publishing co.

Source: Jaya - An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

C Rajagopalachari (2017). Mahabharata (63rdedition), Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 10 Marks

MSE   30 Marks

CIA 3 10 Marks

End Assesment 50 Marks

BBS191D - INTRODUCTION TO EXISTENTIALISM (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to the primary figures and themes of existentialism. Although Jean-Paul Sartre was one of the few thinkers who readily adopted the word “existentialism” (along with de Beauvoir and Marcel), the term eventually was used to describe the entire tradition of European thought that dominated the first part twentieth-century, and focused on the analysis of human existence. The readings in the course will focus on three groups of thinkers: the nineteenth-century precursors to existentialism (Dostoyevsky, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche), the German thinkers who laid the groundwork for existential thought (Kafka, Heidegger, Jaspers), and the French thinkers who were most identified with the movement (Sartre, de Beauvoir, Camus). The lectures and discussions will focus primarily on a close reading of the selected primary texts.

Learning Outcome

·         To enable students to understand life and discover meaning in life

·         To incite  critical thinking among students to search for meaning

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Existentialism
 

Nineteenth-Century Precursors to Existentialism:  Pascal, Dostoyevsky,

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The Existentialism Philosophy
 

Kierkegaard: Fear and Trembling, Nietzsche: The Will to Power, The Critique of Morality, Nihilism, The Transvaluation of Values

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
German Existentialism: Kafka, Heidegger, Jaspers
 

Kafka: Three Parables, Heidegger: The Way Back into the Ground of Metaphysics, Jaspers: Existenzphilosophie

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
French Existentialism: Sartre, de Beauvoir, Camus
 

Sartre: Being and Nothingness, Negation, In-Itself, For-Itself, Freedom and Anguish, Bad Faith, Being-for-Others, De Beauvoir: The Second Sex, introduction, Myth and Reality, The Independent Woman, Sartre: Existentialism is Humanism, Camus: The Myth of Sisyphus

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
The Death Camps
 

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz and implications of existentialism in the contemporary word. The relevance of Existentialism today.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

·         In Kaufmann, W. (1956). Existentialism: From Dostoevsky to Sartre. New York: Meridian Books.

 

·         Kierkegaard, S., Evans, C. S., & Walsh, S. (2006). Fear and trembling. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

·         Sartre, J.-P. (1966). Being and nothingness: An essay on phenomenological ontology. New York: Washington Square Press.

 

·         Beauvoir, Simone de, 1908-1986. (2009). The second sex. London :Jonathan Cape,

 

·         Levi, P., Woolf, S. J., & Roth, P. (1996). Survival in Auschwitz: The Nazi assault on humanity.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reynods, Jack, Understanding Existentialism, Chesham, 2006

Evaluation Pattern

Book Review : 10 Marks

Drama (On the theme of Existetialism) - 30 Marks

Mid Semester : 20 Marks

End Semester: 30 Marks

BBS191E - TOURISM, CULTURE, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Course presents several of the operational projects implemented by, or with the support of UNESCO, to illustrate how cultural tourism policies developed in the spirit of the principles and values contained in the texts, standard-setting instruments, declarations and recommendations adopted by UNESCO, are put into practice.

To open a debate on the complex questions that surround the relations between culture and tourism, tourism and development, and tourism and dialogue among cultures.

Learning Outcome

  • To use Tourism as an instrument to bring individuals and human communities into contact
  • To understand the role of cultures and civilizations in facilitating dialogue among cultures
  • To recognise the capacity of Tourism in assisting the world’s inhabitants to live better together and thereby contribute to the construction of peace in the minds of men and women

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction, Key Themes and Issues in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Finding Meaning through Tourism, Tourism as a World of Paradoxes, The Centrality of Experiences, Changing Contexts and Emerging Challenges in the Context of Development

Culture, Heritage and Diversity as Tourism Resources, Understanding Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism, Cultural Tourism as a Means of Economic Development, Developing the Cultural Supply Chain, Exploitation of Culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism as a Vehicle for Inter-Cultural Dialogue
 

Tourist – Host Encounters, The Role of Routers / Intermediaries / Media, Tourism – Tourist Education, Cross Cultural Understanding

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism and Environmental Protection
 

Introduction to the Natural Environment, Tourism and the Spirit of Nature, Fragile and Vulnerable Ecosystems, Cultural Implications of Mobilizing Natural Resources for Tourism, From Ecotourism to Integrated Tourism

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Issues of Governance in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Developing Structures to Develop and Manage Tourism and Culture, Complexities and Challenges of Policy Making in Tourism and Culture, Responsibilities / Tensions and Actions, The Gender Dimension, Stakeholders and Collaborations

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Preservation and Mobilization of Cultural Resources
 

Cultural Tourism Itinerary, Raising Awareness about the Fragility of Heritage Sites, Education for Lasting Tourism

Case Studies from The Palestinian Territories, Central America, Western Africa, Mauritania and Angkor

Economic Empowerment and poverty Alleviation, Sustainable Tourism Development Strategy, Forging Innovative and Inter-Disciplinary Approaches, Indigenous Resource Management Systems, Empowering Communities through Tourism

Case Studies from The Aral Sea Basin, Local Effort in Asia and Pacific (LEAP), Mountainous Regions of Central and South Asia

Dissemination of Knowledge and Reconciliation with the Past, Local and Indigenous Knowledge Systems in a Global Society (LINKS), UNESCO’s Actions in the field of Tourism, Culture and Development

Case Studies on UNESCO’s Conventions, Seminars and Universal Declarations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Mobilizing Nature for Sustainable Tourism
 

Capacity Building and Youth Poverty Alleviation through Tourism and Heritage (PATH)

Case Studies on Sao Paulo’s Green Belt Biosphere Reserve

Text Books And Reference Books:

Appadurai A. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Conceptual Platform. In K. Stenou (ed.) UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 9-16.

Appadurai A. (2003) Modernity at Large. Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.

Boumedine R. S. and Veirier L. (2003) Towards a Strategy for the Sustainable Development of Tourism in the Sahara in the Context of Poverty Eradication. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Cohen E. (2004) Contemporary Tourism. Diversity and Change. Elsevier, London.

Hemmati, M. ed. (1999) Women’s Employment and Participation in Tourism, Report for UN Commission on Sustainable Development 7th Session. UNED.

Intergovernmental Conference on Cultural Policies for Development (1998) Final Report. (Also referred to as Stockholm Action Plan). UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

International Labour Organisation (2001) Human resources development, employment and globalization in the hotel, catering and tourism sector (Report for discussion at the Tripartite Meeting on Human Resources Development, Employment and Globalization in the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Sector, Geneva, ILO).

Komla E.E. and Veirier L. (2004) Tourism, Culture and Development in West-Africa: For a Cultural Tourism Consistent with Sustainable Development. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Posey D.A. (Ed) (1999) Cultural and Spiritual Values of Biodiversity. A Complementary Contribution to the Global Biodiversity Assessment. Intermediate Technology Publications, London (on behalf of United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Nairobi).

Robertson, R. (1990) Mapping the Global Conditions: Globalization as the Central Concept. In M. Featherstone (ed.) Global Culture: Nationalism, Globalization and Modernity. Sage, London, pp. 15-30.

Steck B., Strasdas W., and Gustedt, E. (1999) Tourism in Technical Co-operation. A guide to the conception, planning and implementation of project-accompanying measures in regional rural development and nature conservation. GTZ, Eschborn.

Tour Operators’ Initiative for Sustainable Tourism Development (2004) Supply Chain Engagement for Tour Operators: Three Steps towards Sustainability. UNEP-Sustainable Tourism, Paris.

Winkin Y. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Pool of Ideas for Implementation. In K. Stenou (ed.)

UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 17-60.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism – From an Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (20 Marks)

CIA 2 - Mid Semester Examination (25 Marks)

CIA 3 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Integrated Tourism by Mobilizing Natural Resources” (20 Marks)

Final Submission - An Individual Activity supported by Written Submission on “Designing a Structured Plan to Develop and Manage Sustainability through Tourism and Culture; An Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (30 Marks)

BECH131 - PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is designed to expose the students to the basic principles of microeconomic theory. The emphasis will be on thinking like an economist and the course will illustrate how microeconomic concepts can be applied to analyze real-life situations.

Course Objectives

  • Understand that economics is about the allocation of scarce resources and how that results in trade-offs.
  • Understand the role of prices in allocating scarce resources in market economies and explain the consequences of government policies in the form of price controls.
  • Appreciate positive as well as normative view points on concepts of market failure and the need for government intervention.

Learning Outcome

  • The students will acquainted with the basic principles of microeconomic theory.
  • They will be able to think like economists.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Exploring the subject matter of Economics
 

Why study economics? Scope and method of economics; the economic problem: scarcity and choice; the question of what to produce, how to produce and how to distribute output; science of economics; the basic competitive model; prices, property rights and profits; incentives and information; rationing; opportunity sets; economic systems; reading and working with graphs.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Supply and Demand: How Markets Work, Markets and Welfare
 

Markets and competition; determinants of individual demand/supply; demand/supply schedule and demand/supply curve; market versus individual demand/supply; shifts in the demand/supply curve, demand and supply together; how prices allocate resources; elasticity and its application; controls on prices; taxes and the costs of taxation; consumer surplus; producer surplus and the efficiency of the markets.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The Households
 

The consumption decision - budget constraint, consumption and income/price changes, demand for all other goods and price changes; description of preferences (representing preferences with indifference curves); properties of indifference curves; consumer‘s optimum choice; income and substitution effects; labour supply and savings decision - choice between leisure and consumption.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
The Firm and Perfect Market Structure
 

Behaviour of profit maximizing firms and the production process; short run costs and output decisions; costs and output in the long run.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Imperfect Market Structure
 

Monopoly and anti-trust policy; government policies towards competition; imperfect competition.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Input Markets
 

Labour and land markets - basic concepts (derived demand, productivity of an input, marginal productivity of labour, marginal revenue product); demand for labour; input demand curves; shifts in input demand curves; competitive labour markets; and labour markets and public policy; New Frontiers in Microeconomics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Case, K.E., Fair, R.C., &Oster, S.M. (2013).Principles of Microeconomics (11th ed.). Pearson Education Inc.

Mankiw, N. G.  (2017). Principles of Microeconomics (8th ed.). Cengage Learning.

Stiglitz, J. E., & Walsh, C. E. (2006). Principles of Microeconomics (4th ed.). W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., New York, International Student Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Lipsey, R. G., & Chrystal, K. A. (1999). Principles of Economics (9th ed.). Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Mankiw, N. G. (2011). Economics: Principles and Applications (10th ed.). Cengage Learning.

Pindyck, R. S., & Rubinfeld, D. L. (2013). Micro Economics (8th ed.). Pearson Education, USA.

Ramsfield, E. (1997). Micro Economics (9th ed.). W. W. Norton and company, New York.

Ray, N.C. (1975). An Introduction to Microeconomics. Macmillan Company of India Ltd., New Delhi.

Salvatore, D. (2011). Managerial Economics in a Global Economy (7th ed.). Oxford University Press.

Samuelson, P. A., & Nordhaus, W.D. (2010). Economics (19th ed.). McGraw-Hill Companies.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE*

CIA2

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

*MSE – Mid Semester Exam      **ESE – End Semester Exam

 Question Paper Pattern: MSE and ESE (Max. Marks = 50)

Section A

Section B

Section C

5 x 2 = 10 Marks

6 x 5 = 30 Marks

1 x 10 = 10 Marks

BECH132 - MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS-I (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This is the first of a compulsory two-course sequence. The objective of this sequence is to transmit the body of basic mathematics that enables the study of economic theory at the undergraduate level, specifically the courses on microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory, statistics and econometrics set out in this syllabus. In this course, particular economic models are not the ends, but the means for illustrating the method of applying mathematical techniques to economic theory in general. The level of sophistication at which the material is to be taught is indicated by the contents of the prescribed textbook.

Course Objectives

  • To introduce the students to the basic concepts, procedures and techniques of mathematical economics
  • To enable the students to apply mathematical techniques to economic theory in general.
  • To create analytical ability among students by using Mathematical techniques and decision making ability. 

Learning Outcome

The students will be able to apply mathematical techniques and models for the deeper understanding of economics, especially the branches of microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Preliminaries
 

Elements of logic and proof; Sets and Set operations; Relations; Equations: Linear and Quadratic; Simultaneous Equations; Functions: quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic; Graphs, Slopes and Intercept; Economic Application of Graphs and Equations: Iso-cost Lines, Supply and Demand Analysis, Income determination models.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Differential Calculus: Single Independent Variable Functions
 

Limits; Continuity; Curvilinear Functions; the Derivative; Rules of Differentiation; Higher-order Derivatives; Optimisation; Uses of the Derivatives in Economics: Increasing and Decreasing Functions, Concavity and Convexity, Inflection points, Optimisation of Economic Functions, Relationship among Total, Marginal and Average Concepts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Differential Calculus: Multivariable Functions
 

Multivariable Functions and Partial Derivatives; Rules of Partial Differentiation; Second and Higher-order differentials; Optimisation; Constrained optimisation with Lagrange Multipliers; Implicit functions; Application of Partial Derivatives in Economics: Utility Maximisation, Marginal Productivity, Elasticity, Producers Equilibrium, Optimisation of Cobb Douglas and CES Production Function.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Differential Calculus: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
 

Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Solving Natural Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Logarithmic transformation of Nonlinear Functions; Rules of Differentiation; Higher-order Derivatives, Partial Derivatives; Optimisation of Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Logarithmic differentiation; Application in Economics: Elasticity, Alternative measures of growth, Optimal Timing, Derivation of Cobb Douglas Production Function.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chiang, A.C. & Wainwright, K.  (2013). Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics. (4th ed.). McGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited.

Sydsaeter, K. &   Hammond, P. (2016). Mathematics for Economic Analysis. New Delhi: Pearson Education Inc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bradley, T.  (2013). Essential Mathematics for Economics and Business. London: John Wiley & Sons.

Dowling, E.  T. (2012). Schaum’s Outlines-Introduction to Mathematical Economics. (3rd ed.).  New York: McGraw Hill.

Renshaw, G. (2011). Maths for Economics. (4th ed.).  Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Roser, M. (2003). Basic Mathematics for Economists. (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BECH133 - ECONOMIC HISTORY OF INDIA FROM 1750 TO 1947 (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course traces the evolution of the modern Indian Economy. It places the phenomenon of India’s economic development within the compulsions of colonial rule.  Therefore, it serves as a background course for the study of Indian Economic issues and the Political Economy of India.

Course Objectives

To train students to:

  • Understand the importance of contextualising the discipline in historical terms.
  • Analyse the economic conditions of India, before and during the British rule and how it might have contributed to changing the patterns of production and consumption in the region.
  • Emphasise the role of historical factors that led to the changing distribution of the gains and losses associated with economic growth.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course:

  • Students will be able to understand and examine the importance of studying Economic History to gain a deeper understanding of the interplay between institutional change and economic growth.
  • Students will be able to analyse and argue how certain historical events from before and during the British colonial rule in India may have given rise to the patterns of economic choices that followed in the long run.
  • Students will be able to examine and evaluate if the explanation for increasing economic inequality can be found in the specific manner in which these forces of imperialism and globalisation acted in South Asia or if the explanation lies in how other factors (geographical constraints or social institutions) interacted with these forces.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Economic History: An Introductory Perspective
 

Globalisation and colonialism; Theories of Economic History; Market Formation, Institutions, Class, Political Power and Resource Endowments; Colonial Narratives of India and beyond.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
India in 1750
 

Empires; Economic Conditions: Property, Village Community, Industry and Foreign Trade; Institutional Changes in Property Rights and its consequences; Patterns of Ownership, Tax, Tenancy and Land Markets.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Stability and Change in the Cities (1770-1810)
 

Ruling groups on the move; Religious and social organisation outside the village; Sects, towns and traders; Artisans, traders and urban stability; Two case studies of adaptation – grain and salt; The re-orientation of trade routes and merchant communities.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Agriculture
 

The Agricultural Production Function; Trends in output and income, Factor, Credit and Product Market; Effects of Market Expansion and Stagnation.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Industry
 

Types and patterns of Industrialization; Conditions of Small Scale Industry; Textiles and Handicrafts; Large Scale Industry; Pre-war to World War II; Two major Industries; Cotton Textile and Jute; Industrial Organization: Structure, Labour and Finance.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Infrastructure and Economic Management
 

Drivers of Infrastructure Investments; Irrigation; Railways; Roads and Inland Waterways; Post and Telegraph; Education and Health Care; Fiscal and Monetary System.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bayly, C. A. (2012). Rulers, Townsmen, and Bazaars: North Indian Society in the Age of British Expansion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Roy, T. (2011). The Economic History of India. (3rd ed.).New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bandyopadhyay, S. (2004). From Plassey to Partition: A History of Modern India. New Delhi: Orient Longman Private Limited.

Habib, I. (2006). Indian Economy: 1858 – 1914. New Delhi: Tulika Books.

Stein, B. (1998). A History of India (2nd ed.). London: Wiley-Blackwell.

Tomlinson, B. R. (1993).  The Economy of Modern India: 1860 – 1970. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

 Question Paper Pattern: MSE and ESE (Max. Marks = 50)

Section A

Section B

Section C

5 x 2 = 10 Marks

6 x 5 = 30 Marks

1 x 10 = 10 Marks

BECH141 - INTRODUCTION TO THE PHILOSOPHY OF ECONOMICS (2019 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Economics and philosophy overlap in three major areas. These are the ontology and epistemology of Economics, rationality, and welfare and justice. The course first touches upon the fundamental ontological questions such as, what is Economics, what is utility, and how do economists measure it?  Does evidence of widespread `irrationality’ from behavioural economics undermine standard microeconomic theory?  It then discusses the epistemological problems such as if economic models are literally false representations of reality, how can they aid understanding or action?  Finally the course also introduces students to the questions about welfare, justice, liberty and rights, at least insofar as these are connected to features of economic institutions, processes, or outcomes.

Course Objectives

The objectives of offering this course are:

  • To provide students a philosophical platform for carrying out discussions on Economic theories and models
  • To introduce students to the rational-choice theory
  • To make students understand the philosophical nature of the fundamental debates in Economic methodology
  • To sketch the fundamental questions concerning ethics of economic policy decisions and to develop your abilities to present and to criticize arguments both in discussion and in writing.

Learning Outcome