CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

School of Social Sciences

Syllabus for
Master of Science (Clinical Psycho-oncology)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPO111 BIOSTATISTICS Core Courses 2 2 50
MPO112 ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH SEMINAR Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
MPO131 FOUNDATIONS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL COUNSELLING Core Courses 4 4 100
MPO132 BASIC HUMAN ANATOMY Core Courses 4 4 100
MPO133 NEUROBIOLOGICAL BASES OF COGNITION, AFFECT AND BEHAVIOUR Core Courses 4 4 100
MPO134 QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN CLINICAL PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MPO135 ETHICS IN CLINICAL PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
MPO181 COMMUNITY SERVICE Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 1 1 25
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPO211 RESEARCH LAB - 2 2 50
MPO212 JOURNAL CLUB - 1 1 25
MPO221 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR - 1 1 25
MPO231 SOCIAL AND PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN - 4 4 100
MPO232 BIOLOGY OF CANCER AND TREATMENT - 4 4 100
MPO233 MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS - 4 4 100
MPO234 EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICES IN CLINICAL PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY - 4 4 100
MPO235 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN CLINICAL PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY - 4 4 100
MPO251 CLINICAL AND COUNSELLING SKILLS IN HEALTH CARE - 4 4 100
3 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPO331 PSYCHOLOGICAL, PSYCHOSOCIAL AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF CANCER Core Courses 4 4 100
MPO332 DISTRESS MANAGEMENT AND EVIDENCE BASED INTERVENTIONS IN CANCER Core Courses 4 4 100
MPO333 PRIMARY PREVENTION AND TOBACCO CESSATION COUNSELLING Core Courses 4 4 100
MPO351 COMMUNICATION AND INTERPERSONAL SKILLS IN CANCER CARE Core Courses 4 4 100
MPO381 CLINICAL PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY PRACTICUM Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2 4 100
MPO382 RESEARCH MANUSCRIPT Skill Enhancement Course 2 6 100
MPO383 SUMMER INTERNSHIP Skill Enhancement Course 0 2 50
4 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPO431 PALLIATIVE CARE AND BEREAVEMENT - 4 4 100
MPO432 GENETIC COUNSELLING AND SCREENING IN CANCER - 4 4 100
MPO441A ASIAN HEALING PRACTICES - 2 2 50
MPO441B PSYCHOSOCIAL REHABILITATION - 2 2 50
MPO441C CRISIS AND TRAUMA - 2 2 50
MPO441D PSYCHONEUROIMMUNOLOGY - 2 2 50
MPO481 SEMINAR AND PUBLICATION - 2 2 50
MPO482 INTERNSHIP - 2 8 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The MSc in Clinical Psycho-oncology is an multidisciplinary programme designed for those planning careers in psychosocial care of persons affected by cancer and pallatieve care. The programme is especially useful for psychologists, Counsellors, social workers, nurses, doctors, and persons from allied health fields with an interest in oncology. The programme is benchmarked to International Standards in Psycho - oncology practise and contexualised to meet local and regional needs.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Demonstrate domain expertise in the field of psycho-oncology including theoretical foundations of human behavior

PO2: Demonstrate consultative decision making with empathy, clarity and comprehensiveness while respecting diversity among various stakeholders in the field of psycho-oncology

PO3: Demonstrate ethical and analytical research skills and contribute to knowledge sharing among various stakeholders

PO4: Demonstrate professional competencies and practise skills needed in a multidisciplinary team in psycho-oncology settings

PO5: Demonstrate skills in evaluating research from a critical perspective, exhibit proficiency in evidence-based clinical practices and participate in community-oriented action research in psycho-oncology settings

PO6: Illustrate the relation between physiological and psychological domains of oncology

PO7: Demonstrate skills to work with individuals and families of people with oncological conditions at different stages of their lifespan

PO8: Deal with ethical and moral dilemmas in end-of-life care with knowledge about the national and international policies and standards of care in palliative and end-of-life care

Assesment Pattern

Assessment Pattern


The department follows a pattern of 70 % marks for Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and 30 % marks for End Semester Examinations (ESE).

Break up of continuous internal assessment for 4 credit courses is as follows

CIA 1: 30 marks
CIA 2: 30 Marks
Class participation: 5 marks
Attendance: 5 marks

 

Attendance Percentage

Marks

95% -100%

05 marks

90% - 94%

04 marks

85% - 89%

03 marks

80% - 84%

02 marks

76% - 79%

01 mark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For two credit courses the breakup of CIA is as follows

CIA1:20 marks
CIA 2:25 Marks
Class participation and Attendance: 5 marks

Minimum pass marks for the CIA of a course is 50 % and a pass in each of the CIA is mandatory to be eligible to write the End semester examinations. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA before moving to the next CIA. The students who fail a CIA will have to apply for repeat CIA immediately after publishing the results of each of the CIA components. In such a case an application should be made, to the Office of Examinations and obtain necessary approvals forwarded through the HoD and Dean. The number of chances for repeating each CIA is one. Students who fail the CIA in a semester have to apply for CIA repeat of the whole course in the subsequent semester

The end semester examinations shall be conducted for 2 hours and evaluated out of 50 marks which are then converted to out of 30 marks. Minimum of 40 % marks is required to pass in the ESE of each course and an overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course(CIA+ESE) . Student failing a course due to less than minimum in ESE shall repeat the ESE while his/her internal scores shall remain valid.

Permission for admission to the ESE is granted only if
• A student has obtained a minimum of 33/65 (CIAs + Class participation marks)
• A student has at least 85% of the attendance in aggregate at the end of the semester.
• The Vice Chancellor is satisfied with the character and conduct of the student.

 

Grading Pattern

Percentage 

Grade 

Grade point

(10 point scale) 

Grade point

 (4 Point scale) 

Interpretation 

80-100 

O

10

4

Outstanding

70-79

A+

9

3.6

Excellent 

60-69

A

8

3.2

Very Good

55-59

B+

7

2.8

Good

50-54

B

6

2.4

Above Average

Examination And Assesments

Formative and Summative assessments are conducted by the department to ascertain the readiness for learning and the attainment of learning outcomes. Assessments are examinations are based on competency framework and principles of outcome-based education. Attainment of learning outcomes/ expected competencies is evaluated using either holistic or analytic rubrics, grading schemes or attainment criteria specified to the students at the beginning of the semester. Learning outcomes (Course outcomes) of each course are mapped to programme outcomes. Assessments and examinations follow the principle of constructive alignment and outcomes are mapped to higher-order thinking skills. The most common frameworks used in this programme include Revised Blooms Taxonomy and Structure of Observed Learning outcomes (SOLO) and ICAP framework.

 Assessment is based on the performance of the student throughout the semester.

Credit Structure

Normally 15 hours of classroom teaching in a semester is considered as one credit for theory courses.

  • Courses with 30 hours per semester will earn the candidate 2 credits.
  • Courses with 45-50 hours per semester will earn the candidate 3 credits.
  • Courses with 51 hours and above per semester including practical will earn the candidate 4 credits.
  • Dissertations/Practical equivalent to one course will earn the candidates 4-6 credits.

 

 

 

 

MPO111 - BIOSTATISTICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the basic principles and methods of biostatistics, providing students with a sound methodological foundation for practice in health care settings. The purpose of the course is to teach fundamental concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics with applications in health care, public health, and epidemiology. Basic statistics, including probability, descriptive statistics, inference for means and proportions, and regression methods are presented.

Course Outcome

CO1: Distinguish between numerical and categorical data, including which methods to use for each.

CO2: Know the appropriate application and limitations of hypothesis tests and regression methods.

CO3: Choose an appropriate graphical or tabular display for a given data set and question.

CO4: Determine which basic statistical method(s) is/are most appropriate to analyse the data at hand.

CO5: Use standard statistical software, such as SPSS, to implement the statistical methods.

CO6: Draw conclusions from statistical analyses and place them into the appropriate public health context.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Descriptive Statistics
 

Looking at your data – Types of data, tables and graphs, central tendency and dispersion

Probability – Bayes theorem, sensitivity and specificity, odds ratio and relative risk

Distributions – Binomial, poisson, normal, central limit theorem, standard scores/z scores

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Inferential Statistics
 

Statistical inference – Samples and populations, power, confidence intervals, p values, type 1 and type 2 error

One and two groups – One sample population mean, paired sample t test, independent sample t test

Comparing more than two groups - One way ANOVA, two-way - ANOVA

Comparing two groups (categorical outcomes) -Chi square, Mc Nemar’s test, odds ratio, relative risk

Correlation, Linear Regression, Multiple Regression

Nonparametric tests – sign test, Wilcoxon test, Kruskal Wallis, Rank Correlation

SPSS labs

Text Books And Reference Books:

Triola, M.M, Triola, M.F., & Roy, J (2018) Biostatistics for the biological and health sciences. Pearson

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Field, A (2013). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS statistics. Sage publications

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation:5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

MPO112 - ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH SEMINAR (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce students to the domain of academic writing and its intricacies. Every student, regardless of his or her area of interest, will be called upon to use an academic style of writing at different levels and at various points in time. It will help students identify and practice the elements, style and language of academic writing. Students will have opportunities to practice academic writing, both individually and in collaboration with others. It will also help students learn how to review research articles through a seminar format.

Course Outcome

CO1: Scientifically acknowledge different sources of information in their writings

CO2: Write a document in APA format

CO3: Avoid plagiarism

CO4: Review articles in a scientific manner

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction and Forms of Academic Writing
 

Introduction to Academic Writing - Key issues: plagiarism, biases and frequent errors. Guidelines and rules in Academic Writing: Introduction to style and formatting guidelines from the American Psychological Association (APA); specific guidelines pertaining to in-text citations, references, and structures of academic courses. Forms of Academic Writing: Abstract writing; summarisation; review of literature; scientific poster presentations; reflective, analytic, and descriptive reports; book review; film review.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Research Seminar
 

Reviewing of articles in the area of healthcare in small groups

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bailey, S. (2011). Academic writing: A handbook for international students.3rdEdition. New York: Routledge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (7 th ed.). (2020). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPO131 - FOUNDATIONS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL COUNSELLING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course gives a foundation for counselling, the basic theoretical orientation towards different schools of thoughts in counselling. Different philosophical, sociological and psychological foundations for counselling will be discussed in this course. The theoretical understanding of counselling across settings, differences in the application of counselling in psychiatric and health care settings, the theoretical basis of counselling with chronic and life-limiting conditions will be discussed.

Course Outcome

CO1: Trace the evolution of counselling as a helping process

CO2: Demonstrate an understanding of the different schools of thoughts in counselling

CO3: Understand their role as counsellors across different settings

CO4: Recognise ethical and practical issues which can come up in different settings of counselling.

CO5: Initiate their professional identity as counsellors and try and link theories they learn to practice counselling techniques

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to counselling
 

Concept of counselling; the difference between guidance, counselling and psychotherapy; Development of the profession of counselling: historical perspective and the stages; Relevance of counselling in different settings; perspectives of counselling in different specialities.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Theoretical perspectives of counselling
 

Philosophical foundations of counselling: dignity and value of individual; Sociological foundations: Social development, socialization, social approval, and social milieu; Psychological foundations of counselling: Psychoanalytic perspectives, Behaviouristic perspective, Humanistic and existential perspective; Cognitive and social perspective; Eclectic approach to counselling.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Ethical and Legal issues in counselling
 

Ethical and legal issues in counselling, licensing in India and abroad, ethical dilemmas in counselling, advance care directives, living will. Ethicality in decision making and the role of surrogates, Ethical issues in Online counselling.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Recent Trends in counselling
 

Counselling for diverse groups; Supervision- personal and professional; Group counselling: theories, techniques and skills, brief counselling, trauma and bereavement counselling, Supportive counselling, Grief counselling, Technological advances in counselling, Online counselling

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Neukurg, E (2011). The world of the counsellor: An introduction to the counselling profession. Nelson Education.
Robert, G. L., & Marianne, M.H. (2003). Introduction to Counselling and Guidance. Pearson Education, Inc

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Corey, G. (2012). Theory and practice of counselling and psychotherapy (9th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks, to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)

MPO132 - BASIC HUMAN ANATOMY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the various systems of the body. A basic understanding of how the body works is essential to understand health, diseases and how a health psychologist can contribute to the health and wellness of clients.

Course Outcome

CO1: Define body systems and describe the types of body parts that makeup body system

CO2: Summarise how the various body systems work.

CO3: Identify and describe various common illnesses linked to body systems.

CO4: Discuss the role of a psychologist in maintaining health and wellness of the body.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Endocrine System, Digestive System,
 

Endocrine System: Overview, Adrenal Glands, Other Glands, Disorders involving the Endocrine System – Diabetes, Role of the health psychologist.

Digestive System: Overview, Functioning of the Digestive System, Related Diseases – GI diseases, IBS, Role of the health psychologist.

 

 
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Cardiovascular System, Respiratory System
 

Cardiovascular System:  Overview, Structure and Functions – The Heart and Blood Vessels, Blood Pressure, Related Diseases - CHD, Role of the health psychologist

Respiratory System: Overview, Structure and Functions, Related Diseases, Role of the health psychologist

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Renal System, Reproductive System
 

Renal System: Overview, Structure and Functions, Related Diseases – Kidney Disease, Role of the health psychologist

Reproductive System: Overview, The Ovaries and Testes, Fertilization and Gestation, Disorders of the Reproductive System – Infertility, PCOS, Role of the health psychologist

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Immune System, Nervous System, Genetics and Health
 

Immune System: Overview, Infection, the course of infection, Antigens and Immunity, Disorders related to the Immune system.  Role of the health psychologist

Nervous System:  Overview, Related Disorders – Epilepsy, Paralysis, Dementia, Role of the Health Psychologist

Genetics and Health; Overview, Genetics and Susceptibility to Disorders

Text Books And Reference Books:

Taylor, S. E. (2006). Health psychology. Tata McGraw-Hill Education

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Sarafino, E. P. (1994). Health Psychology, Biopsychosocial interactions. John Wiley & Sons

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks, to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

 

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)

MPO133 - NEUROBIOLOGICAL BASES OF COGNITION, AFFECT AND BEHAVIOUR (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course on ‘Neurobiological Basis of Cognition, Affect and Behaviour’ orients the student to the Neurobiological understanding of human behaviour, emotion, and cognition. This course is offered in the first semester and introduces the student to the Human Nervous system and the neurophysiological underpinnings of psychological processes.  This course is also designed to help the learner apply this understanding to the field of Clinical Psycho-oncology.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the foundations of human neurophysiology.

CO2: Develop a biopsychological understanding of human behaviour and its implications for clinical psycho-oncology.

CO3: Develop a biopsychological understanding of human affect and its implications for clinical psycho-oncology.

CO4: Develop a biopsychological understanding of human cognition and its implications for clinical psycho-oncology.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Physiological Psychology
 

The biological approach to behaviour, affect and learning; Basic structure of the nervous system; The cells of the nervous system: Neurons, Glia, The blood-brain barrier; The Nerve Impulse: The resting potential, The Action Potential; Synapses: Properties of Synapses, The role of Neurotransmitters.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The Physiological bases of human behaviour
 

Sleep and Wakefulness: The physiological basis of the biological clock; Stages of Sleep; The physiological basis of Hunger; The physiological Basis of Thirst; The physiological Basis of Reproductive Behaviours; Implications of the physiological bases of human behaviour in the field of clinical psycho-oncology

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The Physiological bases of human affect
 

Emotions and autonomic arousal; The functions of emotions; The physiological basis of aggression; The physiological basis of fear and anxiety; The role of stress on health; Implications of the physiological bases of human affect in the field of clinical psycho-oncology.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
The Physiological bases of human cognition
 

The Neurophysiological Basis of Learning and Memory: The role of the hippocampus; Intelligence; Language; Lateralization; Understanding circuitry pathways of the brain; Implications of the physiological bases of human cognition in the field of clinical psycho-oncology

Text Books And Reference Books:

Kalat, J. W. (2019). Biological psychology (13th ed.). Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.


Kolb, B., & Whishaw, I. Q. (2019). An Introduction to Brain and behavior (6th ed.). Worth.


 
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Pinel, J. P. J. (2018). Biopsychology (10th ed.). Pearson Education Limited.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks, to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)

MPO134 - QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN CLINICAL PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Clinical Psycho-oncologists require a working knowledge of research skills in specific applications to health and health care. This course provides an introduction to research in healthcare. The course will include both qualitative and quantitative research methods, using examples of research across a range of areas in health. Students will be introduced to the most common research designs used in health care service, evaluation and public health. This course will be followed by an advanced course in Evidence-based research in health and wellness in the second semester, building upon the foundations laid in this course. This course will be supplemented by the course Biostatistics as well as the course in Ethics offered in the current semester.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop research questions to address contemporary health and health care concerns

CO2: Distinguish and choose designs suitable for solving health care and public health issues

CO3: Describe methodologies that can address a range of public health and health care challenges, including but not limited to determinants of mortality and morbidity; leading causes of health disparities among regional, national, and global populations; and transmission for infectious and chronic diseases.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
The Scientific Method
 

Foundations of Health Research

Qualitative and Quantitative methods

Research Planning

The Research Process

Formulation of Research Questions

Sampling Methods, Recruitment Procedures and External Validity

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Research Designs in Health Care
 

Experimental Designs and Randomized Controlled Trials (Intervention Studies)

Surveys and Quasi-Experimental Designs

Single Case (n=1) Designs

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Research Designs in Health Care
 

Epidemiological Research Observational Research ( Case-Control studies, Case-Crossover studies)

Cohort Studies (Cross-Sectional studies, Ecological studies)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Data Collection
 

Questionnaires and Survey Designs

Mixed Methods

 

Measurements.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Polgar, S & Thomas, S (2014). Introduction to Research in Health Sciences. Sixth Edition. Churchill Livingston

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Munnang,i S, & Boktor S.W. [Updated 2021 Apr 29]Epidemiology Of Study Design. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK470342/

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%  

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course (CIA+ESE).

MPO135 - ETHICS IN CLINICAL PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To provide students with foundational knowledge and skills in ethical and professional behaviour that will enable them to competently reflect upon, address and resolve the socio-cultural issues that students will confront during their training and professional practice. This ethics course involves teaching rudimentary knowledge and skills in ethical theory and practice in health care  

Course Outcome

CO1: communicate a personal understanding of the moral significance and ethical responsibilities of being a health care professional.

CO2: communicate an understanding of the goals of health care, including the influence of culture and diversity on health care practice.

CO3: demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary to make ethically responsible patient care decisions.

CO4: examine interprofessional approaches to health care and work in interprofessional groups to address ethical issues in health care

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History, Religion and Bioethics
 

The history and development of clinical ethics; modern research ethics, codes and guidelines; role of religion in ethics – Islam, Hinduism, Christianity, Judaism;  culture and bioethics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Public Health Policy, Law and Global Health Ethics
 

Indian law and its implication on clinical practice and research; Disparity in health, health care and access to health; Disparity in resource allocation for health -macro, meso and micro levels, public health policy and resource allocation; ethical analysis of policies

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Research Ethics
 

IRB and its functions; ethical issues in health care; vulnerable populations, risks and benefits; authorship; contemporary issues in research ethics

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Clinical Ethics
 

Functions of a clinical ethics committee; ethical issues at the end of life; ethical issues at the beginning of life; reproductive medicine and ethics; euthanasia; professionalism.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Loewy, E.H (2002). Textbook of Health Care Ethics. Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  Tom L Beauchamp, James F Childress. (2008) Principles of Biomedical Ethics.

3.     

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Albert R Johnsen, Mark Sielgler, William J Winslade . Clinical ethics a practical approach to the ethical decision in clinical medicine

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks, to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)

MPO181 - COMMUNITY SERVICE (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:25
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In this course students will engage in supervised community service for 15 hours during the semester. Students are encouraged to work on any health care issue in the community and develop and implement a module for health promotion. Reflections on their interactions are an integral part of this course. Student engagement will be assessed by a supervisor.

Course Outcome

CO1: Attend all discussion/reflection hours that are held. Since there will only be a few, make sure not to miss any

CO2: Keep your camera on during class and participate in the discussion/reflection

CO3: Come prepared with the work assigned for the class

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Field Work
 

Students in small groups may either partner with various NGO’s and organizations working in health care or identify a need in the community on their own. They will have to develop modules to increase awareness of a targeted health issue and deploy this in the community. Students will gain hands-on experiences in working with various issues in the community.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Reflection & Report Writing
 

Reflection is a core component of community service. It is a period of critical thinking performed by the student and is based on a specific or overall experience of the student. It guides students towards greater personal development by coming to a better understanding of their own values, opinions, and assumptions. The types of reflection which can be used are, class discussion, brainstorming, sharing of critical personal and group incidents and so on. The students are expected to submit a report at the end of this course using the following guidelines.

  • Reason for choosing the particular health issue
  • Stakeholders/beneficiaries
  • The planning phase of community service initiatives
  • Logistics for the initiative of the action
  • Execution of the action initiative
  • Specific learning outcome
  • Impact assessment/Evaluation 
Text Books And Reference Books:

NA

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 10 marks

CIA 2: 15 Marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. 

 

MPO211 - RESEARCH LAB (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The primary goal of this two-credit course is to provide the students support to develop a clear and concise research proposal that addresses an important health care issue. The research proposal is expected to be converted into a project which is then converted into a manuscript and ready for publication by the end of the third semester of their programme. Each student is attached to a faculty advisor who holds the lab once a week with a  group of students attached to him/her/them. This course is followed by Research lab 2 in the third semester and the Manuscript and Publication course in the final semester of the programme. Students are encouraged to present their key research ideas in the form of poster presentations in colloquia organized by the Department of Psychology in association with health care centres. The course will use a seminar format and dwell on peer feedback and faculty supervision. This is not a lecture-based course.

 

           

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and create the key components of a research proposal

CO2: Demonstrate the ability to conduct literature reviews and gather the critical scientific information related to the research proposal

CO3: Demonstrate writing skills by writing, a clear, concise research proposal with scientifically defensible aims, methods and conclusions

CO4: Develop the skills to objectively review and write a scientific critique of a colleague?s proposal

CO5: Describe the important concepts related to using human subjects in scientific research

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Key components of a research proposal
 

Choosing research questions based on evidence

C.A.R.S model

Literature review

Choosing Research design based on evidence

Consultation skills

Informed consent

The Institutional Review Board (IRB) and CHRIST University Code of research Conduct and Ethics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Communicating research ideas in a scientific community
 

Scientific poster

Selecting journals for manuscript publication

Publication ethics, predatory publishing

Community of Publication Ethics (COPE)

Indexing agencies, Impact Factor and publication indices

Text Books And Reference Books:

https://libguides.usc.edu/writingguide (University of South Carolina, Research Guides)

Aveyard, H. (2014) Doing a Literature Review in Health and Social Care: A Practical Guide. 3rd edition. New York: McGraw-Hill Education,

Ballenger, B, P.(2015) The Curious Researcher: A Guide to Writing Research Papers. 8th edition. Boston, MA: Pearson

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Eby, E. (2012) The College Student's Guide to Writing a Great Research Paper: 101 Easy Tips and Tricks to Make Your Work Stand Out. Ocala, FL: Atlantic Pub. Group

Yagoda, B. (2013) How to Not Write Bad: The Most Common Writing Problems and the Best Ways to Avoid Them. New York: Riverhead Books.

Turabian, K. L. (2018) A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers. 9th edition. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

 

MPO212 - JOURNAL CLUB (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:25
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Journal club is a student-driven and faculty-supervised mandatory activity. Each student in the programme will choose a published empirical article in the area of health psychology or health care from a journal available in the University library and preferably indexed in PubMed. The students will present the article in turns weekly and facilitate a group discussion of the article. A research  blog will be created on the Learning Management System of the University (Moodle) and the blog will be open till the end of the week. The student presenting the article must make article available for the class to read a week in advance after gaining approval of the instructor, and all students  will  place their critical views of the article in the discussion thread prior to the journal club meeting.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: critically read, interpret, and present published data

CO2: discuss the strengths and weaknesses of publications

CO3: enhance critical thinking and problem-solving skills

CO4: demonstrate skills in interpreting and critically evaluating scientific data

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Critical evaluation and presentation of an empirical article in the area of and health care.
 

 Critical evaluation and presentation of an empirical article in the area of and health care.

 

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Xiong, L., Giese, A-K., Pasi, M., Charidimou, A., van Veluw, S & Viswanathan, A (2018). How to Organize a Journal Club for Fellows and Residents, Stroke, 49:e283-e285. DOI: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.118.021728

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 10 marks

CIA2: 15 Marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA

MPO221 - PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:25
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to various aspects of Clinical Psycho-oncology. It is aimed at giving students an understanding of what actually goes on in psycho-oncology practice. It will involve a series of lectures from practitioners in the field. This course is meant to enhance their professional development as they work to becoming practising psycho-oncologists

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of various practice issues in Clinical Psycho-oncology

CO2: Articulate their roles as clinical psycho-oncologists in a medical setting

CO3: Develop an awareness of their professional competence and an understanding of what competencies they need to further develop.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Guest lectures
 

 Guest lectures by experts in the field of  Psycho- oncology

Text Books And Reference Books:

NA

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA: 10 marks

CIA: 15 marks

A must-pass assessment with a passing grade of 50%. 

MPO231 - SOCIAL AND PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course introduces trainee helping professionals to human growth and development across the lifespan, focusing on typical and atypical development, major milestones and life cycle stages. Students will gain an enhanced knowledge of the stages and domains of human development. We will examine major theories and approaches in physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development and emphasize the interdependence of all domains of development. We will also discuss the impact of chronic illness, adverse life events and developmental challenges individuals' face in the life cycle stage and its effects on growth and development. The lifespan developmental perspective provides students with a foundation to conceptualize and apply developmental theory and research, emphasizing its usefulness in answering questions that address changes in an individuals' health and wellbeing.

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify the primary reasons for studying human development across the lifespan.

CO2: Explain major terms, concepts, and theories in developmental psychology

CO3: Describe culture, systemic and environmental factors that affect human development.

CO4: Evaluate various issues in lifecycle stages using theories in developmental psychology

CO5: Apply theories of developmental psychology to real-life examples

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Biological bases of Human Development
 

The study of human development; Biological foundations: heredity-environment correlations- twin studies, genetic influences, prenatal development, birth, physical milestones, and changes including growth spurts, puberty, brain development; critical and sensitive periods, the pattern of physical development; Challenges for cognitive and psycho-social development, the role of nutrition, poverty, illness, lifestyle and disability on development across the lifespan.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Cognitive and Identity Development
 

Cognitive development- Piaget and Vygotsky; Moral development and reasoning-Kohlberg and Gilligan; Development of identity- Erickson and Marcia, emerging adults-Arnett, positive youth development model, adolescent risk behaviour; Gender development and gender role socialization; the role of culture, play, education, and peers on development across the lifespan.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Socio-emotional Development
 

Emotional regulation and dysregulation, temperament, attachment theories and styles- Bowlby, Ainsworth, factors that affect attachment, adult attachment patterns and relationship- Shaver and Fraley, Sternberg; Caregiving and parenting-Baumrind; Social contexts of lifespan development-Bronfenbrenner’s ecosystems model, the role of family patterns, adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), resilience on development across the lifespan.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Ageing and Endings of Life
 

Adult developmental tasks- Havighurst; Life stages-Levinson, quarter and mid-life crisis, sexuality and menopause; Gains and losses in later adult life, biological and social theories of ageing, positive and successful ageing

Death, understanding of death and causes for death across the life span, grief, mourning and bereavement, facing one's death, coping with death and dying- Kubler Ross; Cultural issues; Dying with dignity- palliative care and hospice care.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Berk, L. E. (2016). Exploring lifespan development. Pearson.

Broderick, P.C., & Blewitt, P. (2010). The life span: Human development for helping professionals. (3rd Ed.). Pearson.

Santrock, J.W. (2011). A topical approach to lifespan development. Tata McGraw-Hill Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Feldman, R. S. (2015). Discovering the life span. (Third Edition). Pearson Global Education.

Papalia, D.E., Olds, S.W. & Feldman, R.D. (2017). Human Development (Ninth Edition). Tata McGraw-Hill

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks, to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)

MPO232 - BIOLOGY OF CANCER AND TREATMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Cancer is defined as uncontrollable cell growth.  The complexities of the causes and the different types of cells that give rise to this disease have underscored the need for a better understanding of the basic biology of cancer.   Advancements in basic and biomedical research have led to more effective treatments, enhanced detection methods, and better prevention strategies.  This course aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the biology and pathology of cancer.  This course will explore the role of mutations in cancer cells, and how they lead to the dysregulation of essential biological properties like programmed cell death, cell proliferation and differentiation.   Classical treatment methods will be compared with newer treatment strategies like targeted therapies.  This course will also explore the challenges associated with diagnosing cancers, as well as ways in which to prevent cancer.  The ever-expanding role of “omics” and bioinformatics in areas such as tumor classification, prognosis and treatment will also be discussed.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate a working knowledge of the common cellular and molecular mechanisms that are deregulated in cancerous cells, and how their deregulation contribute to the development of cancer

CO2: The role gene mutation plays in the development of cancer and ways in which can cancer be considered a ?heritable? trait.

CO3: Ways in which environmental factors influence cancer susceptibility and how may we use this information to prevent cancer

CO4: How cancer manifests itself in the human body and what features of cancer lead to high mortality rates

CO5: the biological rationale for both traditional chemotherapies and novel targeted therapeutic approaches and the benefits and limitations of each option

CO6: ways can genomic technologies provide insight into cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and the limitations of these technologies

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Cancer definition

Overview of the hallmarks of cancer
Mutagens, carcinogens, and mutations
Tumor viruses and the discovery of oncogenes
Tumor cells possess genetic abnormalities
Mechanisms of oncogene activation
Role of growth factors and receptors in carcinogenesis
RAS signalling in cancer
Familial cancer syndromes and the discovery of tumor suppressors

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Cell cycle control and the pRb tumor suppressor

Apoptosis and the p53 tumor suppressor

Cellular senescence

Telomeres, cellular immortalization, and tumorigenesis

Multi-step tumorigenesis and the evolution of cancer

Tumor-promoting  stimuli

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 3
 

Cancer stem cell

DNA repair mechanisms

DNA repair defects and their relationship to cancer

Angiogenesis

Metastasis

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 4
 

Tumor Immunology

Cancer cell metabolism

Treatment- traditional chemotherapeutics

Treatment- Immunotherapies

Treatment-targeted therapy.

New Genomic and proteomic technologies

Applications of new technologies in prevention, assessing risk, diagnostics, and treatment.

Text Books And Reference Books:

The Biology of Cancer, 2nd Edition; Author(s): Robert A. Weinberg; ISBN: 9780815342205

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks, to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)

MPO233 - MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce students to mental health issues normally found in general health care. The course will address issues of comorbidity, common mental health issues found across populations seeking general health services.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and describe common mental health (Psychiatric) issues encountered in general health care

CO2: Identify appropriate treatment strategies to manage common mental health (Psychiatric) concerns

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Psychiatric Evaluation and Psychiatric Emergencies
 

Clinical Assessment for Psychiatric symptoms, Mental Status Examination, Safety Assessments

Capacity evaluation and Informed consent

Psychiatric Emergencies: Delirium, Agitation, Catatonia, Intoxication, overdose and withdrawal, suicide.

 
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Psychiatric Symptoms and their management-1
 

Anxiety, Dementia, Depression, Disordered eating behaviours, Dissociation, Mania, Obsessions and Compulsions,

 
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Psychiatric Symptoms and their management-2
 

Personality disorders, problems with sexual function and behaviours, psychosis, sleep disorders

Unexplained medical symptoms

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Treatment Modalities
 

Psychopharmacology, Somatic Treatments, Psychotherapeutic treatments.

 
Text Books And Reference Books:

Rosenquist, J. N. (Ed.). (2009). The Massachusetts General Hospital/McLean Hospital residency handbook of psychiatry. Lippincott Williams & Wilki

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Sadock, B. J. (2007). Kaplan & Sadock's synopsis of psychiatry: behavioral sciences/clinical psychiatry.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks, to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)

MPO234 - EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICES IN CLINICAL PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course gives the students an opportunity to examine the foundations and application of evidence-based practices in healthcare.

Course Outcome

CO1: be able to evaluate clinical research from a quality perspective

CO2: demonstrate strategies to conduct reliable and valid research in health care

CO3: demonstrate strategies to examine evidence an its application in healthcare planning and implementation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Overview of evidence based practices.
 

Writing focused clinical questions.

Planning steps to locate relevant evidence

Searching for evidence in databases

Evidence-based point of care resources

Recording search strategies

Organising relevant evidence

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Evidence-based practice in assessment and diagnosis
 

Types of diagnostic procedures

Diagnostic tool selection factors

Diagnostic guidelines, algorithms, and standards of care

Diagnostic biostatistics

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Evidence-based practices in treatment, harm and prevention
 

Treatment research

Treatment selection

Studies of harm

Studies of prevention

Biostatistics In the treatment of harm and prevention

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Implementation and evaluation in evidence-based practice
 

Appraising trustworthiness of quantitative evidence

Synthesising evidence: systematic reviews, meta-analysis and preference analysis

Structure of a quantitative research report

comparison of quantitative and qualitative research evidence

Appraising trustworthiness of qualitative research

critical analysis of qualitative study

implementation and evaluation

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Howlett, B., Rogo, E. J., Shelton, T. G. (2014). Evidence-based Practice for Health Professionals: An Interprofessional Approach. United Kingdom: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Jolley, J. (2013). Introducing Research and Evidence-Based Practice for Nursing and Healthcare Professionals (2nd ed.). Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315846996

APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice. Evidence-based practice in psychology. Am Psychol. 2006 May-Jun;61(4):271-85. doi: 10.1037/0003-066X.61.4.271. PMID: 16719673.       

Drake, R. E., Merrens, M. R., & Lynde, D. W. (Eds.). (2005). Evidence-based mental health practice: A textbook. W. W. Norton & Company.

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Marks, D. F., & Yardley, L. (Eds.). (2004). Research methods for clinical and health psychology. Sage.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

 All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks, to be eligible to write the ESE. 

 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

 

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)

MPO235 - QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN CLINICAL PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course will introduce students to the tradition of qualitative research in social sciences with an emphasis on its applicability in psychology. Different methods of collecting qualitative data are discussed. Methods of Qualitative data analysis are also touched upon . Along with courses on research in the second semester, this course intends to provide students with the theoretical background to develop their research proposal.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner will be able to: 

  • Understand the philosophical  foundations on which qualitative research methods are based

  • Gain familiarity with the conceptual foundations of qualitative research methods in Psychology

  • Understand various traditions of qualitative research methodologies in psychology.

  • Learn different methods of data collection.

  • Understand different methods of data analysis in qualitative research methods.

Course Outcome

CO1: Distinguish between different research paradigms

CO2: Demonstrate skills in designing a qualitative research proposal

CO3: Collect qualitative data using various methods

CO4: Demonstrate skills in qualitative data analysis

CO5: Demonstrate skills of reporting in qualitative research

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Foundations of Qualitative Research
 

Defining qualitative research; Historical development of qualitative research; Key philosophical and methodological issues in qualitative research; Different traditions of qualitative research; Grounded theory, Narrative approach, Ethnography ,Action research and Discourse analysis (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs) 

  1. Review of different articles related to the different traditions of qualitative research

  2. Skill training seminars

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Qualitative Research Design
 

Conceptualizing research questions, issues of paradigm, .Designing samples, Theoretical sampling, Contrasting qualitative with quantitative approach in research process  Issues of Credibility and trustworthiness (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs) 

  1. Qualitative research proposal  lab

  2. Simulated techniques for designing qualitative research

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Methods of Collecting Qualitative Data
 

What is qualitative data? Various methods of collecting qualitative data: participant observation, interviewing, focus groups, life history and oral history, documents, diaries, photographs, films and videos, conversation, texts and case studies (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs) 

  1. Simulated techniques on different data collection methods

  2. Skill training seminars

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Analyzing Qualitative Data
 

Different traditions of qualitative data analysis; thematic analysis, Narrative analysis, Discourse analysis, Content analysis (8 hrs)

Research Lab (7 Hrs) 

  1. Qualitative  data analysis software NVivo

  2. Reporting qualitative research data

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Creswell, J. W., & Poth, C. N. (2017). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches. Los Angeles, CA: Sage. 

  • Ritchie, J., Lewis, J., McNaughton Nicholls, C., & Ormston, R. (2014). Qualitative    research Pactice A  guide    for social science students and researchers (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Sage Publication Limited.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Bryman,A (Ed.)(2007) Sage Benchmarks in social science research  methods Vol.I,Vol.II ,Vol,III,and Vol.  IV.New Delhi : Sage Publications

  • Kvale,S.(Ed.) (1997).Psychology & Post-modernism. New Delhi:Sage Publications

  • McGhee, P. (2001). Thinking critically about qualitative research in psychology. In P. McGhee, Thinking psychologically (pp.98-111). New York: Palgrave

  • Smith,J.A.(ed.)(2003).Qualitative psychology: A practical guide to research methods.New Delhi: Sage.

  • Smith,J.A., Harre,R., & Langenhove,L.V.(eds.).(1995).Rethinking methods in psychology.  NewDelhi:Sage.

  • Willig,C.(2001).Introducing qualitative research in psychology: Adventures in theory and method. Buckingham:Open University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern: 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with a minimum overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

 

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course.(CIA+ESE)

MPO251 - CLINICAL AND COUNSELLING SKILLS IN HEALTH CARE (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides an opportunity for students to practise counselling and communication skills (under supervision) required while working in health care settings with patients, family members and significant others. Based on communication models in psychology, this course is hands-on and experiential and used competence- mastery training model in a lab setting.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: demonstrate under supervision basic counselling and communication skills required in a variety of settings outlined in the course

CO2: demonstrate multicultural competence while communicating with patients and family members in lab setting

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Counselling and communication in health care
 

Doctor-Patient Communication

Information gathering and clinical reasoning

Self-care strategies

Multicultural counselling competence

Relationship building

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Patient centered counselling
 

 

Listening to stories about illness and health

Listening skills (Basic listening sequence: Attending skills, Paraphrase,)

Responding to emotions (Empathy, Reflection of feelings, reflection of meaning, reframing structuring)

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Talking to children about life, death and sex
 

Solution focussed brief therapy skills

Communicating about ethical dilemmas

Communicating about risk and uncertainty

Working with infertility

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Information giving and counselling in specific health care contexts
 

Breaking bad news in health care settings

Conveying  the diagnosis

Facilitating Behaviour Change through Motivational Interviewing

Responding to medical error and complaints

Text Books And Reference Books:

Clinical Communication in Medicine. (2016). Papageorgiou, A., Kidd, J., Brown,J., & Noble , L (Eds) United Kingdom: Wiley.

Counselling and Communication Skills for Medical and Health Practitioners.(1998). Bayne, R., Nicolson, P., & Horton, I (Eds). United Kingdom, Wiley. 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Nelson-Jones, R. (2015). Basic Counselling Skills: A Helper′s Manual. United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%   

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE. 

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)

MPO331 - PSYCHOLOGICAL, PSYCHOSOCIAL AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF CANCER (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The course aims at sensitizing the students to various psychological, psychosocial and cultural aspects of cancer. The students will understand the differences in these factors among diverse cancer groups, with regard to the site of illness, stage of illness, gender, socio-economic and cultural background of people affected with cancer. The students will be trained in designing culturally sensitive psychosocial interventions for people diagnosed with cancer and their caregivers.

Course Outcome

CO1: By the end of the course the student should be able to: CO 1 : Distinguish between the psychological, psychosocial and cultural aspects of cancer

CO2: CO 2: Demonstrate skills on analysing the need for interventions using different theoretical understanding

CO3: CO 3 : Demonstrate skills on developing psychosocial interventions for the cancer survivors and for their care givers.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Psychological aspects of cancer
 

Psychological reaction to cancer diagnosis, co-morbid mental health conditions, potential positive impact, general distress and psychological issues related to cancer,  Fear of progression in cancer patients and survivors, Different theoretical models to understand the fear and other psychological aspects- Kubler Ross model, Protection Motivation Theory, the Extended Parallel Process Model or the Uncertainty in Illness Theory.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Psychosocial aspects of cancer
 

Psychosocial issues in oncology: a historical perspective; Crisis and coping- leaning to live with cancer and its clinical implications, patient’s individual factors and health system-related factors; contextual and familial factors. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Cultural aspects of Cancer
 

Cultural and ethnic factors; interpersonal and environmental factors that influence cancer care and treatment. Impact of culture on the patient role, participation, decision making and clinicians’ role in teatment. Beliefs about cancer causation and the importance of language and words for cancer in different cultures. Cancer prevention: Western and Eastern contexts.

Quality of life defined in different cultures

Death and dying and bereavement across cultures

Complimentary and alternative medicines in cancer care.

Cross-cultural differences in spirituality

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Integrative intervention strategies.
 

Screening tools for psychological and psychosocial risk factors in cancer- Screening and assessment of unmet needs, assessment tools for anxiety, depression, distress, cognitive problems, pain, suicidal risk, quality of life, functional assessments, caregiver burden

Managing uncertainty, stigma, collusion, Search for meaning

Guidelines for culturally competent care.

Lifestyle modifications for cancer control across cultures.

Supportive expressive psychotherapeutic interventions in cross-cultural cancer care.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Holland J.C., & Zittoun, R.(Eds). (1990)Psychosocial Aspects of Oncology. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Moore J.R., & Spiegel, D (Eds)(2004). Cancer, Culture, and Communication. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York

 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%  

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

 

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

 

 

MPO332 - DISTRESS MANAGEMENT AND EVIDENCE BASED INTERVENTIONS IN CANCER (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The course introduces the students to various evidence-based interventions for cancer care. The interventions include psychological, psycho social and lifestyle interventions. This course will help them to understand the distress associated with a cancer diagnosis and its impact on the well-being of patients from a practitioner’s perspective.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the definition of ?evidence-based practice? as well as the purposes of using such practices in cancer care

CO2: To gain an understanding of the basic evidence based therapeutic methods used in establishing comprehensive cancer care.

CO3: To use the research/professional literature, in combination with an understanding of your client, to aid in choosing effective treatment techniques

CO4: To be able to conceptualize client case studies within a variety of evidence-based approaches (cognitive, behavioural, person-centred, and psychodynamic)

CO5: To become familiar with a few core techniques for providing psychosocial support by including family and community and thus gain an understanding of developing an integrated approach to cancer care.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Psychosocial Problems in Adult Patients With Cancer
 

 Anxiety, depression, withdrawn patient, anger, family and social issues, distress, Barriers to Distress Management in Cancer (under-recognition of psychological needs of the patient, financial issues, lack of community resources, financial barriers, lack of social support, stigma )

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Management of distress in patients with cancer
 

Multifactorial approach, recognising distress as a continuum, collaboration with social workers, psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurses and family,

Screening for distress and psychosocial needs, Making and implementing a treatment plan to address these needs; Referring to services as needed for psychosocial care; and Re-evaluating, with plan adjustment as appropriate. Educational and training programs 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Psychosocial Interventions
 

Need for Evidence-based interventions, significance, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, mindfulness-based stress reduction, brief CBT intervention (Memory and Attention Adaptation Training, Supportive Psychotherapy, Dignity therapy  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Psychoeducation interventions and lifestyle changes
 

Psychoeducational interventions: stress management, family therapy, education on pharmacological interventions (aftereffects, need and side effects), exercise, Complementary and/or Integrative Therapies, Existential therapy, Access to religious or spiritual practices 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Cancer Principles & Practice of Oncology, (6th Edition.), DeVita, V.T., Hellamn,  S., Steven, A., & Rosenberg. (2001). Philadelphia. Lippincott Williams &  Wilkins. 
  2. Cancer and Emotion: A Practical Guide to Psycho-oncology. Jeniffer  Barraclough, 1999. Wiley Publishers 
  3.  Cancer and the Family Life Cycle: A practitioner's guide from families, systems,  health. 2002. Theresa A. Beach, Donald R. Nicholas and Marci A. 
  4. Children and cancer: The quality of Life. 2004. Christine Eiser. Routledge.  5. Cognition & Cancer. 2008. Christina A. Meyers, James R. Perry. Cambridge  University Press. 
  5.  Handbook of Pain Management, 2004 R. Melzack and P.D.Wall Published by  Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh. 
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Williams, K. C., Brothers, B. M., Ryba, M. M., & Andersen, B. L. (2015). Implementing evidence-based psychological treatments for cancer patients. Psycho-oncology, 24(12), 1618–1625.https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.3937
  2. Sallie Anne Newell, Rob William Sanson-Fisher, Nina Johanna Savolainen, For the NSW Cancer Council Cancer Education Research Program, Systematic Review of Psychological Therapies for Cancer Patients: Overview and Recommendations for Future Research, JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Volume 94, Issue 8, 17 April 2002, Pages 558–584, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/94.8.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%  

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

 

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course (CIA+ESE).

MPO333 - PRIMARY PREVENTION AND TOBACCO CESSATION COUNSELLING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Advances in cancer screening, detection and prevention decreased the mortality associated with cancer, however, the incidence remains high. Tobacco and other substance use are the major modifiable risk factors in cancer and lead to poor prognosis. This course aims at training students in effective behavioural interventions for quitting tobacco and other substances. This orients students to the model treatment programs and systematic follow-ups to ensure the prevention of cancer.

Course Objectives

This course provides students with an understanding of:

  • Impact of substance addiction on cancer incidence and treatment
  • Preventive strategies to quit addiction
  • Familial and societal role in primary prevention of cancer
  • Therapeutic psychosocial interventions in primary prevention related to addiction 

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the impact of addiction on cancer and treatment

CO2: Demonstrate motivational strategies to quit addiction

CO3: Explain biopsychosocial aspects of tobacco use and addiction

CO4: Elaborate model tobacco cessation programs

CO5: Explain the role of counsellors in identifying people at risk, motivating them to quit the addiction, maintaining follow-ups and relapse prevention

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to tobacco use and its impact
 

 

 

Epidemiology of tobacco use and cancer; forms and types of tobacco use; health consequences of tobacco use; tobacco use, cancer and other diseases: epidemiology and impact. prevalent tobacco use practices in India

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Biopsychosocial aspects of tobacco use (addiction) and treatment
 

 

Biopsychosocial aspects in Complete response, partial remission, recurrence and recovery in tobacco use and treatment. Psychosocial measures to curtail tobacco use and thereby prevent cancer: policy level, environmental and treatment-related. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Psychosocial interventions for tobacco cessation
 

 

Tobacco cessation treatments: 5 ‘A’s, and other model treatment programs, stepped care models, motivational interviewing techniques. Family interventions to support tobacco cessation programs. Follow-up and relapse prevention strategies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Preventive programmes for Tobacco use
 

School-based prevention programmes: The need, Purposes, models and outcome of school-based programmes.

 

Prevention programmes for youth: The need, Purposes, models and outcome of school-based programmes.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Tobacco Control Programmes in India
 

National Tobacco Control Programme (NTCP) in India: The aim, plan, mechanism, guidelines, and monitoring strategies of NTCP.

 

The National Tobacco Cell (NTC): The aim, plan, mechanism, guidelines, and monitoring strategies of NTC.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Warnakulasuriya and Greenspan (eds) (2020). Textbook of Oral Cancer: Prevention, Diagnosis and Management

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 The American Cancer Society (Eds) (2017) Principles of Oncology: Prevention to Survivorship

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%  

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

 

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course (CIA+ESE).

MPO351 - COMMUNICATION AND INTERPERSONAL SKILLS IN CANCER CARE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides an opportunity for students to understand and master core clinical skills in communication to facilitate conversations with patients, caregivers and the entire healthcare team. Communication in cancer care requires training in order to be effective in a clinical setting. Inadequate communication may cause much distress for patients and their families which can lead to poorer choices about their health and well-being and also adversely impacts healthcare professionals.

Course Outcome

CO1: Able to navigate different segments of oncology care (patients, caregivers and healthcare providers) that require effective use of communication skills

CO2: Well-versed with models of communication for handling difficult conversations in the cancer trajectory with various populations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Importance of Communication in cancer
 

Evidence-based practices for Communication skill training in Psycho-oncology

Basic Counselling Skills in cancer communication

Advanced Counselling Skills in cancer communication

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Bed side communication and counseling
 

Communication about treatment and procedures in cancer

Communication skills to handle difficult families

Communication in cancer care - Cultural Factors

Communication with oncology teams

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Communication with Children & Parents in cancer
 

Communication with Adults undergoing cancer

Communication with the Geriatric population

Communication skills to handle difficult situations (Anger, conflicts, sudden death, etc)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Navigating difficult cancer trajectories
 

Navigating difficult cancer trajectories (diagnosis, prognosis, recurrence, end of life)

Models in communicating bad news (SPIKES, ABCDE, BREAKS)

Communication skills to manage denial

Communication skills to manage collusion

Communication and conversations in end-of-life-care

Communication and counselling about bereavement services

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Chaturvedi SK, Strohschein FJ, Saraf G and Loiselle CG (2014) Communication in cancer care: psycho-social, interactional, and cultural issues. A general overview and the example of India. Front. Psychol.5:1332. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01332
  • Shim, EJ., Park, J., Yi, M. et al. Tailoring communications to the evolving needs of patients throughout the cancer care trajectory: a qualitative exploration with breast cancer patients. BMC Women's Health16, 65 (2016).https://doi.org/10.1186/s12905-016-0347-x
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%  

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

 

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course (CIA+ESE).

MPO381 - CLINICAL PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY PRACTICUM (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

During Supervised clinical practicum students spend 100 hours engaging in a clinical practicum in a mental health agency. Students are expected to attend group and individual supervision both on-site and on campus. As a follow-up of the theoretical and basic skill inputs the students have received in various clinical psychology specialization papers during II and III semesters, students need to learn clinical skills.

This course will help the learner to demonstrate

  • Basic diagnostic and assessment skills.

  • Interviewing skills.

  • Basic therapeutic skills to engage in brief sessional work with clients.

  • Personal development as (future) clinicians.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate skill in arriving at provisional and differential diagnoses

CO2: Provide a detailed Psychopathology formulation

CO3: Provide a detailed Psychotherapeutic formulation

CO4: Become more self-aware in terms of their therapeutic skills or blind spots.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Supervised clinical practicum
 

 

Students engage in supervised clinical practicum at various internship sites

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Group supervision and individual supervision
 

 

Students present cases in groups as well as discuss them with the supervisor  in individual sessions

Text Books And Reference Books:

NA

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%

Continuous Internal Assessment

1) Pre-course self-assessment - 10 marks Write a two-page paper assessing yourself as a developing counsellor. The paper should include the following: (a) your strengths as a counsellor in training, (b) learning goals for the semester, (c) counter-transference issues requiring additional examination and work, and (d) theoretical orientation(s) to which you subscribe.

2) Mid Semester Viva - 20 marks

The viva is based on the student's work at their internship site and general counselling knowledge including theories and their application.

3) Group supervision presentation - 15 marks

4) Participation (inputs given to peers during supervision) -10 marks

5) Progress notes and Logs - 10 marks

6) Attendance- 5 marks

End Semester Examination:

ESE viva - 30 marks

The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 38/70 to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE) The passing grade for the ESE is 40% An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE) 

MPO382 - RESEARCH MANUSCRIPT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:6

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is the second of two labs that facilitate the evolving research dissertation of the students. Following the research proposal presented in the second semester, students will undertake the data collection and analysis of the data in this semester. Through peer feedback and instructor support students will critically examine the issues of reliability and validity of their work and engage in learning tools of data analysis using SPSS and NVivo software.

This course will help the learner to:

  • gain familiarity with different methods of data analysis
  • understand the issues of reliability, validity and trustworthiness in data.
  • gain familiarity with the presentation of qualitative and qualitative data in a scientific format

 

Course Outcome

CO1: By the end of the course the learner will be able to: ● Demonstrate skills of quantitative data analysis using SPSS

CO2: ● Demonstrate the skills of qualitative data analysis using NVivo

CO3: ● Develop skills on presenting quantitative or qualitative data in a scientific format

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Statistical Data Analysis using SPSS
 

 

 

 
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Qualitative Data Analysis using NVivo
 

 

 

 
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Reliability , Validity and Trustworthiness of data
 

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Miles, M.B, Huberman, A.M & Saldana, J (2013).Qualitative Data Analysis: A Methods Sourcebook, 3 rd Edition. Sage, New Delhi

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course

MPO383 - SUMMER INTERNSHIP (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:0
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Students will do volunteer work with any community / mental health agency at the end of the second semester during the summer holidays for a minimum period of 30 days. The student can choose a volunteer opportunity that best suits their skills, availability, and expectations. 

Course Objectives: 

 

The main objectives of the Internship are that

  • Students willingly accept to assist, support or help the agency in activities which may include the following 
    • Working & supporting the client population
    • assisting in administrative responsibilities
    • assisting in the agency helpline
    • any other activity as outlined by the agency
  • Students develop a sense of professionalism as they prepare to start their practicum in the third semester

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify a client population they might like to work with

CO2: Work in an organizational setting

CO3: Demonstrate professionalism in the work place

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
Processing Learning Outcomes
 

Observing clinical practice, note taking, Reflection and analysis

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Friedman, H. S. (2015). Encyclopedia of mental health. Academic Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Stricker, G., & Gold, J. R. (Eds.). (2013). Comprehensive handbook of psychotherapy integration. Springer Science & Business Media.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

 

Evaluation:

1) Students are expected to prepare a log book in the following format:

Name of the Agency

Date:                                                                                                       Day:

No. of Hrs:

Time

Brief description of work done

 

 

Total No. of Days

Total No. of Hrs

Signature & Name of the Authority

 

2) They are required to get a certificate letter from the Agency for volunteer work/ internship.

3) Submit a final Reflective report in the following format:

Name –

Course –

Name of External Supervisor -

Name of Organization –

Name of Internal Supervisor –

Outline

 

  • Profile of The Organisation
  • The policy of the Organization regarding volunteer work
  • Activities that you did
  • Experiential learning
  • Summary and conclusion.

Marks

Logbook – 10 marks

Report – 40 marks

Students must obtain a minimum mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPO431 - PALLIATIVE CARE AND BEREAVEMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course is aimed to educate students in Palliative and end-of-life care. The theoretical understanding of palliative care and its models,  focus of palliative care interventions, the changing palliative care needs across illness progression, and the team involved in providing palliative care are elaborated in the course. The preparation and support for nearing death and post-death are explained under bereavement, and the ethical issues in palliative and end-of-life care, supportive interventions and grief therapy during the bereavement phase are well explained. The difference between palliative and end-of-life care across the lifespan will also be discussed.  The course aims at providing the knowledge and skills required for palliative care professionals and preparing them for their practicum.

Course Objectives:

This course provides students with an understanding of:

  • Conceptual clarity regarding palliative, end-of-life care and bereavement
  • Critical decision-making and ethical dilemmas during palliative and end-of-life care
  • Importance of the skill of communication in palliative and end-of-life care.
  • The difference in palliative and end-of-life care for the aged, adults, and children. 
  • Providing grief counselling
  • Providing supportive work during the bereavement period.

 

 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Elaborate on the history and development of Palliative care in India and abroad.

CO2: State the principles, and values of palliative care, and different models of palliative care applicable across lifespan.

CO3: Demonstrate communication skills in the palliative and end of life care

CO4: Explain the ethical principles and practices during palliative and end of life care.

CO5: Elaborate on the grief therapy and supportive interventions during the bereavement phase.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to palliative and end of life care and bereavement
 

What is Palliative care; Differences between Palliative care, end-of-life care and bereavement. The history of the development of palliative care in India and abroad.  The principles, values and models of palliative care: hospital-based, hospice and home-based care. The process of bereavement. The multidisciplinary team in Palliative care.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Palliative care across the life span
 

Differences between palliative care across the lifespan and the challenges during each stage. Paediatric palliative care. Some of the conditions require palliative care across the lifespan. Community participation in palliative care.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Skills and ethical consideration during palliative, end of life care and bereavement
 

Building empathetic relationships: Importance of relationship and boundaries in palliative care; Communication skill during palliative, end of life care and bereavement. Ethical dilemmas and critical decision making during palliative, and end-of-life care.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Therapeutic interventions at palliative, end of life care and bereavement phase.
 

Grief therapy and grief counselling: stages and models of grief, tasks of mourning; Supportive counselling/psychotherapy during bereavement phase. Theoretical models for interventions during the palliative end-of-life care and bereavement phase.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  • Worden, W. (2018). Grief Counseling and Grief Therapy, (5th edn): A Handbook for the Mental Health Practitioner

  • Coenen,  C.(2020). The Creative Toolkit for Working with Grief and Bereavement: A Practitioner's Guide with Activities and Worksheets.

  • MacLeod and Block (Ed) (2019) Textbook of Palliative Care, Springer

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Breura, Higginson, and Gunten. (2016). Textbook of Palliative Medicine and Supportive care. CRC 

  • Ferrel and Paice (eds)(2019). Oxford Textbook of Palliative nursing (5th edn.) Oxford Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%  

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

 

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course (CIA+ESE).

MPO432 - GENETIC COUNSELLING AND SCREENING IN CANCER (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is conceptualised to apply knowledge on the genetics of cancer to counselling. The process of disease surveillance through genetic counselling and screening is emphasised in the course. The student will understand the models of genetic counselling and their application to cancer. Students are trained to help people understand and adapt to the medical, psychological and familial implications of genetic contributions to disease and the need for early screening and management.

Course Objectives

This course provides students with an understanding of:

 

  • Genetics of cancer  and its psychological and familial implications of it
  • Guidelines to be followed in psychosocial genetic counselling.
  • Knowledge about screening procedures for different types of cancer.
  • Applying knowledge to educate people about inheritance, testing, management, and prevention.
  • Possible interventions to help people to adapt to the risk or condition

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the genetics of cancer

CO2: Analyse the familial and societal implications of cancer.

CO3: Elaborate on the screening procedures

CO4: Provide psychosocial genetic counselling to the people affected by or at risk for cancer.

CO5: Demonstrate supportive interventions and guidance for adaptation to the condition.

CO6: Provide counselling to ensure informed choices in treatment and management.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Genetic Counselling and Screening
 

Genetics of cancer; history and practice of genetic counselling, competencies in psychosocial genetic counselling; the process of genetic counselling; Communication of risk to clients at various risks.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Emotional response to genetic counselling
 

The psychosocial, familial and societal implications of cancer, emotional response and defence mechanisms associated with genetic counselling. Supportive interventions and guidance to adapt to the condition.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Guidelines for psychosocial genetic counselling
 

Providing relevant and objective information; educating about inheritance, testing, management, and prevention; assurance of the counsellee's understanding; providing psychological support; informed consent; confidentiality of genetic information; considering familial implications; assuring autonomous decision-making by the counsellee. Empirical evidence on psychosocial genetic counselling, with special reference to cancer.

Strategies for effective psychosocial genetic counselling

Ethical issues in cancer genetic counselling- strategies for being an ethical cancer genetic counsellor

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Screening: Different types
 

Screening and different types of screening in different types of cancer: physical examination and history, laboratory tests, imaging procedures, and genetic tests.

Screening tests, test selection challenges, harms of screening tests

Breast cancer screening- mammography, MRI, tissue sampling, thermography; Cervical cancer screening- pelvic examination, human papilo virus (HPV) and Pap testing; Lung cancer screening- computed tomography (CT)

Other screening tests- alpha-fetoprotein blood tests, breast MRI, CA-125 test, multicancer early detection (MCED) test, prostate-specific antigen blood test, skin examins, a transvaginal ultrasound, and virtual colonoscopy. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Biesecker, Peters, and Resta. (2019). Advanced Genetic Counselling: Theory and Practice. Oxford University Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Weil, J. (2000). Psychosocial Genetic Counselling. Oxford University Press.

  • Schneider, K A (2011). Counselling About Cancer: Strategies for Genetic Counseling, 3rd Edition. Wiley

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)  - 65%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%  

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA

CIA 1: 30 marks

CIA 2: 30 Marks

Class participation: 5 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 33/65 including class participation marks to be eligible to write the ESE.

End Semester Examination (ESE)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

 

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course (CIA+ESE).

MPO441A - ASIAN HEALING PRACTICES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at providing students with an opportunity to understand the philosophical and logical foundations of health and illness conceptualized by Asian healing methods in relation to Western medicine. The course provides students hands on experiences on Yoga and Meditation and an opportunity to understand the possibilities of integrating Asian Healing Practices with Western Medicine.

Course objectives: This course will help the learner

  • To gain a familiarity with Asian Healing Practices.
  • To understand philosophical and logical foundations of Asian Healing Practices
  • To evaluate the best ways in which Asian Healing Practices has integrated with western medicine.
  • To demonstrate the knowledge in any one Asian Healing Practices.

Course Outcome

CO1: Define the concepts and explain the philosophical and logical foundations of Asian Healing Practices.

CO2: Analyze the strengths and challenges of integrating Asian Healing Practices with western Medicine.

CO3: Exhibit the knowledge and experiences in any one Asian Healing Practices

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Asian Healing Practices
 

Science and scientific reasoning in healing; Origin and relevance of CAM; Concepts, Causes, Classification, Diagnosis and Treatment of Health & Illness in Ayurveda.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Indigenous practices
 

Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Reiki ; Acupuncture; Indigenous methods of healing – Shamanism, Religious based and Ritual art form based healing methods; Yoga and Meditation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Nature of Mental Illness- Debates on Psychiatry
 

Philosophical foundations ;Problematizing the notion of mental illness ; various conceptions of mental illness; Anti-psychiatry movement

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Asian Healing Practices and Psychotherapy
 

Philosophy for counseling and psychotherapy; Issues of integration; Implications to Health Psychology; Psychotherapy and medical treatment

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Cooper, R. (2007). Psychiatry and philosophy of science. Stocks field: Acumen.

2. Furnham, A. (2005). Complementary and alternative medicine: shopping for health in post-modern times. In P. White. (Ed.). Bio psychosocial medicine: an integrated approach to understanding illness. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

3. Howard, A. (2000). Philosophy for counseling and psychotherapy. Palgrave.

4. White, P. (Ed.). (2005). Bio psychosocial medicine: an integrated approach tounderstanding illness. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

5. Inglis, B. & West, R. (1983). The alternative health guide. London: Dorling Kindersley Ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Agarwal, R.S. (2006). Secrets of Indian medicine. Pondicherry: Sri Aurobindo Ashram.

2. Sri Aurobindo Ashram. Health and healing in Yoga. (2009). Pondicherry: Sri Aurobindo Ashram.

3. Sharma, R.K. & Dash, B.(2007). Caraka Samhita. Vol.II. Varanasi: Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office.

4. Sharma, R.K. & Dash, B.(2007). Caraka Samhita. Vol.V.Varanasi: Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPO441B - PSYCHOSOCIAL REHABILITATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized in order to offer the opportunity for interested students to specialize in counselling individuals with problems such as chronic pain, brain injury, dementia, epilepsy, cancer, and psychiatric disorders. It provides training in psychological assessment related to rehabilitation counselling. This course is designed to help the student to learn the relevant theory and basic skills important to the profession of rehabilitation counselling psychology.

Course objective /

  • To provide the students with an opportunity to learn the concept of Psychosocial rehabilitation - skills training, case management, vocational training & family education
  • To make the students understand different rehabilitation settings
  • To educate the students on disability assessments and legislation related to mental health

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the principles of rehabilitation science and apply it to the practise of clinical psychology

CO2: Evaluate the disability using Assessment strategies useful in the area of rehabilitation

CO3: Create a model of intervention using community based approaches in rehabilitation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

 

History of rehabilitation; Principles of psychiatric Psychosocial Rehabilitation; Psychosocial aspects of disability; Case management and rehabilitation planning

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Assessment nd Training
 

 

Disability assessment; Various Skills training; Vocational evaluation and training; Job development and placement;Career counselling; community-based Rehabilitation services; Family education; Awareness programs; Technological adaptation

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Wing J.K., Morris B., (ed) Handbook of Psychiatric Rehabilitation Practice. Oxford university press,1981

2. Kaplan, R.M. & Saccuzzo, D.P. (2007). Psychological Testing: Principles,Applications, and Issues.    Australia: Thomson Wadsworth.

3. Cormier,S.&; Cormier,W.H. Interviewing Strategies For Helpers: Fundamental SkillsAnd Cognitive- Behavioural Interventions (Counseling Series). Wadsworth Publishing C

nding illness. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

5. Inglis, B. & West, R. (1983). The alternative health guide. London: Dorling Kindersley Ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Liberman R.P., editor, Effective Psychiatric Rehabilitation.New Directions for Mental Health Services.53.San Francisco CA., Jossey-Bass,1992

2. Liberman R.P., Editor, Psychiatric Rehabilitation of Chronic Mental Patients.Washington DC: Americal Psychiatric Press, 1988

 

3. Bellack S.A and Hersen M., Handbook of BT in the Psychiatric Setting,Plenum Press, New york, 1993

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPO441C - CRISIS AND TRAUMA (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at imparting knowledge on concepts of crisis and trauma. It will provide inputs on stages of crisis and trauma, and skills for dealing with crisis and trauma at personal,interpersonal and community levels. This course will also help the students gain knowledge on techniques relevant to crisis and trauma management and enable the students to understand the clinical outcome of crisis and trauma events so that they are able to plan out strategic interventions accordingly

Course Objectives:

  • To provide the students an opportunity to learn the concept of Crisis and Trauma Counselling - skills training, case management and family education
  • To educate the students on crisis and trauma assessments and legislations related to it

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the concepts and stages of crisis and trauma

CO2: Evaluate the trauma using Assessment strategies useful in the area of crisis and trauma counseling

CO3: Create a model of intervention using crisis and trauma theories and approaches

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Crisis and trauma
 

Crisis Phases - Models of Crisis & Assessment ;Trauma Phases - models of trauma & Assessment

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Interventions & Challenges in crisis & trauma management
 

Different models of interventions;Issues and challenges in trauma management

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Briere, J. & Scott, C. (2006). Principles of Trauma Therapy: A Guide to Symptoms,Evaluation, and Treatment. USA: Sage Publications.

2. Dass-Brailsford, P. (2007). A Practical Approach to Trauma: Empowering Interventions. USA: Sage Publications.

3. Gilliland, Burl E. & James, Richard K. (1998). Crisis Intervention Strategies. Brooks/Cole Publishing Company: USA.

4. Bisson JI, Roberts N, Macho G. The Cardiff traumatic stress initiative: an evidence-based approach to early psychological intervention following traumatic

events. Psychiatric Bulletin. 2003;27:145–147.

5. Başoğlu M, Salcıoğlu E, Livanou M, et al. Single-session behavioural treatment ofearthquake-related posttraumatic stress disorder: a randomised controlled trial. J

Trauma Stress. 2005;18(1):1–11. 

6. Bryant RA. Early predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder. BiologicalPsychiatry. 2003;53:789–795.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Levers, L. L. (2012). Trauma counseling: Theories and Interventions. New York: Springer Pub.

2. Briere, J. (2012). Working with trauma: Mindfulness and compassion. In C. K. Germer & R. D. Siegel (Eds.), Wisdom and compassion in psychotherapy (pp. 265 279). NewYork, NY: Guilford.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)
CIA 1: 20 marks
CIA 2: 25 Marks
Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPO441D - PSYCHONEUROIMMUNOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course introduces the learner to the field of psychoneuroimmunology, highlighting the role of stress on immune system functioning. The course also discusses pathology from this perspective and intervention in terms of immune function enhancement.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop a foundational knowledge of psychoneuroimmunology

CO2: Apply an understanding of stress on immune system functioning

CO3: Develop an understanding of pathology and intervention in psychoneuroimmunology

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to psychoneuroimmunology
 

Historical background; Basics of immune system functioning; Stress and its impact on the immune system.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Pathology and intervention in psychoneuroimmunology
 

Infection; allergy; cancer; autoimmunity; psychopathology; immune function enhancement

Text Books And Reference Books:

Daruna, J. H. (2012). Introduction to psychoneuroimmunology (2nd ed.). Elsevier ; Academic Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks 

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPO481 - SEMINAR AND PUBLICATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized in order to equip the students with the necessary skills of publishing their manuscript in an academic journal and presenting their research work at a conference. The process will be supervised by the respective research supervisors.

Course Objective: 

To help the learner gain familiarity with the process of publication

To help the learner gain exposure to seminars and conferences

Course Outcome

CO1: Carry out a field study ,conduct the necessary data analysis and discuss the results.

CO2: Prepare a manuscript in scientific format for publication in a nationally/ internationally reputed journal.

CO3: Present and defend the study

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
Unit I
 
  • Identifying types of journals, preparing a manuscript according to author guidelines provided by the journal,
  • Preparing a scientific poster, preparing a presentation for an academic conference
Text Books And Reference Books:

Barker, C., & Pistrang, N. (2015). Research methods in clinical psychology: An introduction for students and practitioners. John Wiley & Sons

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Giles, D. (2013). Advanced research methods in psychology. Routledge

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 Marks

Class participation & Attendance: 5 marks

All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA. The student must pass all the CIA components with an overall CIA mark of 25/50 to pass the course.

MPO482 - INTERNSHIP (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:8

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This is a block placement for short field training. Students are required to search for, examine and carve their niche in the field related to their chosen specialization. The basic purpose is to create awareness for the students so that the career progression of the students and the growth of the discipline can both be realized. 

Course Objectives The course is intended to help students gain exposure to a new population that they may work with integrating all they have learnt and apply it in practice to gain confidence in practising as a counselling psychologist

Course Outcome

CO1: Choose their career path

CO2: Demonstrate competence in providing psychosocial interventions related to health and wellbeing.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
Counselling Internship
 

Students will engage in supervised practicum

Text Books And Reference Books:

NA

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation would be done periodically by the supervisors

Evaluation Pattern: Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) - 70%

End semester examination (ESE) - 30%

Total Marks- 100

End Semester Exam (ESE) - Comprehensive Counselling Viva based on 2 cases submitted and practicum (60 marks)

The passing grade for the ESE is 40%

Continuous Internal Assessment (140 marks) All CIAs are must pass assessments with a passing grade of 50%. If a student does not meet the passing grade for CIA, s/he will have to repeat the CIA again before moving to the next CIA.

An overall grade of 50% is required to pass the course. (CIA+ESE)