CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

School of Social Sciences

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Science (Psychology Honours)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN121 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
BBF111 ORGANISATIONAL STUDY Skill Enhancement Course 1 2 50
BBF131 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Core Courses 4 4 100
BBF132 BUSINESS ECONOMICS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBF133 COST ACCOUNTING Core Courses 4 4 100
BBF134 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR Core Courses 3 3 100
BBF161A PERSONAL BRANDING Generic Elective 2 2 50
BBF161B WELLNESS AND LIFE STYLE MANAGEMENT Generic Elective 2 2 50
BBS161A COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS161B A LIFE WORTH LIVING-FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS161C MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECO161A INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECO161B ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION Generic Elective 3 3 100
BENG121 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION-I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
BENG161A READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION Generic Elective 3 3 100
BENG161B GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES Generic Elective 3 3 100
BHIS161A ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST Generic Elective 3 3 100
BHIS161B THE HISTORY OF URBAN SPACE AND EVOLUTION OF CITY FORMS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BMED151B UNDERSTANDING THE VISUAL LANGUAGE OF CINEMA Generic Elective 3 3 100
BMED161A MEDIA LITERACY Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPOL161A PEACE AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPOL161B GLOBAL POWER POLITICS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPSY131 PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES Core Courses 5 5 100
BPSY132 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 5 5 100
BPSY151 ACADEMIC WRITING Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
BPSY152 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
BPSY161 FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY Generic Elective 4 4 100
BPSY161A SCIENCE OF WELLNESS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPSY161B ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY Generic Elective 3 3 100
ENG121 ENGLISH - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
FRE121 FRENCH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
GER121 GERMAN Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
KAN121Y FOUNDATIONAL KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2 0 100
SDPS112 SOCIAL SENSITIVITY SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 2 0 0
SPA121 SPANISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 0 100
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN221 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH - 3 3 100
BBF212 SERVICE LEARNING - 1 2 50
BBF231 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING - 4 4 100
BBF232 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS - 4 4 100
BBF233 FINANCIAL MARKETS AND SERVICES - 3 3 100
BBF234 BUSINESS AND CORPORATE LAW - 4 4 100
BBF262A SUSTAINABILITY AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - 2 2 50
BBF262B MACRO ECONOMICS - 2 2 50
BBS261A CONSUMPTION AND CULTURE IN INDIA - 3 3 100
BBS261B GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE - 3 3 100
BBS261C TOURISM, CULTURE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - 3 3 100
BECO261A ECONOMICS AND LITERATURE - 3 3 100
BECO261B DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - 3 3 100
BENG221 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION-II - 3 3 100
BENG261A READING CITYSCAPES: BANGALORE HISTORIES - 3 3 100
BENG261B READING THE CYBERSPACE: PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE - 3 3 100
BHIS261A THE POLITICS OF MEMORY: THE MAKINGS OF GENOCIDE - 3 3 100
BHIS261B RELIGION: PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS THROUGH AGES - 3 3 100
BMED251B AUDIO CONSUMPTION IN EVERYDAY LIFE - 3 3 100
BMED261A INTER-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION - 3 3 100
BPOL261A POLITICS IN INDIA - 3 3 100
BPOL261B STATE AND TERRORISM - 3 3 100
BPSY231 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY232 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY251 NEUROANATOMY LAB - 2 2 50
BPSY261 MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY - 4 4 100
BPSY261A APPRECIATING AESTHETICS - 3 3 100
BPSY261B HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS - 3 3 100
BPSY281 SERVICE LEARNING - 2 02 50
ENG221 ENGLISH - II - 3 2 100
FRE221 FRENCH - 3 3 100
GER221 GERMAN - 3 3 100
SDPS212 EXPRESSIVE SKILLS - 2 0 50
SPA221 SPANISH - 3 3 100
3 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BPSY331 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY Core Courses 5 5 100
BPSY332 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 5 5 100
BPSY333 STATISTICS FOR BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES Core Courses 5 5 100
BPSY334 QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Core Courses 5 5 100
BPSY361 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND NEURAL NETWORKS Generic Elective 4 4 100
BPSY381 INTERNSHIP Skill Enhancement Course 0 2 50
SDPS312 KNOWLEDGE ACQUISITION SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 2 0 50
4 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BPSY431 CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY432 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY433 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY434 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY451 RESEARCH METHODS LAB-I - 2 2 50
BPSY461 GENETICS & BIO-INFORMATICS - 4 4 100
SDPS412 KNOWLEDGE APPLICATION SKILLS - 2 0 50
5 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BPSY531 COUNSELLING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY Core Courses 5 5 100
BPSY532 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR Core Courses 5 5 100
BPSY533 INDIAN AND TRANSPERSONAL PSYCHOLOGY Core Courses 5 5 100
BPSY541A HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 5 5 100
BPSY541B AVIATION PSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 5 5 100
BPSY542A NEUROPSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 5 5 100
BPSY542B SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 5 5 100
BPSY551 RESEARCH METHODS LAB-II Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
BPSY581 DISSERTATION-I - 2 0 0
BPSY582 INTERNSHIP Skill Enhancement Course 0 2 50
SDPS512 CAREER ORIENTED SKILLS Skill Enhancement Course 2 0 50
6 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BPSY631 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY632 CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY633 POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY641A COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY641B SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY642A FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY642B HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT - 5 5 100
BPSY642C ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY - 5 5 100
BPSY681 DISSERTATION-II - 2 5 50
SDPS612 SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILLS - 2 0 50
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The B.Sc. Psychology Honors program offered by CHRIST (Deemed to be University) is an initiative to meet the increasing demand for psychological understanding and application in diverse fields. Drawing upon the recommendations of the American Psychological Association, the British Psychological Society, and the University Grants Commission, this program integrates both natural sciences and social sciences disciplines, requiring students to take courses from these two broad disciplines. The course structure is designed to enable students to think critically and creatively and investigate how human beings interact with the environment through the modalities of Mind, Body, and Behaviour. To this end, courses are offered from disciplines such as Biotechnology, Biochemistry, Computer Science, Engineering, and Social Sciences.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Demonstrate their understanding of academic knowledge and domain expertise.

PO2: Apply domain knowledge for sculpting career progression.

PO3: Synthesize their understanding through self-learning and research.

PO4: Recognize the significance of interdisciplinary inquiry.

PO5: Analyze and enhance their personal abilities.

PO6: Promote teamwork and leadership skills.

PO7: Demonstrate effective communication for scholastic and co-scholastic activities.

PO8: Promote social and environmental awareness.

Assesment Pattern

CIA 1: Individual Assignments (Reflective essays, Scrap books, Report Writings, etc.)

 

CIA 2: Mid-Semester Examination(Written Examination)

Pattern:     Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

 

CIA 3: Group Assignments (Research proposals,Surveys, Field Studies, Interventions,Exhibitions, etc.)

 

ESE: End Semester Examination (Written Examination)

Pattern:     Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

Examination And Assesments

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attendance

ESE

20%

25%

20%

05%

30%

AEN121 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Additional English course is offered as a second language course and seeks to introduce the students to the nuances of English literature in its varied forms and genres. The students who choose Additional English are generally proficient in the English language. Hence, instead of focusing on introducing them to language, challenging texts in terms of ideas, form, and technique are chosen. Additional English as a course is designed for students in place of a regional language. Non-Resident Indians (NRIs), foreign nationals and students who have not taken Hindi, Kannada, Tamil or French at the Plus 2 or Class XII levels are eligible to choose Additional English. The course is taught for students from different streams, namely, BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA in the first year and for BA, BSc and BCom (Regular) in the second year.

The first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian and Indian sub-continental voices in English in English translation for the Additional English students of the first year. This effort aims to familiarize the students with regional literatures in translation, Indian Writing in English (IWE) and literatures from Pakistan, Nepal and Srilanka, thereby, enabling the students to learn more about Indian culture and ethos through writings from different regions of the country. We have tried to represent in some way or the other the corners of India and the Indian sub-continent in this microcosmic world of short stories, poems and essays

 

There is a prescribed text bookfor the first year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

The first semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Nepal. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. An important addition to this syllabus is the preponderance of North-Eastern writing which was hitherto not well represented. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

  

 

Course Outcome

CO1 CO 2: iv) Understand the cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities of India v) it will be able to be analytical and critical of the pluralistic society they live in through the activities and assignments conducted vi) be aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Keki N Daruwala     “Migrations”

 

2.      Kamala Das            “Forest Fire”

 

3.      Agha Shahid Ali      “Snow on the Desert”

 

4.      Eunice D Souza       “Marriages are Made”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Rabindranath Tagore    “Babus of Nayanjore”

 

2.      Ruskin Bond  “He said it with Arsenic”

 

3.      Bhisham Sahni       “The Boss Came to Dinner”

 

4.      N. Kunjamohan Singh    “The Taste of Hilsa”

 

5.      Mohan Thakuri                “Post Script”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Mahatma Gandhi       “What is True Civilization?” (Excerpts from Hind Swaraj)

 

2.      Ela Bhatt                    “Organising for Change”

 

3.      Sitakant Mahapatra     “Beyond the Ego: New Values for a Global Neighborhood

 

4.      B R Ambedkar             “Waiting for A Visa”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Contemporary knowledge of the soci-political situation in the sub-continent

The text book copy "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

On-line resources to appreciate the text through the Comprehension Questions

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  Classroom assignment for 20 marks keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

Total                   50

BBF111 - ORGANISATIONAL STUDY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Organisational study is offered in the first semester UG programme of Department of Professional Studies, CHRIST (Deemed to be University). The course is run on a self-study mode where in students visit a large manufacturing/service organisation and study in detail about the functioning of the chosen organisation. This is a 30 hours on-site study which aims to familiarize the students with the day-to-day functions and challenges faced by a business. The key points to be focused on the study include industry profile, company and product profile, mission, vision, objectives and strategies of the organization, organization chart - design & structure, policies and procedures followed, functions of various departments and their managers, SWOT analysis, key result areas (KRAs), significant factors for success, competitor analysis, system of accounting followed, product promotional measures, HR Policy, training and appraisal measures , financial highlights and future plans for growth of the organization. The study may also include relevant digital tools/software/platforms used in the organization. This course familiarizes the students with real world functions, practices and challenges of a specific business as well as the industry in which the business operates.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss the structure, functions, policies and procedures followed by a large business organization.

CO2: Evaluate the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of a business

CO3: Recognize the key result areas and significant factors of success of a business

CO4: Demonstrate the application of knowledge and skill sets acquired from the course in the assigned job function/s

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Organizational study
 

The key points to be focused on the study include industry profile, company and product profile, mission, vision, objectives and strategies of the organization, organization chart - design & structure, policies and procedures followed, functions of various departments and their managers, SWOT analysis, key result areas (KRAs), significant factors for success, competitor analysis, system of accounting followed, product promotional measures, HR Policy, training and appraisal measures , financial highlights and future plans for growth of the organization. The study may also include relevant digital tools/software/platforms used in the organization

Text Books And Reference Books:

No essential references since it is a practical course

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

No recommended references since it is a practical course

Evaluation Pattern

This course has 2 credits and carries 50 marks.  The marks are awarded on the basis of following components

1. Project Report : 20 

2. Presentation and Viva: 25 

3. Attendance: 5 

(Total : 50 marks) 

BBF131 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course revisits and strengthens fundamental accounting principles and processes, culminating in the preparation of the financial statements of a sole proprietorship business and for companies. It also provides an introduction to certain fundamental Indian and International Accounting Standards. Further, it extends their knowledge of accounting for the valuation of goodwill and shares and liquidation of companies.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss and apply fundamental accounting concepts, principles and conventions.

CO2: Record basic accounting transactions and prepare annual financial statements for a sole proprietorship business and a company

CO3: Prepare the Statement of Profit and Loss and the Balance Sheet of a company in the prescribed legal format, along with the applicable Notes to Accounts, on the basis of a Trial Balance and accompanying year-end adjustments

CO4: Discuss and apply principles and practices governing the valuation of goodwill and shares.

CO5: Apply fundamental International Accounting Standards at application level

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Overview of accounting principles and procedure
 

Introduction to accounting; Double-entry system; Ind AS 1: Financial statements, purpose, general features (true and fair view, going concern, accrual basis, materiality and aggregation, offsetting, frequency of reporting, comparative information, consistency); Other assumptions and conventions (business entity, money measurement, conservatism). Basic accounting procedure: journal entries, ledgers, cash book, capital and revenue expenditure/receipts, rectification of errors, trial balance, preparation of Statement of Profit and Loss and Balance Sheet: structure, contents; problems based on trial balance and adjustments.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Preparation of financial statements for companies
 

Meaning of financial statements; form and contents of Statement of Profit and Loss and Balance Sheet as per Schedule III to the Companies Act, 2013; general instructions for their preparation along with Notes to Accounts; problems based on Trial Balance and common year-end adjustments/ rectifications. Treatment of taxes deducted at source, advance payment of tax, and provision for taxation. Treatment of interim and final dividend, and corporate dividend tax; meaning of capital and revenue reserves; rules for declaration of dividend out of reserves; simple problems. Computation and treatment of managerial remuneration, including computation of net profit under Section 198 of the Companies Act, 2013.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Liquidation of companies
 

Meaning of liquidation; types of liquidation Secured creditors (fixed/floating charge); order of payment; computation of liquidator’s remuneration; preferential creditors; pro-rata settlement Problems on preparation of Liquidator’s Final Statement of Account; treatment of capital surplus; return of capital to shareholders with different paid-up capitals. Meaning of contributory; ‘B’ List of contributories; simple problems

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Valuation of goodwill and shares
 

Valuation of goodwill: meaning; circumstances for valuation of goodwill; factors influencing the value of goodwill; methods of valuation—average profit method, super profit method, capitalization of average profit method, capitalization of super profit method, annuity method.

Valuation of shares: meaning; need for valuation; factors affecting valuation; methods of valuation—intrinsic value method, yield method, earning capacity method, fair value of shares. Rights issue and valuation of rights issue

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Fundamental International Accounting Standards and Recent Trends in Accounting
 

HR Accounting, Inflation Accounting, Green Accounting, Carbon Accounting, Forensic Accounting, IASB- Conceptual Framework and Regulatory Framework, IAS-: Presentation of Financial Statements, IAS- 2: Inventories, IAS- 16: Property plant and Equipment, IAS-38: Intangible Asset, IAS- 15: Revenue from contracts with customers (Five step model), IAS- 8: Accounting policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors. IAS- 23: Borrowing cost, IAS- 36: Impairment loss.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Jain S. P., & Narang K. L., (2021). Advanced Financial Accounting. Mumbai: Kalyani Publishers
  2. Indian Accounting Standards (Ind AS): The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India. (2016). The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India
  3. FIA Foundations of Financial Accounting FFA. (2021). BPP Learning Media.
  4. Hanif, M., & Mukherjee, A. (2017). Corporate Accounting (2nd ed.). McGrawHill

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Maheswari S. N., & Maheswari S. K. (2020). Financial Accounting. New Delhi: Vikas
  2. Arulanandam M.A., & Raman K. S. (2020). Advanced Accountancy. Mumbai: Himalaya
  3. FR Kaplan, ACCA study material
  4. The Essence of Financial Accounting, Chadwick, L. PHI, 2nd Edition

 

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessments. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)

50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)

25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA - 1 & 3)

20%

Attendance 

05%

Total

100%

           

·       Written Examinations consists of:

§  Mid Semester Exam – 50 Marks   (2 hours duration)

§  End Semester Exam – 100 Marks (3 hours duration)

·       A student should secure a minimum of 40% Marks in the ESE to pass in that paper.

·       In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 Marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper.

BBF132 - BUSINESS ECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts of economics which are relevant to business. The application of theories and models, predominantly of micro economics to business decision making is the main focus of the course. A cursory knowledge of Macro economic factors impacting business is also given.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss the basic concepts of Economics applicable to business

CO2: Evaluate theories of consumer behavior to find out how a consumer takes decisions to buy a product or service

CO3: Evaluate key factors affecting economic variables such as demand, supply, and price of products

CO4: Understand the production function and the costing of different input factors of production

CO5: Analyze different types of cost and the role of costing in fixing the selling price of the product

CO6: Analyze different types of market and their functioning which affect consumer surplus

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Business Economics
 

Meaning- characteristics – distinction between business economics and pure economics – scope of business economics – uses/objectives of business economics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Consumption Analysis
 

Approaches to the study of consumer behaviour - cardinal approach - law of Equi-marginal utility, ordinal approach - indifference curve analysis - properties – consumer surplus – meaning - analysis – limitations

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Demand and Supply (Market) analysis
 

Demand (Determinants, Demand function) - Law of Demand – Variations in demand, Supply (Determinants, Supply function) – Law of Supply –Variations in Supply, Market equilibrium and changes in equilibrium (reference to product markets & factor markets), Interference with market prices - Minimum price & Maximum price and its effect, Market failure – meaning & types - Public goods – Externalities - Merit goods - Demerit goods.

Demand: Elasticity of Demand – Price elasticity of demand –factors determining elasticity of demand – its measurement and its application in business decisions, revenue and price elasticity, concepts of Income& Cross-Promotional elasticity of demand, Supply: Elasticity of Supply – factors determining elasticity of supply, Demand forecasting- Survey and statistical methods

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Production Analysis
 

Production, Firm and Industry, Production function, Production runs or Periods (short run and long run), Production in the short run, Law of variable proportions, Production in the long run, Returns to scale (increasing, constant and decreasing returns to scale), Economies of scale and Diseconomies of scale, Factor Pricing: Rent, Wages, Interest and Profit. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Cost & Revenue Analysis
 

Cost - Cost concepts (Absolute cost and opportunity cost, Accounting cost and Economic cost) – Fixed and Variable cost – TC, AC & MC, Cost-output relationship in the short run - Cost-output relationship in the long run. Revenue – TR, AR & MR - Revenue with no change in price – Revenue with change in price. 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Market Structure
 

Perfect Competition: Assumptions, price and output decisions. Equilibrium of the firm and the industry in the short and the long runs, including industry’s long run supply, producer surplus. Shut down point under perfect competition market, Monopoly: Behaviour of a monopolist in the short and the long run. Price discrimination by a monopolist-1st degree, 2nd degree and 3rd degree

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Dwivedi (2020): Essentials of Business Economics, Vikas Publishing House
  2. Salvatore & Srivatsava (2020): Managerial Economics, 9th Edition, Oxford University Press
  3. Maheshwari (2012): Managerial Economics, 3rd Edition, PHI
  4. H L Ahuja (2019)  Business Economics, 13/e, S. Chand Publishing
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Allen, Weigelt, Doherty & Mansfield (2012): Managerial Economics, 8th Edition, W. W. Norton & Company
  2. Atmanada (2012): Managerial Economics, 2nd Edition, Excel Books
Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessments. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA - 1 & 3)20%

Attendance  05%

Total 100%

 Written Examinations consists of: 

  • Mid Semester Exam – 50 Marks   (2 hours duration)
  • End Semester Exam – 100 Marks (3 hours duration)

A student should secure a minimum of 40% Marks in the ESE to pass in that paper. In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 Marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper. 

 

BBF133 - COST ACCOUNTING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims to provide conceptual understanding of cost accounting. It focuses on the computation of various components of cost, such as material, labour, and overheads. It also covers modules on specific cost accounting methods like job costing and contract costing, and process costing. It provides key data to managers for planning and controlling, as well as data on costing products, services and customers.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss the basic concepts and classification of cost

CO2: Discuss the various methods of inventory control and prepare stock ledger

CO3: Apply different methods of remuneration and incentive system in calculation of wages and bonus.

CO4: Apply different methods of overhead allocation and apportionment to calculate overhead rate.

CO5: Ascertain the profit or loss arising from a contract and process

CO6: Demonstrate reconciliation of differences in profits in cost and financial accounts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Accounting
 

Introduction – Definition – Fundamental Principles –Scope, Functions and objectives – Merits & Demerits –Methods & Techniques-Cost Accounting and financial accounting comparison; Elements of Cost – Cost vs. Expense- Cost Centre, Cost Unit& Cost object- Classification of Cost- Costs for decision making - Installation of Costing system - Cost Sheet - Tenders and Quotations (Problems)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Materials
 

Meaning and classification of material- Purchase Procedure& documentation - Store Keeping Functions; Inventory Control - Fixation of Levels- Periodical and Perpetual Inventory, ABC Analysis, EOQ (Problems); Stores issue - Methods of Pricing of materials – FIFO – LIFO - Simple and Weighted Average Methods. (Problems)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Labour
 

Meaning & classification of Labour- Attendance and payroll procedure- Time Keeping - Methods of Time Keeping - Time Booking – Records - Idle Time - Causes for Idle Time - Treatment of Idle Time – Overtime – Labour Turnover—Labour Remuneration - Features of Good Wage System –Remuneration system and incentive schemes (Problems)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Overheads
 

Meaning and definition –Classification of Overheads- Allocation & Apportionment of overheads (Primary Distribution) Apportionment of Service Department Costs to Production Departments (Secondary Distribution- Reciprocal basis). Absorption of Overheads - Methods - percentage of Direct Material Cost - Direct Labour Cost - Prime Cost - Direct Labour Hour Rate and Machine Hour Rate

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:16
Methods of Costing
 

Contract Costing                                                                                 

Meaning and nature- Difference between Job Costing and Contract Costing – Preparation of Contract Accounts- Ascertainment of Profit/Loss on Contract – Work In Progress and Balance Sheet –Profits on incomplete contracts-Cost Plus and Estimated Contracts (Problems)

Process Costing

Meaning and nature- Preparation of process Accounts- Normal Loss - Abnormal Loss/gain - (Including Inter-Process Profit and Equivalent Production) Preparation of Process Accounts and Joint and By-Products

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Reconciliation of Cost and Financial Accounts
 

Need for reconciliation- Reasons for difference in profits- Reconciliation (Problems)

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Horngren T. Charles, Datar M. Srikant and Rajan V. Madhav. (2017) Cost Accounting: A Managerial Emphasis, Prentice Hall publishers, Delhi
  2. Arora M N – (2021) A Text book of Cost & Management Accounting, Vikas Publishing, New Delhi
  3. Lal Jawahar, Srivastava Seema. (2019) Cost Accounting, Mcgraw-Hill, Delhi
  4. Bhattacharyya A. K.,  Principles & Practice of Cost Accounting, PHI Learning Pvt Ltd
  5. Drury, Edition, Management & Cost Accounting,  Thompson Books.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Saxena V. K. (2020) Essentials of Cost Accounting, Sultan Chand and Sons, New Delhi
  2. Sharma &Shashi. K Gupta(2021) Cost & Management Accounting Kalyani Publishers
  3. Kishore. M. Ravi. (2020) Business Strategy and Strategic Cost Management, 1st Edition, Taxmann Publications, New Delhi
  4. Inamdar S M, Cost & Management Accounting, 21st Edition, Everest Publishing House

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessments. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA - 1 & 3)20%

Attendance  05%

Total 100%

 

Written Examinations consists of: 

  • Mid Semester Exam – 50 Marks   (2 hours duration)
  • End Semester Exam – 100 Marks (3 hours duration)

A student should secure a minimum of 40% Marks in the ESE to pass in that paper. In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 Marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper. 

 

BBF134 - BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper intends to develop conceptual knowledge of Business management and Organizational Behaviour. The study approach enables students understand and analyze practical aspects of management and Organizational Behaviour to become skilled at the art of getting things done through people in a corporate business scenario.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss different schools of management thoughts.

CO2: Understand the implications of individual personality, the process of perception, and how we form attitudes hold much relevance for organizational life

CO3: Strategize to motivate and create a dynamic working environment in which employees want to work hard and give their best

CO4: Build teams that are connected psychologically and emotionally with the workplace

CO5: Device mechanisms to handle conflicts at workplace

CO6: Discuss the models of organisation culture and communication

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Management & Managers
 

Management: Definition – Nature, process and significance of management - Evolution of Management Thought: Classical Management Approaches, Behavioural Management Approaches, Quantitative Management Approach, Modern Management Approaches - Management as a Science or Art - Management as a profession - Role of managers - Managerial Skills and Roles – Changing Hierarchies of Managers – What makes managers successful? – Indian contribution to Management Practice – Contemporary trends in Management thinking

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Personality, Perception & Attitudes at Work
 

Personality – MBTI, The Big Five Model, Personality types in different cultures - Perception, Perceptual Process, Perceptual Distortions – Stereotyping, Halo Effect, Contrast Effects, Self-fulfilling prophecy, Projection, Contrast Effects, Impression Management, Attribution Theory, Attributions across cultures - Attitudes, Components of Attitude, the ABC model, Formation of Attitudes, Job Satisfaction & Measuring Job Satisfaction

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Motivation & Leadership
 

Nature and importance of motivation- Theories of Motivation: Early theories - Scientific Management & Human Relations Model- Contemporary theories: Maslow’s Need Hierarchy Theory, Herzberg two-factor theory, Vrooms expectancy theory & Porters performance satisfaction model.

Nature and importance of leadership- Leadership theories- contemporary issues on leadership

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Group and Team Dynamics
 

Nature of Groups: Types of groups – Formal & Informal groups -Why do people join groups? -Group Development: Forming, Storming, Norming, Performing & Adjourning - Pitfalls of Groups: Status, Group norms, Risky shifts, polarisation & Groupthink.

Teams: Types of Teamwork, Problem solving, Management & Virtual Teams – Implementing teams in organization – Effective Teamwork - Team issues

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Power, Politics & Conflicts at Work
 

Power-Power dynamics – Power Indicators – Determinants of power – Consequences of power- Sources of power- Effective use of power – Power tactics

Politics – Essence of politics – types of political activities -Ethics of Power & Politics

Nature of Conflict – Changing view of conflict – Functional & dysfunctional conflict – The process of conflict – Negotiation & Conflict resolution - Managerial implications of conflict – Workplace deviance

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Organizational Culture & Communication
 

Organizational Culture, Types of Organizational Culture, Organization Cultural Models – Edger Schein, Robert Cooke, Hofstede Model, Communicating with Emotional Intelligence, Effective Interpersonal Communication, Cross-cultural Communication - Lewis Model, Organizational Development

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Koontz. (n.d.). Principles Of Management. India: Tata McGraw Hill Education.
  2. Smith, Paul., Yellowley, Windy & McLachlan, Christopher. (2020) Organisation Behaviour: Managing People in Dynamic Business Organisations, Taylor & Francis
  3. Ashwathappa, K (2016). Organisation Behaviour, Himayala Publishing House
  4. Stephen P.Robbins, M. C. (2018). Management. New Jersey: Pearson Education Inc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Bansal, R. (2014). Stay Hungry Stay Foolish. Ahmedabad: The Centre for Innovation, Incubation and Entrepreneurship, Indian Institute of Management.
  2. Beasley, N. I. (2012). Inside Coca-Cola: A CEO's Life Story of Building the World's Most Popular Brand. St. Martin's Griffin.
Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessments. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)25%

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA - 1 & 3)20%

Attendance  05%

Total 100%

 Written Examinations consists of: 

  • Mid Semester Exam – 50 Marks   (2 hours duration)
  • End Semester Exam – 100 Marks (3 hours duration)

A student should secure a minimum of 40% Marks in the ESE to pass in that paper. In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 Marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper. 

 

BBF161A - PERSONAL BRANDING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is a cross-functional course that aims to offer conceptual understanding of branding and its application on an individual level as opposed to a product, organization or an event. The course encourages the participants to explore various communication mediums to create, build and manage personal brands in analogous and digital spaces.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand Personal branding

CO2: Build personal brand that supports career ambitions

CO3: Strengthen reputation by leveraging digital media

CO4: Understanding the Social Media Opportunity to build personal brand

CO5: Learning Tools & analytics for building a personal brand

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Personal Branding
 

Introduction to branding - Evolution of personal branding - social media & mediums of personal branding - Soft marketing and age of the influencer - Understanding personal branding styles through case studies - Challenges of personal branding

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Knowing yourself to build a brand
 

Understand yourself: Self-Analysis using IKIGAI, Journaling & Personality tests, - Choosing a medium to showcase your branding – Creating a niche for your personal brand, -Introduction to Copywriting, - Common pitfalls while building your personal branding persona

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Communicating your brand with the world
 

Story Telling for personal branding, Content Creation: Resume, Business Cards, own website, Blogging, Digital media- Google, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram - Tools & analytics for building your personal brand

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Montonya, Peter., & Vandehey, Tim. (2019). The brand called you, Mc Graw-Hill
  2. Chritton, Susan (2012). Personal Branding for Dummies, John Wiley & Sons, Inc
  3. Nagpal, Dr. Amit., & Hindustani, Dr. Prakash. (2017). Personal Branding, Storytelling and beyond, 2nd edition, Storymirror Infotech Private Limited
  4. Gulati, Gaurav. (2017).I’M A BRAND: A blueprint for building heard-turning personal brand

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Garcia, Hector., & Miralles, Francesc (2017). IKIGAI: The Japanese secret to a long and happy life, Hutchinson London
  2. Young, Trevor (2013). microDomination: How to leverage social media and content marketing to build a mini-business empire around your personal brand, Wiley
Evaluation Pattern

This is a CIA based Generic Elective course. The evaluation pattern is as follows:

CIA (Overall): 45 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

Total: 50 Marks

BBF161B - WELLNESS AND LIFE STYLE MANAGEMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Every individual should maintain an optimal state of physical, emotional, mental, social and spiritual wellbeing. Adopting a healthy lifestyle is essential to attain this. In this course the idea of physical, mental and social wellness is explored by effectively managing the lifestyle. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify, understand and apply the dimensions of health and wellbeing and describe their relationship to a positive lifestyle.

CO2: Understand and identify the stress to inculcate the habit of leading a healthy lifestyle

CO3: Gain knowledge on health enhancing behaviours

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Wellness
 

Concept of health, wellbeing and wellness, illness- wellness continuum, Determinants and Components of wellness (WHO) and wellbeing, Health compromising behaviours: Smoking, Alcoholism and substance abuse.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Physical, Mental and Social Wellness
 

Stress and its impact on health and wellbeing, mechanisms to deal with stress.

Status of mental health Services, the role of mental health professionals, Barriers accessing mental health services, Risks factors to mental health- adverse childhood experiences, disability, ageing, workplace, family history of mental illness, psychos’ social issues

Interpersonal relationships and its impact on health and wellbeing, need for cultivating positive emotions and attending to healthy relationships and self-care

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Lifestyle Management
 

Lifestyles-sleep, food habits, adverse physical environment, health-enhancing behaviours-dieting, exercise, yoga, mindfulness.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Anspaugh, D.J., Hamrick, M.H., & Rosato, F.D. (2009).  Wellness: Concepts and Applications, 7th ed., McGraw-Hill.
  2. Donatelle, R. J., & Davis, L. G. (2011). Health: the basics. Benjamin Cummings.
  3. Edlin, G., & Golanty, E. (2007). Health and wellness (9th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Publishers. 
  4. Insel, P.M., & Roth, W.T. (2002). Core concepts in health (9th ed.). McGraw- Hill.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Siegel, B. S. (1998). Prescriptions for living. Harper Collins.
  2. Wiking, Meik (2016). The Little Book of Hygge: The Danish way to live well, The Happiness Research Institute, Copenhagen
Evaluation Pattern

This is a 2 credit course for 50 marks. Evaluation pattern is as follows:

CIA (Overall): 45 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

Total: 50 marks

BBS161A - COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course examines the relationship between language use, enormous variety of language experiences, belief systems, and behavioral patterns. On the other hand Etiquette helps smooth the path of our daily activities, whether it's meeting others in our daily interactions talking to someone on the phone, offering condolences properly or understanding how to talk to colleagues at a business conference. Being aware of the beliefs attitudes and etiquettes of individuals will help one to become more tolerant from one individual to the next and from one group to the next.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Able to practice critical thoughts in comprehending the notion of culture, its relationship with language, Etiquettes and the key concepts of cross ?cultural Communication.

CO2: Describes ways to apply proper courtesy in different situations

CO3: Understand the change that constantly undergoes in personal and social use.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction: Greetings and Courtesy
 

Greeting a person, - the different ways of greeting, saying goodbye to another person, Thank You, Excuse me, Introduction to oneself, Yawning, Coughing, Interrupting, Offering assistance/ help, refusing help, requesting privacy, speaking in a low voice,(speaking etiquette) waiting for help, accepting or declining an invitation, expressing admiration, The key principles of common courtesy, professional manners and the Golden Rule as they are practiced in the workplace environmentClassroom Etiquette and Student Behavior Guidelines, The guidelines for maintaining a civil classroom environment

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Manners and civility
 

Introduction to adjusting to a new culture, Theories on second language and culture acquisition, communication, National Standards, Culture acquisition through family and Homestays, Distinguish among the three main forms of communication in the workplace: verbal, nonverbal, and virtual. Proper and improper uses of workplace communication, the potential repercussions of poor listening in the workplace, the proper and improper use of technology in the workplace

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Etiquette
 

Why Etiquette Matters, Identify common cultural differences, taboos, and customs that may be practiced in the workplace, Discuss ways to navigate and honor cultural differences in the workplace, Describe how to express an appropriate awareness of international and other customs. The Common Courtesies of Life, Polite Conversation, Telephone Etiquette, Correspondence, Basic Table Manners, Overnight Guests, Wedding Etiquette, Moments of Sorrow, Appropriate Behavior for Children, Gift Giving Guidelines.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Business Etiquette
 

Introduction to Modern Etiquette, The Rules of the Workplace, Meetings and Introductions, Conversation and Listening Skills, Telephone/Cell Phone, Texting, Emailing and Internet Etiquette, Etiquette in Public Places, Employment/Volunteer Etiquette, Dining Etiquette, Social Gathering Etiquette (Guest and Host/Hostess), School Etiquette, Confidence Without Arrogance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Personal and professional Presentation
 

Restaurant Etiquette, Cellphone Etiquette, Voice Mail Etiquette, Air Travel Etiquette, Cocktail Party Etiquette, Office Gossip Etiquette, Business Dress Etiquette, Email Etiquette, Social Media Etiquette, Job Interview Etiquette, International Etiquette

Text Books And Reference Books:

Books on Common etiquettes

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Etiquette books

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated on the basis of class performance and they have to do CIAs and exclusive Class presentations and workshops to create awarness on the etiquettes they have learned in the class

BBS161B - A LIFE WORTH LIVING-FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course focuses on the knowledge and skills that students require to lead a healthy, productive and balanced life.

To examine health in its truest sense, one must explore beyond the limits of medicine to engage a much wider set of questions embracing social, cultural, political, economic, moral and spiritual aspects of human experience. 

Course Outcome

CLO1: Explain health as a multi-dimensional and dynamic concept, which necessarily integrates individual, societal, biomedical, spiritual, cultural and historical influences, and how this relates to health issues encountered in everyday life.

CLO2: Assess the inter-relatedness of health perceptions and practices across cultures.

CLO3: Discuss personal responsibilities towards achieving well being in a rational way and how this contributes to the individual, community and global good

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to health
 

Health of individuals and communities – The significance of determinants of health and how these raise or lower the health of individuals and communities - Health promotion to improve health - Personal and popular attitudes and beliefs and their impact on decision making - self-management - interpersonal and key consumer health skills - Factors influencing health, and actions and strategies to protect and promote health, through investigation and inquiry processes.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Food and Values
 

Philosophy of food, Values – Three different types of values, Meat – Is it wrong to eat animals?Hunger – Do we have a duty to help starving people? - Drugs – Why is it wrong to take drugs? - GM food – How should food technology be regulated? - Capitalism – Food, globalization, and equality - Art – Can food be art? What is art? - Taste – Is taste entirely subjective? - Science – Can science explain conscious taste experiences? -Eating – Eat to live, or live to eat

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Nutrition
 

Balanced diet & Nutrition, Macro and micro nutrients – Nutritive and non nutritive components of diet – Eating for weight control – healthy weight – The pitfalls of dieting – food intolerance and food myths – Food supplements for adolescents. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Physical Education
 

Concept of physical education – Meaning – definition – aims – objectives of physical education and fitness – Need & importance of fitness – Types of fitness – Health related physical fitness – performance related physical fitness – physical activities and health benefits - Activities for developing physical fitness

What is sleep? – The phylogeny of sleep – Developmental course of sleep – Dreams- Functions of sleep – Daytime sleepiness and alertness – Sleep disorders.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Spirituality, Religion and Social Change
 

Meaning of life - Meaning of death- Indian Rituals, symbols, and myths - Spirituality, altruism and moral justice - Resources to deal with stress, temptations, disappointments and failures, social oppression, the loss of possessions and of loved ones, and with one’s own death. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Indian Journals of health and well being

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Indian Journals of health and well being

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1: 20 marks

Midterm exam: 25

CIA 3: 20

Endterm exam: 30

Attendance: 5

 

BBS161C - MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The Mahabharata of the great Maharishi Veda Vyasa is a treasure trove of knowledge, principles and paradigms. It is written that what is not in the Mahabharata will not be found elsewhere. Written nearly thousands of years ago, the Mahabharata is as yet a source of knowledge, especially modern management principles.In essence it highlights the victory of Dharma in times of Adharma.This subject is a comprehensive learning on management lessons which can be inferred from the great epic. It gives a clear understanding and comparison of management Principles, practices and the various functions of management with the epic. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of management. It also deals with behavioral issues in the individual processes, group and interpersonal processes.

Course Objectives:

  •  Discuss the epic by summarizing the various parvas/units in class in accordance with the management concept
  •  Review and make a critical estimate of the epic with a focus on morals, ethics, legal and management concepts
  • To develop competencies and knowledge of students to become effective professionals

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the fundamentals of management, its functions and the utilization of critical thinking skills in relation to principles, and theories.

CO2: Explain the structure and the operations of management by citing relevant situation/instances from the epic

CO3: Develop an understanding of moral, ethical & legal dimension before any decision by citing relevant situation/instances from the epic

CO4: Express the literary beauty and cultural significance of Mahabharata and to reflect the relevant content to the issues of our own times

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Mahabharatha
 

The older generations-The Pandava and Kaurava princes- Lakshagraha (the house of lac)

Establishment of the kingdom-Administration and Management principles

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Marriage and Building of New city
 

Marriage to Draupadi- An event study approach.

Indraprastha-A new beginning- Pressure for change – Change process, Types of change, Factors influencing change, Resistance to change

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
The Big Game
 

The dice game- Cooperative strategies & Reasons for strategic alliances-

Exile and return- Risks and costs of strategic alliances

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
The battle at Kurukshetra
 

The battle at Kurukshetra - Strategic Planning and Management- levels at which strategy operates- Event approaches to strategic decision making,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Post Kurukshetra
 

The end of the Pandavas- Succession Planning,Authority and Responsibility

The reunion Organizing- Choosing the organizational structure

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Rao, V.S.P., & Krishna, V.H., (2011). Strategic Management: Text and Cases. New Delhi: Excel Books.

Pratap Chandra Roy ,The complete Mahabharata translated into English prose directly from the original sanskrit text.(1st Edition) oriental publishing co.

Source: Jaya - An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

C Rajagopalachari (2017). Mahabharata (63rdedition), Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 10 Marks

MSE   30 Marks

CIA 3 10 Marks

End Assesment 50 Marks

BECO161A - INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of institutions and the informal economy in a global context. The discourse examines the informal economy through the lens of institutional economics. The aim is to acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention.  

 

Course Objectives

This course aims to help students to:

  • outline the concept of institutions and institutional change through some of the major theoretical constructs in institutional economics.
  • summarize and illustrate the various mechanisms of the informal economy connecting the theoretical concept to issues of measurement.
  • examine the linkages of formal and informal economy;
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss these complex ideas.

Course Outcome

CO1: Illustrate the major concepts and explain some of the theoretical discourses in the study of institutional change and the informal economy.

CO2: Examine how the formal and informal economies are no longer separate watertight compartments but function together as an interactive system

CO3: Apply these complex ideas of property rights and transaction costs to their own research

CO4: Demonstrate their research findings through written and oral presentation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Institutions and Institutional Change
 

Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance; Informal Constraints; Formal Constraints; The Path of Institutional Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Elements of Institutional Economics
 

Contracts and Property Rights: the Concepts of Exchange and Property, Critique of the Utilitarian Calculus; Transaction Costs, Bargaining Power; Markets as Institutions; Firms and Markets

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Informality: Concepts, Theory and Measurement
 

Bureaucratic Form and the Informal Economy; The Relevance of the concepts of formality and informality : A Theoretical Appraisal; Formal and Informal Enterprises: Concepts, Definition, and Measurement Issues in India

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Linking the Formal and Informal Economy
 

Rethinking Informal Economy: Linkages with the Formal Economy and the Formal Regulatory Environment; Technology and Informality

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Empirical Studies in Institutional Change and Informality
 

The Impact of Regulation on Growth and Informality: Cross-Country Evidence; Blocking Human Potential: How Formal Policies Block the Economy in the Maputo Corridor; Enforcement and Compliance in Lima’s Street Markets: The Origins and Consequences of Policy Incoherence towards Informal Traders

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Readings

Alston, L. J., Eggertsson, T., & North, D. C. (Eds.). (1996). Empirical Studies in Institutional Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Guha-Khasnobis, B., Kanbur, R., & Ostrom, E. (Eds.). (2006). Linking the Formal and Informal Economy: Concepts and Policies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Misztal, B. (2002). Informality: Social theory and Contemporary Practice. Routledge.

North, D. (1990). Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic PerformanceInstitutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings

Arias, O., Fajnzylber, P., Maloney, W., Mason, A., Perry, G., & Saavedra-Chanduvi, J. (2007). Informality: Exit and Exclusion. Washington: The World Bank.

Harris, J. (2006). Power Matters: Essays on Institutions, Politics, and Society in India. New York: Oxford University Press.

Mehta, P. B., & Kapur, D. (2005). Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Nayyar, D. (Ed.). (2002). Governing Globalization: Issues and Institutions. Oxford University Press.

Oviedo, A. M. (2009). Economic Informality: Causes, Costs, and Policies: A Literature Survey of International Experience. Country Economic Memorandum (CEM).

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

Institutions and Informal Economy

45%

50%

5%

 

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

 

End Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

 

BECO161B - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies. The course will consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption.

 Course Objectives:

This course will help students to:

  1. acquaint with significant debates about transparency, competition and privatization and their relevance to corruption;
  1. analyse corruption in emerging economies through various case studies;
  1. discuss issues from various perspectives, such as viewing corruption as erosion of trust and abuse of power;
  2. train the students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Course Outcome

CO1: identify the nuances in the way corruption is defined and interpreted in different economies.

CO2: investigate some impacts of corruption on emerging economies.

CO3: analyse the cause and consequences of corruption and examine some of the policies and reforms aimed at tackling corruption

CO4: present complex ideas through written and oral presentations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries? Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: The Role of Institutions.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption?  Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anti-Corruption Device. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in the Private Sector. Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on

Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187-203.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

The Economics of Corruption

45%

50%

5%

Mid Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

End Semester Examination

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

 

 

BENG121 - ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION-I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

English Language and Composition course is an intensive program for two semesters for all the students of the BA/BSc programmes (ENGH, ECOH, JOUH, PSYH, EPH and EMP) that introduces students to a wide range of expository works in order to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of graduate-level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. It would provide students with the opportunity to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and the subjects in texts. The course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in multiple mediums, including visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, comic strips, music videos, and TED talks; students would develop a sense to comprehend how a resource of language operates in any given text. In the semester the course focuses on the famous rhetorical pieces from across the world to familiarise the learners with various techniques and principles.

Course Objectives

The purpose of the course is to:

  • Introduce learners to various types of rhetorical pieces - written, oral text and visual texts.
  • Provide an understanding of various rhetorical strategies in various compositional pieces
  • Famarlize learners with various strategies of reading and writing by exposing them to effective and ineffective rhetorical pieces.
  • Promote analytical reading and formulate arguments based on the readings.
  • Enable learners to employ rhetorical strategies in their own writing

Course Outcome

CO 1 : Analyse and interpret samples of good writing by identifying and explaining an author's use of rhetorical strategies and techniques.

CO2: Evaluate both visual and written texts and determine if it is effective or ineffective rhetoric.

CO3: Create and sustain arguments by applying effective strategies and techniques in their own writing.

CO4: Communicate effectively in different mediums by developing their LSRW skills.

CO5: Demonstrate their knowledge in the form of cogent well-written report.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Language of Composition
 

The unit will focus on understanding rhetoric and various rhetorical situations. The aim is to assert the idea that rhetoric is always contextual and there is a link between the speaker, audience and what the content of the text is. This will enable students to understand the significance of context while analysing and composing a text.

1. Introduction to Rhetoric and Rhetorical Situation.

a. Lou Gehrig (1939) “Farewell Speech” (Speech) https://www.lougehrig.com/farewell/

2. SOAP Analysis: Through the analysis of the text the aim is to look at the mode in which various factors like subject, occasion, audience and purpose impact rhetoric. 

a. George W. Bush (2001) “9/11 Address to the Nation” (Speech) http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/gwbush911addresstothenation.htm

b. Jawaharlal Nehru (1947) “Tryst with Destiny” (Speech) http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jawaharlalnehrutrystwithdestiny.htm

3. Ethos, Pathos and Logos: Understanding Aristotle’s concept of Ethos, Pathos and Logos is significant in understanding effective rhetoric. By looking at some of the famous rhetorical works the aim is to understand how the writer’s/ orators of some of the famous rhetorical pieces have used these elements to persuade the reader/ audience.

a. Ethos

i. King George VI (1939) “The King’s Speech” (Speech, can play part of the movie) https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/George-VI-King-s-Speech-September-3-1939

ii. Judith Ortiz Cofer (1992) “The Myth of Latin Women: I Just met a Girl Named Maria” (Essay) https://www.quia.com/files/quia/users/amccann10/Myth_of_a_Latin_Woman

b. Logos

i. Alice Waters (2006) “Slow Food Nation” (Essay) https://www.thenation.com/article/slow-food-nation/

c. Pathos

i. Dwight D. Eisenhower (1944) “Order of the Day” (Speech) https://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/order-ofthe-day-6-June-1944

d. Combining Ethos, Logos, and Pathos

i. Rabindranath Tagore (1941) “Crisis of Civilization” https://www.scribd.com/doc/163829907/Rabindranath-Tagore-The-Crisis-of-Civilization

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Written Texts
 

Focus of the unit would be to introduce multiple ways of analysis, close reading, and usage of argumentative statements and diction.

1. Ralph Ellison (1962) “On Bird, Bird-Watching and Jazz” (Essay) http://www.unz.org/Pub/SaturdayRev-1962jul28-00047

2. Virginia Woolf (1942) “The Death of the Moth” (Essay) https://www.sanjuan.edu/cms/lib8/CA01902727/Centricity/Domain/3981/Death%20of%20A%20Moth-Virginia%20Woolf%20copy.pdf

3. Groucho Marx (2006) “Dear Warner Brothers” (Letter) https://archive.org/details/Groucho_Marx_Letter_to_Warner_Brothers

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Visual Texts
 

The unit will focus on how to read a visual text and the impact it has on the audience.

1. ACLU (2000) “The Man on the Left” (Advertisement) https://www.mansonblog.com/2016/10/aclu-charles-manson-martin-luther-king.html

2. R. K. Laxman Political cartoons (Cartoon) http://webneel.com/rk-lakshman-editorial-cartoons-indian-cartoonist (Political Cartoons)

3. Times of India (2017) ISRO launch cartoon (Cartoon) https://www.tatacliq.com/que/isro-launch-breaks-record-memes/ISROLaunch

https://indianexpress.com/article/trending/trending-in-india/times-of-india-isro-104-satellite-launch-in-response-to-new-york-times-mangalyaan-cartoon-twitter-reactions-4529893

Analysing Advertisements (Fair and Lovely,…), gender stereotypes in ads

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Determining Effective and Ineffective Rhetoric
 

The unit will engage with the questions on why few texts are effective rhetorical pieces as opposed to others. A few texts will be analysed to look at different rhetorical situations, and how it is effective and ineffective in persuading the audience/ reader.

1. PETA, Feeding Kids Meat Is Child Abuse (Advertisement) https://www.peta.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/childabuseBB72.jpg

2. Anne Applebaum (2011) “If the Japanese Can’t Build a Safe Reactor, Who Can?” (Essay) https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/if-the-japanese-cant-build-a-safe-reactor-who-can/2011/03/14/ABCJvuV_story.html?utm_term=.8

3. Simon Lancaster (2016) Ted Talk: Speak Like a Leader (Speech) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGBamfWasNQ

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
From Reading to Writing
 

By carefully reading the viewpoints of others and considering a range of ideas on an issue, one develops a clearer understanding of our own beliefs — a necessary foundation to writing effective arguments. The unit will focus on analysing elements of argument as a means of critical thinking and an essential step toward crafting argumentative essays. The unit will focus on making an argument and supporting it by synthesising multiple sources.

1. Understanding Argument

Csalexander03 (2012) Why Investing in Fast Food May Be a Good Thing by Amy Domini (Essay) https://csalexander03.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/why-investing-in-fast-food-may-be-a-good-thing-by-amy-domini/

2. The New York Times (2004) Felons and the Right to Vote (Essay) http://www.nytimes.com/2004/07/11/opinion/felons-and-the-right-to-vote.html

3. Using Visual text for Argument

Objevit.cz (2017) “Holocaust + Selfie Culture = ‘Yolocaust’” (Video) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjjV_X5re4g

4. Using sources to inform an Argument

5. Using Sources to Appeal to Audience

Text Books And Reference Books:

ACLU. (2000). The man on the left. The Manson family blog.

https://www.mansonblog.com/2016/10/aclu-charles-manson-martin-luther-king.html

Adhwaryu, S. (2017). ISRO launch cartoon. Times of India. https://www.tatacliq.com/que/isro-launch-breaks-record-memes/ISROLaunch or

https://indianexpress.com/article/trending/trending-in-india/times-of-india-isro-104-satellite-launch-in-response-to-new-york-times-mangalyaan-cartoon-twitter-reactions-4529893

Applebaum, A. (2011). If the Japanese can’t build a safe reactor, who can? Washington Post. https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/if-the-japanese-cant-build-a-safe-reactor-who-can/2011/03/14/ABCJvuV_story.html?utm_term=.8

Bush, G. W. (2001). 9/11 address to the nation. American Rhetoric: Rhetoric of 9/11. https://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/gwbush911addresstothenation.htm

Cofer, J. O. (1992) The myth of Latin women: I just met a girl named Maria. Many Voices, Many Lives. https://www.quia.com/files/quia/users/amccann10/Myth_of_a_Latin_Woman

Csalexander03. (2012). Why investing in fast food may be a good thing by Amy Domini. Csalexander03 blog. https://csalexander03.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/why-investing-in-fast-food-may-be-a-good-thing-by-amy-domini/

Ellison, R. (1962). On bird, bird-watching and jazz. The Saturday Review, 47-49. http://www.unz.org/Pub/SaturdayRev-1962jul28-00047

Gehrig, L. (1939). Farewell speech. Lou Gehrig. https://www.lougehrig.com/farewell/

King George VI King’s speech. (1939). Awesome Stories. https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/George-VI-King-s-Speech-September-3-1939

Laxman, R. K. (n.d.) Political cartoons. Webneel. http://webneel.com/rk-lakshman-editorial-cartoons-indian-cartoonist

Marx, G. (2006). Dear Warner Brothers. Archive,org. https://archive.org/details/Groucho_Marx_Letter_to_Warner_Brothers

McGeveran, T. (2008). Toni Morrison's letter to Barack Obama. Observer. http://observer.com/2008/01/toni-morrisons-letter-to-barack-obama/

Nehru, J. (1947). Tryst with Destiny. American Rhetoric: Online speech bank. http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jawaharlalnehrutrystwithdestiny.htm

Nixon, R. (1952). Checkers speech. Watergate. http://watergate.info/1952/09/23/nixon-checkers-speech.html

Objevit.cz. (2017, Jan. 28). Holocaust + selfie culture = ‘yolocaust’ [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjjV_X5re4g

PETA. (2010). Feeding kids meat is child abuse. https://www.peta.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/childabuseBB72.jpg

Tagore, R. (1941). Crisis of civilization. Scribd. https://www.scribd.com/doc/163829907/Rabindranath-Tagore-The-Crisis-of-Civilization

Tedx Talks. (2016, May 23). Speak like a leader-Simon Lancaster-TEDxVerona [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGBamfWasNQ

Waters, A. (2006) Slow food nation. The Nation. https://www.thenation.com/article/slow-food-nation/

Woolf, V. (1942). The death of the moth. In V. Woolf, The death of the moth and other essays (pp. 1-3). Harcourt Inc. https://www.sanjuan.edu/cms/lib8/CA01902727/Centricity/Domain/3981/Death%20of%20A%20Moth-Virginia%20Woolf%20copy.pdf

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kubota, R., & Lehner, A. (2004). Toward critical contrastive rhetoric. Journal of Second Language Writing, 13(1), 7-27.

Mohr, K. A., & Mohr, E. S. (2017). Understanding Generation Z students to promote a contemporary learning environment. Journal on Empowering Teaching Excellence, 1(1), 84-94.

Seaboyer, J., & Barnett, T. (2019). New perspectives on reading and writing across the disciplines. Higher Education Research and Development, 38(1), 1-10.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1; Individual Assignment: 20 marks

CIA 2; Mid-semester Assessment Submission: 25 marks

End Semester Submission (Practical) : 50 marks

BENG161A - READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This common core course aims to provide a basic introduction to understanding discourses of science and technology as represented in select science fiction. The course will help students understand some of the basic questions about the human condition that are raised, debated and negotiated in and through the representative fiction. Keeping the contemporaneity of issues today, the course will also emphasize how there is a crucial intersection of various ideas that cut across several disciplines with regard to technology and life, thereby making it crucially relevant to engage with it in the contemporary context. Anyone interested in questions of science, fiction and human condition may choose this course.

Objectives:

• To introduce students to the field of science fiction

• Help students identify and raise questions through these works of fiction some relevant questions in the contemporary context

• To direct students towards realising the intersection of various issues raised across different disciplines.

Course Outcome

CO1: By the end of the course the learner should be able to: Recognise the issues and debates raised as being interdisciplinary in nature, and hence engage with the form at a more critical level

CO2: Reflect on the implications of science fiction in the contemporary times and show it in their writings.

CO3: Debate about various issues related to the portrayal of humanity in science fictions.

CO4: Provide an inter-disciplinary perspective towards analyzing science fiction.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction
 

This unit will provide students a basic overview of science fiction through some critical and conceptual lens. The New Critical Idiom Series, Science Fiction, would be used here to introduce aspects of SF to students. Locating the interdisciplinarity of the domain would be central in this module. Reference material would be handed out by the course instructor.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Negotiating 'Reason'
 

This unit will raise crucial debates in and around questions of ‘science’ and ‘reason’. The unit will also help students recognize the importance of raising these questions from various disciplinary points of view, an important one being philosophy.

• Isaac Asimov short story “Reason”

• Select Episodes of the series Stranger Things

The Matrix

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
SF and Technology
 

This unit will engage with how technology becomes a crucial part of negotiating SF. What are the fundamental concerns that Sf raises regarding technology and the human condition? How does technology come to be framed within SF? How is gender and sexuality framed within discourses of SF? How does SF address the anxieties of technology and future would be some of the questions engaged with here. Any one of the following novels may be taken up for discussion along with the viewing suggestion given below.

• Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

• William Gibson, Neuromancer

• Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake

• “Hated in the Nation” from Black Mirror Season 3

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Indian Science Fiction
 

This unit will engage with the science fiction in the Indian context. One of the main points of discussion would be to understand how Indian SF writers have engaged with tropes of SF that we are familiar with and what kind of an ‘India’ is imagined thereof which has implications socially, politically and culturally.

• Vandana Singh “Delhi”

• Sumit Basu, Turbulence

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Compilation

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bell, David and Barbara M. Kennedy. Eds. The Cybercultures Reader. Routledge, 2000. (Excerpts) Carey, Peter. What is Post-humanism? Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Carey, Peter. What is Post-humanism? Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Hollinger, Veronica. “Contemporary Trends in Science Fiction.” Science Fiction Studies. No. 78, Vol. 26, 1999.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignments: 95 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

BENG161B - GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce students to the major theoretical and applied debates as well as major moral puzzles and challenges in the field of global ethics. Ethics is gaining ground as an important humanities intervention in a fast-changing world. A course on ethics is often an added advantage for students as it helps them shape a socially-aware perspective of the social reality.

Drawing on interdisciplinary perspectives and thematic issues in the fields of international politics, business, communications and law, the course will challenge students to reflect on major ethical theories and traditions as well as core problems such as corporate governance, global distributive justice, the ethics of making and sustaining peace, media ethics and legal dimensions of ethics. By combining the works of both classic and contemporary philosophers with contemporary applied global issues, students will be able to critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ‘good global citizenship’.

Learning Objectives: On completing the course, students will be able to:

• Open-mindedly consider different viewpoints in moral controversies.

• Identify the strengths and weaknesses of different philosophical and popular arguments on the various topics.

• Demonstrate understanding of the major moral philosophical approaches and techniques in moral reasoning.

• Formulate and critically assess personal positions/convictions.

Course Outcome

CO1: On the completion of the course, students will be equipped with: The general ability to critically compare, contrast and synthesise major theories and concepts and to apply them in a creative manner to conceptual debates and real-life ethical challenges; critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ?good global citizenship?. CO2: Analyse various ethical dilemmas present in the society and efficiently present it in form of classroom debates and discussions. CO3: Demonstrate a clear understanding of various school of thoughts in the domain of ethics through their assignments. CO4: Appraise their views on various aspects of ethics and present it with clarity through multiple engagements in the classroom.

CO2: Analyse various ethical dilemmas present in the society and efficiently present it in form of classroom debates and discussions.

CO3: Demonstrate a clear understanding of various school of thoughts in the domain of ethics through their assignments.

CO4: Appraise their views on various aspects of ethics and present it with clarity through multiple engagements in the classroom.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction
 

Global Ethics: Conceptual Definitions, Historical Origins & Present Challenges Introduction to the course Ethics, Morals and Values Cultural Relativism vs Universalism (case study)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Ethical Theories
 

Rationalist Ethical Theories Contractualist ethics Deontological Ethics Utilitarian Ethics Discourse ethics, Alternatives to Ethical Rationalism Virtue Ethics Feminist & Care Ethics Postmodernist Ethics

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Applying Ethical Theories
 

Ethics of International Aid and Development: Humanitarian Aid in Conflict Zones

Global Distributive Justice and Global Poverty: Models for International Economic Justice

Ethics of War: Torture in Abu Ghraib (Case Study)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Ethics of Making and Sustaining Peace
 

Rohingya Issues: Are humanitarian interventions justified? The case study of Myanmar/Burma

Global Environmental and Climate Ethics: Trade Agreements and Global Environmental Ethics

Global Business Ethics and Arms Trade: The Ethics of Capitalism (Film Inside Job)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Ethics of International Law
 

Natural Resources Extraction from the Kimberley process towards universal legislation (Movie: Blood Diamond),

Global Journalism Ethics, Digital Media Ethics and Whistleblowing Practices: Snowden and Whistleblowing

Ethical Implications of Emerging Technologies: Genetics, stem cell and embryo research: Embryo research and women’s rights

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hutchings, K. (2010) Global Ethics. An Introduction, Polity: Cambridge

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Copp, D. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory, Oxford: OUP

Graham, G. (2008) Ethics and International Relations, 2nd Edition. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

LaFollette, H. (ed.) (2003) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Practice, Oxford: OUP

Evaluation Pattern

Assignments: 95 marks

Attendance: 5 marks

BHIS161A - ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The influence and presence of the past is felt everywhere and every day in our lives. Movies, newspapers or the internet bombard us and expose us to the past – both familiar and unfamiliar. However, the barrage of information and the forces of globalisation have led to increasing questions on the relevance and the value of the past – indeed a denial even. This course will engage the students with the myriad ways in which the past, though no longer present – is a presence in our lives today. It will introduce the students to think historically, relate to their memories of their own past and make them aware of the multiple perspectives which will enable them to read, write and reflect on the past; or in other words, make history. 

This course will introduce students to the methodological and theoretical questions that animate and inform the practice of history. How do professional historians work? What is their goal? How do they locate and analyze source materials? What kinds of arguments do historians try to make? How, ultimately, is history produced? This course will ask how (or whether) historians’ particular sources – and their location in the archives – can give voice to the ordinary and of things ‘past’. Moreover, the course will address how the advent of the information age impact upon the historians’ profession by exploring how modern technology – whether film, photography, or the internet – changed the way historians work and address their audience.

Course Objectives:

  • To familiarize the students with foundational concepts in history and historical enquiry such as fact, fiction, truth, narrative, memory, conservationism and counterfactuals.
  • To identify and make students aware of the importance of historical awareness to arrive at independent and informed opinion and contribute meaningfully in local and global affairs and debates.
  • To equip students with an understanding of ‘history’ and the characteristics of ‘the past’ in present day society.
  • To help develop proficiency in research, analysis and writing; and to encourage wide, independent, selective reading on historical subject matter to foster a sustained, reasoned, well focused argument, based on a broad selection of evidence.
  • To identify arguments in historical works in order to be able to critique evidence used in support of the arguments.
  • To interpret varied sources and place them within their proper historical context to integrate secondary sources into their own original narratives and distinguish between different kinds of history.

 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Discover how and why historians debate issues of evidence and interpretation and learn to distinguish between various schools or styles of academic history.

CO2: Critically engage with representations of the past in the present to enable them to analyze and use evidence in interrogating historical accounts.

CO3: Critically reflect and engage with the interface between the past and the present, fostering a healthy appreciation for history and its imprint on our present world.

CO4: Apply how historical narratives are shaped by states, organizations, and individuals.

CO5: Analyze the interaction between history and politics when following the news and in examining historical cases.

CO6: Analyze the interaction between history and politics when following the news and in examining historical cases.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
The Many Pasts
 

a)     Doing History - The Place of the Past.

b)    Facts, Fiction and Lies: Interrogating evidence - paintings, films, novels.

 Level of Learning: Practical/Application

c) Facts, Fiction and Lies: Interrogating evidence - paintings, films, novels-Students will take any work of Historical fiction, Historical Films as case studies and analyse the element of fact and fiction

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The Use and Abuse of History
 

a) Voice and the Subject: Narratives and Counter-narratives – Winston Churchill, Velupillai Prabhakaran, Pirates of the Caribbean, Tom and Jerry

b) Locating the Popular: Historical Fiction or Fictionalised History– Exploring the Fantasy Worlds of Ice Age, Hogwarts, Narnia, Westeros and Middle-earth.

c) The Past Today: The Ayodhya Debate and the Ram Janmbhoomi issue, Dwarka, Kapilavastu.

d) Historical Monuments and their Authorship/Ownership: The Temple Mount and Taj Mahal.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

a)                Voice and the Subject: Narratives and Counter-narratives – Winston Churchill, Velupillai Prabhakaran, Pirates of the Caribbean, Tom and Jerry

 

b)               Locating the Popular: Historical Fiction or Fictionalised History – Exploring the Fantasy Worlds of Ice Age, Hogwarts, Narnia, Westeros and Middle-earth.

 

Screening of Documentaries, Speeches and Films followed by Student-led panel discussion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Locating Sources: The Historian's Voice
 

a)     History and the Visual: Photography, Film and the Image – Gladiator, Schindler’s List, 300, Gone with the Wind, Jodha Akbar and Mohenjo Daro

b)    Historical Re-enactments? Light and Sound Shows at Golconda, Red Fort and Khajuraho.

 

c)     Alternate Histories: Oral Histories, Sports Histories, Graphic Novels, Caricatures and Political Cartoons.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Memory, Commemoration, and Silence
 

a)     Memory and History: Power and the Production of History –Museums and Memorials.

b)    ‘Truth’ and ‘myth’: History as Conspiracy – Insider and Outsider Perspectives – the Aryan Debate, Hindutva Ideology and Neo-Nazis.

c)     Private Lives and Public Affairs: The British Monarchy, the Nehru-Edwina Affair.  

d)    Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

a)                  Private Lives and Public Affairs: The British Monarchy, the Nehru-Edwina Affair.

b)                 Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files

c) Case study of various Print mediums which have discussed these issues to analyse how media is responsible for creating various memory narratives.

Text Books And Reference Books:

·    Davis, Natalie Z. 1981. The Possibilities of the Past, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 12, No.2, The New History: The 1980s and beyond II, pp. 267-275.
·    Gaddis, John Lewis. 2002. The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past, New York:  Oxford Univ Press.
·    Gathercole, Peter and David Lowenthal (eds.) 1994. The Politics of the Past, New York: Routledge.
·    Hodder, Ian and Scott Hutson. 2003 (Third Edition). Reading the Past, New York: Cambridge Univ. Press.
·    Kumar, Ravinder 1989. The Past and the Present: An Indian Dialogue, Daedalus, Vol. 118, No.4, pp. 27-49.
·    Thompson, Paul. 2000. The Voice of the Past: Oral History, New York: Oxford Univ Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·      Banerjee, Sumanta, 2003. Ayodhya: A future bound by the past, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 38, No. 27, pp. 2795-2796.
·      Buchli, Victor and Gavin Lucas 2001. Archaeologies of the Contemporary Past, Routledge.
·      Carr, E.H. 1967. What is History,Vintage.
·      Chalcraft, David et.al. 2008. Max Weber Matters: Interweaving Past and Present, Ashgate.
·      Chapman, James 2005. Past and Present: National Identity and the British Historical Film, I.B.Tauris.
·      Clarke, Katherine 2008. Making Time for the Past: Local History and the Polis, Oxford Univ Press.
·      Damm, Charlotte 2005. Archaeology Ethno-History and Oral Traditions: approaches to the indigenous past, Norwegian Archaeological Review, Vol. 38, No. 2, pp. 73-87.
·      Fowler, Don D. 1987. Uses of the past: Archaeology in the service of the state, American Antiquity, Vol. 52, No. 2, pp. 229-248.
·      Greene, Naomi 1999. Landscapes of Loss: the Nationalist Past in Postwar French Cinema, Princeton Univ Press.
·      Hamilakis et. al. 2001. Art and the Re-presentation of the Past, The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 153-156.
·      Muller, Jan-Werner 2004. Memory and Power in Post-War Europe: Studies in the presence of the past, Cambridge Univ. Press.
·      Murray, Williamson and Richard Hart Sinnreich (eds.) 2006. The Past as Prologue: The Importance of History to the Military Profession, Cambridge Univ Press.
·      Piercey, Robert 2009. The Uses of the Past from Heidegger to Rorty:Doing Philosophy Historically, Cambridge Univ. Press.
·      Shrimali, K.M. 1998. A Future for the Past? Social Scientist, Vol. 26, No. 9, pp. 26-51.
·      Stone, Peter G. and Philippe G. Planel 1999. the Constructed Past, Routledge.
·      Walsh, Kevin 1992. The Representation of the Past: Museums and heritage in the post-modern world, Routledge

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - Evaluation Pattern

Assignment 1

Assignment 2

Total

20

20

40

 

Mid Semester Examination

Submission

Presentation

Total

30

20

50

 

End Semester Examination

Submission

Presentation

Total

30

20

50

 

BHIS161B - THE HISTORY OF URBAN SPACE AND EVOLUTION OF CITY FORMS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

A focus on urban history offers fertile territory for a variety of topics. The development and inhabitation of cities has been an important feature in Cartesian and human landscapes for thousands of years. Regardless of time and place, cities have always brought together people and the products of their labor together in relatively limited spaces. Cities have thus been incubators for experiments in social organization, policy-making, planning, environmental modification, and economic innovation. Consequently, cities are dynamic and vital centers, which inform and are shaped by human experience. Studying how cities and their inhabitants change over time—whether on a long or short horizon or on a global, national, regional, or local scale—offers an informative framework within which to consider broader historical questions, such as the relationship between people, place, work, culture, and politics. Studying cities, moreover, offers students a great opportunity to engage in comparative historical study and to work with a variety of available technologies for studying cities.

Course Objectives:

       To deploy multiple analytical approaches to urban space, its organization, and inhabitation in order to analyze and situation urban development as a historical process that takes place within a broader historical context

       To illustrate multiple approaches to understanding changes in economic, political, and social formations in cities over time, as an important element in developing historical knowledge

       To acquaint the students how political development in historical context affected the rise and demise of urban centres

  • To acquaint the students how modern notions of urban development emerged and the various trends of the modern urban development

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and deploy various approaches to comparatively analyzing cities, using critical thinking to analyze urban space and urban life from multiple perspectives

CO2: Recognise and engage with the role of cities, suburbs, and urbanization in historical narratives

CO3: Demonstrate an ability to negotiate with ideas of immigration, migration, and economic and technological change, and how they have shaped cities through history

CO4: Reflect and analyse on the relationship of the built environment of cities with the natural environments surrounding them

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
What is Urban History?
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

a)What is Urban History? Urbanism as an Interdisciplinary Project- Urbanism and Comparative Method

b)Historiography of Urbanism - Modern Studies of Urbanism: Henri Pirenne and Max Weber- Study of Urbanism in the USA

c) Urbanism and Modernity

d)Urban Histories and the ‘Cultural Turn’

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches to the Study of Ancient and Medieval Urban Centers
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

a)The Harappan Cities-Between the Harappan and the Early Historic: An Absence of Cities?  The Early Historic Cities-Early Historic Cities in Texts-Understanding Early Historic Urbanisation

b)Idea of Medieval Cities of Europe- the spread of urbanism and emergence of town planning- urban revival in western Europe

c)Perceptions on Medieval Indian Cities-Commercially and Politically Charged Urbanism- Urbanism and Sufi and Bhakti Spaces-Poliscracy- Portuguese Cities: Polisgarchic-‘City-States Of Medieval India

Skill-Based

●Students will create two models of urban layout: Indian and western.

●They will have an exhibition of their model layouts, where they will introduce their peers about the traits and differences of these two layouts.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Colonial Cities
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

a)Dependent Urbanisation and New Urban Forms in Colonial India-City Planning in India under British Rule-Race, Class and Ethnicity in the Colonial City

b)Modernity and the City in Colonial India-The City as the Site of Spectacles-The City as the Site of Movements

c)Case Study of Colonial Cities: Calcutta, Bombay, Madras, Delhi

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Themes on Modern Cities
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

a)Space and Urban Theory- Materialities-Knowledge

b)Science, Planning and Expertise- Connections and Flows of modern cities 

c)Emerging concepts- Global City, Inclusive City, Livable City, Safe City, Future City – Impact of new town movement on post-independent Indian city planning -beginning of modern town planning in India

Skill-Based

 ●Students will create posters of these different kind of urban layouts and organize mock classrooms, where they will address the class with their teaching props.                                 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential References:

●Adams R. McC., (1966) The Evolution of Urban Society: Early Mesopotamia and PrehispanicMexico (Chicago: Aldine).

●Basant, P. K., (2012) The City and the Country in Early India: A Study of Malwa (Delhi: Primus Books).

●Ballhatchet, Kenneth, (1980) Race, Sex, andClass under theRaj:ImperialAttitudes and Policies and Their Critics, 1793-1905 ( London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1980).

●Chandavarkar, Rajnarayan, (2009) History, Culture and the Indian City (Delhi: Cambridge UniversityPress).

●Bayly, C. A., (1992) Rulers, Townsmen and Bazaars: North Indian Society in the Age of British Expansion, 1770-1870 (Delhi: Oxford University Press).

●Banga Indu (ed.), (1991) City in Indian History: Urban demography, Society and Politics (Delhi: Manohar).

●Chattopadhyaya,B., (2003) ‘The City in Early India: Perspectives from Texts’, in B. Chattopadhyaya, Studying Early India: Archaeology, Texts, and Historical Issues (Delhi: Permanent Black), pp. 105-34.

●Edward Soja (2000): Postmetropolis, Critical Studies of cities and Regions, Blackwell Publisher Ltd. 17. 

●Fischer, Claude S. 1975 Towards a subcultural theory of urbanism, Reprinted in J.J. Macionis and N. Benokraitis (ed.) 1989 Seeing Ourselves (pp 367-373).

●Frykenberg, R.E., (1986) Delhi Through Ages: Selected Essays in Urban History, Culture and Society (New Delhi: Oxford University Press)

●G. P. Chapman, A.K. Dutt and R.W. Bradnock (ed.) (1999): Urban growth & Development in Asia, Vol.2: Living in the Cities, Ashgate Publishing Ltd.

●Marshall, P.J., (2000),The White Town ofCalcutta under the Rule of the East India Company‟, Modern Asian Studies, Vol. 34, No. 2 (May), pp. 307-331. 

●Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. Hayden, Dolores, (1996) The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press). 

●Pirenne, Henri, (1969) Medieval Cities: Their Origins and the Revival of Trade (Princeton: Princeton University Press). 

●Shane, Ewen, (2016) What is Urban History? (Cambridge: Polity Press). Southall, Aidan, (1998) The City in Time and Space (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press). 

●Trigger, B., (1972) ‘Determinants of Urban Growth in Pre-industrial Societies’ in Ucko, Ucko, P.J., Tringham R. and Dimbleby, G.W. (eds.) Man, Settlement and Urbanism (London: Duckworth Publishers).

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

●Braudel, Fernand, (1989) The Identity of France (London: Fontana Press).

●Blake, Stephen, (1993) Shahjahanabad: The Sovereign City in Mughal India, 1639- 1739 (New Delhi: Cambridge University Press). 

●Braudel, Fernand (1973) Capitalism and Material Life, 1400-1800, tran. by Miriam Kochan (New York: Harper & Row).

●Cohen, R., (1979) ‘State Origins: A Reappraisal’ in Claessen, H.J.M. and Peter Skalnik (eds.) The Early State (Hague: Mouton). 

●Champakalakshmi, R., (1996) Trade, Ideology and Urbanisation: South India, 300 BC and 1300 AD (Delhi: Oxford University Press).

●Finley, M., (1977) ‘The ancient city: from Fustel de Coulanges to Max Weber and Beyond’ Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 19. 

●Jacobsen T, Adams RMcC., (1958) ‘Salt and silt in ancient Mesopotamian agriculture’, Science, Vol. 128, pp. 1251-58. Fried, Morton, (1967) The Evolution of Political Society (New York: Random House). 

●Harvey, David, (1985) The Urbanisation of Capital: Studies in the History and Theory of Capitalist Urbanization (Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press).

●Heitzman, James, (2008) TheCity in SouthAsia (London and NewYork: Routledge).

●Kenoyer, J. M., (1998) Ancient Cities of the IndusValley Civilization (Karachi: Oxford University Press). Kenoyer, J. M. and K. Heuston, (2005) The Ancient South Asian World (Oxford: University Press).

●Latham A, et.al. (2009): Key Concepts in Urban Geography, Sage, Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, Washington.

●Martindale, D., (1958) ‘The Theory of the City’ in Weber, Max, The City, Translated and edited by Martindale (New York: Don and Neuwirth, G. Free Press).

●Mumford, L., (1961) The City in History (New York: Harcourt, Brace and World). Orans, Martin, (1966) ‘Surplus’, Human Organization, Vol. 25, pp. 24-32

●Nightingale, CarlH., (2008) „Before Race Mattered: Geographies ofthe Color Line in Early Colonial Madras and New York‟, The American Historical Review, Vol. 113, No. 1 (February), pp. 48-71

●Peers, Douglas M., (1998) „Privates offParade: Regimenting Sexuality in the NineteenthCentury Indian Empire‟, The International History Review, Vol. 20, No. 4 (December), pp. 823-854.

● Pieterse E, (2008): City Futures, Confronting the Crisis of Urban Development, Zed Books Ltd, London and New York.

●Steward, J., (1968) ‘Cultural Ecology’ in The International Encyclopedia of The Social Sciences, Vol. 3. Tonkiss, Fran, (2009) Space, the City and Social Theory (Cambridge: Polity Press). 

●Weber, Max, (1958) The City, Translated and edited by Martindale, Don and Neuwirth, G. (New York: Free Press). Wirth, Louis, (1938) ‘Urbanism as a way of life’ Reprinted in J.J. Macionis and N. Benokraitis (ed.) (1989) Seeing Ourselves (pp.360-366) (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs).

 

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code 

Course Title

Assessment Details 

BHIS 191 B

 Urban History: The History of Urban Space and Evolution of City Forms

CIA

20 Marks 

MSE

 

CIAII

20 Marks 

ESE 

50 Marks

Group Assignment

(The Assignment will have 2 components related to each other)

Submission Paper

Individual

Assignment 

Submission  paper

(Research based)

BMED151B - UNDERSTANDING THE VISUAL LANGUAGE OF CINEMA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course would provide students with a thorough knowledge of the conceptual and practical aspects of digital cinematography through engagement with works of eminent cinematographers from around the world and the equipment.


The course aims to help students to:

  • Appreciate cinematography as a combination of artistic and technological endeavors
  • Understand the basics concepts of cinematography and shot design
  • Harness the power of natural and artificial lighting  to compose powerful shots
  • Explore the creative possibilities of cinematography and understand its importance in effective storytelling.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and describe the visual elements in cinematography.

CO2: Demonstrate understanding of different tools of cinematography.

CO3: Apply knowledge of cinematography techniques to create films.

CO4: Use cinematography skills to make films on social issues.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Cinematography
 
  • Cinematography as an art
  • Art of visual storytelling
  • Evolution of cinematography
  • Eminent cinematographer’s from world cinema
  • Cinematography and effective storytelling.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The Cinematographer?s medium and Tools
 
  • Light, Camera, Lenses
  • Basics of Lighting 
  • Various types of light sources and their practical application
  • Colour temperature, Lens Choice, Lens filters, Exposure/F-stop/Shutter/ISO
  • Depth of field Camera operating
  • Hands-on introduction to camera equipment.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Camera placement and Shot Design
 
  • Composition & Framing
  • Types of Shots
  • Shot design for single camera and multi camera productions
  • Camera Placement -how does it affect the meaning
  • Motivated Camera Movement.
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Video editing
 
  • Introduction to video editing application
  • Video editing on smartphone
  • Editing on Adobe Premiere Pro-creating projects, workspaces and workflows, capturing and importing, video effects and transitions, graphics, titles, and animation, compositing, colour correction and grading, improving performance and troubleshooting.
Text Books And Reference Books:

Pro, A. P. (2010). Adobe Premiere Pro.
Team, A. C. (2012). Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 Classroom in a Book: Adobe Prem Pro CS6 Classro_p1. Adobe Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Block, B. (2013). The visual story: Creating the visual structure of film, TV and digital media. CRC Press.
Alton, J. (2013). Painting with light. University of California Press.
 

Evaluation Pattern

Overall end-semester evaluation for 95 marks
Project I: 20 Marks 
Project II: 25 Marks
Project III: 20 Marks
End semester Submission Project IV: 30 Marks. Attendance 5 Marks

BMED161A - MEDIA LITERACY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Media literacy is designed to help students develop an informed and critical understanding of the nature of an ever expanding and increasingly dominating mass media –as information sources, as entertainment, and as an industry–as well as to examine, interpret, and evaluate the messages contained within, and their social, cultural and political implications. This course exposes the student to the base complexities of media literacy, develop critical thinking skills, provides the methods of analysis necessary to interpret media content as well as methods of critical writing appropriate for media analysis.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • Think critically about the role of the media in human rights promotion;
  • Identify ethical dilemmas facing journalists, filmmakers and other media professionals.
  • Understand the historical and contemporary perspective of human rights
  • Use analytical tools to examine pertinent case studies and relevant global trends.
  • Assess and examine what human rights are in terms of its relationship to media production.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse and critically appraise various media products for specific audiences

CO2: Develop critical media literacy and skills to analyse media content

CO3: Critically assess and improve their own texts

CO4: Develop an understanding of ideology in the context of our media system

CO5: Develop skills pertaining to act responsibly in Online environment

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Media Literacy
 

Understanding what is media literacy? 
Media Literacy Skills and key concepts 
Conditions for Media Learning
Deconstructing media and literacy expectations  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Media and the Social World
 

The Media Triangle
Media logs and historical perspectives
Understand, analyze and evaluate- finding hidden messages
Fake News, Deep Fakes 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Uses and abuses of Digital Media
 

Understanding Web 2.0: Understanding digital information literacy
Digital Storytelling 
Online Learning Communities & Connectivism

Text Books And Reference Books:

Alexander, A. & Hanson, J. (2007). Taking Sides: Clashing Views in Media and Society. 
McGraw-Hill Contemporary Learning Series: Dubuque, IA. 384 pp.
Hiassen C. (1998). Team Rodent: How Disney Devours the World. Ballantine Books. 96 pp
Potter, J (2013). Media Literacy. Sage Publication, New Delhi

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kilbourne, J. (1999). Can’t Buy My Love: How Advertising Changes the Way We Think and Feel. Simon and Schuster: New York. 366 pp.
McLuhan, M. (1998) Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man. Seventh Printing. MIT Press: MA 365 pp. (orig. pub. In 1911).

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline
Overall end-semester evaluation for 95 marks
Project I: 20 Marks 
Project II: 25 Marks
Project III: 20 Marks
End semester Submission Project IV: 30 Marks. Attendance 5 Marks

BPOL161A - PEACE AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description 

This course views conflict as an ever-present component of any decision-making environment, including Planning and Public Administration and International Relations. It offers tools for: understanding the nature of conflict at different levels and of individual and joint decision-making processes; devising individual and group strategies that minimize the destructive consequences of conflict; and, identifying solutions satisfactory to all involved. Some conflict-related concepts and processes are general and context-free, while others are specific to the planning and policy fields. Some simulation games and cases, and the students' reaction to them, will provide the basis for class discussions about the nature of various decision mechanisms and the role of perceptions in managing conflicts. The course introduces students to the key concepts and theoretical approaches employed to explain and understand conflict, and the range of policies and practices that seek to manage, resolve and transform conflicts. Case studies from South Asia and the rest of the world are used to provide empirical illustrations in class. Students will be invited to analyze the successes/failures of different techniques employed by peace activists, policy makers, and peace research scholars. 

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • understand the concepts, theories and practices, with a focus on equipping students with toolkits of handling conflict and negotiation.
  • understand the mechanism of creating values and achieving integrative negotiation outcomes.
  • assess the debates over the main ideas that constitute the fields of conflict management and peace.

Course Outcome

CO1: identify the importance of, and the ability of using communication and information exchange in conflict and negotiation contexts.

CO2: apply concepts in handling conflicts with employers, colleagues, customers, business partners, and clients from different cultural/country backgrounds.

CO3: examine the study of conflict management and peace studies and understand how this subject has prompted enormous scholarly debate and disagreement both in history and other fields

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

The Nature and Origins of Conflict: How and Why People Conflict; Differences, diversity and opportunity; Conflict: Meaning, Nature and types and levels of conflict; Violent and Non-Violent Conflicts; Conflict Mapping and Tracking; Conflict Management and Conflict Resolution

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Conflict Management
 

A Holistic Approach to Conflict Management; Conflict Prevention and Preventive Diplomacy; Conflict Prevention and Early Warning; Stages in Conflict Management

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Peace building
 

Understanding Peace Process; Stages in the Peace Process; Peace-making, Peacekeeping and Peacebuilding; Negotiation and Mediation; Arbitration and Adjudication 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Challenges for conflict management
 

Variation in Contexts: Culture, Religion, and Identity; Contemporary Challenges: (1) Terrorism; (2) Environmental Conflicts; Prospects for Conflict Resolution 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Baker, D. P. (2010). Conflict management for peacekeepers and peacebuilders: by Cedric de Koning and Ian Henderson
  • Galtung, Johan (1969), “Violence, Peace, and Peace Research”, Journal of Peace Research, 6(3): 167-191.
  • Bajpai, Kanti (2004), “A Peace Audit on South Asia”, in Ranabir Sammadar (ed.) Peace Studies: An Introduction to the Concept, Scope, and Themes, New Delhi: Sage.
  • Pammer, W. J., & Killian, J. (Eds.). (2003). Handbook of conflict management. CRC Press.
  • Fischer, R., Ury, W., & Patton, B. (1981). Getting to yes. Negotiating Agreement Without Giving in.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Bercovitch, Jacob and Richard Jackson (2009), Conflict Resolution in the Twenty-first Century: Principles, Methods and Approaches, Ann Arbor (MI): University of Michigan Press.
  • Levy, Jack S. (2007), “International Sources of Interstate and Intrastate War”, in Chester
  • Crocker et al. (eds.) Leashing the Dogs of War, Washington DC: USIP.
  • Menon, Ritu (2004), “Doing Peace: Women Resist Daily Battle in South Asia”, in
  • Radhika Coomaraswamy and Dilrukshi Fonseka (eds.), eace Work: Women, Armed Conflict and Negotiation
  • Zartman, I. William (2001), “Preventing Deadly Conflict”, Security Dialogue, 32(2): 137-154.
  • Ramsbotham, Oliver et al. (2011), Contemporary Conflict Resolution, 3rd Edition.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 25

CIA 2 (Mid sem) - 25

ESE - 45

Attendance- 5

BPOL161B - GLOBAL POWER POLITICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The global balance of power is changing dramatically. As the world seems to be moving away from American Hegemony, the question of where power lies in global politics is becoming ever more significant. Great powers remain as the critical actors in the international system and the nature of the international order is determined by their interactions in war and peace. This course focuses on the transformation of the global power politics particularly focusing on the power shifts in the post-cold war international system. The course will also introduce students to the emergence of new powers such as China, India, Brazil and South Africa and the changing dynamics of the international system. The course will examine whether great powers can cooperate in addressing the consequential challenges in the new century; climate change, nuclear proliferation, refugee crisis, international terrorism and other issues. The course will also examine the competition among the great powers in the South and East China Sea, and the West Asian region.

 

CourseObjectives:

The course aims to help students to:

  • introduce to the key concepts and theories of international relations.
  • examine the key issues pertaining to great power politics in the twenty first century. 
  • outline the dynamics of strategic interaction between great powers and focuses on great power competition during World Wars, Cold War period and the post-Cold War period. 
  • develop an understanding of the great power dynamics, the use of power by great powers in international relations.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyze the global power politics in the twenty-first century

CO2: Examine the major contemporary issues and challenges in global politics

CO3: Evaluate the changing power dynamics and power shifts in international relations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to International Relations
 

International Relations: Meaning, nature and scope of international relations; Key Concepts of International Relations: Sovereignty (territorial sovereignty), Balance of Power, National Power, Security and Globalization.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Theorization of Great Power in International Relations
 

Theories of International Relations: Realism (Classical Realism and Neo-Realism), Liberalism (Neoliberalism), Constructivism.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Great Power Politics in the Cold War Era
 

First World War, Second World War: Causes and Consequences, dynamics of strategic interaction between the great powers including the alliances, Inter war period (multipolarity), the Cold War (bipolarity) and the post-Cold War period (unipolarity).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Power shifts in the Post-Cold War
 

Power shifts in the post-Cold War international system, Great Powers: traditional and non-traditional security threats, Emergence of new powers (rise of China and India as a challenge to the west).

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baylis, J. and Smith, S. (eds.) (2011), The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations, London: OUP.

Heywood, A (2014), Global Politics, Palgrave Foundation.

John J. Mearsheimer, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics, updated ed. (New York: Norton, 2014).

Martin Griffiths and Terry O Callaghan (2002) ‘International Relations: The Key Concepts’.     Routledge London and New York.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Barry Buzan and Ole Weaver (2003), ‘Regions and Powers: The structure of International Security’ Cambridge.

Ikenberry, G. John, Ed. 2002. America Unrivaled: The Future of the Balance of Power, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.  

Devatak, D, Anthony Burke and Jim George (2007), ‘An Introduction to International Relations: Australian Perspectives’, Cambridge University Press.

Hans J Morgenthau (1948). Politics among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace, Alfred A Knopf, New York.

Kenneth Waltz (1979) ‘Theory of International Politics’. Addison-Wesley Publications.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline:

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

BPOL161B

Global Power and Politics

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 25= 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10= 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

BPSY131 - PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is about the study of basic psychological processes. It is an introductory paper that gives an overall understanding about the field of Psychology. It will provide students with an introduction to the key concepts, perspectives, theories, and sub-fields in psychology. It focuses on various basic processes underlying human behavior.

Course Objectives

This course aims to:

  • Understand the real nuances of psychology with a brief historical sketch of the science of psychology and a glimpse into the methods used in the study of  human behaviour 
  • Understand the fundamental processes underlying human behaviour
  • Apply the principles of psychology in replicating and demonstrating various famous psychology experiments

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain various perspectives in psychology and take positions based on their understanding

CO2: Demonstrate fundamental processes underlying human behaviour through experiments, role play etc.

CO3: Apply their understanding in coming up with new ideas,concepts, etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Psychology
 

Definition and goals of Psychology; Psychology as a science;

Historical foundations of Psychology; Contemporary perspectives in psychology;

Methods of research; Ethics in psychological research.

 

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Consciousness, Sensation and Perception
 

Consciousness – Definition; Sleep and dreams; Altering consciousness – hypnosis, meditation, biofeedback and drugs; Definitions; Absolute and difference threshold; Signal detection theory; Sensory adaptation; Perception: Understanding perception, Gestalt laws of organization, Perceptual constancy - depth perception, size perception, perception of movement; Various sensory modalities; Extrasensory perception

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Learning
 

Learning – Definitions; Classical conditioning – experiments, extinction, spontaneous recovery, generalization, discrimination, higher-order conditioning;

Operant conditioning – Thorndike’s law of effect, basics of operant conditioning, Reinforcement and Punishment, Schedules of reinforcement;

Cognitive learning: Latent learning, Observational learning and Insight learning. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Motivation and Emotion
 

Motivation: Meaning, Approaches: instinct, drive reduction, arousal, incentive, cognitive, humanistic; Types of motivation - physiological Motivation (Hunger, Thirst, Sex)and psychological motivation (Achievement, Affiliation and Power)

Emotion: Meaning, Physiological basis of emotions; Theories – James-Lange Theory, Cannon-Bard theory, Cognitive theory; Emotional expression, facial feedback hypothesis, facial-affect programme

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Psychology of Individual Differences
 

Concepts and nature of Individual differences; Nature vs. nurture; Gender Difference in cognitive processes and social behavior;

Intelligence – Definition, Contemporary theories of intelligence; Tests of intelligence; Emotional, Social and Spiritual intelligence

 

  

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baron, R. A. (2001). Psychology. New Delhi: Pearson Education India.

Rathus, S. A. (2017). Introductory Psychology, 5thEd. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. 

Nolen-Hoeksema, S., Fredrickson, B.L. & Loftus, G.R. (2014).Atkinson &Hilgard'sIntroduction to Psychology.16th Ed.

United Kingdom: Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Feldman, R. S. (2011). Understanding Psychology. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

Morgan, C. T., King, R. A., & Schopler, J. (2004). Introduction to Psychology. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

Kalat, J. W. (2016). Understanding Psychology. New York: Cengage Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

  

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attd

ESE

20

25

20

05

30

 

 CIA 1: Individual Assignments (Reflective essays, Scrap books, Report Writings, etc.)

 

CIA 2: Mid-Semester Examination(Written Examination)

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

 

CIA 3: Group Assignments (Research proposals,Surveys, Field Studies, Interventions,Exhibitions, etc.)

 

ESE: End Semester Examination (Written Examination)

 

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

 

BPSY132 - HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

One of the routes to understand and critically appreciate contemporary Psychology is to look at its history. This course intends to provide a bird’s eye view of the emergence and development of Psychology as a formal scientific discipline. It traces the history of the origins of the discipline, in both ancient and modern times. It also traces the growth of the discipline in modern India.

Course Objectives: This course aims to

  • Describe the key contributions of major figures in the history of psychology.
  • Relate the major perspectives in psychology with the individuals responsible for articulating them.
  • Understand how historical trends and events have influenced the development of psychology as a scientific discipline.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of major questions/ideas that have driven psychological thought throughout its history.
  • Examine the historical context including political and cultural contexts within which the development of psychology as a discipline has taken place.
  • Understand perspectives and current trends in psychology in India.

Course Outcome

CO1: The understanding about the importance of History.

CO2: The knowledge about the origins of various systems of psychology.

CO3: The skill to relate the philosophical and historical underpinnings of contemporary psychology.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Historical Foundations
 

Understanding Science, History, Psychology and the notion of Systems; Psychology’s historical foundations in ancient Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Birth of the Discipline
 

The emergence of modern science; Background for the emergence of modern Psychology: The French, British and German tradition.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Nineteenth Century Bases for Psychology
 

Nineteenth-century bases of Psychology: Physiology, Psychophysics, and Evolution; The founding of modern Psychology as Natural-Human science.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Major Systems
 

Voluntarism and Structuralism, Functionalism, Gestalt psychology, Psychoanalysis, Behaviorism, Humanistic Psychology.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Beyond the Systems: Contemporary Developments
 

History of Psychology in India; Diversity in Psychology; Indigenization; Globalization and the field of Psychology in the 21st century. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Brennan, J.F. (2003). History and systems of psychology (6thEdn.).New Delhi: Pearson Education Inc.

Hergenhahn, B.R. & Henley, T. (2013). An Introduction to the History of Psychology. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning.

Lawson, R.B., Graham, J.E. & Baker, K.M. (2007). A history of Psychology: Globalizations, ideas and applications. New Delhi: Prentice-Hall Inc. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Brown, S.D. & Stenner, P. (2009). Psychology without foundations: History, philosophy and psychosocial theory. New Delhi: Sage.

Heidbreder, E. (1933/1961). Seven psychologies. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Hunt, M. (2007). The story of psychology. New York: Anchor Books

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attd

ESE

20

25

20

05

30

 

CIA 1: Individual Assignments (Reflective essays, Scrap books, Report Writings, etc.)

  

CIA 2: Mid-Semester Examination(Written Examination)

Pattern:    Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

 

CIA 3: Group Assignments (Research proposals,Surveys, Field Studies, Interventions,Exhibitions, etc.)

 

ESE: End Semester Examination (Written Examination)

Pattern:    Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

BPSY151 - ACADEMIC WRITING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims to improve students' scientific writing skills and presentation skills. To that end, students will work on article-based writing assignments, following the guidelines of the 7th edition of the American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual. Also, students will work on journal articles and poster-making presentation assignments.

 

Course Objectives: This course aims to  

  • Read research articles accurately, being able to abstract their essential ideas and understand their implications.
  • Write concisely and objectively using APA format, the standard of our field.

Course Outcome

CO1: Read and summarize complex ideas accurately, including future directions, from psychological sources and research

CO2: Create a coherent and integrated poster presentation based on a review of the pertinent psychological literature

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Organizing and Developing Your Ideas and Writing
 

Formulating your ideas; Assessing your sources; How to conduct a literature search; How to read and summarize a Journal Article.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Scholarly Writing and Elements of Style
 

Types of Articles and Papers; Ethical, Legal and Professional standards in Publishing; Paper Elements and Format; Effective Scholarly Writing; Grammar and Usage.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Guidelines for Academic Writing
 

Bias-free Language guidelines; Mechanics of Style; Tables and Figures; Works Credited in the Text; Reference List and Examples.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Beins, B. C., & Beins, A. M. (2020). Effective writing in psychology: Papers, posters, and presentations (3rd ed.). John Wiley & Sons.

American Psychological Association. (2019). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (7th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Hartley, J. (2008). Academic Writing and Publishing: A Practical Guide, New York: Taylor and Francis.

Evaluation Pattern

Article Critique Assignment

Poster Presentation

Quiz

15

15

20

 

 

BPSY152 - EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course will introduce students to various famous experiments used in the field of psychology, it will make students understand how experimental methods are applied to study psychological phenomena and the processes that underlie it. They will learn how to conduct experiments in a controlled environment and write accurate reports.

 

Course Objectives: To enable students to:

      Gain exposure to various psychological experiments and its conduction.

      Acquire skills of rapport building and conduction.

  • Report experiments in psychology involving human participants.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Knowledge of various experiments in psychology.

CO2: Skills to demonstrate effective conduction of experiments.

CO3: ● Report writing skills for experiments involving human participants

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Experimental Psychology
 

Definition of experimental psychology; History and evolution of experimental psychology; Experiment conduction skills; Report writing.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Conduction of Experiments and Report Writing
 

Sensation: Method of limits using an Aesthesiometer

Perception: Muller-Lyer illusion

Memory: Span of immediate memory

Motivation: Achievement motivation test (projective)/ Achievement motivation scale (n-Ach)

Personality: NEO-FFI/ 16 PF

Intelligence: Bhattia’s Battery of Performance/ Culture Fair Intelligence Test/ Raven’s standard progressive matrices

Text Books And Reference Books:

Myers, A., & Hansen, C. (2006). Experimental psychology. Thomson Wadsworth.

Manual:  Method of limits using an Aesthesiometer

Manual: Muller-Lyer illusion

Manual: Span of immediate memory

Manual: Achievement motivation test (projective)/ Achievement motivation scale (n-Ach)

Manual: NEO-FFI/ 16 PF

Manual: Bhattia’s battery of performance/ Culture fair intelligence test/ Raven’s standard progressive matrices.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Feldman, R. S. (2011). Understanding Psychology. Tata McGraw Hill.

Evaluation Pattern

Experiment conduction

Report

Viva

10

30

10

BPSY161 - FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course will provide a basic overview of human anatomy and physiology and how the various systems of the body function together. Taking an organ system approach, this course will highlight the structure-function relationships that maintain homeostasis in a healthy human body.

Course Objectives: This course aims to

  • Understand the structure and explain the basic concepts that govern each organ and organ system and their integration to maintain homeostasis.
  • Gain knowledge about the structure and explain the basic concepts of endocrinology and neurochemistry that forms the basis of human behaviour.
  • Gain familiarity about the organ systems like the musculoskeletal, circulatory, gastrointestinal, respiratory, urinary, endocrine, reproductive and nervous system, structurally and functionally.

Course Outcome

CO1: Elaborate the understanding of structural organization of maintaining life and homeostasis and communicate effectively in class discussions.

CO2: Demonstrate knowledge of the structure and function of different systems and disease related to it orally and written

CO3: Explain differences in 4 basic tissue types in order to be able to predict tissue and organ function based on structure individually.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Levels of Organization
 

Introduction to Physiology; Molecular, Cellular and Tissue Physiology; Principles of homeostasis; cell organelles; membranes – permeability and transport.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Biochemistry
 

Introducing the role of biochemistry and its relationship to life processes. Biomolecules and Carbohydrates -    Classification; Proteins- Amino acids- -peptide bond -Proteins-biological importance-classification based on solubility and composition-levels of organization-primary, secondary (alpha -helix and beta -pleated Sheet) and tertiary structure, (forces stabilizing it)-quaternary structure;  Enzymes- Classification-active site-specificity-Fischer and Koshland models-Enzyme kinetics;

Nucleic Acids- Types-components of nucleic acids-nucleosides and nucleotides-poly nucleotides-structure of DNA- (Watson and Crick model) biological roles of DNA and RNA. Central dogma of molecular biology; Replication of DNA- semi-conservative mechanism.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Elementary endocrinology & neurochemistry
 

Hormones and Neurotransmitters; source, sink receptor and related pathology.

Nutrition Biochemistry - Vitamins-definition-classification and deficiency manifestations of water soluble and fat soluble vitamins-coenzyme functions of B-complex vitamins;

Biological Oxidation - Bioenergetics-ATP and other high energy molecules-energy coupling in biological reactions-stepwise process of biological oxidation; Metabolism (Catabolism and anabolism) Carbohydrate metabolism, Fatty acid metabolism and Protein metabolism.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Support and Movement
 

 Skin, Muscle and Skeletal Systems; Skin – injuries wounds and aging; skeletal and muscle organization.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Systemic Fluids, Transport and Environmental Exchange
 

Blood formed elements and functions ,plasma and platelets; cardiovascular system, regulation of arterial blood pressure; lymphatic system, lymph nodes, thymus and spleen; body defenses and immunity, non-specific Immunity, specific Immunity and transfusion reactions. Stages of digestion and absorption of nutrients, enzymes, digestive pathway and liver and pancreas; Physiology of respiration, control of breathing, lungs, gas exchange and transport; Excretory system and the kidneys, filtration, reabsorption, and secretion; Fluid, Electrolyte and acid-base balance, urine formation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Sherwood, L. (2007). Human Physiology: From cells to systems. Sydney, Australia: Thomson/Brooks/Cole.

Moini, J. (2012). Anatomy and physiology for health professionals. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Barrett, K. E., & Ganong, W. F. (2010). Ganong's review of medical physiology. New York: McGraw-Hill Medical.

Widmaier, E. P., Raff, H., Strang, K. T., & Vander, A. J. (2014). Vander's human physiology: The mechanisms of body function. (older version in library)

Marieb, E. N. (2006). Essentials of human anatomy & physiology. San Francisco: Pearson/Benjamin Cummings.

Martini, F. H., Nath, J. L., & Bartholomew, E. F. (2005). Anatomy and physiology. New York: Prentice Hall.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attd

ESE

20

25

20

05

30

 

CIA 1: Individual Assignments (Reflective essays, Scrap books, Report Writings, etc.)

 

CIA 2: Mid-Semester Examination(Written Examination)

 

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

              Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

              Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

               Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory

CIA 3: Group Assignments (Research proposals,Surveys, Field Studies, Interventions,Exhibitions, etc.)

 

ESE: End Semester Examination (Written Examination)

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

             Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

             Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

             Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

 

BPSY161A - SCIENCE OF WELLNESS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course heralds the emergence of a new field of science that endeavours to understand how individuals and societies thrive and flourish, and how this new knowledge can be applied to foster happiness, health and fulfillment. Taking a dynamic, cross-disciplinary approach, the course explores the most promising routes to well-being, derived from the latest research in psychology, neuroscience, economics, and the effects of our natural environment. The course provides an overview of the latest insights and strategies for enhancing our individual well-being, or the well-being of the communities in which we live and work

Course Objectives

This course aims to:

  • Understand the evolution and development of health and well-being
  • Develop a holistic approach to living life well
  • Create optimal programs for individuals and populations

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyze various perspectives from the latest research in psychology, neuroscience, economics, and the effects of our natural environment on well being

CO2: Develop a holistic perspective on wellbeing

CO3: Design interventions to enhance positive mental health in individuals and populations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Well-Being
 

Well being as a concept, happiness, and subjective well-being, Expanding the repertoire of positive emotions: The broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions; Relationship with reality and its role in the well-being of young adults; Increasing happiness in life, Positive mental health in individuals and populations

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Well-being across life-span
 
Living well at every stage of life: Resilience in childhood, positive youth development, life tasks of adulthood and successful aging; Role of meaningful relationships: infant attachment, adult attachment, love and flourishing relationships; Seeing the future through self efficacy and optimism; Role of Self efficacy in life arenas, learned optimism.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Socio-cultural and Economic Considerations
 

The relevance of subjective well-being to social policies: optimal experience and tailored intervention; The social context of well-being; Does money buy happiness?; A well-being manifesto for a flourishing society.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

Huppert, Baylis, & Keverne (2005). The Science of Well-Being.  Oxford  University Press.

Synder, & Lopez (2007). Positive Psychology. New Delhi: Sage Publishing House

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Coan, R. W. (1977). Hero, artist, sage, or saint? A survey of what is variously called mental health, normality, maturity, self-actualization, and human fulfillment. New York: Columbia University Press.

Boniwell, I. (2012). Positive Psychology In a Nutshell: The Science of Happiness (3rd edition). London: Mc Graw Hill.

Bradburn, N. M. (1969). The structure of psychological well-being. Chicago, IL: Aldine.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Individual Assignment

Group Assignment

End semester

Attendance

25

25

45

05

BPSY161B - ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Advertisement psychology is a branch of psychology which studies the pattern of responses by the human system to advertisement stimuli. Advertising is the art of influencing human behaviors to buy certain products. Recently  advertisers are discovering the need to know the facts which psychology can give about what attracts attention, what sticks in memory, what gives a pleasant impression, what persuades and what leads to the act of purchase. The field helps marketers and copyrighters to prepare effective advertisements.

Course Objectives

This course aims to:

  • Understand the historical and scientific origin and development of the fie
  • Learn the cognitive,affective and behavioural responses to the advertisement stimuli
  • Develop the skills to evaluate the effectiveness of advertisements from psychological perspectives 

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply the psychological perspectives of advertisements in the real life setting.

CO2: Integrate different domains such as cognitive, affective and behavioral responses in the field of advertisement.

CO3: Develop the ability to make applications based on understanding of marketing strategies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Introduction to advertisement psychology
 

Introduction to advertisements; its objectives and importance;

Types and forms of advertising;

Effects of advertisements - a psychological perspective;

Classic and contemporary approaches of classifying advertisement effectiveness.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Cognitive processing of advertisements
 

Influence of advertisements on buying behaviors;

Dynamics of Attention, Comprehension, Reasoning for advertisements;

Attitudes and attitude changes with the influence of advertisements;

Principles of persuasion and attitude change;

Achieving advertisement compliance without changing attitude.   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: International Advertising and Creating Brand
 

Emergence of International Advertising;

Advertising in Multicultural Environment;

Ethics in Advertising;

Integrated marketing communication and marketing mix.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Fennis, B. M., & Stroebe, W. (2015). The Psychology of Advertising. New York: Psychology Press.

Andrew,A. Mitchell. (1993).Advertising Exposure, Memory and Choice.Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Linda, F. Alwitt& Andrew, A. Mitchell. (1985).Psychological Processes and Advertising Effects: Theory, Research, and Applications. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ. London.

Rolloph, M.E. & Miller, G.R. (Eds) (1980).Persuasion: New Directions in Theory and Research.Sage. N.Y.

Eddie. M. Clark, Timothy.C. Brock,& David W. Stewart. (1994).Attention, Attitude and Affect in Response to Advertising. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Individual Assignment

Mid-Semester Exam

Group Assignment

Attendance

25

45

25

05

ENG121 - ENGLISH - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities, and politics

CO2: Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO3: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO4: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 1 1. The Happy Prince By Oscar Wilde 2. Shakespeare Sonnet 18
 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
unit 2
 

1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer

2. What Solo Travel Has Taught Me About the World – and Myself -ShivyaNath- Blogpost

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Note taking

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
unit 3
 

1. Thinking Like a Mountain

By Aldo Leopold

2. Short Text: On Cutting a Tree

By Gieve Patel

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Paragraph writing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
unit 4
 

1. Violence in the name of God is Violence against God

By Rev Dr Tveit

 

2. Poem: Holy Willie's Prayer

By Robert Burns

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
unit 5
 

1. The Story of B24

By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 2. Short Text: Aarushi Murder case 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
unit 6
 

1.Long text:My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

2. short text: Why You Should Never Aim for Six Packs

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
unit 7
 

1.Long Text: Sir Ranjth Singh- Essay by SouravGanguly

2. Short text: Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
visual text
 

Visual Text: Before the Flood

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addfitional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks online and 50 marks written exam

FRE121 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
Course Description:  “Latitudes 1”  A1/A2guides the learner in a process of acquisition.  This method leads naturally to communicate and to carry out tasks in French. Learning language skills goes hand in hand with discovering the socio-cultural realities specific to France and the Francophonie.
Course Objectives:  “Latitudes 1”A1/A2 is composed of 4 modules of 3 units. Each module has a general objective and more specific to define the linguistic knowledge with the help of which the learners will implement various skills such as to understand, to speak, to interact and to write. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Student will able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written French

CO2: Student will able to recognize the value of French language learning and francophone cultures through participation in a variety of activities.

CO3: Student will able to demonstrate language learning skills and strategies as cognitive and social development.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Parler de soi - Salut!
 

o   Salutation

o    Getting acquainted with people

o    Introducing oneself

o    Excusing oneself

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Enchante
 
  • Asking someone to introduce himself/herself
  •  Introducing someone
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
J?adore
 

o   Expressing one’s tastes

o   Speaking about one’s plans

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Echanger - Tu veux bien
 

o   Asking  someone to do something

o   Asking politely

o   speaking about past actions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
On se voit quand ?
 

o   proposing, accepting, refusing an invitation

o   Indicate the date

o   Fixing an appointment

o   asking and specifying time

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Bonne Idee
 

o   Expressing one’s positive and negative point of view                 

o   finding out rates

o   asking about quantity

o   expressing quantity

Text Books And Reference Books:

Latitudes 1 Methode de Français A1/A2 , Regine Merieux , Yves Loiseau

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     French websites like Duolingo, Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Quiz/ self-introduction and introducing someone

10%

 

CIA 2 – Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 –  poster making / Role play

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Evaluation Pattern:

(CIA1:20 marks + CIA2:50 marks + CIA3:20 marks)/2 + Attendance: 5 marks + End Sem: 50 marks

 

 

 

GER121 - GERMAN (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • Course Description: This course mainly deals with the listening, speaking, writing, reading modules of basic German by using different pedagogies and effective strategies in order to meet the requirements of various situations. This course also enables the students to have cross-cultural competencies and cognitive skills. Students will learn how to introduce themselves. Students will be able to create a profile in internet. Students will be able to describe the way and ask for the specific location. Students will be able to have a conversation in Restaurant. Students will be able to schedule an appointment on phone. Students will be able to talk about birthdays.

 

Course Objectives:

·       To achieve language proficiency skills on the basic level

     To develop the skills demonstrated in the ability to interpret simple text

     To attain some transcultural competency: an awareness of cross-cultural differences between societies.

     To develop the ability to formulate basic questions

 

 

     

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Through this course student should be able to Introduce him/herself and others as well as ask others about themselves

CO2: Understand and use familiar, everyday expressions and very simple sentences related to the basic needs.

CO3: Recall the words and communicate in a very simple manner

CO4: Write simple phrases related to personal details.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Guten Tag
 

Grüßen und verabschieden, sich und andere vorstellen, über sich und andere sprechen, Zahlen bis 20, Telefonnummer und E-mail-Adresse nennen, buchstabieren, über Länder und Sprachen sprechen.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Freunde, Kollegen und ich
 

über Hobbys, sich verabreden, Berufe und Arbeitszeiten sprechen, Wochentage benennen, über Arbeit, Zahlen ab 20 nennnen, über Jahreszeiten sprechen, ein Profil im Internet erstellen. Artikel der, die, das, verben und Personalpronomen II, Ja-/Nein- Frage, Plural der Substantive, die verben haben und sein.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
In Hamburg
 

Plätze und Gebäude benennen, fragen zu Orten stellen, Texte einer Bildergeschichte zuordnen, Dinge erfragen, Verkehrsmittel benennen, nach dem Weg fragen und einen Weg beschreiben, Texte mit internationalen Wörtern verstehen, Artikel lernen. Bestimmter Artikel: der, die, das, unbestimmter Artikel: ein, eine, ein, Negationsartikel: kein, keine, kein, Imperativ mit Sie.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Guten Appetit
 

über essen sprechen, einen Einkauf planen, Gespräche beim Essen führen, mit W-fragen Texte verstehen, Wörter ordnen und lernen, Positionen im Satz, Akkusativ, Verben mit Akkusativ.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Tag für Tag
 

Die Uhrzeit verstehen und nennen, Zeitangaben machen, über die Familie sprechen, sich verabreden, sich für eine Verspätung entschuldigen, einen Termin telefonisch vereinbaren. Zeitangaben mit am, um, von.... bis, possessiveartikel: mein, dein..., Modalverben im Satz: Satzklammer, Modalverben müssen, können und wollen.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Zeit mit Freunden
 

Etwas gemeinsam planen, über Geburtstage sprechen, eine Einladung verstehen und schreiben, im Restaurant bestellen und bezahlen, über ein Ereignis sprechen, bestimmte Informationen in Texten finden, Veranstaltungstipps im Radio verstehen. Datumsangaben: am ...., trennbare Verben, Präposition für + Akkusativ mich, dich ..., Präteritum von haben und sein.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Netzwerk neu Deutsch als Fremdsprache A1 Textbook, workbook, glossar and 2cd ‘s by Stefanie dengler, Paul rusch, Helenschmitz, Tanja sieber, klett -Langenscheidt publishers

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

1.     Studio d A1 set of three books and CD by Herr Mann Funk, Cornelsen publishers

2.     Deutsch Sprachlehre für Ausländer and Glossar Deutsch-English by Heinz Griesbach-Dora Schulz, Max Hueber publishers

3.     Deutsch für den Beruf text book by adelheid h, Max Hueber publishers

4.     Deutsch für den Beruf work book by adelheid h, Max Hueber publishers

5.     Grammatik intensiv trainer A1 Deutsch – Langenscheidt by Mark lester, larry beason, langenscheid publishers

6.     Fit für Goethe Zetifikat A1 start Deutsch 1 by Johaness Gerbes, Frau ke van der Werff, Hueber publishers

7.     Learn german through games and activities level1 Deutsch als Fremdsprache/Kursbuch und Arbeitsbuch and CD by Sabine Emmerich & Federica Colombo, eli publishers

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Quiz / Introduction

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Role Play /Assignment Ex:  Describe the house / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

KAN121Y - FOUNDATIONAL KANNADA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: It is a thirty hours course. Students will be exposed to the use of Kannada Language both in oral and written forms. In the introductory sessions Kannada alphabets, words, simple sentence writing and basic grammar will be taught. At the end of the course students will be able to Read, Write and Speak in Kannada Language

Course Objective:
•    To enable students to communicate in the State Language Kannada.  
•    Helps the students, particularly coming from other states in their day to day conversations.
•    The course mainly focusses on Conversational Kannada and writing Kannada.

Course Outcome

CO1: On completion of the course, students will be able to read and write in Kannada.

CO2: Students will be exposed to Kannada Reading, Writing, and speaking language skills.

CO3: Students will be aware of the culture and heritage of Karnataka.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
TOPIC -1
 

Kannada Varnamale- Swargalu, Sandhyakshara, Anuswara & Visarga              

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Topic - 2
 

Vargeeya Vyanjana, Anunasikagalu 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Topic 3
 

Avargeeya Vyanjana, Ottakshargalu

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Topic - 1
 

Kaagunitha

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Topic - 1
 

1.     Parts of Speech: Noun, Pronoun, Verb, Conjunction, Interjection,

Exclamatory.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Topic - 1
 

Linga, Vachana, Vibhakti Pratyagalu 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Topic - 1
 

Verb Root, Verb- Past and Non Past

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:9
Topic - 1
 

Sentence making, Translation & Question form, Negation, Opposite words

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:9
Topic - 2
 

Comprehension, Letter Writing

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Kannada Alphabets, Number, Days Chart

2. Thili Kannada - K S Madhusudana, H N  Muralidharan

3. Spoken Kannada for Absolute Beginners - Sanjay D

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Spoken Kannada for Absolute Beginners - Sanjay D

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 Alphabets (Vowels and Consonats), Otthakshara, Kagunitha. 10%

CIA-2 Noun, Verb, Number, Gender, Tense, Days, Name of Things. 15%

CIA-3  Conversation Practice, Vachana, Opposite Word, Sentance making (Animals, Birds, Vegetables, things) Translation, Letter Writing. 15% 

Attendance 10%

End Semester Exam:

Question Paper Pattern

·       Section A - Test of linguistic ability through grammar components –15 marks

·       Section B - Test of translating abilities and comprehension, short answers - 15 marks

·       Section C - Test of writing skills / Originality in letter writing, dialogue and essay

writing – 20 marks 

SDPS112 - SOCIAL SENSITIVITY SKILLS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:0
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The course aims at equipping the students to acquire social sensitivity skills by focusing on inculcating self awareness, personal integrity, adaptability and harmonious living that are aligned with graduate attributes and echo our university motto (excellence and service)

 

Course Objectives

The course provides scope to improve self awareness of students.

  • It equips the students with skills to adapt to dynamic environment.
  • It equips the students with skills to be as individual with personal integrity.
  • It equips the students with skills to be in harmony with nature

Course Outcome

CO1: Explore their strength and weaknesses

CO2: Adapt themselves to the ever emerging social challenges

CO3: Act as individuals with personal integrity and social harmony

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Adaptability
 

Acclimatization, Law Abidance, Civic Sense, etc.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Personal Integrity
 

Academic Honesty, Assuming Responsibility, Healthy and Hygiene practices, etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Harmonious Living
 

Respecting Diversity, Cross-Cultural Recognition, Environmental sensitivity, etc.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Self-Awareness
 

Introspection & Reflective exercises, SWOC Analysis, Self-Confidence and Self-Esteem

Text Books And Reference Books:

News papers, Research articles and materials shared during sessions.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Relevant topics covered in Text books prescribed for core subjects.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation  Criteria 

1 mark

2 marks

3 marks

4 marks

5 marks

Class involvement

Poor

Satisfactory  

Good 

Active involvement

Active involvement and engaging the class

Demonstration of skill

Poor

Satisfactory  

Adequate

Good 

Excellent demonstration

 

SPA121 - SPANISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description:

To teach verbal communication through grammar, vocabulary and exercises.

Teaching of language to form sentences and progress towards paragraph writing.

Teaching of language for dialogue writing in given situation presenting oneself

To talk about daily routine

Telling the time

Comprehension

Speaking skills

Course Outcome

CO1: Learn to communicate through grammar, vocabulary and exercises.

CO2: To learn general vocabulary and technical terminologies related to hotel management.

CO3: Enable the student to speak in a given situation.

CO4: To express themselves and comprehend through dialogues.

CO5: To answer questions, give and take orders.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 1
 

Reflexive verbs

Conjugations

Uses: sentences

Daily routine

Telling time

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 2
 

Dialogue Writing

In the cafeteria

At the restaurant

In the class

At the bus station, etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3
 

Irregular verb conjugation

Uses: sentences

Conditional tense for being more courteous and polite

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit 4
 

Uses of auxiliary verbs

Conjugation

Sentences

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Unit 5
 

Gerunds

Uses

Conjugation

Auxiliary verbs for gerunds

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dictionary, preferably Collins, 501Verb Conjugation Book from Barron’s, Aula 01, Suena 01, Pasaporte 01.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

**

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assesment and the final marks will be sent ito the Examination office.

AEN221 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The second semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Srilanka. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

 

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

 

Course Outcome

CO1 CO 2: iv) Understand the cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities of India v) it will be able to be analytical and critical of the pluralistic society they live in through the activities and assignments conducted vi) be aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Jayanta Mahapatra    “Grandfather”

 

2.      Meena Alexander    “Rites of Sense”

 

3.      K.Satchidanandan      “Cactus”

 

4.      Jean Arasanayagam   “Nallur”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Temsula Ao             “The Journey”

 

2.      A. K Ramanujan       “Annaya’s Anthropology”

 

3.      Sundara Ramswamy   “Waves”

 

4.      Ashfaq Ahmed            “Mohsin Mohalla”

 

5.      T.S Pillai                      “In the Floods”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Salman Rushdie        “Gandhi Now”

 

2.      Amartya Sen             “Sharing the World”

 

3.      Suketu Mehta            “Country of the No”

 

4.      Rahul Bhattacharya     “Pundits From Pakistan” (An Excerpt)

Text Books And Reference Books:

The textbook "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Online references for Comprehension Questions in the textbook

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Classroom assignment/test for 20 marks keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.


Question Paper Pattern        

Mid Semester Exam: 2 Hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 5 x 5 = 25

Section B: 5 x 15= 75

Total                   100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BBF212 - SERVICE LEARNING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Service-learning is an experiential learning pedagogy which happens outside the classrooms wherein students learn and develop civic knowledge and skills by actively participating in activities connected to a social cause. In order to nurture student's holistic development and to make an effective contribution to the society in a dynamic environment, the Department of Professional Studies, has introduced Service learning as a skill based 30 hours 2 credit course in the second semester of undergraduate programme.

The five components of the course include investigation, planning & preparation, action & reciprocity, reflection, demonstration of results and celebration. Students will be divided in to small groups under a faculty mentor who will guide and monitor the service-learning activities undertaken by each group. Each group will identify an activity focusing on some needs of the community which they will undertake and complete during the second semester. At the end of the semester, the students must prepare a report on the work done and also make a presentation using multimedia in which they will highlight their individual research and the project itself.

Course Outcome

CO1: Exhibit greater sense of what it means to be in community and act with integrity

CO2: Able to identify community needs

CO3: Demonstrate skills and knowledge learned

CO4: Demonstrate flexibility and adaptability in working with community issues

CO5: Display competence and comfort when interacting with diverse groups

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Service learning
 

The five components of the course include investigation, planning & preparation, action & reciprocity, reflection, demonstration of results and celebration. Students will be divided in to small groups under a faculty mentor who will guide and monitor the service-learning activities undertaken by each group. Each group will identify an activity focusing on some needs of the community which they will undertake and complete during the second semester. At the end of the semester, the students must prepare a report on the work done and also make a presentation using multimedia in which they will highlight their individual research and the project itself. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Since this is a practical course, there are no essential references

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Since this is a practical course, there are no recommended references

Evaluation Pattern

This course has 2 credits and carries 50 marks.  The marks are awarded as follows:

1. Project Report : 20 

2. Presentation and Viva: 25 

3. Attendance: 5 

(Total : 50 marks)  

BBF231 - ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course extends the learners’ knowledge in Financial Accounting by providing them with an overview of the legal requirements for the presentation of financial statements for Indian companies with respect to various forms of corporate reorganisations and special circumstances, internal reconstruction through capital reduction, business combinations, holding companies, and liquidation of companies.

Course Outcome

CO1: Be familiar with the statutory provisions and accounting treatment regarding bonus issue and buy back of equity shares

CO2: Understand the meaning, statutory provisions and accounting treatment of redemption of preference shares and debentures

CO3: Record accounting entries giving effect to a scheme of capital reduction, and prepare the reconstructed Balance Sheet of a company.

CO4: Compute purchase consideration and account for business combinations in the books of the transferor and transferee companies.

CO5: Prepare a Consolidated Balance Sheet for a holding company with a single subsidiary after accounting for various inter-company adjustments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Alteration of share capital
 

Bonus Shares: meaning; characteristics of bonus shares; circumstances for issue; statutory provisions, including SEBI guidelines; reserves available/ not available for issue of bonus shares; accounting treatment.

Equity shares with differential rights, Introduction to accounting for employee stock options, Buyback of equity shares: meaning; advantages; limitations prescribed under the Companies Act, 2013; transfer to Capital Redemption Reserve; accounting treatment; preparation of Balance Sheet after buyback

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Redemption of preference shares and debentures
 

Redemption of preference shares: statutory provisions; arranging for cash for the purpose of redemption, including fresh issue of shares; transfer to Capital Redemption Reserve; treatment regarding premium on redemption; preparation of Balance Sheet after redemption.

Redemption of debentures: liability to create Debenture Redemption Reserve (DRR); investment of DRR; methods of redemption—payment in lump sum, payment in installments, purchase in open market; simple problems

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Capital reduction and internal reconstruction
 

Meaning of capital reduction; statutory provisions, Problems on accounting for a scheme of internal reconstruction based on capital reduction, including re-organization through surrender of shares, Preparation of Balance Sheet after reconstruction

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:16
Accounting for business combinations
 

Introduction; meaning of business combinations; accounting procedure, Computation of purchase consideration, Accounting entries in the books of the acquirer /transferor and acquirer/transferee companies