CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

School of Social Sciences

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Psychology, English)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN121 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
ENG122 DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 50
EST131Y BRITISH LITERATURE: ANGLO-SAXON TO EARLY VICTORIAN Core Courses 4 4 100
EST151Y BRITISH LITERATURE: ANGLO-SAXON TO EARLY VICTORIAN-PORTFOLIO Core Courses 2 2 50
EST161Y NARRATIVE MODES-I Generic Elective 3 3 100
FRE121 FRENCH - 3 3 100
GER121 GERMAN Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
KAN121Y FOUNDATIONAL KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2 0 100
PSY111Y ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 50
PSY131Y BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESS-I Core Courses 4 4 100
PSY151Y BASIC RESEARCH METHODS AND PRACTICALS IN PSYCHOLOGY-I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2 2 50
SPA121 SPANISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 0 100
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN221 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH - 3 3 100
ENG222 DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - II - 3 3 100
EST231Y BRITISH LITERATURE: LATE VICTORIAN TO THE PRESENT - 4 4 100
EST251Y BRITISH LITERATURE: LATE VICTORIAN TO THE PRESENT-PORTFOLIO - 1 2 50
EST261Y NARRATIVE MODES-II - 3 3 100
FRE221 FRENCH - 3 3 100
GER221 GERMAN - 3 3 100
PSY211Y LIFESKILL EDUCATION - 2 2 50
PSY231Y BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESS-II - 4 4 100
PSY241AY BASICS OF PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY - 3 3 100
PSY241BY CAREER GUIDANCE AND LAY COUNSELLING - 3 3 100
PSY241CY STRESS MANAGEMENT - 3 3 100
PSY251Y BASIC RESEARCH METHODS AND PRACTICALS IN PSYCHOLOGY-II - 2 2 50
SPA221 SPANISH - 3 3 100
  

Department Overview:

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

Total                   50

Examination And Assesments

CIA (Continuous Internal Assessment)-Total Marks- 50

CIA-1: Activity-based Individual Assignment- 10 Marks

CIA-2: Mid sem Exam-Case/Scenario-based Question- 25 Marks-2 hourS; Department level

CIA-3: Individual Assignment- 10 Marks

Attendance- 5 Marks

AEN121 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Additional English course is offered as a second language course and seeks to introduce the students to the nuances of English literature in its varied forms and genres. The students who choose Additional English are generally proficient in the English language. Hence, instead of focusing on introducing them to language, challenging texts in terms of ideas, form, and technique are chosen. Additional English as a course is designed for students in place of a regional language. Non-Resident Indians (NRIs), foreign nationals and students who have not taken Hindi, Kannada, Tamil or French at the Plus 2 or Class XII levels are eligible to choose Additional English. The course is taught for students from different streams, namely, BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA in the first year and for BA, BSc and BCom (Regular) in the second year.

The first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian and Indian sub-continental voices in English in English translation for the Additional English students of the first year. This effort aims to familiarize the students with regional literatures in translation, Indian Writing in English (IWE) and literatures from Pakistan, Nepal and Srilanka, thereby, enabling the students to learn more about Indian culture and ethos through writings from different regions of the country. We have tried to represent in some way or the other the corners of India and the Indian sub-continent in this microcosmic world of short stories, poems and essays

 

There is a prescribed text bookfor the first year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

The first semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Nepal. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. An important addition to this syllabus is the preponderance of North-Eastern writing which was hitherto not well represented. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

  

 

Course Outcome

CO1 CO 2: iv) Understand the cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities of India v) it will be able to be analytical and critical of the pluralistic society they live in through the activities and assignments conducted vi) be aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Keki N Daruwala     “Migrations”

 

2.      Kamala Das            “Forest Fire”

 

3.      Agha Shahid Ali      “Snow on the Desert”

 

4.      Eunice D Souza       “Marriages are Made”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Rabindranath Tagore    “Babus of Nayanjore”

 

2.      Ruskin Bond  “He said it with Arsenic”

 

3.      Bhisham Sahni       “The Boss Came to Dinner”

 

4.      N. Kunjamohan Singh    “The Taste of Hilsa”

 

5.      Mohan Thakuri                “Post Script”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Mahatma Gandhi       “What is True Civilization?” (Excerpts from Hind Swaraj)

 

2.      Ela Bhatt                    “Organising for Change”

 

3.      Sitakant Mahapatra     “Beyond the Ego: New Values for a Global Neighborhood

 

4.      B R Ambedkar             “Waiting for A Visa”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Contemporary knowledge of the soci-political situation in the sub-continent

The text book copy "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

On-line resources to appreciate the text through the Comprehension Questions

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  Classroom assignment for 20 marks keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

Total                   50

ENG122 - DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Academic Skills are a blend of theoretical ability to recognize the nuances of language aspects and hands-on training to exercise the acquired knowledge in reasoning, reading and writing. Academic Skills focus on developing research skills through careful reading and critical writing that are considered foundational and crucial in textual scholarship and knowledge production. The participants of this course will determine their areas of interest in conceptualizing their seminal work and constructing a reasoned argument. This course prompts the participants to take their learning-receptive skills and productive skills in a purpose-driven and practice-oriented mode on a contextual basis.

The course deals with receptive skills (reading) and productive skills (writing). In fact listening and speaking skills are not directly involved but act as a higher cognitive process. This course facilitates the participants with varied practices, tasks, exemplars, sample papers to practice with context-driven reading material. It runs for one full academic year with specific learning outcomes which are two-fold – conceptual grasp and textual application. The whole course and its structure involve Bloom’s taxonomy of knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, evaluation and synthesis.

Objectives

To enable the learner

       acquire higher order receptive and productive skills

       develop reading skills at the higher education level

       be aware of functional grammar to improve research writing skills

       grasp and apply the mechanics in academic writing skills

       use study skills for research-based knowledge dissemination (writing a paper or presentation)

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Awareness of different approaches to knowledge, a critical and creative bent of mind that leads to a content-based investigation.

CO2: Working knowledge of different purposes of writing, especially persuasive (argumentative), analytical, and informative writings paves the way for research-based reading and writing.

CO3: Application of functional grammar and mechanics that enhance conceptual clarity, communicative style, and style of writing

CO4: Hands-on experience in a research culture which is discipline-specific in nature

CO5: Experiential learning through participatory learning and service learning

CO6: Awareness of problem-based learning and need-based learning

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Basic skills
 

To enable learners to fine tune their expressions through better choice of words and sentence structures with clarity of idea.

       Expanding vocabulary, spelling nuances, refreshing grammar, avoiding common errors and pitfalls, learning sentence structures, and use of punctuation (mechanics).

       Use of dictionary

       Use of Word document tools

       Use of Library resources

       Concept mapping- mind mapping

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Reading skills
 

To enable students to develop appropriate reading comprehension skills through nuanced understanding of reading techniques.

       Previewing

       Reading for Main Ideas

       Using Contexts for Vocabulary

       Skimming/Scanning for Details

       Making Inferences

       Restating

       Phrasing

                                                                       

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Study Skills
 

To enable students to use basic study skills to organize knowledge received and to streamline their ideas into appropriate academic discourse.

 

       Understanding the text

       Critical thinking

       Mnemonics

o   Introduction to the need for mnemonics?

o   Memory organisation through pegging practices

o    Word, acronym, models, note cards, images, etc

 

 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Language skills
 

to enable students to understand and appreciate different kinds of literature and express their understanding in the form of short paragraphs or essays

       Language focus

       Literary appreciation- language devices-literary devices

       Grammar-university grammar (functional grammar)

       Sentence structure

       Vocabulary

       Use of Formal and informal language

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Listening Skills
 

To enable students to listen to lectures and take notes and organize these to discuss or write about concepts or show application of knowledge

       Listening Skills

       Concept Building

       Approaches to LS

       Features of LS

       Function

       Importance of LS at university level education

       Practical sessions

 

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Critical Reading
 

To enable students to develop the art of critical reading through close reading formulas

 

       Pre-reading

       Annotating

       Outlining

       Summarizing

       Finding oppositions

       Inventoring

       Identifying thesis and related arguments

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
portfolio organisation
 

Set of hours for application

Exemplars

(Self Study Learning, Portfolio Building, teaching on Formative and Summative assessment mode, Problem Based Learning modules and project Submission)

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Langan, J. (1995). English Skills With Reading (3rd Ed.). McGraw Hill. New York.

2.      Osmond, A. (2013). Academic Writing and Grammar for Students. Sage. Los Angeles.

3.      Robitaille, J. and Connelly, R. (2002).  Writer’s Resource: From Paragraph to Essay. Thomson Heinle. Australia.

Please note that the teacher in charge will also be bringing in authentic material to the class apart from the books mentioned in the reference.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Please note that the teacher in charge will also be bringing in authentic material to the class apart from the books mentioned in the reference. (through google classroom) 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (weightage) = 50 marks

 

ESE (weight) = 50 marks

 

 

CIA I – 20 MARKS- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit I

CIA II- 50 Marks- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit I and II

CIA III- 20 Marks- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit III

Internal Assessment Breakup:

CIA I -10 Marks

CIA II- 25 Marks

CIA III- 10 Marks

Attendance- 5 Marks

End Sem- 50 Marks Portfolio Submission

 

EST131Y - BRITISH LITERATURE: ANGLO-SAXON TO EARLY VICTORIAN (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will serve as an introductory course for British Literature. The course will locate the texts in their respective socio-political and historical contexts. The selection aims to introduce different genres of British literature.

Course Objectives

  • To introduce  students to the socio-political, religious, cultural, and linguistic aspects of the UK through English literary texts
  • To help students understand texts as products of a historical, political and cultural processes
  • To enable students to identify different forms, genres and subgenres in literature
  • To sensitize students to human values through an exposure to socio-historical concerns of subjectivity, identity, community and nationhood.
  • To sharpen critical appreciation and analytical writing skills through an introduction to models of literary criticism.

Course Outcome

C01: Students will be able to discern the socio-political, religious, cultural, and linguistic aspects of the UK through English literary texts.

CO2: Students will be able to analyse and critique texts as products of a historical, political and cultural processes.

CO3: Students will be able to identify different forms, genres and sub-genres in literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
The Anglo-Saxon Period
 

Emergence of English language, History of England from 42 BC to Norman Conquest- salient features.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
The Medieval Period
 

Impact of Norman rule on English social structure, English language in the medieval period, mystery, morality plays and miracle plays, feudalism

Chaucer: The Prioress from Prologue to The Canterbury Tales.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The Renaissance Period and after
 

Protestantism, Bible translation, religious literature, humanism, English Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo Styles

William Shakespeare:         

Sonnet 116

‘O that this too solid flesh would melt” Soliloquy by Hamlet in Hamlet Act 1 Scene 2

‘To Be or Not To Be’ Soliloquy by Hamlet in Hamlet Act 3 Scene 1

 Francis Bacon: “Of Truth”

John Donne: “Canonization”

John Milton: Excerpt from Satan’s speech in Book 1, Paradise Lost

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Reformation, Restoration and after
 

Metaphysical Poetry, Epic conventions, Mock epic, Puritanism, Restoration, Rise of the novel, the English novel in the eighteenth century, Gunpowder plot, Oliver Cromwell,

Dissolving the parliament, Periodical essays, empiricism, Influence of French culture through restoration, the enlightenment

 

John Dryden:  First three stanzas of “Mac Flecknoe”

Alexander Pope: Belinda’s Boudoir from The Rape of the Lock

Addison and Steele: “Character of Will Wimble”

Oliver Goldsmith: “Beau Tibbs”

Oliver Goldsmith: She Stoops to Conquer or Christopher Marlowe: Dr. Faustus

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Romantic and early Victorian Age
 

Romanticism, notion of literary creation and poets, closet drama, the French Revolution, Victorian morality, industrial revolution, utilitarianism, rise of nation-states, impact of colonialism on England, emergence of universal education in England

William Wordsworth: “Lines Written in Early Spring”

S.T. Coleridge: “Christabel”

Shelley: “Ode to the Westwind”

Keats: “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”

Charles Lamb: “Dream Children”

Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. For all texts, Norton Editions are to be treated as the official prescribed editions.
  2. For critical material The Cambridge Companion Series of CUP, Case Book Series of Macmillan and Palgrave, and Norton series of WW Norton are officially prescribed.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 8th Ed. New York: Wardworth, 2005. Print.

Ferguson, Margaret, Mary Jo Salter and Jon Stallworthy. Eds. The Norton Anthology of Poetry. 4th Ed. New York: WW Norton, 1996. Print

Gordden, Malcom, and Michael Lapidge. The Cambridge Companion to Old English Literature. Rpt Cambridge: CUP, 2006. Print.

Gupta, Ambika Sen. Selected College Poems. Rpt. Hyderabad: Orient Longman,             1999.

Herman, Daniel. The Cambridge Companion to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2007. Print.

John, Eileen, and Dominic McIver Lopes. Philosophy of Literature: Contemporary and Classic Readings. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004. Print

Maxwell, Richard, and Katie Trumpener. The Cambridge Companion to Fiction in the Romantic Period. Cambridge: CUP, 2008. Print

Sampson, George.The Concise Cambridge History of English Literature, 3rd Ed. Cambridge: CUP, 2005. Print

Ramarao, Vimala. Ed.Explorations. Vol I. Bangalore: Prasaranga, Bangalore University, 2004. Print

Shingle, Michael. Daniel Defoe Robinson Crusoe. New York: WW Norton, 1994. Print

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

  1. group presentations on topics relevant to British literature/Art and literary movements
  2. an exhibition/display based on different eras, movements and literary and non-literary genres

 

CIA III will be a moddle test on the Novel

 

These are suggested examples of CIAs. However, during the course of teaching, there could be other suggestions, and CIAs could be slightly modified based on class dynamics and calibre of students.

 

Selected Texts chosen to be taught may be revised / used as extended reading which may be tested in CIA 1, 2 or 3. Example: only 1 soliloquy may be taught.

 

Mid Semester Examination CIA II: 2 Hours

 

Section A: Short Notes – 5x3marks= 15 (5 questions out of 7)

Section B: Essay Questions – 2x10 marks = 20 (2 questions out of 3)

Section C: Long Essay Questions – 1x15 marks = 15 (1 question out of 2)

 

Total: 50 Marks

 

End Semester Examination: 3 Hours

 

Section A: Short Notes – 10x3 marks = 30 (10 questions out of 12)

Section B: Essay Questions – 4x10 marks = 40 (4 questions out of 6)

Section C: Long Essay Questions – 2x15 marks = 30 (2 questions out of 4)

 

Total: 100 Marks

EST151Y - BRITISH LITERATURE: ANGLO-SAXON TO EARLY VICTORIAN-PORTFOLIO (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Portfolio is a practical course. Students are expected to display their understanding of the literary history, terminologies and major literary movements chronologically in writing. A portfolio is a written submission of analytical work of a selected literary period in a given format. This will demonstrate how students have developed their critical and analytical skills from the literary texts and supporting materials.    

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
The Anglo-Saxon Period
 

Emergence of English language, History of England from 42 BC to Norman Conquest- salient features.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
The Medieval Period
 

Impact of Norman rule on English social structure, English language in the medieval period, mystery, morality plays and miracle plays, feudalis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Renaissance Period and After
 

Protestantism, Bible translation, religious literature, humanism, English Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo Styles.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Reformation, Restoration and after
 

Metaphysical Poetry, Epic conventions, Mock epic, Puritanism, Restoration, Rise of the novel, the English novel in the eighteenth century, Gunpowder plot, Oliver Cromwell, dissolving the parliament, Periodical essays, empiricism, Influence of French culture through restoration, the enlightenmen.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Romantic and early Victorian Age