CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

School of Social Sciences

Syllabus for
BSc (Psychology/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BPSY101-1 PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BPSY102-1 BASIC STATISTICS IN PSYCHOLOGY Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BPSY121-1 FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY Allied Core Courses 4 4 100
BPSY161-1 ACADEMIC WRITING-I Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2 50
BPSY411-1 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-I Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2 50
BS141 COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO142 ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG184-1 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST141B READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST142B GLOBAL ETHICS AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS141 ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED142 UNDERSTANDING THE LANGUAGE OF CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED143 DEMOCRACY AND MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL142 GLOBAL POWER POLITICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL143 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BPSY101-2 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BPSY121-2 MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY Allied Core Courses 4 4 100
BPSY201-2 QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
BPSY411-2 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-II Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2 50
BPSY461-2 NEUROANATOMY LAB Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2 50
BS141 GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
BS142 TOURISM, CULTURE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO144 DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
ENG184-2 LANGUAGE AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST141 READING THE CITY: BANGALORE HISTORIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST142 READING THE CYBERSPACE: THE PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS142 RELIGION: PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS THROUGH AGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED141 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 POLITICS IN INDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
    

    

Introduction to Program:

The B.Sc. Psychology Honors program offered by CHRIST (Deemed to be University) is an initiative to meet the increasing demand for psychological understanding and application in diverse fields. Drawing upon the recommendations of the American Psychological Association, the British Psychological Society, and the University Grants Commission, this program integrates both natural sciences and social sciences disciplines, requiring students to take courses from these two broad disciplines. The course structure is designed to enable students to think critically and creatively and investigate how human beings interact with the environment through the modalities of Mind, Body, and Behaviour. To this end, courses are offered from disciplines such as Biotechnology, Biochemistry, Computer Science, Engineering, and Social Sciences.

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Demonstrate their academic knowledge and domain expertise

PO2: Synthesize their understanding through self-reflection, psychological assessment, and research

PO3: Recognize the significance of the interdisciplinary inquiry

PO4: Analyze and enhance their personal abilities

PO5: Promote teamwork and leadership skills

PO6: Employ professional communication for scholastic and co-scholastic activities

PO7: Apply psychological knowledge for sculpting their career

PO8: Promote self, social, and environmental awareness

Assesment Pattern

CIA 1: Individual Assignments (Reflective essays, Scrap books, Report Writings, etc.)

 

CIA 2: Mid-Semester Examination(Written Examination)

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

 

CIA 3: Group Assignments (Research proposals,Surveys, Field Studies, Interventions,Exhibitions, etc.)

 

ESE: End Semester Examination (Written Examination)

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

Examination And Assesments

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attd

ESE

20

25

20

05

30

BPSY101-1 - PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description 

This course is about the study of basic psychological processes. It is an introductory paper that gives an overall understanding of the field of Psychology. It also introduces students to the key concepts, perspectives, theories, and subfields in psychology. It focuses on various mechanisms underlying human behavior. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Comprehend the characteristics that make psychology a science.

CO2: Analyze the process of sensation and perception through various theoretical frameworks.

CO3: Interpret fundamental processes underlying human behavior through case studies, role play, etc.

CO 4: Relate and apply various psychological concepts and approaches to their real life situations.

CO 5: Reflect and evaluate individual differences.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Psychology
 

Definition and goals of Psychology; Psychology as a science; Historical foundations of Psychology; Contemporary perspectives in psychology; Methods of research; Ethics in psychological research.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Consciousness, Sensation and Perception
 

Consciousness – Definition; Sleep and dreams; Altering consciousness – hypnosis, meditation, biofeedback and drugs;

Definitions; Absolute and difference threshold; Signal detection theory; Sensory adaptation;Perception: Understanding perception, Gestalt laws of organization, Perceptual constancy - depth perception, size perception, perception of movement;

Various sensory modalities; Extrasensory perception.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Learning
 

Learning – Definitions; Classical conditioning – experiments, extinction, spontaneous recovery, generalization, discrimination, higher order conditioning; Operant conditioning – Thorndike’s law of effect, basics of operant conditioning, Reinforcement and Punishment, Schedules of reinforcement; Cognitive learning: Latent learning, Observational learning and Insight learning.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Motivation and Emotion
 

Motivation –Meaning, Approaches: instinct, drive reduction, arousal, incentive, cognitive, humanistic;

Types of motivation - physiological Motivation (Hunger, Thirst, Sex)and psychological motivation (Achievement, Affiliation and Power) Emotion: Meaning, Physiological basis of emotions; Theories – James-Lange Theory, Cannon-Bard theory, Cognitive theory;

Emotional expression, facial feedback hypothesis, facial-affect programme.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Psychology of Individual Differences
 

Concepts and nature of Individual differences; Nature vs. nurture;

Gender Difference in cognitive processes and social behavior;

Intelligence – Definition, Contemporary theories of intelligence; Tests of intelligence;

Emotional, Social and Spiritual intelligence.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baron, R. A. (2001). Psychology. New Delhi: Pearson Education India.

Nolen-Hoeksema, S., Fredrickson, B.L. & Loftus, G.R. (2014). Atkinson & Hilgard's Introduction to Psychology. 16th Ed. United Kingdom: Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Feldman, R. S. (2011). Understanding Psychology. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

Morgan, C. T., King, R. A., & Schopler, J. (2004). Introduction to Psychology. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

Kalat, J. W. (2016). Understanding Psychology. New York: Cengage Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attd

ESE

20

25

20

05

30

 

 

CIA 1: Individual Assignments (Reflective essays, Scrap books, Report Writings, etc.)

 

CIA 2: Mid-Semester Examination(Written Examination)

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

            Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

 

CIA 3: Group Assignments (Research proposals,Surveys, Field Studies, Interventions,Exhibitions, etc.)

 

ESE: End Semester Examination (Written Examination)

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

BPSY102-1 - BASIC STATISTICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to statistics in psychology. Statistics are essential in allowing us to assess whether or not an observed phenomenon might have occurred by chance alone. Additionally, we will read psychological journal articles that utilize the statistics we are learning so that we can see how psychologists use and write about statistics. Students will learn how to manually calculate, interpret and present data.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and explain basic concepts of statistics.

CO2: Describe the nature, purposes, and limitations of descriptive statistical techniques and manually calculate/draw and interpret.

CO3: Explain the concepts of inferences, hypothesis testing, and measures of statistical significance and manually calculate and interpret data using inferential statistics.

CO4: Describe the nature, purposes, and limitations of correlational and regression techniques and explain the nature, purposes, and limitations of various nonparametric statistical techniques and manually calculate and interpret various statistical techniques.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Statistics
 

Statistics: definition, functions, and uses in research; Basic concepts: variables; levels of measurement, hypotheses; The Normal Curve: characteristics, applications, Skewness, Kurtosis; population, and sampling.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Descriptive Statistics
 

Frequency distributions; Graphical representation – Bar graph, Pie chart, Line graphs, Histogram, Frequency polygon, Frequency curve, Ogive; Measures of Central Tendency: mean, median, mode – calculation, interpretation, uses; Measures of Variability: Range, Quartile Deviation, Average Deviation, Variance, Standard Deviation - calculation, interpretation, use.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Inferential Statistics
 

Hypothesis/Significance Testing; Errors in Significance Testing; Measuring Statistical Significance: Variance, Standard Deviation, Standard Error, Z-scores; t-test – One-sample t-test, Independent samples t-test, Paired samples t-test; One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Correlational and Non-parametric Statistics
 

Correlation and correlation coefficient; Scatter plot; Correlation methods: Pearson’s correlation, and Spearman’s rank correlation – Assumptions and Calculation; Overview of Regression analysis: Simple Linear Regression – calculation, interpretation, uses, Multiple Linear Regression, Logistic Regression. Difference between parametric and non-parametric statistics; Assumptions for non-parametric techniques; Types of Non-parametric tests: Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, Kruskal-Wallis test, Friedman’s test.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Gravetter, F. J., & Wallnau, L. B. (2014). Essentials of Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (8th ed.). Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Aron, A., Coups, E. J., & Aron, E. N. (2014). Statistics for Psychology (6th ed.). Pearson.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Howell, D. C. (2013). Statistics Methods for Psychology (8th ed.). Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attendance

ESE

20

25

20

05

30

 

BPSY121-1 - FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will provide a basic overview of human anatomy and physiology and how the various systems of the body function together. Taking an organ system approach, this course will highlight the structure-function relationships that maintain homeostasis in a healthy human body.  

Course Outcome

CO1: Elaborate the understanding of structural organization of maintaining life and homeostasis and communicate effectively in class discussions.

CO2: Demonstrate knowledge of the structure and function of different systems and disease related to it orally and written.

CO3: Explain differences in 4 basic tissue types in order to be able to predict tissue and organ function based on structure individually.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Levels of Organization
 

Cell and organelles, plasma membrane, mitochondria, golgi bodies, endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, centrioles, nucleus, ribosomes. Membrane transport, tissue, organ, and organism levels of organization.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to biomolecules and Metabolism
 

Carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, NA, vitamins & minerals, Enzymes – classification, models of action, enzyme activity, Carbohydrate metabolism: glycolysis, TCA, electron transport chain, Amino acid metabolism (transamination, deamination, decarboxylation), Fatty acid metabolism (digestion, cholesterol metabolism)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Systems of the body
 

Circulatory and lymphatic systems: Blood formed elements and functions, plasma and platelets; cardiovascular system, regulation of arterial blood pressure; lymphatic system, lymph nodes, thymus and spleen; body defenses and immunity, non-specific Immunity, specific Immunity and transfusion reactions. Digestive, Respiratory, and excretory system: Stages of digestion and absorption of nutrients, digestive enzymes, digestive pathway, and accessory organs. Physiology of respiration, control of breathing, lungs, gaseous exchange and transport. Excretory system and the kidneys, filtration, reabsorption, and secretion. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Support and movement
 

Skin, Muscle and Skeletal Systems; Skin – injuries wounds and aging; skeletal and muscle organization and physiology 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Neuroendocrinology
 

Neurotransmitters, receptors, signaling, and synapse. Hormones, functions, and homeostasis 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Agarwal, Cell Biology, Genetics, Molecular Biology, Evolution and Ecology. S Chand publicating, 2004. ISBN: 8121924421, 9788121924429

Sherwood, L. (2007). Human Physiology: From cells to systems. Sydney, Australia

Mader. S.S.(2004). Understanding human anatomy and physiology. McGraw-Hill Publication. Sue Longenbake

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

U. Satyanarayana and U. Chakrapani, Biochemistry. 3rd Ed. Books and Allied (P). Ltd. 1999.

B.Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell 5th ed., Garland Science, 2008, 608pp

Thomson/Brooks/Cole. Moini, J. (2012). Anatomy and physiology for health professionals.

 Sudbury, MA:  Martini, F. H., Nath, J. L., & Bartholomew, E. F. (2005). Anatomy and physiology. New York: Prentice Hall. 

 Dale Purves et al. Neuroscience. 5th Ed. Sinauer Associates, Inc. Publishers, MA, USA.

 

Siegel. Essential Neuroscience. 3rd Ed. Wolters Kluwer. PA, USA.

G.K.Pal (2017). Comprehensive text book of Medical Physiology. Vol.The Health Sciences Publisher. New Delhi.

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

MSE

CIA III

ESE

Attendance

20

30

20

25

5%

Individual Assignment - CIA – I (20 Marks)

Assignment description: Class test – 10 marks MCQs and 10 marks short answers

 

Group Assignment - CIA - III

Assignment description: Exhibition/ Model making/ posters

Illustration of hormonal / neurochemical component and discuss its significance in the context of the various systems of the body and their role in its function and dysfunction. To understand the significance of biomolecules/ neurochemicals in the structural and functional organization and homeostasis of the systems of the human body.

To appreciate their contribution in disease.

CIA 2: Mid-Semester Examination (Written Examination)

Pattern: Section A 5x02=10marks (outof 6)

             Section B 4x05=20marks (out of 5)

             Section C 1x10=10marks (out of 2)

             Section D 1x10=10marks (Compulsary)

ESE: End Semester Examination (Written Examination)

Pattern: Section A 5x02=10marks (outof 6)

             Section B 4x05=20marks (out of 5)

             Section C 1x10=10marks (out of 2)

 

             Section D 1x10=10marks (Compulsary)

 

BPSY161-1 - ACADEMIC WRITING-I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to improve students' scientific writing skills and presentation skills. To that end, students will work on article-based writing assignments, following the guidelines of the 7th edition of the American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual. Also, students will work on journal articles and poster-making presentation assignments.

Course Outcome

CO1: Read research articles accurately, being able to abstract their essential ideas and understand their implications.

CO2: Write concisely and objectively using APA format, the standard of our field.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Organizing and Developing Your Ideas and Writing
 

Formulating your ideas; Assessing your sources; How to conduct a literature search; How to read and summarize a Journal Article.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Scholarly Writing and Elements of Style
 

Types of Articles and Papers; Ethical, Legal and Professional standards in Publishing; Paper Elements and Format; Effective Scholarly Writing; Grammar and Usage. Bias-free Language guidelines; Mechanics of Style; Tables and Figures; Works Credited in the Text; Reference List and Examples.

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Psychological Association. (2019). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (7th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Beins, B. C., & Beins, A. M. (2020). Effective writing in psychology: Papers, posters, and presentations (3rd ed.). John Wiley & Sons.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Hartley, J. (2008). Academic Writing and Publishing: A Practical Guide, New York: Taylor and Francis.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignment worksheet/Lab reports

Case study/Exhibition/Activity

Presentation/Quiz/Objective tests/worksheets

15

15

20

 

 

BPSY411-1 - EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course will introduce students to various famous experiments used in the field of psychology such as, psychophysics, intelligence, learning and sensation perception. It will make students understand how experimental methods are applied to study psychological phenomena and the processes that underlie it. They will learn how to conduct experiments in a controlled setting and write accurate reports.

 

Course Objectives: By the end of the course the learner should be able to:

CO1: Understand various experiments in psychology.

CO2: Demonstrate effective conduction of experiments.

CO3: Prepare reports for experiments

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand various experiments in psychology.

CO2: Demonstrate effective conduction of experiments.

CO3: Prepare reports for experiments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Experimental Psychology
 

Definition of experimental psychology; History and evolution of experimental psychology; Experiment conduction skills; Report writing.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Conduction of Experiments and Report Writing
 

Sensation: Method of Minimal Changes to determine AL (Two Point Threshold)

Perception: Method of Average Error: Muller -Lyer Illusion

Learning: Bilateral Transfer Learning: Whole vs Partial Learning

Memory: Level of Processing

Memory: Serial Position Curve

Text Books And Reference Books:

Myers, A., & Hansen, C. (2006). Experimental psychology. Thomson Wadsworth.

Manual: Method of limits Method of Minimal Changes to determine AL (Two Point Threshold)

Manual: Muller-Lyer illusion

Manual: Bilateral Transfer

Manual: Whole vs Partial Learning

Manual: Level of Processing

Manual: Serial Position Curve

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Feldman, R. S. (2011). Understanding Psychology. Tata McGraw Hill.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Continous Internal Report

Conduction 

Viva

20

20

10

 

Each report for experiment would be given 10 marks. 

BS141 - COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course examines the relationship between language use, enormous variety of language experiences, belief systems, and behavioral patterns. On the other hand Etiquette helps smooth the path of our daily activities, whether it's meeting others in our daily interactions talking to someone on the phone, offering condolences properly or understanding how to talk to colleagues at a business conference. Being aware of the beliefs attitudes and etiquettes of individuals will help one to become more tolerant from one individual to the next and from one group to the next.

Course Objectives

  • Students will practice critical thoughts in comprehending the notion of culture, its relationship with language
  • To identify etiquettes and the key concepts of cross –cultural Communication.
  • To familiar ways to apply proper courtesy in different situations.
  • To help better understand the change that constantly undergoes in personal and social use.

Course Outcome

CO1: Practice critical thoughts in comprehending the notion of culture, its relationship with language

CO2: Identify etiquettes and the key concepts of cross ?cultural Communication.

CO3: Familiarize ways to apply proper courtesy in different situations

CO4: Understand the change that constantly undergoes in personal and social use.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction: Grace and Courtesy
 

Greeting a person, saying good bye to another person, Thank You, Excuse me, Introduction to oneself, Yawning, Coughing, Interrupting, Offering help, refusing help, requesting privacy, speaking in a low voice, waiting for help, accepting or declining an invitation, expressing admiration, The key principles of common courtesy, professional manners and the Golden Rule as they are practiced in the workplace environment, Classroom Etiquette and Student Behavior Guidelines, The guidelines for maintaining a civil classroom environment.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Manners and civility
 

Introduction to adjusting to a new culture, Theories on second language and culture acquisition, communication, National Standards, Culture acquisition through family and Homestays, Distinguish among the three main forms of communication in the workplace: verbal, nonverbal, and virtual. Proper and improper uses of workplace communication, the potential repercussions of poor listening in the workplace, the proper and improper use of technology in the workplace.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Etiquette
 

Why Etiquette Matters, identify common cultural differences, taboos, and customs that may be practiced in the workplace, discuss ways to navigate and honor cultural differences in the workplace, describe how to express an appropriate awareness of international and other customs. The Common Courtesies of Life, Polite Conversation, Telephone Etiquette, Correspondence, Basic Table Manners, Overnight Guests, Wedding Etiquette, Moments of Sorrow, Appropriate Behavior for Children, Gift Giving Guidelines.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Business Etiquette
 

Introduction to Modern Etiquette, The Rules of the Workplace, Meetings and Introductions, Conversation and Listening Skills, Telephone/Cell Phone, Texting, Emailing and Internet Etiquette, Etiquette in Public Places, Employment/Volunteer Etiquette, Dining Etiquette, Social Gathering Etiquette (Guest and Host/Hostess), School Etiquette, Confidence Without Arrogance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Personal and professional Presentation
 

Restaurant Etiquette, Cellphone Etiquette, Voice Mail Etiquette, Air Travel Etiquette, Cocktail Party Etiquette, Office Gossip Etiquette, Business Dress Etiquette, Email Etiquette, Social Media Etiquette, Job Interview Etiquette, International Etiquette

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chaney, L. H. (2020). The essential guide to business etiquette.

Foster, D. (2002). The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa and the Middle East: everything

Holliday, A., Hyde, M., & Kullman, J. (2010). Intercultural communication: An advanced resource book for students. Routledge

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Wilkie, H. (2001). Writing, Speaking, Listening: The Essentials of Business Communication. How to books Ltd.

Martin, J. S., & Chaney, L. H. (2012). Global business etiquette: A guide to international communication and customs. ABC-CLIO.

Pramezwary, A., Lee, E., & Oktalieyadi, V. (2021). ETIQUETTE AND PROTOCOL IN HOSPITALITY. Penerbit NEM.

Evaluation Pattern

Component

 

Description

Units

Maximum marks

Weightage

Total Marks in Final Grade

CIA1 A

Quiz

1

20

100%

20

CIA1 B

Individual Assignment

3

25

100%

25

CIA2

Group Assignment

2

25

100%

25

CIA3

Group Assignment

4 and 5

25

100%

25

Attendance

 

 

5

100%

5

TOTAL

 

 

100

ECO142 - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies. The course will consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption.

Course Objectives

 1. to create an understanding of the economic issues associated with corruption

 2. to enhance the student's understanding of the effect of corruption on growth and development

 3. to provide insights into the effect of corruption on emerging countries 

Course Outcome

CO1: identify the nuances in the way corruption is defined and interpreted in different economies

CO2: investigate some impacts of corruption on emerging economies

CO3: analyse the cause and consequences of corruption and examine some of the policy reforms aimed at tackling corruption

CO4: present complex ideas through written and oral presentation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries? Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: The Role of Institutions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption?  Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anti-Corruption Device.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in the Private Sector. Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187-203.

Evaluation Pattern

 

            MSE/ CIA2

 

ESE

 

Attendance

45 Marks

50 Marks

5 Marks

ENG184-1 - ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an intensive program for two semesters for all the students of the BA/BSc programmes (ENGH, ECOH, JOUH, PSYH, EPH and EMP) that introduces students to a wide range of expository works in order to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of graduate-level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. It would allow students to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and subjects in texts. The course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in multiple mediums, including visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, comic strips, music videos, and TED talks; students would develop a sense to comprehend how a resource of language operates in any given text. In the semester the course focuses on famous rhetorical pieces from across the world to familiarise the learners with various techniques and principles.

The objective of the course is to

● Introduce learners to various types of rhetorical pieces - written, oral text and visual texts.

● Provide an understanding of various rhetorical strategies in various compositional pieces

● Famarlize learners with various strategies of reading and writing by exposing them to effective and ineffective rhetorical pieces.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse and interpret samples of good writing by identifying and explaining an author?s use of rhetorical strategies and techniques.

CO2: Evaluate both visual and written texts and determine if it is effective or ineffective rhetoric.

CO3: Create and sustain arguments by applying effective strategies and techniques in their own writing

CO4: Demonstrate their knowledge in the form of cogent well-written report.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Language of Composition
 

The unit will focus on understanding rhetoric and various rhetorical situations. The aim is to assert the idea that rhetoric is always contextual and there is a link between the speaker, audience and what the content of the text is. This will enable students to understand the significance of context whether local, regional, national or global while analysing and composing a text. The unit deals with human values. 

1. 1. Introduction to Rhetoric and Rhetorical Situation.

a. Lou Gehrig (1939) “Farewell Speech” (Speech) https://www.lougehrig.com/farewell/

2. SOAP Analysis: Through the analysis of the text the aim is to look at the mode in which various factors like subject, occasion, audience and purpose impact rhetoric. 

a. George W. Bush (2001) “9/11 Address to the Nation” (Speech) http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/gwbush911addresstothenation.htm

b. Jawaharlal Nehru (1947) “Tryst with Destiny” (Speech) http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jawaharlalnehrutrystwithdestiny.htm

 

3. Ethos, Pathos and Logos: Understanding Aristotle’s concept of Ethos, Pathos and Logos is significant in understanding effective rhetoric. By looking at some of the famous rhetorical works the aim is to understand how the writer’s/ orators of some of the famous rhetorical pieces have used these elements to persuade the reader/ audience.

a. Ethos: i. King George VI (1939) “The King’s Speech” (Speech, can play part of the movie) https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/George-VI-King-s-Speech-September-3-1939

ii. Judith Ortiz Cofer (1992) “The Myth of Latin Women: I Just met a Girl Named Maria” (Essay) https://www.quia.com/files/quia/users/amccann10/Myth_of_a_Latin_Woman

b. Logos: i. Alice Waters (2006) “Slow Food Nation” (Essay) https://www.thenation.com/article/slow-food-nation/

c. Pathos: i. Dwight D. Eisenhower (1944) “Order of the Day” (Speech) https://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/order-ofthe-day-6-June-19

d. Combining Ethos, Logos, and Pathos

i. Rabindranath Tagore (1941) “Crisis of Civilization” https://www.scribd.com/doc/163829907/Rabindranath-Tagore-The-Crisis-of-Civilization

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Written and Visual Texts
 

This unit will focus on introducing the students to multiple ways of analysis, close reading, and usage of argumentative statements and diction. In addition to that the unit will focus on how to read visual texts from a global, national and regional perspective and the impact it has on the audience. The unit enhances the reading and comprehension skills of students and prepare them to get employed in content creation.

1. Virginia Woolf (1942) “The Death of the Moth” (Essay)

https://www.sanjuan.edu/cms/lib8/CA01902727/Centricity/Domain/3981/Death%20of%20A%20Moth-Virginia%20Woolf%20copy.pdf

2. Groucho Marx (2006) “Dear Warner Brothers” (Letter) https://archive.org/details/Groucho_Marx_Letter_to_Warner_Brothers

3. ACLU (2000) “The Man on the Left” (Advertisement) https://www.mansonblog.com/2016/10/aclu-charles-manson-martin-luther-king.html

4. R. K. Laxman Political cartoons (Cartoon)

http://webneel.com/rk-lakshman-editorial-cartoons-indian-cartoonist (Political Cartoons)

5. Times of India (2017) ISRO launch cartoon (Cartoon)

https://www.tatacliq.com/que/isro-launch-breaks-record-memes/ISROLaunch

https://indianexpress.com/article/trending/trending-in-india/times-of-india-isro-104-satellite-launch-in-response-to-new-york-times-mangalyaan-cartoon-twitter-reactions-4529893

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Determining Effective and Ineffective Rhetoric
 

The unit will engage with the questions on why few texts are effective rhetorical pieces as opposed to others. A few texts will be analysed to look at different rhetorical situations, and how it is effective and ineffective in persuading the audience/ reader. The selected texts deal with the issues of animal rights, nuclear rights, food crisis, and holocaust (human values) and help the students to engage with global scenario of the issues concerned. Any five of the suggested topics can be taken in class.

1. PETA, Feeding Kids Meat Is Child Abuse (Advertisement) https://www.peta.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/childabuseBB72.jpg

2. Anne Applebaum (2011) “If the Japanese Can’t Build a Safe Reactor, Who Can?” (Essay) https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/if-the-japanese-cant-build-a-safe-reactor-who-can/2011/03/14/ABCJvuV_story.html?utm_term=.8

3. Simon Lancaster (2016) Ted Talk: Speak Like a Leader (Speech) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGBamfWasNQ

4. Understanding Argument: Csalexander03 (2012) Why Investing in Fast Food May Be a Good Thing by Amy Domini (Essay) https://csalexander03.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/why-investing-in-fast-food-may-be-a-good-thing-by-amy-domini/

5. The New York Times (2004) Felons and the Right to Vote (Essay) http://www.nytimes.com/2004/07/11/opinion/felons-and-the-right-to-vote.html

6. Using Visual text for Argument: Objevit.cz (2017) “Holocaust + Selfie Culture = ‘Yolocaust’” (Video) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjjV_X5re4g

Text Books And Reference Books:

Texts prescribed for study in each unit. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kubota, R., & Lehner, A. (2004). Toward critical contrastive rhetoric. Journal of Second Language Writing, 13(1), 7-27.

Seaboyer, J., & Barnett, T. (2019). New perspectives on reading and writing across the disciplines. Higher Education Research and Development, 38(1), 1-10.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 5 marks 

MSE- 10 marks 

CIA 3-  5 marks 

ESE- 25 marks

 

EST141B - READING TECHNOLOGY IN/AND SCIENCE FICTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims to provide a basic introduction to understanding discourses of science and technology as represented in select science fiction narratives. The course will help students understand some of the basic questions about the human condition that are raised, debated, and negotiated in and through representative fiction that addresses global and national concerns. Keeping the contemporaneity of issues today, the course will also emphasize how there is a crucial intersection of various ideas that cut across several disciplines with regard to technology and life, thereby making it crucially relevant to engage with it in the contemporary context. Anyone interested in questions of science, fiction, and the human condition and the cross-cutting issues of gender, environment, technology, ethics, sustainability, etc may choose this course. The course will help develop theoretical knowledge about the genre, critical reading skills, and creative writing skills through class engagements and assignments.

 

Objectives:

• To introduce students to the field of science fiction

• Help students identify and raise questions through these works of fiction some relevant questions in the contemporary context

• To direct students towards realising the intersection of various issues raised across different disciplines.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognize the concepts and debates raised in the genre and engage with the form critically.

CO2: Reflect on the implications of science fiction in contemporary times and illustrate it in their writings. CO3. Appraise the many representations of the human and nonhuman in science fiction and the concerns it makes evident.

CO3: Develop an interdisciplinary perspective towards analyzing science fiction.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Science Fiction Narratives
 

This unit will provide students with a basic overview of science fiction through some critical and conceptual lenses that are commonly identified across SF narratives globally. The New Critical Idiom Series: Science Fiction, would be used here to introduce aspects of SF that touch upon human values and concerns such as gender, environment, ethics, technology, etc. Locating the interdisciplinarity of the domain would be central to this module and will build theoretical knowledge and critical reading skills.

1. History of Science Fiction

2. Common Terminologies

3. Critical Concerns about Technology for Humanity

 

Essential readings:

1. Hollinger, Veronica. “Contemporary Trends in Science Fiction.” Science Fiction Studies. No. 78, Vol. 26, 1999.

2. Mendlesohn, Farah, and Edward James. The Cambridge companion to science fiction. Cambridge University Press, 2003.

3. Nicholls, Peter, and John Clute. "New Encyclopaedia of Science Fiction." (1999).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
SF and technology
 

This unit will engage with how technology becomes a crucial part of negotiating contemporary existence as represented through SF. What are the fundamental concerns that Sf raises regarding technology and the human condition? How does technology come to be framed within SF? How are gender and sexuality framed within the discourses of SF? How SF addresses the anxieties of technology and the future would be some of the questions engaged with here. Critical reading skills and creative writing exercises will enable students to develop creative and critical skills.

1. The Matrix

2. Select Episodes of the series Stranger Things

3. Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

4. Any episode of Black Mirror

 

Essential readings:

● Ryder, W., Harbour, D. and Modine, M., 2016. Stranger Things | Netflix. [online] Netflix.com. Available at: <https://www.netflix.com/watch/80077368?trackId=200257859> [Accessed 8 November 2016].

● Wachowski, Andy, et al. Matrix. Burbank, CA: Warner Home Video, 1999.

● Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. New York: Everyday Library, 2006.

● “Hated in the Nation.” Black Mirror, season 3, episode 6, 21 Oct. 2016. Netflix.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Indian Science Fiction
 

This unit will engage with science fiction in the Indian context. One of the main points of

discussion would be to understand how SF writers from India have engaged with tropes of SF that we are

familiar with and what kind of an ‘India’ is imagined thereof which has implications socially, politically,

 

21

 and culturally. The unit enables critical insights into the concerns around human and non-human and the intersectionalities of it in the Indian context.

1. Vandana Singh “Delhi”

2. Manjula Padmanabhan, “Harvest”

3. Cargo

 

Essential readings:

1. Padmanabhan, Manjula. Harvest. Hachette UK, 2017.

2. Singh, Vandana. “Delhi.” Lightspeed, June, 2016, Delhi - Lightspeed Magazine. Accessed on 4 March 2023.

3. Kadav, Arati. Cargo. Mumbai: Fundamental Pictures, 2019. Netflix

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hollinger, Veronica. “Contemporary Trends in Science Fiction.” Science Fiction Studies. No. 78, Vol. 26, 1999.

2. Mendlesohn, Farah, and Edward James. The Cambridge companion to science fiction. Cambridge University Press, 2003.

3. Nicholls, Peter, and John Clute. "New Encyclopaedia of Science Fiction." (1999).

4. Ryder, W., Harbour, D. and Modine, M., 2016. Stranger Things | Netflix. [online] Netflix.com. Available at: <https://www.netflix.com/watch/80077368?trackId=200257859> [Accessed 8 November 2016].

5 Wachowski, Andy, et al. Matrix. Burbank, CA: Warner Home Video, 1999.

6 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. New York: Everyday Library, 2006.

7 “Hated in the Nation.” Black Mirror, season 3, episode 6, 21 Oct. 2016. Netflix.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Malak, Amin. "Margaret Atwood’s “The Handmaid Tale” and the Dystopian Tradition." Canadian Literature 112 (1987): 9-16.

Howell, Amanda. "Breaking silence, bearing witness, and voicing defiance: the resistant female voice in the transmedia storyworld of The Handmaid’s Tale." Continuum 33.2 (2019): 216-229.

Barnett, P. Chad. "Reviving cyberpunk:(Re) constructing the subject and mapping cyberspace in the Wachowski Brother's film The Matrix." Extrapolation (pre-2012) 41.4 (2000): 359.

Wetmore Jr, Kevin J., ed. Uncovering Stranger Things: Essays on eighties nostalgia, cynicism and innocence in the series. McFarland, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 30 marks 

MSE 30 MARKS 

ESE 35 MARKS 

ATTENDANCE 5 MARKS 

EST142B - GLOBAL ETHICS AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce students to the major theoretical and applied debates

as well as major moral puzzles and challenges in the field of global ethics.

Ethics is gaining ground as an important humanities intervention in a

fast-changing world. A course on ethics is often an added advantage for students

as it helps them shape a socially-aware perspective of the social reality and

develop ethical skills and foster employability.. Drawing on interdisciplinary

perspectives and thematic issues in the fields of international politics, business,

communications and law, the course will challenge students to reflect on major

ethical theories and traditions as well as core problems such as corporate

governance, global distributive

justice, the ethics of making and sustaining peace, media ethics and legal

dimensions of ethics. By combining the works of both classic and contemporary

philosophers with contemporary applied global issues, students will be able to

critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary

perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ‘good

global citizenship’. Through this, student reflect on cross cutting issues of

human values, gender, sustainability and professional development.

Course Outcome

CO1: The general ability to critically compare, contrast and synthesise major theories and concepts and to apply them in a creative manner to conceptual debates and real-life ethical challenges; critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ?good global citizenship?.

CO2: Analyse various ethical dilemmas present in the society and efficiently present it in the form of classroom debates and discussions.

CO3: Demonstrate a clear understanding of various schools of thoughts in the domain of ethics through their assignments.

CO4: Appraise their views on various aspects of ethics and present it with clarity through multiple engagements in the classroom.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

This unit introduces students to the conceptual frameworks of integrity and ethics in local and

global contexts. IT exposes students to ethical dilemmas and provides conceptual clarity on nuances of

integrity, human values and ethical decision making. It develops ethical skills in order to enable better

professional behaviour and employability.

1. Global Ethics: Conceptual Definitions,

2. Historical Origins & Present Challenges

3. Introduction to the Ethics, Morals and Values

4. Cultural Relativism vs Universalism (case study)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Ethical Theories
 

This unit introduces students to various ethical theories, under the two categories of rationalist

ethical theories and the more recent alternatives. It enables students to apply these global and national

theoretical concepts to local and personal situations. By this application process, students reflect on cross

cutting issues of human values, gender, sustainability and professionalism and develop ethical thinking

skills that fosters employability. (Include LRNG, Employability, and Cross-cutting issues):

1. Rationalist Ethical Theories

2. Contractualist ethics

3. Deontological Ethics

4. Utilitarian Ethics

5. Discourse ethics,

6. Alternatives to Ethical Rationalism

7. Virtue Ethics

8. Feminist & Care Ethics

9. Postmodernist Ethics

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Applying Ethical Theories
 

This unit is based on some relevant contemporary applications of ethical theories learnt in the

previous unit. The unit sees the practical application of ethics in local, regional, national and global fields of

business, journalism, digital media and technology. It develops ethical skills in order to enable better

professional behaviour and employability.

1. Global Business Ethics and Arms Trade: The Ethics of Capitalism (Film Inside Job)

2. Global Journalism Ethics, Citizen Journalism

3. Digital Media Ethics and Whistleblowing Practices: Snowden and Whistleblowing

4. Ethical Implications of Emerging Technologies (Film The Social Network)

5. Genetics, stem cell and embryo research: Embryo research and women’s rights

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hutchings, K. (2010) Global Ethics. An Introduction, Polity: Cambridge

Ferguson, C. (2010). Inside Job. Sony Pictures Classics

Fincher, David. (2010) The Social Network. Columbia Pictures

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Copp, D. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory, Oxford: OUP.

Graham, G. (2008) Ethics and International Relations, 2nd Edition. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

LaFollette, H. (ed.) (2003) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Practice, Oxford: OUP

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 30 MARKS

MSE 30 MARKS

ESE 35 MARKS

ATTENDANCE 5 MARKS 

HIS141 - ENCOUNTERING HISTORIES: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The influence and presence of the past is felt everywhere and every day in our lives. Movies, newspapers or the internet

bombard us and expose us to the past – both familiar and unfamiliar. However, the barrage of information and the forces

of globalisation have led to increasing questions on the relevance and the value of the past – indeed a denial even. This

course will engage the students with the myriad ways in which the past, though no longer present – is a presence in our

lives today. It will introduce the students to think historically, relate to their memories of their own past and make them

aware of the multiple perspectives which will enable them to read, write and reflect on the past; or in other words, make

history.

This course will introduce students to the methodological and theoretical questions that animate and inform the practice

of history. How do professional historians work? What is their goal? How do they locate and analyze source materials?

What kinds of arguments do historians try to make? How, ultimately, is history produced? This course will ask how (or

whether) historians’ particular sources – and their location in the archives – can give voice to the ordinary and of things

‘past’. Moreover, the course will address how the advent of the information age impact upon the historians’ profession by

exploring how modern technology – whether film, photography, or the internet – changed the way historians work and

address their audience.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discover how and why historians debate issues of evidence and interpretation and learn to distinguish between various schools or styles of academic history.

CO2: Critically engage with representations of the past in the present to enable them to analyze and use evidence in interrogating historical accounts.

CO3: Critically reflect and engage with the interface between the past and the present, fostering a healthy appreciation for history and its imprint on our world.

CO4: Apply how historical narratives are shaped by states, organizations, and individuals.

CO5: Analyze the interaction between history and politics when following the news and in examining historical cases.

CO6: Apply how issues of identity and memory factor into our historical understandings and how this can condition present day policies and decision-making.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
The Many Pasts (Global, National, Regional, local)
 

Level of Learning: Theory/Basic

a) Doing History - The Place of the Past.

b) Facts, Fiction and Lies: Interrogating evidence - paintings, films, novels.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

c) Facts, Fiction and Lies: Interrogating evidence - paintings, films, novels-Students will take any work of Historical

fiction, Historical Films as case studies and analyse the element of fact and fiction

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Use and Abuse of History (Global, National)
 

Level of Learning: Theory/Conceptual/Interpretative

a) Voice and the Subject: Narratives and Counter-narratives – Winston Churchill, Velupillai Prabhakaran, Pirates of the

Caribbean, Tom and Jerry

b) Locating the Popular: Historical Fiction or Fictionalised History – Exploring the Fantasy Worlds of Ice Age, Hogwarts,

Narnia, Westeros and Middle-earth.

c) The Past Today: The Ayodhya Debate and the Ram Janmabhoomi issue, Dwarka, Kapilavastu.

d) Historical Monuments and their Authorship/Ownership: The Temple Mount and Taj Mahal.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

e) Voice and the Subject: Narratives and Counter-narratives – Winston Churchill, Velupillai Prabhakaran, Pirates of

the Caribbean, Tom and Jerry

f) Locating the Popular: Historical Fiction or Fictionalised History – Exploring the Fantasy Worlds of Ice Age,

Hogwarts, Narnia, Westeros and Middle-earth.

Screening of Documentaries, Speeches and Films followed by Student led panel discussion

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Locating Sources: The Historian?s Voice (Global, National)
 

Level of Learning: Analytical

a) History and the Visual: Photography, Film and the Image – Gladiator, Schindler’s List, 300, Gone with the Wind,

Jodha Akbar and Mohenjo Daro

b) Historical Re-enactments? Light and Sound Shows at Golconda, Red Fort and Khajuraho.

c) Alternate Histories: Oral Histories, Sports Histories, Graphic Novels, Caricatures and Political Cartoons.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Memory, Commemoration, and Silence (Global, National)
 

Level of Learning: Theory/Conceptual/Interpretative

a) Memory and History: Power and the Production of History – Museums and Memorials.

b) ‘Truth’ and ‘myth’: History as Conspiracy – Insider and Outsider Perspectives – the Aryan Debate, Hindutva

Ideology and Neo-Nazis.

c) Private Lives and Public Affairs: The British Monarchy, the Nehru-Edwina Affair.

d) Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files.

Level of Learning: Practical/Application

e) Private Lives and Public Affairs: The British Monarchy, the Nehru-Edwina Affair.

f) Suppressing the Text: State Secrets and Declassification – Wikileaks and the Netaji Files

g) Case study of various Print mediums which have discussed these issues to analyse how media is responsible for

creating various memory narratives.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Davis, Natalie Z. 1981. The Possibilities of the Past, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 12, No.2, The New History:

The 1980s and beyond II, pp. 267-275.

● Gaddis, John Lewis. 2002. The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past, New York: Oxford Univ Press.

● Gathercole, Peter and David Lowenthal (eds.) 1994. The Politics of the Past, New York: Routledge.

● Hodder, Ian and Scott Hutson. 2003 (Third Edition). Reading the Past, New York: Cambridge Univ. Press.

● Kumar, Ravinder 1989. The Past and the Present: An Indian Dialogue, Daedalus, Vol. 118, No.4, pp. 27-49.

● Thompson, Paul. 2000. The Voice of the Past: Oral History, New York: Oxford Univ Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Banerjee, Sumanta, 2003. Ayodhya: A future bound by the past, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 38, No. 27, pp.

2795-2796.

● Buchli, Victor and Gavin Lucas 2001. Archaeologies of the Contemporary Past, Routledge.

● Carr, E.H. 1967. What is History, Vintage.

● Chalcraft, David et.al. 2008. Max Weber Matters: Interweaving Past and Present, Ashgate.

● Chapman, James 2005. Past and Present: National Identity and the British Historical Film, I.B.Tauris.

● Clarke, Katherine 2008. Making Time for the Past: Local History and the Polis, Oxford Univ Press.

● Damm, Charlotte 2005. Archaeology Ethno-History and Oral Traditions: approaches to the indigenous past,

Norwegian Archaeological Review, Vol. 38, No. 2, pp. 73-87.

● Fowler, Don D. 1987. Uses of the past: Archaeology in the service of the state, American Antiquity, Vol. 52, No. 2, pp.

229-248.

● Greene, Naomi 1999. Landscapes of Loss: The Nationalist Past in Postwar French Cinema, Princeton Univ Press.

● Hamilakis et. al. 2001. Art and the Re-presentation of the Past, The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 7,

No. 1, pp. 153-156.

● Muller, Jan-Werner 2004. Memory and Power in Post-War Europe: Studies in the presence of the past, Cambridge Univ.

Press.

● Murray, Williamson and Richard Hart Sinnreich (eds.) 2006. The Past as Prologue: The Importance of History to the

Military Profession, Cambridge Univ Press.

● Piercey, Robert 2009. The Uses of the Past from Heidegger to Rorty: Doing Philosophy Historically, Cambridge Univ. Press.

● Shrimali, K.M. 1998. A Future for the Past? Social Scientist, Vol. 26, No. 9, pp. 26-51.

● Stone, Peter G. and Philippe G. Planel 1999. the Constructed Past, Routledge.

● Walsh, Kevin 1992. The Representation of the Past: Museums and heritage in the post-modern world, Routledge

Evaluation Pattern

 Course Code  HIS141

Course Title Assessment Details :  Encountering Histories: The Place of the Past

 

CIA1 - 20 Marks  Group assignment - Submission paper

MSE CIAII - 25 Marks - Submission paper

 

ESE - 50 Marks - Individual Assignment - Submission paper

 

 

MED142 - UNDERSTANDING THE LANGUAGE OF CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course would provide students with a thorough knowledge of the conceptual and practical aspects of digital cinematography through engagement with the works of eminent cinematographers from around the world and the equipment.

The course aims to help students to:

  • Appreciate cinematography as a combination of artistic and technological endeavors
  • Understand the basics concepts of cinematography and shot design
  • Harness the power of natural and artificial lighting to compose powerful shots
  • Explore the creative possibilities of cinematography and understand its importance in effective storytelling.

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and describe the visual elements in cinematography.

CO2: Demonstrate understanding of different tools of cinematography.

CO3: Apply knowledge of cinematography techniques to create films.

CO4: Use cinematography skills to make films on social issues.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to the language of cinema
 

Cinematography as an art; Art of visual storytelling; Evolution of cinematography; Eminent cinematographer’s from world cinema; Cinematography and effective storytelling.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
The Cinematographer?s medium and Tools
 

Light, Camera, Lenses, Basics of Lighting; Various types of light sources and their practical application;Color temperature, Lens Choice, Lens filters, Exposure/F‐Stop/Shutter/ISO; Depth of field Camera operating; Hands-on introduction to camera equipment

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Visualising and Shot Design
 

Composition & Framing; Types of Shots; Shot design for single camera and multi camera productions

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Camera Placement and Movement
 

Camera Placement -how does it affect the meaning; Motivated Camera Movement.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  • Pro, A. P. (2010). Adobe Premiere Pro.
  • Team, A. C. (2012). Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 Classroom in a Book: Adobe Perm Pro CS6 Classro_p1. Adobe Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  • Block, B. (2013). The visual story: Creating the visual structure of film, TV and digital media. CRC Press.
  • Alton, J. (2013). Painting with light. Univ of California Press.
Evaluation Pattern
  • CIA 1: Submissions for 20 marks
  • Mid-Semester Submission: 30 marks
  • CIA 3: Submissions 20 marks
  • End Semester Submission: Submission for 30 marks

MED143 - DEMOCRACY AND MEDIA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
The course provides an overview of the complex interrelation and interdependence between media and democracy. The normative objective of this course is to
understand and critically evaluate whether the existing forms and structures of media, enable, support and promote a democratic society. It also tries to explore whether new forms of media can empower media's role within democratic societies. The course also provides a deep understanding of complexities that arise in neoliberal democracies and contemporary media systems.
Course Objectives :
  • To equip students with tools for critical consumption of media.
  • To analyze the structural deficiencies preventing the media from performing its democratic functions.
  • To understand media as an Ideological State Apparatus' to 'manufacture consent'.

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss the significance of the fourth estate in a constitutional democracy.

CO2: Recognize media's critical function of speaking truth to power.

CO3: Identify the threats of increasing corporatization, concentration of ownership, and evolving funding models in the digital economy.

CO4: Critique the undemocratic overrepresentation of social elites in Indian newsrooms.

CO5: Discern the role of mass and social media in manufacturing public opinion and reality.

CO6: Critique various forms of censorship and curbs on press freedom in India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Theory, Concept, and Definitions
 
  • Definition of Democracy and Democratic theory.
  • Media as the fourth estate.
  • Democratic responsibilities of media.
  • Fundamental rights and the media's role in protecting them. 
  • Media as the voice of the voiceless.
  • Media as the watchdog of democracy.
  • Media as the platform for deliberation (Media as Public Sphere).
  • Media worker as the democratic warrior.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Media, Democracy and Capitalism
 
  • Contemporary structure of media within capitalism:
  • Advertising funding and its implications on media's democratic functions.
  • Big business and government
  • Media as Big Business.
  • Use of SLAPP on media houses and self-censorship.
  • Media concentration, conglomeration, commercialization and its effect on democracy.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Democratic Media
 
  • Media reform and democratic media.
  • Media policy and democratic reform.
  • Alternatives to commercial media models: Case studies of BBC, NPR, and Aljazeera.
  • Critical analysis of Doordarshan and Rajya Sabha TV as possible democratic media.
  • Emergence of digital news platforms and their role in democratic communication [The Wire, Quint News Laundry, The News Minute, Scroll].
  • Representation of Caste and minorities in the media.
  • Media trials and the creation of the common enemy.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Social Media, Alternative Media and Democracy
 
  • Social media as the new public sphere.
  • Social media democratic elections in the current era (Case studies of 2016 US elections and 2019 Indian elections).
  • Alternative media spaces: Exploring community radio, Video Volunteers and Alt News.
  • Critical examination of alternative models of media

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
Video Voice for Social Change Manyam Praja Video : A Community Empowerment Initiative
 
  • Participatory Video (PV).
  • Manyam Praja Video.
  • Elements of Participatory Process.
  • Teaching Process. Community Video Producer (CVP). Community Video Unit (CVU).

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
Media Trial and at the time of Trialling Media: An Indian Perspective
 
  • Media trial. Sensationalism. Some instances of media trial in India.
  • Celebrity power and PR teams. Me Too. Cancel Culture. Ethical Consideration.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Curran, J. (2011). Media and democracy. Routledge.
  • Chattarji, S., & Ninan, S. (Eds.). (2013). The hoot reader: media practice in twenty-first century India. New Delhi: Oxford
  • Ghosh, S., & Thakurta, P. G. (2016). Sue the Messenger: How Legal Harassment by Corporates is Shackling Reportage and Undermining Democracy in India. Paranjoy Guha Thakurta.
  • Hardy, J. (2014). Critical political economy of the media: An introduction. Routledge.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Herman, E. S., & Chomsky,N. (2010). Manufacturing consent: 1he political economy of the mass media, Random House.
  • McChesney, R. W. (2016). Rich media, poor democracy: Communication politics in dubious times. New Press.
  • Thomas, P. N. (2010). Political Economy of Communications in India: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1st ed.). New Delhi, India: Sage Publication.

Research Articles:

  • Biswal, S. K. (2019). Exploring the role of citizen journalism in rural India. Media Watch, 10, 43-54.
  • Curran, J. (1991). Rethinking the media as a public sphere. Communication and citizenship, 27-57.
  • Khan, U. (2015). Indian media: Crisis in the fourth estate. Kennedy School Review, 15, 70
  • Rao, S., Mudgal, V. (2015). Introduction: Democracy, Journalism and Civic Society in India. Journalism Studies. 16(5), 615-623.
  • Saeed, S. (2015). Phantom journalism governing India's proxy media owners. Journalism Studies, 16(5), 663-679,
  • Thussu, D. K. (2007). TheMurdochization'of news? The case of Star TV in India. Media, Culture & Society, 29(4), 593-611.
Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline

  • Overall end semester  evaluation for 95 marks
  • Project I: 20 Marks 
  • Project II: 25 Marks
  • Project III: 20 Marks
  • End semester Submission Project IV: 30 Marks. Attendance 5 Marks

 

POL142 - GLOBAL POWER POLITICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The global balance of power is changing dramatically. As the world seems to be moving away from American Hegemony, the question of where power lies in global politics is becoming ever more significant. Great powers remain as the critical actors in the international system and the nature of the international order is determined by their interactions in war and peace. This course focuses on the transformation of global power politics particularly focusing on the power shifts in the post-cold war international system. The course will also introduce students to the emergence of new powers such as China, India, Brazil and South Africa and the changing dynamics of the international system. The course will examine whether great powers can cooperate in addressing the consequential challenges in the new century; climate change, nuclear proliferation, refugee crisis, international terrorism and other issues. The course will also examine the competition among the great powers in the South and East China Sea, and the West Asian region.

 

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  •   understand the key concepts and theories of international relations.
  •  examine the key issues pertaining to great power politics in the twenty-first century.
  • outline the dynamics of strategic interaction between great powers and focus on great power competition during World Wars, Cold War period and the post-Cold War period.
  • develop an understanding of the great power dynamics, the use of power by great powers in international relations.

Course Outcome

CO1: analyse global power politics in the twenty-first century.

CO2: demonstrate the major contemporary challenges and issues in global politics.

CO3: evaluate the changing power dynamics and power shifts in international relations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to International Relations
 

International Relations: Meaning, nature and scope of international relations; concepts and theories of International Relations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Great Power Politics in the Cold War era
 

First World War, Second World War: causes and consequences, inter war period (multipolarity), the Cold War (bipolarity) and the post-Cold War period (unipolarity).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Power shifts in the Post-Cold War
 

Power shifts in the post-Cold War international system, Great Powers: traditional and non-traditional security threats, emergence of new powers(rise of China as a challenge to the West)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baylis, J. and Smith, S. (eds.) (2011), The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations, London: OUP.

Heywood, A (2014), Global Politics, Palgrave Foundation.

Griffiths, M and Terry O Callaghan (2002), International Relations: The Key Concepts’. Routledge London and New York.

Griffiths, M. (1999) ‘Fifty Key Thinkers in International Relations, Routledge London and New York.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Barry Buzan and Ole Weaver (2003), ‘Regions and Powers: The structure of International Security’ Cambridge.

Ikenberry, G. John, Ed. 2002. America Unrivaled: The Future of the Balance of Power, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. 

John J. Mearsheimer, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics, updated ed. (New York: Norton, 2014).

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline:

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

POL142

Global Power and Politics

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 25= 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10= 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

 

POL143 - DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 The course  is designed to provide a sound working knowledge of policy-making actors and processes within the public sector at national and sub-national levels of government. In addition, the module provides an understanding of the principles of good governance in the public and corporate sectors, and knowledge and skills in the areas of professional values and ethics.

There are a large number of different forms of government, so this module focuses primarily on the actors and structures typically found in democratic states, but reference is made to other approaches where relevant. Even within democracies there is a large amount of variation, with differences such as federal or unitary arrangements, monarchies or republics, prime-ministerial or presidential systems, etc. As far as possible, this variety is reflected in the syllabus and learning materials, but inevitably there a limit to the extent to which all variations can be addressed. Where, for example, the materials focus on approaches applied in the UK, USA or EU in order to provide concrete cases that can be analysed alongside general or theoretical concepts, this is not intended to suggest that these approaches are in any way the ‘norm’. This course is designed to develop student’s capacity to critically analyze the terrain where politics and ethics intersect. It also examines some arguments for and against keeping the practice of politics separate from the sphere of ethics. It explores the problems of “dirty hands” and “many hands” in government, public organizations and public life. It discusses some of the ethical dilemmas confronting public officials and powerful institutions and organizations which have major impact on the life of ordinary citizens in a democratic polity. It offers a reflective and methodological approach to develop moral reasoning and analytical skills to evaluate ethical issues and to guide decision-making in government and public life. The rationale of the study is to make the pupils aware of the importance of democracy. What constitute democracy, what is its

importance from the point of view of the role of individual and what exactly can an individual get if he performs his role well in the society. This module also aims to make the individual understand the different aspects of democracy and its implications in the overall development of the state. The course on “Democracy and Ethics” is to introduce and discuss the moral foundations of democracy in principle, and democratic institutions, in particular. The students are initiated to various types of moral discourses in political philosophy. Further, this course looks at the development of democracy, in the global and national realm. Democracy as an ideal gets fructified in the form of a government, which in turn is based on the principles of justice, freedom, equality, and fraternity. Ethics acts as the premise on which a successful democracy rests. syllabus is introduced from the point of view that all students upon entering into the college, enroll themselves as voters and encourage and enthuse other members of the society to participate not only in election process but also electoral and political process in general.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Discover and analyse the terrain where politics and ethics intersect, based on different theoretical perspectives

CO2: Critically assess the problems of ?dirty hands? and ?many hands? in government and public organizations and evaluate by reflecting on and applying various ethical and political theories of responsibility.

CO3: Discover and critically investigate the ethical dilemmas confronting public officials in discharging their public duties, based on different ethical perspectives

CO4: Acquire and enhance skills in moral reasoning and ethical analysis to guide their personal and professional lives

CO5: Discuss and apply principles and concepts of ethical behaviour

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Foundations of Principle of Moral Philosophy - Justice between Peoples
 

 

 

1.      Nature of ethics and its relevance

2.      How ethics reinforces democratic principles

3.      Common unethical means adopted in democracy: identify and rectify

4.      Difference between Ethics, Morals and Values

 

5.      Human Rights,

 

6.       Distributive Justice,

 

7.      Decision-theoretic Consequentialism, Deontology

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Political Responsibility: The Problem of Dirty Hands and Many Hands
 

                                    

1.      Platonic Concept of Virtue


2.      Aristotle’s Account of Rational Agents, Choice, Deliberation and Action


3.      Practice of Virtue and Attainment of Happiness


4.      Kant: Good Will as source of moral action


5.      Duty Ethics


6.      Sources of Utilitarianism in John Stuart Mill and Jeremy Bentham


7.      Utility as the Moral criterion

8.       Liberalism, ‘“Precommitment” and “Post commitment”

9.      Hindu Tradition: Dharma and Karma, Purusharthas

10.  Buddhist Tradition: Four Noble Truths and Eight- fold Path

11.   Indian Principles in Ethical Context: Saravana, Manana and Nidhidhyasana

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Democracy
 

1.      Principles of Democracy: Freedom, Equality and Fraternity,

2.      Government by Consent


3.      Constitutional Government and Rule of Law

4.      Democracy and Human Rights society

 

5.      Instrumentalist Conceptions of Democratic Authority

 

6.      Democratic Consent Theories of Authority

 

7.      Limits to the Authority of Democracy

 

8.      Leadership: Servant, Participative, Consensus, leaderships in Democracy

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Indian Democracy and Path to Enlightened Democracy
 

1.      History and Democratic Heritage, Freedom Struggle,


2.      The Indian Constitution: Preamble and other constitutional values


3.      Ethical Code of Conduct for Politicians


4.      Citizenship, Fundamental Rights and Fundamental Duties of Indian Citizens

 

5.      Character record of members of legislature

 

6.      Ethical use of majority in parliament

 

7.      Avoidance of ‘floor crossing’ and defection

 

8.      Respecting independence of judiciary and media

 

9.      Safeguarding national history and avoiding distortion

 

10.  Ensuring political neutrality of Universities and their syllabi

 

Judicious allocation of central funds to states Free and fair elections

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Aristotle, (1955). Nichomachean Ethics, trans. J. A. K. Thomson, Baltimore, Maryland: Penguin Books.


2.      Christiano, T. (Ed.). (2002). Philosophy and Democracy, Oxford: Oxford University Press.


3.      Cortella, L. (2015). The Ethics of Democracy: A Contemporary Reading of Hegel's Philosophy of Right, Giacomo Donis (tr.), New York: SUNY Press.


4.      Dewey, J. (1993). Philosophy and Democracy [1919] and The Ethics of Democracy [1888] in The Political Writings, ed. D. Morris, I. Shapiro, Indianapolis: Hackett, 1993.


5.      Finnis, J. (1983). Fundamentals of Ethics. Oxford: Clarendon Press.


6.      Gandhi, M. K. (1927). An Autobiography or The Story of My Experiments with Truth. Ahemadabad: Navajivan Mudranalaya.


Granville, A. (2000). The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation. New Delhi: Oxford University Press

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Jain, S. (2000). The Constitution of India: Select Issues and Perceptions. New Delhi: Taxmann.


2.      Locke, J. (Ed.). (1980). Second Treatise on Civil Government, (1690), C. B. MacPherson, Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.


3.      Kant, I. (1959). Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. trans. Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril.


4.      KANT, Immanuel, Critique of Practical Reason, translated by Lewis White Beck, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril, 1956.


5.      MACHIAVELLI, The Prince [1513], ed. Q. Skinner, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1988.


6.      PLATO, The Republic, revised/trans. by Desmond Lee, Harmondsworth, UK: Penguin Books, 1974.


7.      RAWLS, John, Political Liberalism, New York: Columbia University Press, 1996.


8.      SANDEL, Michael (ed.), Justice-A Reader, Oxford University Press, 2007.


9.      SINGER, Peter, Democracy and Disobedience, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1973.


10.  WALZER, Michael, "Philosophy and Democracy", Political Theory, Vol.9, No.3, 1981, 379-399.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1   25

CIA 2   25

CIA 3   45

BPSY101-2 - HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to introduce the emergence of Psychology as a separate discipline. Students will study the philosophical, and scientific background led to the development of Psychology as a formal discipline. Once they are familiar with the foundation, this course allows students to learn the systems in Psychology and examine the differences between each system. Finally, it takes students to identify the significance of indigenization and diversities when applying psychological knowledge, where a special focus is given to Psychology in India.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical foundations of psychology.

CO2: Demonstrate the knowledge of scientific foundations of Psychology and apply it in psychological experiments.

CO3: Integrate the philosophical and Scientific understanding of psychology for a deeper understanding of the systems in Psychology.

CO4: Understand the status and the need for of Psychology in India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:13
Philosophical Foundations of Psychology
 

Psychology: An introduction to the subject and its historical philosophical foundation

The Eastern Philosophical roots: Persia and Middle East, India, and China

The Western Philosophical roots: The Greek and Roman traditions; Influences from the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Eastern versus Western influences

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Psychology: Scientific foundation
 

Science: Introduction

Scientific foundations of Psychology: The emergence of Science; The French, The British and The German tradition

Scientific movements of 19th century: Physiology, Psychophysics and Evolution

An introduction to the Human models of Psychology

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Major Systems in Psychology
 

Structuralism, Functionalism, Gestalt psychology, Psychoanalysis, Behaviorism, Humanistic Psychology

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Psychology in the contemporary world
 

History of Psychology in India

Philosophical Roots of Indian Psychology

Why indigenization matters? Diversity, Gender, Globalization

Current trends and Status of Psychology in India

Text Books And Reference Books:

Brennan, J.F. (2003). History and systems of psychology (6thEdn.).New Delhi: Pearson Education Inc.

Hergenhahn, B.R. & Henley, T. (2013). An Introduction to the History of Psychology. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Mishra, A. K., & Padalia, D. (2021). Re-envisioning psychology: A critical history of psychology in India. Psychology in modern India: Historical, methodological, and future perspectives, 163-201.

Dalal, A. K. (2014). A journey back to the roots: Psychology in India. Foundations and applications of Indian psychology, 18-39.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attd

ESE

20

25

20

05

30

 

 

CIA 1: Individual Assignments (Reflective essays, Report Writings, etc.)

 

CIA 2: Mid-Semester Examination(Written Examination)

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

            Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

 

CIA 3: Group Assignments (Research proposals,Surveys, Field Studies, Interventions,Exhibitions, etc.)

 

ESE: End Semester Examination (Written Examination)

Pattern:  Section A    5 x 02 = 10 marks (out of 6)

                Section B    4 x 05 = 20 marks (out of 5)

                Section C   1 x 10 = 10 marks (out of 2)

                Section D   1 x 10 = 10 marks (Compulsory)

BPSY121-2 - MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course gives an insight about pharmacological management of various diseases and effects of various drugs on the human system through introduction to medicinal chemistry.

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry
 

Chemotherapy,Drugdevelopmentprocess,generalprinciplesofdosageform,drugdesignandmodes of drug administration, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pro-drugs, me too drugs,Theoriesofdrugactivity:Occupancytheory,ratetheory,andinducedfittheory,greenchemistryinthemanufactureofdrugs.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Classification of Drugs and types of drugs
 

Sources,indication,mechanismofaction,andadversereactionsof-antipyretics,analgesicsandAnti-inflammatoryDrugs(Aspirin,paracetamol,ibuprofen),Antibiotics (Penicillin-G,Sulphonamides,quinolones, dapsone, amino-salicylic acid, isoniazid, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, rifampicin),Antihistamines (Methapyrilene, chlorpheniramine),Antiviral (Acyclovir, Amantadine), Anti-fungal(griseofulvin), Cardio and cerebro-vascular drugs (Amyl nitrite, sorbitrate,levodopa, methyldopa),Antidiabetics(Insulinandoralhypoglycaemicagents),Cholesterolloweringdrugs(statins).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Psychoactive drugs- the chemotherapy of the mind
 

CNSDepressants:Barbiturates(Phenobarbital,Thiopentalsodium),Benzodiazepines,(Diazepam,Alprazolam, Chlordiazepoxide),Anticonvulsants-(Phenytoin,Trimethadione,Ethosuximide),Meprobamate,Pethidine,Methadone,Glutethimide,Chlorpromazine.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Psychoactive drugs: Drugs of abuse
 

Physiologyofaddiction,Drugsofabuse–Alcohol,Nicotine,Marijuana,Cocaine,Heroin,MDMA,Amphetamine,Hallucinogens,LSD,Opioids,Cannabinoids,Biological,behaviouralandsocialeffectsofdrugaddiction,Combatingsubstanceabuse andDeaddiction.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Foye,W.O.(2008).Foye'sprinciplesofmedicinalchemistry. LippincottWilliams&WilkinsKar,A.&Wiley (2018).MedicinalChemistry.NewAge InternationalPublishers.

S.C.SharmaandJyotsanaChaturvedi(2016),MedicinalChemistry,VishalPublishingCo.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Gareth Thomas (2003), Fundamentals of Medicinal Chemistry.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attd

ESE

20

25

20

05

30

BPSY201-2 - QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides an introduction to quantitative research methods and its application in psychology. It gives a comprehensive overview of the sampling techniques, methods of data collection, and different types of research designs. The process of quantitative research with special emphasis on experimental designs and developmental research designs will be covered in this course.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and describe basic concepts in research

CO2: Define and explain basic concepts of quantitative research methods

CO3: Identify and describe experimental and developmental research designs and design a psychological study

CO4: Evaluate and report psychological research in relation to the APA Ethical Code in the conduct of human and animal research

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Foundations of Quantitative Research
 

Definition of scientific research; Research Questions – types; Methods of Inquiry; Sources of research ideas; Philosophical roots of research; Ontology and epistemology; Research types: Fundamental, Action, Experimental, Exploratory, and Descriptive research.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Process of Quantitative Research
 

Causality and experimentation; Definition and nature of variables; Operationally defining variables; Independent variables; Dependent variables; Extraneous variables; Formulation of research problems and hypothesis ; Different types of hypothesis: null and directional; Experimental manipulation and control of variables; Steps in quantitative research; Sampling techniques: probability and non-probability sampling; Methods of data collection: observational methods, surveys, questionnaires, and psychometric tests.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Experimental and Developmental Research Designs
 

Experimental research designs; Types of experimental design based on subjects and factors; Within subjects, between subjects, single subject, single factor, and factorial design; Sources of error variance and its management in the various types of experimental designs; Quasi-experimental design; Mixed design; Case-control design; Developmental research designs; How to write a research proposal.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Ethical Issues in Quantitative Research
 

Reliability and validity of psychological measurements: Types and threats; Ethical issues in psychological research: evolution; human participants; animal research; APA guidelines. Institutional Human and Animal Ethical Committees and the process of review; Report writing.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bordens, K.S., & Abbott, B.B. (2006). Research and design methods: A process approach (6th ed.). New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill.

 

Singh, A.K. (2019). Test, measurements and research methods in behavioural sciences. Patna: Bharathi Bhavan Publishers and Distributors.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Gravetter, F. J., & Forzana, L. A. B. (2009). Research methods for behavioral sciences. Wordsworth Cengage learning.

Kerlinger, N. (1996). Foundations of behavioural research. India: Prentice Hall

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1

CIA 2

CIA 3

Attendance

ESE

20

25

20

05

30

 

BPSY411-2 - EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-II (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce students to various famous experiments used in the field of psychology such as, psychophysics, intelligence, learning and sensation perception. It will make students understand how experimental methods are applied to study psychological phenomena and the processes that underlie it. They will learn how to conduct experiments in a controlled setting and write accurate reports. 

Course Outcomes: By the end of the course the learner should be able to:

CO1: Understand various experiments in psychology.

CO2: Demonstrate effective conduction of experiments.

CO3: Prepare reports for experiments  

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand various experiments in psychology.

CO2: Demonstrate effective conduction of experiments.

CO3: Prepare reports for experiments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Experimental Psychology
 

History and evolution of experiments

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:24
Conduction of Experiments and Report Writing
 

Perception: Method of Constant Stimuli to determine DL (Weber’s Law)

Learning: Transfer of Learning (Maze learning)

Memory: Verbal Working Memory

Thinking: Tower of London

Thinking: Level of Categorization

Text Books And Reference Books:

Myers, A., & Hansen, C. (2006). Experimental psychology. Thomson Wadsworth.

Manual: Method of Constant Stimuli to determine DL (Weber’s Law)

Manual: Transfer of Learning (Maze learning)

Manual: Verbal Working Memory

Manual: Tower of London

Manual: Level of Categorization 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Feldman, R. S. (2011). Understanding Psychology. Tata McGraw Hill.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Continous Internal Report

Conduction 

Viva

20

20

10

 

Each report for experiment would be given 10 marks.

 

BPSY461-2 - NEUROANATOMY LAB (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This lab is designed to offer students an opportunity to develop an academic and professional ‘toolbox’. To accomplish this objective, the students will be given insights, experiences, and challenges to cultivate their research prowess in quantitative research methods.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate skills in data management and choosing appropriate statistical techniques.

CO2: Demonstration of data analysis skills using a real-time data and statistical analysis package (JAMOVI/JASP or R).

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Data Collection and Preliminary Analysis
 

Preparing the data file; Creating a data file and entering data; Screening and cleaning the data. Tests of Normality

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Descriptive and Inferential Statistics
 

Descriptive statistics; Correlation, Partial correlation,Regression; t-tests, independent, paired; ANOVA, one-way, two-way, Factorial ANOVA; Non-parametric statistics. (JAMOVI or R Studio).

Text Books And Reference Books:

Gravetter, F. J., & Wallnau, L. B. (2014). Essentials of Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (8th ed.). Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

 

Aron, A., Coups, E. J., & Aron, E. N. (2014). Statistics for Psychology (6th ed.). Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Howell, D. C. (2013). Statistics Methods for Psychology (8th ed.). Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignment Worksheets 

 Calculation Activity

Presentation /Quiz/ Objective Tests

15

15

20

 

BS142 - TOURISM, CULTURE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Course presents several of the operational projects implemented by, or with the support of UNESCO, to illustrate how cultural tourism policies developed in the spirit of the principles and values contained in the texts, standard-setting instruments, declarations and recommendations adopted by UNESCO, are put into practice.

To open a debate on the complex questions that surround the relations between culture and tourism, tourism and development, and tourism and dialogue among cultures.

Course Outcome

CO1: Illustrate tourism as an instrument to bring individuals and human communities into contact

CO2: Explain the role of cultures and civilizations in facilitating dialogue among cultures

CO3: Evaluate the capacity of Tourism in assisting the world?s inhabitants to live better together and thereby contribute to the construction of peace in the minds of men and women

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction, Key Themes and Issues in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Finding Meaning through Tourism, Tourism as a World of Paradoxes, The Centrality of Experiences, Changing Contexts and Emerging Challenges in the Context of Development, Culture, Heritage and Diversity as Tourism Resources, Understanding Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism, Cultural Tourism as a Means of Economic Development, Developing the Cultural Supply Chain, Exploitation of Culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism as a Vehicle for Inter-Cultural Dialogue
 

Tourist – Host Encounters, The Role of Routers / Intermediaries / Media, Tourism – Tourist Education, Cross Cultural Understanding

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Tourism and Environmental Protection
 

Introduction to the Natural Environment, Tourism and the Spirit of Nature, Fragile and Vulnerable Ecosystems, Cultural Implications of Mobilizing Natural Resources for Tourism, From Ecotourism to Integrated Tourism

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Issues of Governance in Tourism, Culture and Development
 

Developing Structures to Develop and Manage Tourism and Culture, Complexities and Challenges of Policy Making in Tourism and Culture, Responsibilities / Tensions and Actions, The Gender Dimension, Stakeholders and Collaborations

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Preservation and Mobilization of Cultural Resources
 

Cultural Tourism Itinerary, Raising Awareness about the Fragility of Heritage Sites, Education for Lasting Tourism

Case Studies from The Palestinian Territories, Central America, Western Africa, Mauritania and Angkor

Economic Empowerment and poverty Alleviation, Sustainable Tourism Development Strategy, Forging Innovative and Inter-Disciplinary Approaches, Indigenous Resource Management Systems, Empowering Communities through Tourism

Case Studies from The Aral Sea Basin, Local Effort in Asia and Pacific (LEAP), Mountainous Regions of Central and South Asia

Dissemination of Knowledge and Reconciliation with the Past, Local and Indigenous Knowledge Systems in a Global Society (LINKS), UNESCO’s Actions in the field of Tourism, Culture and Development

Case Studies on UNESCO’s Conventions, Seminars and Universal Declarations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Mobilizing Nature for Sustainable Tourism
 

Capacity Building and Youth Poverty Alleviation through Tourism and Heritage (PATH), Case Studies on Sao Paulo’s Green Belt Biosphere Reserve

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Appadurai A. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Conceptual Platform. In K. Stenou (ed.) UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 9-16.

Appadurai A. (2003) Modernity at Large. Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.

Boumedine R. S. and Veirier L. (2003) Towards a Strategy for the Sustainable Development of Tourism in the Sahara in the Context of Poverty Eradication. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Cohen E. (2004) Contemporary Tourism. Diversity and Change. Elsevier, London.

Hemmati, M. ed. (1999) Women’s Employment and Participation in Tourism, Report for UN Commission on Sustainable Development 7th Session. UNED.

Intergovernmental Conference on Cultural Policies for Development (1998) Final Report. (Also referred to as Stockholm Action Plan). UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

International Labour Organisation (2001) Human resources development, employment and globalization in the hotel, catering and tourism sector (Report for discussion at the Tripartite Meeting on Human Resources Development, Employment and Globalization in the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Sector, Geneva, ILO).

Komla E.E. and Veirier L. (2004) Tourism, Culture and Development in West-Africa: For a Cultural Tourism Consistent with Sustainable Development. UNESCO Publishing, Paris.

Posey D.A. (Ed) (1999) Cultural and Spiritual Values of Biodiversity. A Complementary Contribution to the Global Biodiversity Assessment. Intermediate Technology Publications, London (on behalf of United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Nairobi).

Robertson, R. (1990) Mapping the Global Conditions: Globalization as the Central Concept. In M. Featherstone (ed.) Global Culture: Nationalism, Globalization and Modernity. Sage, London, pp. 15-30.

Steck B., Strasdas W., and Gustedt, E. (1999) Tourism in Technical Co-operation. A guide to the conception, planning and implementation of project-accompanying measures in regional rural development and nature conservation. GTZ, Eschborn.

Tour Operators’ Initiative for Sustainable Tourism Development (2004) Supply Chain Engagement for Tour Operators: Three Steps towards Sustainability. UNEP-Sustainable Tourism, Paris.

Winkin Y. (2002) Cultural Diversity: A Pool of Ideas for Implementation. In K. Stenou (ed.)

UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. UNESCO Publishing, Paris, pp. 17-60.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Culture and Cultural Resources in Tourism – From an Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (20 Marks)

CIA 2 - Mid Semester Examination (25 Marks)

CIA 3 - Group Activity and Written Submission on “Integrated Tourism by Mobilizing Natural Resources” (20 Marks)

Final Submission - An Individual Activity supported by Written Submission on “Designing a Structured Plan to Develop and Manage Sustainability through Tourism and Culture; An Inter-Disciplinary Perspective” (30 Marks)

ECO143 - DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates on democracy and emerging issues in economies.  The course discusses how various socioeconomic factors act as constraints on economic growth and development. This basic framework allows a student to delve into the causes and consequences of various strategies/methods taken/applied by policymakers and practitioners and how it affects the overall objective of the state/economy through a trifocal analysis of the economy, society, and market keeping the central theme of ‘Democracy.’This course will introduce students to:

  • Growing crisis of wealth distribution and income inequality.
  •  Sectoral significance and state intervention in policy making.
  • Informal sector and labor market participation and rights.
  • Analyze corruption in emerging economies through various case studies.
  • Discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory, and measurement.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise the growing crisis of wealth and income inequality among the members of the economy.

CO2: Understand the economic crisis in different sectors and government interventions in practices.

CO3: Get familiar informal sector and labour market participation and rights.

CO4: Understand debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption.

CO5: Investigate issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing challenges in economies through the lens of democracy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratization and Society
 

Theories of Democratization; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratization; The Global Wave of Democratization; Causes and Dimensions of Democratization: The Political Economy of Democracy; Political Culture, Mass Beliefs and Value Change; Gender and Democratization; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratization Processes: Role, impact on policy reforms and cultural change.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratisation and Society
 

Theories of Democratisation; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratisation; The Global Wave of Democratisation; Causes and Dimensions of Democratisation: The Political Economy of Democracy: Political Culture, Mass Beliefs, and Value Change; Gender and Democratisation; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratisation Processes: Role, Impact on Policy Reforms and Cultural Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation;   Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratization; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation; Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratisation; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of political transitions: Choice of the economic and political regime; Theoretical extensions: growth, trade, political institutions; Democracy and the public sector; the state, the treat of expropriation and the possibility of development: Social and economic wellbeing and policy reforms.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of Political Transitions: Choice of Economic and Political Regime; Theoretical Extensions: Growth, Trade, Political Institutions; Democracy and the Public Sector; the State, the Threat of Expropriation and the Possibility of Development: Social and Economic Wellbeing and Policy Reforms

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development
 

A Marxian theory of democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development
 

A Marxian Theory of Democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; The Case Study of India; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development Indian Experience
 

India’s Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality, and Public Reasoning; A case study on Gujarat experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome; Kerala experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development: Indian Experience
 

India's Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality and Public Reasoning, A Case Study on Gujarat's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome; Kerala's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhagwati, J. N., & Panagariya, A. (2012). India's Tryst with Destiny: Debunking Myths that Undermine Progress and Addressing New Challenges. HarperCollins Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Boix, C. (2003). Democracy and Redistribution. Cambridge University Press.

Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2015). An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions. Economics Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 20 Marks

CIA 3: 45 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

ECO144 - DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the idea of sustainable development and public policies within that context. The course discusses the challenges of sustainable development. This course will equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to design policies that promote sustainable development.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the principles and goals of sustainable development.

CO2: Explain the interdependence of economic, social, and environmental factors and how they must be balanced to promote sustainability.

CO3: Understand problems from interdisciplinary perspective.

CO4: Think of integrated solutions to the current problems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:17
Sustainable Development
 

Concepts; Historical roots; Measurement; Indicators of sustainable development; Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and indicators.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Challenges to Sustainable Development
 

Poverty; Population Growth; Public Health; Education; Biodiversity Conservation; Climate Change and Migration; Gender Discrimination.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Constraints on Public Policy and Sustainable Approaches
 

Constraints on Public Policy -- Economic constraints; Political Feasibility: Interests and Power; Institutional Constraints; Social and Cultural Factors: Constraining and Enabling.

Sustainable Approaches -- Participatory approach to development; Inclusive growth; Gender mainstreaming; Policy Coherence and Technological Innovations.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dreze, Jean & Amartya Sen (eds.) 1999. Indian Development Selected Regional Perspectives. Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Mulligan, Martin. 2010. An Introduction to Sustainability, Environmental, Social and Personal Perspectives. Routledge.

Sachs, J. 2015. The Age of Sustainable Development. Columbia University Press.

Moran, M., Rein, M., & Goodin, R. E. (2006). The Oxford handbook of public policy. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addison, T., Harper, C., Prowse, M., Shepherd, A., Armando Barrientos, with, Braunholtz-Speight, T., Zohir, S. (2009). The Chronic Poverty Report 2008–09. Retrieved from https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion-files/2566.pdf

Bellinger, W. K. (2007). The economic analysis of public policy. Routledge.

Hausman, D. M., & McPherson, M. S. (2006). Economic analysis, moral philosophy, and public policy. Cambridge University Press.

Kates, R. W., Parris, T. M., & Leiserowitz, A. A. (2005). What is sustainable development? Goals, indicators, values, and practice. Environment (Washington DC), 47(3), 8-21.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA I

Marks

CIA II

Marks

CIA III

Marks

Attendance

Marks

10 (conducted out of 20)

10 (conducted out of 20)

25 (conducted out of 50)

5

 

 

ENG184-2 - LANGUAGE AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Language and Contemporary Society is a course offered for the second semester students of the BA/BSc programmes (ENGH, ECOH, EPH, EMP, JOUH, PSYH) that introduces students to a wide range of expository, analytical and fictional and non-fictional works to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of graduate-level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and cultural contexts. It would provide students with the opportunity to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and the subjects in texts. The course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in varied genres, including essays, poetry, documentary and short story. The students would develop a sense to comprehend how a resource of language operates in any given text. The course is more thematic in nature familiarising students with texts from multiple disciplines, especially in the context of India.

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically engage with some of the existing rhetorics within the socio-political and cultural context of India.

CO2: Compose expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that reflect divergent manifestations of the contemporary Indian socio-cultural milieu.

CO3: Demonstrate the ability to move effectively through the stages of the writing process with careful attention to inquiry and research, drafting, revising, editing, and review.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Questions of knowledge and Language
 

The unit aims to sensitise the students about the evolving politics of education in the regional, national and global contexts through expository, argumentative and analytical texts. The texts in the unit will also address larger questions of exclusion, intellectual freedom and of emerging technologies.

  1. Robert Anderson. “ The ‘Idea of a University’ today”
  2. Krishna Kumar. (2022). “Politics of Knowledge”
  3.  Chandra Bhan Prasad (2006) “Hail English, The Dalit Goddess” (Essay)

http://www.anveshi.org.in/hail-english-the-dalit-goddess/

  1. M Madhava Prasad (2015) Language, the Political Commons

https://www.anveshi.org.in/language-the-political-commons/

  1. Deutsche, Welle. (2023) “AI experts say ChatGPT is changing education. But how?” -Chat GPT and Academic Writing

https://frontline.thehindu.com/news/ai-experts-say-chatgpt-is-changing-education-but-how/article66449967.ece

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Question of Margins
 

The unit will engage the students with the discourses on the cross-cutting issues of caste, gender, food and marginality through short stories and poems which bring out different manifestations of the issues in the local and national contexts.

  1. Huchangi Prasad. (2019) Children of God Tran. by Chandan Gowda
  2. Sky Baba (2013) Vegetarians only (Short Story) (Minority/Life choice/Food politics)
  3. Ranajit Das: “Sherlock Holmes India Trip” (Rural Indian poverty, questions of gender, Bengali poem in translation)
  4. Ruskin Bond (1988) “The Night Train at Deoli” (Short Story reflecting the romantic humanist attitude of the educated middle class towards the downtrodden)
  5. Pallavi Rao (2017) “Politics of the Intimate Pt. 3: The Brahmin Mistress and the Bahujan Maid”(Essay) (Caste)

https://medium.com/@pallavirao84/politics-of-the-intimate-pt-3-the-brahmin-mistress-and-the-bahujan-maid-6becf6e2fbcb

Teaching learning strategies:

Lecture, discussions and readings

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Questions of Social Justice
 

The unit deals with varied questions of social justice through essays, speeches and poems. The texts are selected from global, regional and local contexts to enhance the understanding of contemporary issues of India and help the learners to gain the understanding of human values of the marginalised sections such as workers in unorganised sector, of the society.

  1. Jayati Ghosh (2016) On Anti-National Economics (Essay) (Economic policy)

http://www.frontline.in/columns/Jayati_Ghosh/antinational-economics/article8356541.ece

  1. Gopal Honnalgere: “The Convicts” (a poem on social justice in peril by Kannada poet)
  2. Sitakant Mahapatra: “The Election” (Poem on Rural India and Corrupted Politics)
  3. Ben Rowen. 2019. The Fault in Our Star Names. https://psmag.com/social-justice/the-fault-in-our-star-names
  4. P Sainath. Wrestling with the rural economy (2013)

https://ruralindiaonline.org/en/articles/wrestling-with-the-rural-economy/

Teaching learning strategies:

Reading, Debate and Discussion

Text Books And Reference Books:

Texts prescribed in the course

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

James Lovelock. The Coming Age of Hyperintelligence. MIT, 2019.

Michio Kaku. Physics of the Future:  How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100, Anchor Academic Publishing, 2012.

Roshan Kishore (2017) “How a Bihari Lost his Mother Tongue to Hindi” (Essay)

http://www.livemint.com/Leisure/Nl73WC1JA8d6KVybBycNlM/How-a-Bihari-lost-his-mother-tongue-to-Hindi.html

Sen, Orjit and Pakhi Sen (2021) “Hear of Light”. (Graphic Narrative)

https://indianculturalforum.in/2021/02/02/heart-of-light/

R. Shashank Reddy. (2017) “Why India Needs a Strategic Artificial Intelligence Vision”.

https://thewire.in/tech/india-artificial-intelligence

Hariharan, Githa and Salim Yusufji. (2019). Battling for India.  Speaking Tiger: New Delhi.

Kakkoos (2017) by Divya Bharthi (Documentary) (Caste)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-UYWRoHUpkU

Raja Rao: What does it mean to be Queer (2019)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMIuFl3m_U4

The Collected Poems of Gopal Honnalgare. Edited by K A Jayaseelan. Poetrywala, 2020

Shashi Tharoor (2015) Speech in Oxford (Speech)

http://www.ibtimes.co.in/shashi-tharoor-garners-appreciation-his-spirited-argument-oxford-union-debate-full-text-640299

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I (10 Marks)

CIA II/MSE (50 Marks)

CIA-III (10 Marks)

ESE (50 Marks)

Attendance 5 Marks

Submission mode.

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component. Marks reduced to 5 in the final tallying.

 

 

Centralized exam.

Section A: 2x 10 marks

Section B: 1x 15 marks

Section C: 1 x 15 marks

There can be choices in Section A and B. Section C will have a compulsory question

Marks reduced to 20 in the final tallying.

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

Submission mode.

Can be an individual assignment or a group assignment with an additional individual component.

Marks reduced to 5 in the final tallying.

Centralized exam.

Section A: 2x 10 marks

Section B: 1x 15 marks

Section C: 1 x 15 marks

There can be choices in Section A and B. Section C will have a compulsory question.

Marks reduced to 25 in the final tallying.

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts. 

Taken from KP

EST141 - READING THE CITY: BANGALORE HISTORIES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The urban spaces of India have transformed immensely with increased global influences. The course attempts to explore various aspects of cultural identity and compare those identities formed, represented, and reproduced in the metropolitan context of Bangalore. The course enables students to think of the concept of 'the city' as a dynamic entity and analyse how our understanding of, and interaction with the city produces knowledge of space, emerging subjectivity and the “Other”. The city will be examined as a physical and socio-political structure. Metropolitan cities are considered nowadays as sites in the transnational network of financial and technological activities and hence they must be studied as global spaces in addition to its local and regional specificities.

The course is conceptualized with the following objectives:

1. To introduce students to the idea of the city and enable them to ask some relevant questions in the contemporary context.

2. To introduce students to narratives as told by monumental and representational cultures of cities.

3. To make students reflect on how cosmopolitanism and diversity are expressed in urban environments. and how urban space mediate transnational and global links.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognize the politics that constitutes the notion of a city with contextual understanding of the specificities of Bangalore through classroom discussions and assignments

CO2: Reconstruct the idea of city space in the contemporary context of globalisation and transnationalism and reflect upon it in the forms of various classroom engagements

CO3: Critically appreciate the plurality of contemporary cosmopolitan spaces through various classroom engagements and assignments

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
The Past and the Present
 

This unit attempts to look at the histories of Bangalore from cultural, literary and socio-political aspects. It aims to give a detailed understanding of how the city space has evolved during the precolonial, colonial and postcolonial eras

1. Bangalore from the Pre-colonial to the Age of Globalisation: From The Promise of the Metropolis: Bangalore's Twentieth Century Janaki Nair.

2. Past and Present of the City through folklore and other write-ups- From “Multiple City: Writings on Bangalore” Aditi De.

3. Everyday City Experiences- “Majestic: The Place of Constant Return” Zac O’Yeah.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding the City of the Global Digital Age
 

This unit looks at the sense of the city in the global digital age and how the city is formed of politically aware people making it a public space of contestations and demonstrations.

1. Reading the City in a Global Digital Age: The Limits of Topographic Representation” Saskia Sassen

2.“The Problem” Michael Goldman, Vinay Gidwani, Carol Upadhya

3.“The City as Dichotomy” Sharadini Rath.

4.“Contestations Over Public Spaces” Lekha Adavi, Darshana Mitra And Vinay Sreenivasa

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Fictional Representation of the City and City Walk
 

This unit tries to look the history of the city through a fictional representation. Karnad toasts to 'Bendakalooru', the place of boiled beans. The unit also proposes City Walk. Based on the ideas about the past and present of the city discussed in the previous two units, the students may take out a city walk in any area of their choice and bring out documentary evidence of the same in the form of photographs and write-ups.

1.“Boiled Beans on Toast: A Play” by Girish Karnad

2. City Walk

Text Books And Reference Books:

Prescribed texts

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Massey, Doreen. “City as a Global Space”  City Worlds

2. Madanipour, Ali. Urban Design, Space and Society. 2014.

3. Sabiki, Ranjit. A Sense of Space: The Crisis of Urban Design in India, 2019.

4. Shaw, Annapurna. Indian Cities in Transition.

5.Friedman, Thomas L. The World is Flat: The Globalized World in the Twenty-First Century.

Evaluation Pattern

Components

CIA I

CIA II: MSE

CIA III

Attendance

Marks/Percentage

20%

 

25%

 

50%

 5%

EST142 - READING THE CYBERSPACE: THE PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

We become savvy about the world on a daily basis. Cyberspace aided by the internet is one agency that enables our knowledge and entertainment production, dissemination and consumption. We interact with the virtual space much more than we often interact with the real to the extent that the simulacra we live in have become more real/hyperreal than the real itself. In this scenario, it is important to read, understand, critique and reorient our relationship with the cyber world we live in and breathe through. The course will also deal with aspects of the public as personal and the personal as public. This course is an attempt to engage with these aspects by negotiating with the virtually real.

 

 

This course aims to equip students to understand literature as

  • Introduce students to the critical evaluation of the digital space 

  • Reconfigure the confluences and disjuncture of cyberspace 

  • To orient students towards recognising the nebulous division between the public and the private in digital spaces

Course Outcome

CO1: Assess the notion of cyberspace and its contemporary implication and present it through classroom debates and discussions.

CO2: Distinguish between the virtual and the real and present it in their writings and discussions.

CO3: Raise awareness about the contemporary problems pertaining to this field through multiple engagements

CO4: Assess and evaluate the use of social media for promoting various social and cultural issues.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Cyberculture and the Cyberspace
 

General introduction to the key concepts related to cyberculture 

1. Lister et al : “New Media in Everyday Life” 

 

2. Pramod K Nayar: “Reading” Cybercultures 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Cyberliteratures
 

 This unit will attempt to enable students to deal with new forms of literature enabled by the cyberspace. It will look at how the internet and the cyberworld has reconfigured language, grammar, meaning, form and content for the digital native cyborg who seamlessly traverse the real and the virtual, the banal and the political. This section will deal with genres and the student and faculty can mutually decide on select examples from each genre. 

• Terribly Tiny Tales 

• Fan fiction 

• Hypertext Poetry 

• Slam Poetry 

 

• Twitterature

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Social Networking and Online Shopping
 

This unit will discuss aspects of freedom and the empowerment of communities through the cyberspace be it through social networking sites, online shopping, youtubing, Netflix, vlogging and blogging. It will look at how choices are mediated in the name of empowering the common public and how a certain hegemony gets constructed through manipulated consent. 

1. Lloyd Morrisset: “Technologies of Freedom” 

2. Film: The Social Network 

3. Drama: An episode from Black Mirror 

4. Andrei Gornyk: “From Youtube to Ru Tube, or How I Learnt to Love All Tubes”

5. Netflix 

6. Vlogging and Blogging 

 

7. Online Shopping – Amazon/Flipkart 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Surveillance and Knowledge Systems
 

This unit will attempt to look at the various aspects of surveillance that the digital and cybertechnology has equipped us with. It will examine how this constructs discourses of the body, gender and selfhood. This unit will also look at the manner in which knowledge and information has also been reconfigured and appropriated through digital and cybertechnology. 

 

1. Pramod K Nayar: Biometric Surveillance 

 

2. Swati Chaturvedi: I am a Troll: Inside the Secret World of the BJP’s Digital Army.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Lister et al : “New Media in Everyday Life” 

 

Pramod K Nayar: “Reading” Cybercultures

Lloyd Morrisset: “Technologies of Freedom” 

Film: The Social Network 

Drama: An episode from Black Mirror 

 

Andrei Gornyk: “From Youtube to Ru Tube, or How I Learnt to Love All Tubes”

Pramod K Nayar: Biometric Surveillance 

 

Swati Chaturvedi: I am a Troll: Inside the Secret World of the BJP’s Digital Army.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bell, D. (2001). An introduction to cybercultures. London: Routledge. 

Lister, M., Dovey, J., Giddings, S., Grant, I., & Kelly, K. (2010). New media: A critical introduction. London: Routledge. Nayar, P. K. (2010). An introduction to new media and cybercultures. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. 

 

Snickars, Pelle and Patrick Vonderau, eds. (2009). The Youtube Reader. National Library of Sweden.

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: 20 marks 


Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts through means that the facilitator deems appropriate and suitable for the students.

CIA 2: 20 Marks

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts through means that the facilitator deems appropriate and suitable for the students. 

ESE 1: 20 (marks

The students can be evaluated through exhibitions, visual essays or visual stories, mini-documentaries, performances, creating social media content and promotions, cumulative portfolios, student seminars, organising public output, docudramas and other modes of creative evaluation suitable for the course.

ESE 2: 30 marks (Submission) Pattern

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts

HIS142 - RELIGION: PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS THROUGH AGES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Humankind is rich with tales of belief systems, practices and customs of various religions and inter relations and complexities of the same. This course aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of interfaith relations of the  world, which will deal with significant religious philosophies from not only the Indian subcontinent but also the world. This introduces the students to the ancient western religions, the concepts like paganism, animism and totemism, theoretical framework of religion and aspects of divination. This aims at familiarising students with the basic ideologies of the religions like Jainism, Buddhism, Hinduism and elements of power and politics associated with them - and how our ideas and philosophies of sustainability and development have been shaped and influenced heavily over the ages by them.

Course Objectives: 

 

  • To introduce the students to various philosophies of religions of the world

  • To familiarise the students with indigenous religious traditions and practices

  • To provide an overview of interfaith relations of the world and the power dynamics associated with that

  • To engage the students in discussion of selected case studies thereby sharpening their analytical and critical thinking skills 

  • To familiarise students with the beginnings of religions of the world and their possible traceable transitions 

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically analyse the diverse religious ideologies of the world

CO2: Apply the concepts/ideas/theories of religion in their everyday engagement with topics related to world religions

CO3: Identify local and indigenous religious systems, ethnic and folk religions and practices

CO4: Critically analyse the various religious conflicts of the world that are ongoing with a lens of objectivity and logic

CO5: Apply ideas of interfaith relations and analyse the relations of power play, sovereignty, status quo and marginalisation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:11
What is Religion? Theories and Sources
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual 

 

  1. Theories of religion- Tylar and Frazer, Freud, Durkheim, Marx, Weber

  2. Sources of religion - Scriptures, Symbols, Practices and Traditions

  3. Paganism-Animism-Totemism-Shamanism

  4. The institutionalised religion - Code of conduct, Administration, Hierarchy

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Divination: The Western World
 

Level of Knowledge:  Conceptual/Interpretative

 

  1. Myth and the mystic - Omens, Oracles and Prophecies

  2. Early Pagan Religion in Mesopotamia - Ancient Egypt

  3. Olympian deities and funerary practices  in Greece - Rome and Ancestor Worship

  4. The world of Abrahamism and Semitic religions - Judaism, Christianity, Islam

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Indic and Ethnic Religions: The Eastern World
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual/Interpretative



 

  1. Confucianism- Taoism- Zoroastrianism

  2. Vedic Hinduism- Philosophy, Traditions,Rituals and Practices

  3. The heterodox philosophies- Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism

  4. Ethnic religions and Folk religions

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Power, Politics, Conflicts and Peace
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

 

  1. Politics and Religion - The symbiotic bond and Power nexus

  2. Gendering the institutions - Women and positions of power, The laity and follower

  3. The popular - The Village deities and Family deities; The celebrations of faith - Festivals, fairs, songs

  4. Case studies of Syria, Iraq, Nigeria, Myanmar

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential References:

 

  • Ali, Daud & Pandian, Anand. 2010. Ethical Life in South Asia. Indiana, US: Indiana University Press.

  • Hinnells.J (Ed.) 2010. The Routledge Companion to the Study of Religion. New York: Routledge.

  • Mc Cutcheon,R.T. 1999. The Insider/ Outsider Problem in the Study of Religion: A Reader. London: Cassell

  • Popkin. Richard.H. (Ed) 1998. Hume, David. Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Company.

  • Tweed, Thomas.A. 2006. Crossing and Dwelling: a theory of Religion. Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press.

  • Wainright, William. 2005. Religion and Morality. London and New York: Routledge. (Part I & Part II)

  • Ramaswamy, Vijaya. (Ed) 2014.  Devotion and Dissent In Indian History. New Delhi: Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended References: 

 

  • Ames. Roger T. & Rosemont Jr., Henry. 1999. The Analects of Confucius: A Philosophical Translation. New York. Ballantine Books. 

  • Boyce, Mary. 2000. Zoroatrians: Their religious beliefs and practices. New York: Routledge.      

  • Brown.P. 1992.  Power and Persuasion in Late Antiquity:

  • Towards a Christian Empire. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press. 

  • Chakrabarti, Kunal. 2018. Religious Process: The Puranas and the making of a Regional Tradition. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

  • De Lange, N.R.M. 2000. An Introduction to Judaism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

  • Doniger, Wendy. 2014. On Hinduism, USA: Oxford University Press. 

  • Eidinow, Esther & Kindt, Julia. 2015. The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion. New York: Oxford University Press.

  • Glasenapp, Helmuth Von. 1999. Jainism An Indian Religion of Salvation. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. 

  •  Grant,R.M. & Tracy, D.A. 1984.  A Short History of the Interpretation of the Bible. London: SCM.

  • Hart, David Bentley. 2014. The Experience of God, Being, Consciousness, Bliss. New Haven: Yale.

  • Higginbotham, Joyce & Higginbotham, River. 2002. Paganism: An Introduction to Earth Centered Religions. Woodbury, Minnesota: Llewellyn Publications. 

  • Lipner.J.J. 1994. Hindus: Their Religious Beliefs and Practices. London: Routledge. 

  • Mahalakshmi.R. 2011. The Making of the Goddess: Korravai-Dugra in the Tamil Traditions. New Delhi: Penguin Books. 

  • Mahalakshmi.R. 2019. Art and History: Texts, Contexts and Visual Representations in Ancient and Early Medieval India. New York: Bloomsbury Academic India. 

  • Ramaswamy, Vijaya. 1996. Divinity and Deviance- Women in Virasaivism. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.       

  • Ramaswamy, Vijaya. 2007. Walking Naked: Women, Society, Spirituality in South India. University of Michigan and Shimla: Indian Institute of Advanced Study.·        

  • Waines.D. 1997. An Introduction to Islam. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.·        

  • Walpola, Rahula. What the Buddha taught. 1994. New York: Black Cat Publishers.·        

  • Woodhead et.al. (Eds) 2009.  Religions in the modern world: traditions and transformations. London: Routledge. 

Evaluation Pattern

 

Course Code 

Course Title 

Assessment Details 


HIS142

      

Religion: Philosophy and Politics Through Ages

CIA I

20 Marks 

MSE

25 Marks

CIA III

50 Marks

Group 

Assignment 

MSE - Submission paper

Individual Assignment  

MED141 - INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The aim of the course is to offer students the opportunity to understand, explore and appreciate the nature of human diversity and globalisation by providing a direct international experience in a virtual collaborative learning environment with students. It aims to form an intercultural perspective, provide knowledge of communication and behaviour within and between different cultures.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

 

  • Identify and explain basic theories of human interaction within multi-cultural environments.

  • Understand  basic principles of communication within various cultural settings.

  • Identify and explain the specific culturally oriented communication needs of a variety of marginal or sub-cultural groups

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply principles of human communication in cross-cultural settings

CO2: Create media content for cross cultural communication

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

 

  • Definitions and a basic understanding of cross-culture communication

  • Differences between cross culture and intercultural communication

  • Dimensions & Models for Cultural Analysis- Popular models of cross cultural communication.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Context, Culture and Identity
 

 

  • Context, Situation & Action Chains- Culture, Technology

  • Workforce and environment, 

  • Countering oppression through inclusion

  • Culture & Identity - Educational attainment, Geographical locations, ethnicity.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Global Identity
 

 

  • Intercultural Relations and Globalisation (Case Study Work)

  • Global Identity; Communicating with a Cross-Cultural Audience

  • Reading: Cross-cultural conflict by Kevin Avruch (UNESCO EOLSS (Encyclopaedia of life support systems)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Adler, R. B., Rodman, G. R., & Du Pré, A. (2016). Understanding human communication (Vol. 13). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Condon, E. C. (1973). Introduction to cross cultural communication. Rutgers University.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Adorno, Theodor W. and Horkheimer, Max. 1972. “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception”. Dialectic of Enlightenment (trans. John Cumming). New York: Herder and Herder, 120-167.

Gudykunst, W. B. (2003). Cross-cultural and intercultural communication. Sage.

Ting-Toomey, S., & Chung, L. C. (2005). Understanding intercultural communication. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline

Over all end semester evaluation for 45 marks

CIA I: 20 Marks 

CIA II: 20 Marks

End semester Submission CIA III: 50 Marks.

Attendance 5 Marks

 

POL141 - POLITICS IN INDIA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

India is the largest democracy of the world and its diverse society, vast geographical expanse and different cultural-social values make it an extremely complex political system. How does politics in a country like this operate? What are the historical influences and their impact on the modern democratic institutions of India? How has modern India managed to accommodate or shed off its century’s old traditional values in the clash between tradition and modernity? How have modern democratic institutions in India evolved, what are the pressures working upon them and how have these institutions performed till now? How does developmental state in India device and run welfare policies, maintain legitimacy and respond to crisis? The present course will give the students a basic understanding of all these aspects so that they can make sense of the ways in which democracy and political system operates in the country.

Course Outcome

CO1: Relate to the fundamental aspects of Indian Political System.

CO2: Examine the politics in India through study of its strengths and fault lines.

CO3: Assess how democracy and democratic institutions function and are challenged in India.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction and Background
 

Colonial State and Economy; Development of India’s Constitution

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Institutions and Structures
 

The Indian Parliament; The Judicial System of India; Union and State Executive, Office of the Governor and Bureaucracy; Federalism; Party System in India. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The Processes and Fault lines
 

Elections in India; Movements in India; Communalism and Secularism; Caste and Reservations

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Policies and Problems
 

Public Policy; Foreign Policy; Regionalism and Terrorism

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chatterjee, Partha (ed.), 1997. State and Politics in India, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Jayal, Niraja Gopal and Mehta, Pratap Bhanu (eds.), 2019. Politics in India, New Delhi: OUP.
Roy, Himanshu and Singh, Mahendra Prasad (eds.), 2018. Indian Political System, New Delhi: Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhargava, Ashutosh and Acharya, Ashok (eds.), 2017. Poltical Theory: An Introduction, New Delhi: Pearson
Austin, Granville, 2014. The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

50

05