CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, POLITICAL SCIENCE AND HISTORY

School of Social Sciences

Syllabus for
Master of Arts (International Studies)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAIS131 POLITICAL THEORY Core Courses 4 04 100
MAIS132 PRINCIPLES OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS133 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS134 WORLD HISTORY Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS135 INDIAN FOREIGN POLICY Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS136 SOUTH ASIA - 4 4 100
MAIS141A FOREIGN LANGUAGE (FRENCH) Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS141B FOREIGN LANGUAGE (CHINESE) Core Courses 4 4 100
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAIS231 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY - 4 4 100
MAIS232 US AND LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES - 4 4 100
MAIS233 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY - 4 4 100
MAIS234 SOUTH ASIA - 4 4 100
MAIS241A FOREIGN LANGUAGE (FRENCH) - 4 4 100
MAIS241B FOREIGN LANGUAGE (CHINESE) - 4 4 100
3 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAIS331 PROBLEMS OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS332 INTERNATIONAL LAW Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS333 CENTRAL ASIA AND RUSSIAN STUDIES Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS334 COMPARATIVE POLITICS Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS335 EAST AND SOUTH EAST ASIA Core Courses 4 4 100
MAIS351 RESEARCH PAPER Core Courses 0 4 100
MAIS381 DISSERTATION Core Courses 0 2 100
MAIS382 SUMMER INTERNSHIP Core Courses 0 2 100
4 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MAIS431 EUROPEAN STUDIES - 4 4 100
MAIS432 CONFLICT RESOLUTION AND PEACE STUDIES - 4 4 100
MAIS433 AFRICAN STUDIES - 4 4 100
MAIS434 WEST ASIA - 4 4 100
MAIS435 CHINA AND THE WORLD - 4 4 100
MAIS451 RESEARCH PAPER - 0 4 100
MAIS481 DISSERTATION - 0 2 100
      

    

Department Overview:

Department of International Studies, Political Science and History is part of the School of Social Sciences, CHRIST (Deemed to be University), uniting the departments of Political Science and History and the programme of Master in International Studies and History. The Department offers PhD Programmes with distinct interdisciplinary qualities in the field of International Relations, Political Science and History. The Department's Masters Programme has today evolved to compose of all International Relations major area studies, theories, their applications, as well as global tongues like French and Mandarin. It has been moulded with the foremost agenda of making well-equipped professionals out of its student pool. Within its short span of existence, the Department has emerged as one of the most prominent ones in India'ss International Relations and Area Studies turf.

Mission Statement:

Vision:

To become a globally recognized centre for Excellence with a critical understanding of the past and present, towards constructing a comprehensive future.

Mission:

Mission of the department is to groom socially concerned and politically conscious citizens and effective policy experts with a strong grounding in interdisciplinary approaches by providing a platform for critical analysis, experimentation and discovery.

Introduction to Program:

Master of Arts in International Studies (MAIS) is an inter-disciplinary programme; students integrate and apply knowledge across disciplines in order to analyze global issues and problems. It equips students with analytical and critical skills to understand contemporary international politics and prepare them for a range of professions that require knowledge of international affairs. The Programme is designed to provide graduates the expertise and skills appropriate for a range of public and private sector careers where an advanced knowledge and understanding of contemporary international societies is integral to their work.

Program Objective:
PO1: Establish comprehension and have an in-depth and clear understanding of historical and contemporary global politics, its various actors and institutions.

PO2: Apply the knowledge in analyzing and bringing creative solutions to complex international issues through cooperation, conflict resolution, diplomacy and creative thinking.

PO3: Demonstrate critical, analytical, research, problem-solving, self-learning and communication skills required for a range of careers in public and private sectors and also for self-employment.

PO4: Demonstrate entrepreneurship, innovativeness, and continuous learning.

PO5: Exhibit dynamism, consultative decision-making, teambuilding and such other leadership qualities.

PO6: Develop civic sense, inclusiveness, empathy, humility, integrity and display appreciation of diversity, environmental sensitivity and global perspective of issues.

Assesment Pattern

20% of the marks for Factual writing

60% of the marks for Interpretation, Analysis

20% of the marks for Writing style that arguments, cohesion, paragraphs and overall writing.  grammar,

 

Examination And Assesments

Continuous Internal Assessment   100 marks

CIA 1   Written assignments                                                 20 marks

CIA 2   Mid Semester  Examinations                                     50 marks

CIA 3    Written assignments and presentations                     20 marks

Attendance                                                                         10 marks.

End Semester Examinations                                                 100 Marks

MAIS131 - POLITICAL THEORY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:04

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims to help students

  • To understand the concepts, meaning and theories of political science. It is designed to give an in depth knowledge about the political concepts that students will be exposed to in their study of international studies.       
  • To develop an inquisitive attitude towards the current political issues and be able to connect the current issues to the prominent theories of political science.

  • To be open to critically analyze and respect diverse viewpoints.

Course Outcome

CO1: Grasp the core concepts with clarity like - liberty, equality, justice, rights, power, authority, legitimacy, political ideologies, political theories ? see their relevance and interactions.

CO2: Develop the ability to construct and evaluate analytical arguments with clarity

CO3: Recognise the relevance of political theories in contemporary times since they can influence our thought perceptions and actions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Nature, scope & significance of Politics
 
  • Nature, meaning and functions of political theory

·         Major approaches and methods in political theory

·         Sovereignty

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Rights, Liberty, Equality & Justice
 

·         liberty

·         Equality

·         Justice

·         Rights

·         Power

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Political ideologies
 

·         Liberalism

·         Conservatism

·         Socialism

·         Nationalism : Anarchism, Fascism

Gandhism

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Political Theories
 

·        Social Contract  

·         Marxist Theory

·          Behavioralism & Post Behavioralism,

·          Systems theory

·         Communication theory

·         Post-Modernism

·         Feminism 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Political Interaction
 

·         The economy and society

·         Political culture, identity and legitimacy

·         Mass media and political communication

·         Groups, interests and movements

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Heywood, A. (2007). Politics. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  2. Heywood, A. (2007). Political Ideologies. New Delhi: Palgrave Macmillan.
  3. Gaus, Gerald F.,  Kukathas, C, (2011) Handbook of Political Theory, Sage, London
  4. Harrison, Lisa, Little, A, Lock E (Eds) (2015) Politics: The Key Concepts, Routledge, New York
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhagwan, V. and Bhushan, V.  (2011). Principles and Concepts of Political Theory. Noida: Kalyani.

Mahajan, V.D. (2010). Political Theory. New Delhi: S Chand.

Singhal, SC. (2009). Political Theory. Agra: Lakshmi Narain Agarwal.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 20 Marks 

CIA-2  50 Marks 

CIA -3 20 Marks 

Final Marks  100

MAIS132 - PRINCIPLES OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description:

 This is a principles-level course in International Economics for non-majors. International economics is the area of economics concerning transactions and interactions between agents (consumers, firms and governments) of different countries. The main goal is to introduce students to general principles of both international microeconomics and international macroeconomics.

First part of the course deals with basic microeconomics concepts and tools like demand and supply, cost and revenue, market structure and its types (1stand 2nd unit) after learning tools of economics 3rd unit focuses on international trade and gains from trade. Initially, we will see the main theories explaining international trade: who benefits from trade, why certain trade patterns appear, how international trade is related to income distribution, etc. Then in unit 4, we will focus on international trade policy: what are the instruments to encourage or discourage trade, why trade is not as prevalent as the theory would imply, and what are the main arguments for and against free trade. Unit 5 and 6 deals with balance of payment and exchange rate system, it’s important to understand these concepts in order to frame a correct policy for the economic growth and development in the era of globalization and liberalization. The last part of the course will focus on international macroeconomics, or open economy macroeconomics. It will go over exchange rate determination, the interaction between exchange rates, interest rates, inflation, and aggregate output; and discuss international monetary systems.

 Course Objectives

 

•        Introduce students to principles in international economics.

•        Provide a basic understanding of the workings of international trade, foreign exchange determination etc.

•        Develop economic reasoning and approach towards international relations

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify and distinguish different types of market structure and its influence on the economy and the society.

CO2: Analyze the role of free trade, in achieving economic growth and development andGive solutions about the problems of free trade

CO3: Identify the inefficiencies created due to presence of trade policies and regional trade agreement in the market.

CO4: Design the solutions for the economy to connect internationally and improve trade relations with the rest of the world.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Principles of International Economics
 

Introduction to economics, Production Possibility Frontier, Basics: Supply and Demand, Market Equilibrium,. Opportunity cost, Isoquants, Indifference Curve Analysis., Types of Market structure

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Market Structure: Price and Output Determination
 

Cost and Revenue Analysis, types of cost, types of revenue, Price and output determination under different types of market structure.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Gains from Trade
 

Theories of International Trade:  Absolute & Comparative Advantage Theory, Heckscher-Ohlin Theory,  Terms of Trade, Factors affecting ToT, Economic Growth and Development, Factor Endowment growth , Prebisch-Singer Thesis, Immiserising Growth-Jadgish Bhagwati

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Trade Policy Instruments
 

  1. Tariffs and its Effects
  2. Non Tariff Trade Barriers-import quotas, voluntary export agreements, subsidies, buy national policies, product and safety standards, and content requirements.
  3. Other Instruments of Trade Policy

Free Trade Vs Protection

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Balance of payment
 

  1. Balance of Trade Vs BOP
  2. Accounts in BOP
  3. Disequilibrium in BOP and its effects
  4. Measures to Correct BOP
Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Exchange Rates and Open-economy Macroeconomics
 

 

  1. Foreign Exchange Markets and Systems
  2. Theories of Exchange Rate Determination- Mint Theory,
  3. Purchasing power parity Theory
  4. BOP theory
Unit-7
Teaching Hours:10
Macro-Economic Issues and Policies
 

National Income,

Aggregate demand and supply,

Inflation,

Unemployment,

Fiscal policy and monetary policy,

Exim Policy.

Text Books And Reference Books:

—  International Economics – Cherunilam

—  International Economics – Dominick Salvatore

—  International Economics – H.G Mannur

—  International Economics – Raj Kumar

—  International Economics- Bo Sodersten

—  International Economics- Robert J. Carbaugh

—  International Economics: Theory and Policy - Paul R. Krugman and Maurice Obstfeld

—  Textbook of Economics – William Boyes & Michael Melvin

 Deviga Vengedasalam, Karunagaran Madhavan: Principles of Economics. 3 rd Edition

Krugman, Obstfeld, Melitz. International Economics: Theory and Policy, 10th Edition, 2012. Pearson.

Rajkumar: International economics, latest edition. Excel book

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

International Economics – Cherunilam

—  International Economics – Dominick Salvatore

—  International Economics – H.G Mannur

—  International Economics – Raj Kumar

—  International Economics- Bo Sodersten

—  International Economics- Robert J. Carbaugh

—  International Economics: Theory and Policy - Paul R. Krugman and Maurice Obstfeld

—  Textbook of Economics – William Boyes & Michael Melvin

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

  • CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%
  • CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                – 25%

  • CIA III – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation             – 10%

  • Attendance                                                                    – 05%

  • End Semester Examination                                              – 50%

 

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

 

 

 

MAIS133 - INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The study of international relations takes a wide range of theoretical approaches. Some emerge from within the discipline itself; others have been imported, in whole or in part, from disciplines such as economics or sociology. This course introduces students to some of the most important theory and practice for studying international relations. It provides a fairly comprehensive overview of the major political developments and events starting from the twentieth century. Students are expected to learn about the key milestones in world history and equip them with the tools to understand and analyze the same from different perspectives. The aim of the course is to understand International relations and its multidisciplinary nature where the student will be accommodated with contemporary trend of multidisciplinary discourse.

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate analytical aptitude to studying various concepts and theories of International Relations

CO2: Identify and describe the main similarities and differences among the major IR theories.

CO3: Understand the historical evolution of IR theory over the course of time

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
PERSPECTIVES IN IR
 

International Relations: Meaning, nature, scope and importance; Meaning, elements, evaluation of national power, Approaches to International Peace: Balance of Power; Collective Security; Disarmament and arms control and War

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THOUGHT
 

Emmanuel Kant on perpetual peace, Hugo Grotius on International Relation, Karl Smith, Thucydides, Confucius, Arthashastra Thomas Hobbes, Aquinas.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES
 

Idealism, Realism, Liberalism, Neo-Realism and Neo-Liberalism, System theory  World Systems, Functionalism and Neo-functionalism, New-world order, Dependency theory, Game theory and Marxist approaches

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
CONTEMPORARY IR THEORY
 

Historical sociology, Normative theory, Social Constructivism, Postmodernism, post- colonialism, critical theory and Neo- Marxist Approaches in IR

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Alternative approaches to IR theory
 

Non-traditional Security threats in International Relations, Green Politics in International Relations, Globalization and new orders of non-State actors, and Feminist Theories, Language and Symbols in International Relations

Text Books And Reference Books:

Nicholson, M. International Relations: A Concise Introduction. New York: Palgrave, 2002. 1-4. Print.

Smith, M. and R. Little. “Introduction.” Perspectives on World Politics. New York: Routledge, 2000. 1-17. Print.  

Baylis, John and Steve Smith. The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. 4thedn. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. 1-6. Print. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Nicholson, M. International Relations: A Concise Introduction. New York: Palgrave, 2002. 1-4. Print.

Cox, M. “From the Cold War to the War on Terror.” The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Eds. John Baylis and Steve Smith. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 141-155. Print.

Bull, H. “The Balance of Power and International Order”. Perspectives on World Politics. New York: Routledge, 2000. 1-17. Print.

Dunne, T. “Liberalism.”The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Eds. John Baylis and Steve Smith. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. 185-203. Print.

Keohane, R.O. and Joseph S. Nye. “Trans-governmental Relations and the International Organisation.” Perspectives on World Politics. Eds. M. Smith and R. Little. New York: Routledge, 2000. 229-241. Print.

Moravcsik, Andrew. “Taking Preferences Seriously: A Liberal Theory of International Politics.” International Organisation51.4 (1997): 513-553. Print.

Keohane, Robert O. and Joseph S. Nye, Jr. Power and Interdependence. 3rd edn., Addison-Wesley, 2000. 3-52. Print.

Snyder, Jack. Myths of Empire: Domestic Politics and International Ambition. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1991. Print.

Tickner, Ann J. “You Just Don’t Understand: Troubles Engagements Between Feminists and IR Theorists.” International Studies Quarterly 41.4 (1997, December): 611-632. Print.

Peterson, Spike. Gendered States: Feminist (Re)Visions of International Relations Theory. Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 1992. Print.

Enloe, Cynthia. Bananas, Beaches and Bases: Making Feminist Sense of International Politics. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989. Print.

Cohn, Carol and Cynthia Weber. “Missions, Men and Masculinities.” International Feminist Journal of Politics 1.4: 435-451. Print. 

 Moravcsik, Andrew. “Taking Preferences Seriously: A Liberal Theory of International Politics.” International Organisation51.4 (1997): 513-553. Print. 

Keohane, Robert O. and Joseph S. Nye, Jr. Power and Interdependence. 3rdedn., Addison-Wesley, 2000. 3-52. Print. 

Halliday, F. Rethinking International Relations. London: Macmillan, 1994. 147-166. Print. 

Nicholson, M. International Relations: A Concise Introduction. New York: Palgrave, 2002.120-122. Print. 

Galtung, J. “A Structural Theory of Imperialism.”Perspectives on World Politics. Eds. M. Smith and R. Little. New York: Routledge, 2000. 292-304. Print.

Wallerstein, I. “The Rise and Future Demise of World Capitalist System: Concepts for Comparative Analysis.” Perspectives on World Politics. Eds. M. Smith and R. Little. New York: Routledge, 2000. 292-304. Print. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10% 

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

CIA III – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10% 

 Attendance – 05%

 End Semester Examination – 50%

 TOTAL 100%

MAIS134 - WORLD HISTORY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES: : It is essential to understand how the contemporary world, its priorities and articulations are rooted in the modern period. Broadly identified as beginning from 1800’s and lasting till 1950’s, Modernism was a conceptual movement that influenced the progress of History and Culture of the entire world. It was this pre war world that engineered the historical, political, social, economic and cultural sensibilities of Contemporary period and hence it becomes crucial to understanding International Relations. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Correlate the history of the world in a holistic manner, by understanding the process through which histories of different areas are interlinked with politics, society and culture.

CO2: Apply, trace and link the ideas, debates and practices of the contemporary society with that of the pre war period.

CO3: Critically analyse the context in which the present global history is shaping up and link it to issues of environment and gender.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:18
Europe in 19th C .
 

Liberalism and Nationalism in the early 19th century b) Social Darwinism c) Nationalism and nation States: Unification of Italy and Germany. d) The Romantic era: Concerns and Features- Romanticism  and Musical Nationalism of Richard Wagner – Romanticism in Art and Literature of Goya and Wolfgang von Gothe -Intellectual background of Romanticism: Kant, Hegel and Marx

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Africa and Colonialism
 

Colonialism in Africa b) Pre colonial and colonial Africa : European presence  c)Scramble for Africa d) Consolidation of colonial rule: Raw materials and markets, peasant producers, economic impact, early expressions of nationalism.

 e)The People and Cultures of Africa: Religion and Society in early Africa,

  African literature and literary movements, impact of African culture on the West.           

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Asia between 18th and early 20th centuries.
 

a)      Ruptures in Ottomanization,and the issue of eastern question

b)       Arab nationalism – Arabia during the world wars.

c)      Western interventions and regional friction in China: Anglo Chinese confrontations, revolution and the republic-   Japan: Period of assertion 1860 to 1920.           

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
The Americas
 

a)      USA: Formation of national identity – Struggle for nationhood: westward expansion and  the civil war – Idea of USA: i)The age of Jazz ii) Literature: Emerson and David Thoreau iii) Architecture: Frank Lyod Wright 

b)      Early colonial empires in Latin America: Portugal, Spain and France, the age of conquistadores,  Portuguese empire in the Atlantic,

c)   Plantation economy, Slave trade and its impact on Europe.

c) Colonial culture and liberation movements.      

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Sneh Mahajan, Issues in Twentieth Century World History, Macmillan,2010   2010                            

2. Kevin Shillington, History of Africa, Palgrave Macmillan 2012

3. Edited, US History, Rice University, 2017

4.Meenaxi Phukan, Rise of the Modern West, Trinity Press 1998

                                                                            

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.        Hobsbawm, Eric. Age of Extreme: The Short Twentieth Century 1914-1991. London:  Abacus, 1995. 

2.  Carr, E.H. International Relations between the Two World Wars: 1919 – 1939. NewYork: Palgrave, 2004.

3. Taylor, A.J.P. The Origins of the Second World War. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1961.

4.      Carrthuthers, S.L. “International History, 1900- 1945.”The Globalisation of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Eds. John Baylis and Steve Smith.  Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005

6      Calvocoressi, P. World Politics: 1945 – 2000. Essex: Pearson, 2005.

7.     Scott, L. “International History, 1945 – 1990.” The Globalisation of World Politics An Introduction to International Relations. Eds. John Baylis and Steve Smith.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation                     10%

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                      25%

CIA III – Research Topic                                                      10%

Attendance                                                                              05%

End Semester Examination                                                     50%                                        

TOTAL                                                                        100%

 

   Scheme of Evaluation: For all Sections     

50% of the marks for Factual writin

 40% of the marks for Interpretation, Analysis                                                             

 10% of the marks for Writing style that include  grammar, vocabulary, spelling ,presentation

MAIS135 - INDIAN FOREIGN POLICY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Indian foreign policy reflects the perceptions and priorities of our political, economic and military leaderships from time to time in relation to the neighbourhood, middle and big powers. This is evidenced from the continuity and change in Indian national security and foreign policy.

It also deals with the mechanics of Indian foreign policy making and the issues that influence the policy in order for them to develop a perspective on the emerging trends in Indian foreign policy.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the influences on the basic features of Indian foreign policy that have evolved over 75 years of nationhood and understand the mechanics of and appreciate the complexities involved in policy making.

CO2: Appreciate and analyse the role of various Prime Ministers in the foreign policy making.

CO3: Understand the challenges that India faces in its neighbourhood and the reasons behind the policy stances.

CO4: Apply the historical understanding to current India?s policy with regards to our relations with important world players and regional powers

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Foundations of Indian Foreign Policy
 

Doctrinal Aspects; Determinants: domestic and international; Evolution of Indian foreign policy, pre-Independence, post-Independence, Non Aligned Movement, Cold War and Security Politics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Making of India's Foreign Policy
 

Institutions, Structure, and Processes:Structure of Indian Government, Political System, Ministry of External Affairs, Prime Minister’s Office, Research & Analysis Wing, Role of Think Tanks, Media,  Role of the Prime ministers

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
India's Relations with its Neighbours
 

Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Afghanistan and South-East Asia

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
India's Relations with World Powers
 

US, Russian Federation, PRC, Japan, and European Union

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
India's Relations with Regional Powers
 

Israel, East and West Asia, African Countries, Australia and South America.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
India's Foreign Economic Policy
 

Economic aspects; Interactions with Global and Regional Institutions and Grouping (UN, IMF & WB, WTO, ASEAN-ARF, APEC, EU, BRICs, SCO, SAARC, BIMSTEC, Asian infrastructure investment bank).

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
India's Defense and Nuclear Policy
 

Genesis, Doctrines, Evolutionary Trajectory, Emerging Dimensions.

 

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:6
Continuity and Change in 21st Century
 

Non-Alignment,Terrorism, Energy Security, Indian Diaspora

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Bandyopadhyaya, J., The Making of India's Foreign Policy: Determinants, Institutions, Processes, and Personalities, Bombay: Allied Publishers, 1970.

 Dixit, J. N., Indian Foreign Policy and its Neighbours, New Delhi: Gyan Publishing, 2001.

 Dogra Rajiv, India's World: How prime ministers shaped foreign policy, Rupa Publications India , New Delhi, 2020

 Malone, David, C. Raja Mohan, Srinath Raghavan, The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015.

 Malone, David, Does the Elephant Dance: Contemporary Indian Foreign Policy, New Delhi: Oxford, 2011.

 Menon, Shivshankar, Choices: Inside the Making of India’s Foreign Policy, Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press, 2016.

 Rajmohan, C., Crossing the Rubicon: The Shaping of India's New Foreign Policy, New Delhi, Penguin Books, 2005.

Pande, Aparna, From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India's Foreign Policy, New Delhi: Harper Collins, 2017.

 Saran Shyam, How India Sees The World: From Kautilya to Modi, New Delhi: Juggernaut, 2018.

 Tharoor, Shashi, Pax Indica: India and the World of 21st Century, New Delhi: Penguin, 2013.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·         Bajpai, Kanti, Basit, Saira, Krishnappa, V. eds., India’s grand Stategy: History, theory, cases (2014)

·         Nehru, Jawaharlal,  India's Foreign Policy: Selected Speeches, September 1946-April 1961, New Delhi: Publications Division, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Govt. of India, 1961.

·         Nancy Jetly and Rajendra Prasad, India's Foreign Policy: Challenges And Prospects, New Delhi: Vikas Pub. House, 1999.

·         Muni, S.D., India’s foreign Policy, The Democracy Dimension (2009)

·         Tharoor, Shashi Reasons of State: Political development and India’s foreign policy under Indira Gandhi (1982)

 

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation  – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation  10%

·         Attendance                                                     – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                               – 50%

 

                                                                     TOTAL 100%

MAIS136 - SOUTH ASIA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

South Asia is home to the world’s most populous contries, characterized by religious diversity and one of the fastest-growing regional economies. The vast peninsula is situated at the crossroads of West Asia and East Asia, and dominates the shipping lanes of the Indian Ocean. As international attention shifts to Asia, the states of South Asia are expected to play a more prominent role in shaping the affairs of this huge continent.

 

This course provides a foundation to understand the dynamics of this crucial region and offers students the opportunity to concentrate on a part of the world whose importance in international affairs is increasingly recognized by the policy and corporate communities. It includes studying land use systems, political ecology, utilization of and access to natural resources, health issues, food security, ethnic conflicts, wars and migration studies. To achieve a comprehensive understanding of human-environment interactions at the interface between local and global processes, it gives an insight into the central dilemmas of modern politics, economic development and social change present in the region.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop a thorough understanding of culture, history, polity and economy of South Asia.

CO2: acquire a balanced, multi-disciplinary understanding of the contemporary issues in the region of South Asia

CO3: Demonstrate the skills to analyze the significance of South Asian region in world affairs

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Physical and Human Geography of South Asia
 
  • Geology, Landforms, Climate, Settlement, Population, Historical Geography
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
South Asian Regional Identity: Composition, aspiration and Constraints
 
  • South Asian civilization
  • Evolution of power, authority and institutions,
  • Ethnicity and Identity.
  • Culture and Identity in Modern South Asia 1800-2000
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Government and politics of South Asia
 
  • Governance: State Formation, Political Elite, Insurgency and Terrorism, Civil War,
  • Militarization: Civil-Military Relations, Introduction of Nuclear Weapons,
  • Territorial Disputes: Role of Super Powers:  Political, Economic, Military, Social Dimensions   
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Foreign Policy of South Asian countries - Inter-regional conflicts and subsequent relations
 
  • Kashmir
  • Rann of Kutch
  • Farakka
  • Ethnic conflicts
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Regionalism
 

South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation,

  • creation and evolution,
  • trade flows and treaties,
  • barriers to intra-regional trade,
  • challenges and opportunities
Text Books And Reference Books:

1)      South Asia’s Geography of Conflict (August 2010), Robert D. Kaplan

2)      South Asia:  Political and Economic Region, DrNitasha Malhotra, Kamala Nehru College, University of  Delhi

3)       South Asia in a Globalising World: A Reconstructed Regional Geography, 2002, Prentice- Hall, Bradnock, RW & Williams, G

4)      The Changing Map of Asia: A Political Geography, 2007, East, W Gordon

5)      Countries in Transition :A Brief Review of the Emerging Political Economy of Bangladesh, Bhutan, the Maldives, and Nepal, South Asia Occasional Paper Series 3, Asian Development Bank, Manila    

6)      Foreign Assistance and its Impact on Civil-Military Relations: A Case Study of Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal (Thesis) by Bobby Chand, March 2014 , Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, US

7)      Government and Politics in South Asia, Boulder, Col.: Baxter, C., Kennedy, C., Malik, Y., &Oberst, R. (2002)  Westview Press.

8) Mutual Suspicions, Murthy, Padmaja,   (2000) Knowledge World, NewDelhi

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Basham, Arthur L. 1954. The Wonder That Was India; a Survey of the Culture of the Indian SubContinent Before the Coming of the Muslims. London: Sidgwick and Jackson.

Chandra, Bipan. 1989. India's Struggle for Independence. New York: Penguin Books.

Keay, John. 2000. India: A History. London: Harper Collins.

Sarkar, Sumit. 1989. Modern India, 1885-1947. New York: Macmillan Press.

Wolpert, Stanley A. 2004. A New History of India. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

 

 

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

MAIS141A - FOREIGN LANGUAGE (FRENCH) (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

'Travailler en français en entreprise' is a professional French course at elementary level (A1/A2). It has been designed for students whose French is part of the professional project, or people already integrated into the world of work.

'Travailler en français en entreprise' (French in business) is a pragmatic method, based on an action-based approach: students are regularly put in situations through role plays and case studies. The professional situations and the tasks proposed are varied and realistic and thus give rise to written and oral productions close to the authentic.

'Travailler en français en entreprise' (French in business) includes ten units that address a wide range of topics related to the business world.

Course objectives include the ability

- to speak and understand simple conversations

- to understand basic grammar 

- to write simple sentences.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: speak and understand simple conversations

CO2: understand and use simple grammar

CO3: write simple sentences

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Faire connaissance - Getting to know
 

The unit includes a conversation, document, vocabulary, know how and case studies

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Vie professionnelle, vie personnelle - Professional and personal life
 

The unit includes a conversation, document, vocabulary, know how and case studies

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Traiter un problème - Dealing with a problem
 

The unit includes a conversation, document, vocabulary, know how and case studies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Voyager pour affaires - Travel for business
 

The unit includes a conversation, document, vocabulary, know how and case studies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Echanges hors bureauExchanges outside the office
 

The unit includes a conversation, document, vocabulary, know how and case studies

Text Books And Reference Books:

Travailler en français en entreprise - Méthode de français sur objectifs spécifiques - Niveaux A1 /A2 du CECR - Bernard GILLMANN - Edition Didier 2007

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

French Course Grammar - Bescherelle book series, Bertenshaw grammar, French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc

1.    

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Quiz on simple grammar / Role Play

CIA 2 - Written test

CIA 3 - Quiz on various aspects of France and French / Test of the four skills 

MAIS141B - FOREIGN LANGUAGE (CHINESE) (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Given the growing influence of China in the changing world order and the fact that Chinese language is one of the 6 official languages of UN, this basic level course offers an opportunity to the International Studies students to discover and learn this much intriguing ancient, east asian language perceived as the most difficult in the world.

This beginner’s level course will:

  • introduce students to the basics of Chinese language and culture,
  • help them develop basic speaking, listening, reading and writing skills,
  • prepare them for HSK (level 1), an international standardized exam conducted by Confucius Institute Headquarters (Hanban, a public institution) in affiliation with the Government of China
  • and also lay a good foundation for studying or working in a chinese speaking environment.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of brief history of the language as well as it?s unique features. 1.3. They will know the basics of the Chinese phonetic and the writing system. 1.4. They will know the vocabulary, sentence patterns and the grammar necessary for basic needs of communication in everyday life like greetings, talking about self, family, college etc.

CO2: 2. Skill: 2.1. They will have the oral and written skill to be able to understand and communicate in the above given situations. 2.2. They will pronounce the Chinese words more or less correctly. 2.3. With practice they will be able to identify and write characters covered in the first semester. 2.4. They will have the competence to succeed at HSK 1.

CO3: 3. Attitude 3.1. Openness towards the new culture and language 3.2. Awareness that the knowledge and understanding of Chinese language and culture is an asset in the emerging world order 3.3. Appreciate the linguistic and cultural differences.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Xiexie: retroflex, tone and spelling rules, radicals, compound strokes
 
  • Part one: initials j, q, x, finals beginning with 'i',  finals beginning with ü
  • Part two: initials z, c, s, the final 'i'
  • Part three: finar 'er', retroflex ending, the tone sandhi "bù不"
  • Part four: summary of spelling rules, omission of syllables, review of phonetics, compound strokes(1), radicals
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Ni hao : pinyin, tones, characters, putonghua
 
  • Part One: the basic sounds, initials b, p, m, f, d, t, n, l, single finals, tones
  • Part two: initials g, k, h, compound finals, nasal finals, third tone sandhi
  • Part three: Initials zh, ch, sh, r, final -i, finals that begin with 'u'
  • part four: tone sandhi "yi 一", rules of the separation of symbols, origin of Chinese characters, basic strokes, stroke order, fun with Chinese characters
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Initiation: Introduction to the language, country and the Text Book
 

 

  • greeting and ice breaking
  • experiencing the country its culture and language
  • introducing the course and the book
  • a brief history of the language

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Numbers, days and date
 
  • 1 to 10, days of the week
  • 11 to 100 months, date
  • Numbers in Chinese culture

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
How have you been lately?
 
  1. Functions:Daily greetings, Asking about one's name, Greeting others 
  2. Language points: "mā吗" questions, sentence with adjectival predicate, position of the adverb "yě也" word order in Chinese
  3. Chinese characters: components, interrelationship between strokes, compound strokes(2), chinese radicals 亻, 讠, 木, 辶
  4. Cultural knowledge: Simplified Chinese characters
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Which country do you come from?
 
  1. Functions: Introducing others, asking someone's surname, nationality, likes, dislikes, saying goodbye, identifying items
  2. Language points: "shì是" questions, interrogative phrases with "什么shénme" and "哪na", conjunction "和hé", the position of the adverb "都dōu"
  3. Chinese characters: left-right structure, top-bottom structure, enclosed structure, radicals 饣, 口
  4. Cultural knowledge: Chinese dictionaries
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
How many people are there in your family?
 
  1. Functions: Asking about one's family, age, profession, entertaining guests
  2. Language points: “有you” sentences, modifier expressing possession, measure word, interrogative sentences "谁shéi“ and “几ii”, adverb “hái还”
  3. Chinese characters: common left-right structure, radicals 艹,  
  4. Cultural knowledge: Forms of address for family members and relatives
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
What time do you have class tomorrow?
 
  1. Functions: Talking about sudying(1), making a date, asking about time(1), one's major
  2. Language points: a time word as an adverbial, verb/adjective-not-verb/adjective questions, "呢ne"questions
  3. Chinese characters: common top-bottom structure, radicals 刀, 日
  4. Cultural knowledge: The educational system of China
Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
HSK 1 : an introduction
 
  1. pattern, vocabulary, sentence structures
  2. mock tests
Text Books And Reference Books:
  • New Practical Chinese Reader Textbook 1 3rd edition Beijing Language and Culture University press 2015
  • New Practical Chinese Reader Workbook 1 3rd edition Beijing Language and Culture University press 2016
  • HSK vocabulary and mock tests
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • HSK standard course 1
  • HSK standard workbook 1
  • A concise Chinese Grammmar by Guo Zhenhua
  • Fun with Chinese characters 
  • HSK 1 Storybook
  • Fluentu, Chinesepod and many other online resources
Evaluation Pattern
  • CIA 1 20 (10%)
  • CIA II 50 (25%)
  • CIA III 20 (10%)
  • End Sem 100 (50%)
  • Attendance (5%)
  • Total : 100%

MAIS231 - INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

1.    Provide an introductory analysis of theories of political economy.

2.    To provide a basic history of international political economy.

To apply theories of political economy in order to explain the dynamic operation of the global economy as an interaction between economics and politics.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Conceptualise and briefly explain the theoretical frames of international political economy.

CO 2: To trace the evolution of the international political economy up to the period of neoliberalism.

CO 3: Use the basic tools of economics and political science to analyse the nature of international economic competition and interdependence.

CO 4: To explain and analyse the dynamics of financial liberalisation, sovereign debt crisis and the politics of economic distribution.

CO 5: Define economic regionalism and analyse the Euro-zone crisis

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Concepts and Theories
 

The modern Nation State.

Mercantilism and Pre-Modern World Economy. 

Nineteenth Century Liberalism and Structuralism.

The liberal international economy: practice and arguments. 

The nationalist reaction: practice and arguments.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
From the inter-war crisis to financial liberalisation
 

The Gold Standard Era.

The politics of the inter-war years.

The Bretton Woods settlement and the collapse of Bretton Woods.

Orthodox Development Economics and developing economies.

The Mahalanobis Model in India.

Indira Gandhi’s Socialism.

Early Reforms under Rajiv Gandhi in the late 1980s.

The Asian financial crisis.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Global economic competition and interdependence in post-cold war period
 

Developing Economies and the importance of integration with the global economy.

Terms of Trade and the WTO.

The protectionist backlash. 

Controversies over Multinational Corporations.

Economic development of China under Mao, Deng Xia Ping and post Deng period. 

The balance of financial terror.

The financial crisis 2008.

The politics of energy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
The future of modern states
 

The economic discretion of the state.)

Financial Liberalization and the politics of distribution.

The sovereign debt crisis and the modern democratic nation-state.

 Case study of a Latin American country.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
The European monetary union and the euro-zone crisis
 

Immediate Post Second World War Period and the first steps toward Economic Regionalism.

Birth of European Economic, the Monetary Union and Establishment of Euro.

Problems with a single Central Bank.

Causes of the Euro-zone Crisis, Reforms.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Oatley, T. (2015). International political economy. Routledge.

Ravenhill, J. (2014). Global political economy. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Hahnel, R. (2015). The ABCs of political economy. University of Chicago Press Economics Books.

2)    Gilpin, R. (2011). Global political economy: Understanding the international economic order. Princeton University Press.

3)    Stiglitz, J. E. (2002). Globalization and its Discontents (Vol. 500). Norton: New York.

Evaluation Pattern

1)    CIA - 1 20 Marks

        CIA - 2- Mid Semester Exam: 50 marks

       CIA - 3: 20 Marks

MAIS232 - US AND LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The course provides a firm foundation to comprehend the overarching role of US and Latin America in the world affairs.

 

Knowledge

Students will be able to acquire deep knowledge on nature and historical evolution of the foreign policy of US and contemporary relevance of Latin America. They would understand the rationale behind the foreign policy decision making process every country adopts. The learn important foreign policy choices these countries have taken at different stages to promote their national interest.

Skill

Students will be able to critically analyse foreign policy problems in a dynamic manner. They would be able to interpret theoretically of foreign policy decisions being implemented by these countries. Students would acquire the ability to write essays and policy briefs on major developments in foreign policy of the three countries.  

Aptitude

Possess discipline-relevant professional skills, knowledge and competencies. They articulate complex ideas with respect to the needs and abilities of diverse audiences. They engage with the society through writings in popular media and scholarly journals.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the trajectory of American foreign relations.

CO2: Examine the causes of America's rise to power and and it?s foreign policy making vis-à-vis global issues and challenges.

CO3: Identify and examine the issues faced by major regional powers in the Latin American region.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
US Foreign Policy
 

Evolution of US Foreign Policy- Munroe Doctrine, Neutrality, Exceptionalism, World War I & II

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Cold War and its Impact
 
  • US and the Cold War:  Marshall Plan, Truman Doctrine, Korean War, Vietnam War, Cuban Missile Crisis, Nuclear competition, Arms race and Détente.
  • US Foreign Policy during 1980s. End of the cold war and US’ unipolarity
  • New Frontiers of American Foreign Policy in the post-cold war era-  Global War on Terror, Clinton, Bush, Obama and Trump administrations, Climate Change and American Foreign Policy, Nuclear policy of the United States

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Foreign Policy of Brazil and Argentina
 

  • Foundations of Brazil’s Foreign Policy, Brazil’s role in Latin American politics, Brazil US relations
  • Foundations of Argentina’s Foreign Policy, Argentina’s  role in Latin American politics, Argentina-US relations
Text Books And Reference Books:

Bruce Jentleson, American Foreign Policy: The Dynamics of Choice in the 21st Century.

Walter Russell Mead, Special Providence: American Foreign Policy and How It Changed the World. London: Routledge, 2002.

Stewart Patrick and Shepherd Foreman, Multilateralism and U.S. Foreign Policy: Ambivalent Engagement, Colorado: Lynne Rienner, 2002.

Robert J. Pauly Jr., U.S. Foreign Policy and the Persian Gulf: Safeguarding American Interest through Selective Multilateralism, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing House, 2005.

Joyce P. Kaufman, A Concise History of U.S. Foreign Policy, Oxford: Rowman and Littlefield,2006. Robert J. Art. and Seyom Brown, U.S. Foreign Policy: The Search for a New Role, Michigan:University of Michigan Press, 2008.

Marian Doris Irish and Elke Frank, U.S. Foreign Policy: Context, Conduct, Content, Michigan:University of Michigan Press, 2006.

Fausto Boris, A Concise History of Brazil. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

Chacel, Julian M., Pamela S. Falk and David V. Fleisacher, eds., Brazil’s Economic and Political Future. Boulder: Westview Press, 1988.

Child, Jack, Geopolitics and Conflict in South America: Quarrels Among Neighbors. New York:Praeger, 1985.

Child, Jack, Antarctica and South American Geopolitics: Frozen Lebensraum. New York:Praeger, 1988.

Carranza, Mario Esteban, South American Free Trade Area Or Free Trade Area of the Americas? Open Regionalism and the Future of Regional Economic Integration in SouthAmerica. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000.

Leslie Bethall, ed., Brazil: Empire to Republic, 1822-1930. Cambridge: Cambridge UniversityPress, 1989.

Becker, Bertha K. and Claudio A.G. Elgar, Brazil: A New Regional Power in the WorldEconomy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

Roett, Riordan, Brazil: Politics of a Patrimonial Society. New York: Praeger Special Studies.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Walter Russell Mead, Special Providence: American Foreign Policy and How It Changed the World. London: Routledge, 2002.

Stewart Patrick and Shepherd Foreman, Multilateralism and U.S. Foreign Policy: Ambivalent Engagement, Colorado: Lynne Rienner, 2002.

Evaluation Pattern

1.     CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%

2.     CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

3.     CIA III – Research Topic – 10%

4.     Attendance – 05%

5.     End Semester Examination – 50% 

MAIS233 - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

  • To familiarize students with the basic concepts and approaches to the study of research methodology.
  • To acquaint students with the basics of research methods, techniques, and approaches and to assist in the accomplishment of exploratory as well as result oriented research studies.
  • To help students to identify the research problem and start asking the right questions with a goal of improving their ability to make a logical argument. 
  • To assist students to learn various research techniques (qualitative and quantitative).
  • To train students in the process of writing various academic and popular writings.
  • To sensitise students of research ethics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Illustrate familiarity with the basic concepts and approaches to the study of research methodology.Infer the basics of research methods, techniques, and approaches that can assist in carrying out research.

CO2: Identify research problems and start asking the right questions with the goal of improving their ability to make a logical argument. Identify and review the relevant literature. Display various research techniques (qualitative and quantitative) based on the topic. Display skills in the process of writing various academic and popular writings.

CO3: Identify and adopt integrity and ethics while carrying out research. Inculcate inquisitive and innovative nature that can result in fruitful research and learning.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Foundations of Research
 

  •  Human Inquiry and Science
  • Paradigms, Theory, and Social Research
  • The Ethics and Politics of Social Research
  •  Characteristics of scientific method

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Problem Identification & Formulation
 

  • Explanation and Causation
  • Research Question 
  • Literature Review
  • Hypothesis:  Importance, logic, and testing

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Research Techniques
 

  • Qualitative and quantitative research
  • Policy oriented, problem specific research in IR.
  • Experimental and Formal Research Methods
  • Case studies and comparative research
  •  Content analysis and historical analysis
  •  Direct observation, field studies and archival research
  •  Questionnaire, interviewing and Survey
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Research Design and Report
 

  • Analyzing primary and secondary documents
  • Data presentation and preliminary analysis, interpretation of data
  • Research Design and writing the report
  • Organizing and Mapping Arguments
  • Presenting the Material: citation, references, notes

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Approaches and Theories
 
  • Institutional and Organizational Theories
  • Introduction to  study of Karl Popper, Paul Feyerband and Imre Lakotas
  • The English School, Critical Theory:
  • Frankfurt School and Marxist Approach
  •  Normative and Postmodernist Approaches
Text Books And Reference Books:

Ahuja, Ram. Research Method, Rawat Publication, New Delhi, 2001

Art, Robert J. and Jervis, Robert International Politics: Enduring Concepts and Contemporary Issues, Longman, 2010

Dhiman, AK and  SC Sinha. Research Methodology, Ess Ess Publication, New Delhi, 2002

Fowler, Flyod J. (Jr). Survey Research Methods, Sage, Beverley Hills, 1984.

Gerring, John 2004. “What is a Case Study and What is it Good for?”American Political Science Review 98, pp. 341-354

Lantis, Jeffrey S, Lynn M. Kuzma and John Boeher, eds. The New International Studies Classroom: Active Teaching, Active Learning, Lynne Rienner,Publishers, Boulder,2000.

Misra, Rabi  N and Sharma, R. P. Research Methodology and Analysis, Discovery Publishing, New Delhi, 2006

Morgan, David L. Integrating Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: A Pragmatic Approach, Sage, New Delhi, 2014

Paul, K. Hatt and William J. Goode. Methods in Social Research, McGrawHill-Koga-Kausha, Tokyo, 1982

Phophalia, AK.  Modern Research Methodology: New Trends and Techniques, Paradise Publishing, 2010

Silverman, David (Ed). Qualitative Research: Theory, Method and Practice, Sage, New Delhi, 2004

 

Sprinz, Detlef F. and Wolinsky, Yael, Cases, Numbers, Models: International Relations Research Methods

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Phophalia, AK.  Modern Research Methodology: New Trends and Techniques, Paradise Publishing, 2010

Silverman, David (Ed). Qualitative Research: Theory, Method and Practice, Sage, New Delhi, 2004

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

CIA III – Research Topic – 10%

 Attendance – 05%

End Semester Examination – 50%

TOTAL 100%

MAIS234 - SOUTH ASIA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

South Asia is home to the world’s most populous nation states, characterized by religious diversity and one of the fastest-growing regional economies. The vast peninsula is situated at the crossroads of West Asia and East Asia, and dominates the shipping lanes of the Indian Ocean. As international attention shifts to Asia, the states of South Asia are expected to play a more prominent role in shaping the affairs of this huge continent.

 

This paper provides a foundation to understand the dynamics of this crucial region and offers students the opportunity to concentrate on a part of the world whose importance in international affairs is increasingly recognized by the policy and corporate communities. It includes studying land use systems, political ecology, utilization of and access to natural resources, health issues, food security, ethnic conflicts, wars and migration studies. To achieve a comprehensive understanding of human-environment interactions at the interface between local and global processes, it gives an insight into the central dilemmas of modern politics, economic development and social change present in the region.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse the significance of the region?s geography and how this landmass has shaped the history, polity, society and economy of South Asia.

CO2: Trace the evolution of foreign relations among the countries of the region.

CO3: Examine the political initiatives undertaken towards economic regionalism which resulted in the creation of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Physical and Human Geography of South Asia
 

Geology, Landforms, Climate,Settlement, Population, Historical Geography

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
South Asian Regional Identity: Composition, aspiration and Constraints
 
  • South Asian civilization
  • Evolution of power, authority and institutions,
  • Ethnicity and Identity.
  • Culture and Identity in Modern South Asia 1800-2000
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Government and politics of South Asia
 

Governance: State Formation, Political Elite, Insurgency and Terrorism, Civil War, Militarization: Civil-Military Relations, Introduction of Nuclear Weapons, Territorial Disputes: Role of Super Powers:  Political, Economic, Military, Social Dimensions   

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Foreign Policy of South Asian countries - Inter-regional conflicts and subsequent relations
 

a. Kashmir

b. Rann of Kutch

c. Farakka

d. Ethnic conflicts

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Regionalism
 

South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation, creation and evolution, trade flows and treaties, barriers to intra-regional trade, challenges and opportunities

Text Books And Reference Books:

1)      South Asia’s Geography of Conflict (August 2010), Robert D. Kaplan

2)      South Asia:  Political and Economic Region, DrNitasha Malhotra, Kamala Nehru College, University of  Delhi

3)       South Asia in a Globalising World: A Reconstructed Regional Geography, 2002, Prentice- Hall, Bradnock, RW & Williams, G

4)      The Changing Map of Asia: A Political Geography, 2007, East, W Gordon

5)      Countries in Transition :A Brief Review of the Emerging Political Economy of Bangladesh, Bhutan, the Maldives, and Nepal, South Asia Occasional Paper Series 3, Asian Development Bank, Manila    

6)      Foreign Assistance and its Impact on Civil-Military Relations: A Case Study of Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal (Thesis) by Bobby Chand, March 2014 , Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, US

7)      Government and Politics in South Asia, Boulder, Col.: Baxter, C., Kennedy, C., Malik, Y., &Oberst, R. (2002)  Westview Press.

8) Mutual Suspicions, Murthy, Padmaja,   (2000) Knowledge World, NewDelhi

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Government and Politics in South Asia, Boulder, Col.: Baxter, C., Kennedy, C., Malik, Y., &Oberst, R. (2002)  Westview Press.

Mutual Suspicions, Murthy, Padmaja,   (2000) Knowledge World, NewDelhi

Evaluation Pattern

 

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

 

 

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

MAIS241A - FOREIGN LANGUAGE (FRENCH) (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

'Travailler en français en entreprise' is a professional French course at elementary level (A1/A2). It has been designed for students whose French is part of the professional project, or people already integrated into the world of work.

'Travailler en français en entreprise' (In business) is a pragmatic method, based on an action-based approach: students are regularly put in situations through role plays and case studies. The professional situations and the tasks proposed are varied and realistic and thus give rise to written and oral productions close to the authentic.

'Travailler en français en entreprise' (In business) includes ten units that address a wide range of topics related to the business world.

Course objectives include the ability

- to speak and understand simple conversations

- to understand basic grammar 

- to write simple sentences.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: speak and understand simple conversations

CO2: to understand basic grammar

CO3: to write simple sentences

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Vendre - Sales / Selling
 

The unit includes a conversation, document, vocabulary, know how and case studies

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Collaborer - Collaborating
 

The unit includes a conversation, document, vocabulary, know how and case studies

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Commercialiser - Marketing
 

The unit includes a conversation, document, vocabulary, know how and case studies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Organiser - Organising
 

The unit includes a conversation, document, vocabulary, know how and case studies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Compétences - Skills
 

The unit includes a conversation, document, vocabulary, know how and case studies

Text Books And Reference Books:

Travailler en français en entreprise - Méthode de français sur objectifs spécifiques - Niveaux A1 /A2 du CECR - Bernard GILLMANN - Edition Didier 2007

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

French Course Grammar - Bertenshaw , French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc

1.    

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - Quiz on grammar tenses etc / Presenting a product

CIA 2 - Written test

CIA 3 - Quiz on various aspects of French culture / Oral and written comprehension / Oral and written production  

MAIS241B - FOREIGN LANGUAGE (CHINESE) (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Semester 2 Chinese course will be a continuation of the previous course to help students consolidate the basics and further develop their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills and prepare for HSK (level 2), an international standardized exam conducted by Confucius Institute Headquarters(Hanban, a public institution) in affiliation with the Government of China.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will have a repertoire of about 500 characters in Mandarin

CO2: They will possess the vocabulary and common sentence patterns necessary for the day to day situations given in the units covered in the second semester

CO3: They will know the important dates, festivals and places in China and some salient features of Chinese culture

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Happy birthday to you
 
  1. Functions: Talking about the date, wishing on birthday, inviting someone, expressing an apology, a regret
  2. Language points: nominal predicate sentence, two object verbal predicate("sòng", "jiāo"expressing emphasis with "jiù", sentence with rising tone
  3. Chinese characters: Common enclosure structure, radicals: , ,
  4. Cultural knowledge: The Chinese Zodiac
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The library is to the north of the cafeteria
 

1- Functions: Asking for directions, about words one does not understand, describing locations, consoling someone, expresseng not hearing or clearly understanding

2- Language points: nouns of locality, "zài" sentences, "you"or"shì" to indicate existence, "gēn"/"gěi"+noun/pronoun prepositional construction, "hao ma?","duì ma对吗?"questions

3- Chinese characters: compound character, radicals 

4- Cultural knowledge: The local style dwellings in China

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
How much is half a kilo of apple?
 
  1. Functions: praise and response, asking price, for help on encountering a language problem, bargaining, paying, make a request, give permission, choosing clothes, settling a bill,
  2. Language points: bigger numbers, sentences with optative verbs"xiang想" and "keyi可以" , snetences with 2 object-verbal predicate"gei给", "wèn问", "zhao找", questions with interrogative pronoun "zenme怎么"
  3. Chinese characters: locating chinese character in a dictionary based on the radical, radicals 手, , 钅
  4. Cultural knowledge: The currency of China today
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
I'm not feeling well at all
 
  1. Functions: urging someone to do something, apologizing, asking about someone's health, expressing a need, a possibility, registering in a hospital, talking about one's health, treating an illness
  2. Language points: sentence with subject-predicate phrase as the predicate, choice type questions, serial verbs for expressing purpose, optative verbs "yīnggāi应该","yào要","néng能", prepositional construction with zài在 + noun/pronoun
  3. Chinese characters: locating chinese characters in a dictionary based on pīnyīn, radicals 疒, 月, 目, 广
  4. Cultural knowledge: Traditional Chinese Medicine
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
It's getting cool
 
  1. Functions: talking about seasons & weather, one's plans, transportation, suggesting an activity, asking about time (2)
  2. Language points: particle "le了" for change of status, serial verbs for expressing means or manner, optative verbs "huì会", "kenéng可能", sentence with question pronoun "zenmeyàng怎么样"
  3. Chinese characters: pictophonic characters, radicals 氵, 冫, 纟, 灬, 穴
  4. Cultural knowledge: climate of China
Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Merry Christmas + HSK2 practice
 
  1. Functions: talking about something that has happened, someone who has changed, a holiday, about studying (2), asking about one's age(3), holiday greetings, making a phone call (1), passing on someone's regards
  2. Language points: particle "le了" to confirm something has happened, a pivotal sentence, "shìbushì是不是" questions
  3. Chinese radicals: 女, 夊, 阝(left), 阝(right)
  4. Traditional Chinese festivals
  5. HSK: in introduction to the pattern, vocabulary, practice tests
Text Books And Reference Books:
  • New Practical Chinese Reader Textbook 1 3rd edition Beijing Language and Culture University press 2015
  • New Practical Chinese Reader Workbook 1 3rd edition Beijing Language and Culture University press 2016
  • HSK vocabulary and mock tests
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • HSK standard course 2
  • HSK standard workbook 2
  • A concise Chinese Grammmar by Guo Zhenhua
  • Fun with Chinese characters 
  • HSK 1 Storybook
  • Fluentu, Chinesepod and many other online resources
Evaluation Pattern
  • CIA 1 20 (10%)
  • CIA II 50 (25%)
  • CIA III 20 (10%)
  • End Sem 100 (50%)
  • Attendance (5%)
  • Total : 100%

MAIS331 - PROBLEMS OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Problems of International Relations is a combination of interdisciplinary and disciplinary courses to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the interrelationships among people as they function in different cultural, economic, and political settings. Due to the rapid pace of globalization, traditional boundaries are blurred within the international system. Transnational flows of goods, finance, ideas, communications, images, crime, and terrorism operate in an environment of connectedness and interdependence.

Course Outcome

CO1: To become familiar with the theories and arguments of important International Relations theorists, and debate on their contemporary relevance.

CO2: Develop the ability to construct and evaluate analytical arguments with clarity.

CO3: Develop a sense of responsibility and situational awareness to present-day realities and challenges in international politics.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Problems of International Relation
 

EH Carr

  Hans. J. Morganthau

  Kenneth Waltz

Robert Gilpin

John J. Mearsheimer

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Security Studies
 

1.    Hedley Bull

2.    Barry Buzan

3.    Ken Booth

4.    David Mutiner

5.    Robert Jervis

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
A New International Order in post-1990s
 

1.    The End of History; Francis Fukuyama,

2.    Jihad vs. World; Benjamin R. Barber,

3.    The Class of Civilization; Samuel P. Huntington

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Major issues in contemporary World Politics
 

1.    Environmental issues

2.    Terrorism

3.    Human Rights

4.    Maritime Security

5.    Other Non-traditional security issues

6. Gender In International Relations: Ann Tickner

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Evolution of International Society
 

International Politics of Pre-War Era.

Cold War: The Politics of Nuclear Weapons.

Post Cold War IR

Text Books And Reference Books:

John Baylis and Steve Smith and Patricia Owens,  The Globalisation of World Politics : An Introduction to International Relations, London, OUP, 2015

Buzan, Barry, ‘The Timeless Wisdom of Realism?’ in Smith, Steve, Booth, Ken and Zalewski, Marysia, eds., International Theory: Positivism and Beyond, Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Carr, E.H., The Twenty Years Crisis 1919-1939: An Introduction to the study of International Relations, (London: Papermac, 1995).

Mearsheimer, John, ‘Structural Realism’ in Tim Dunne et al, eds., International Relations Theories, Oxford, 2007

Mearsheimer, John, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics, New York, W.W. Norton,2001

Morgenthau, Hans, ‘A Realist Theory of International Politics’ in Politics Among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace , (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 5ed 1973).

K N Waltz, ‘The Origins of War in Neo - Realist Theory’, The Journal of Interdisciplinary History, , Vol. 18, No. 4, (Spring, 1988), pp. 615-628

Waltz, Kenneth N., ‘The Continuity of International Politics’, in Ken Booth and Tim Dunne.eds., Worlds in Collision: Terror and the Future of Global Order , (London, Palgrave, 2002)

John M.   Keyens, The Economic Consequences of the Peace

Kenneth Waltz, Theory of International Politics, New York, Waveland Press, 2010 (Revised Ed)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Robert Gilpin,  The Political Economy of International Relations,Princeton University Press, 1987.

E H Carr,The Twenty Years' Crisis, 1919-1939: An Introduction to the Study of International Relations,

Andrew Futter, Politics of Nuclear Weapons

Myriam Dunn Cavelty, Thierry Balzacq (Eds), Routledge Handbook of Security Studies, Routledge,  New York, 2010.

Columba Peoples, Nick Vaughan-Williams (Eds),  Critical Security Studies: An ntroduction, Routledge, New York, 2015.

 D avid C. Gompert, Michael Mandelbaum, Richard L. Garwin, and John H. Barton, Nuclear Weapons and World Politics: Alternatives for The Future

 Paul Bracken, The Second Nuclear Age: Strategy, Danger, and the New Power Politics

Ward Wilson,  Five Myths about Nuclear Weapons

Joseph Nye Jr, Soft Power: The Means to Success in World Politics, Public Affairs, 2006

Robert Jervis, “Cooperation Under the Security Dilemma”, World Politics, Vol. 30, No. 2 (Jan., 1978), pp. 167-214

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I- 20 marks

CIA II- 50 marks

CIA III- 20 marks

MAIS332 - INTERNATIONAL LAW (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

1.      To understand and appreciate the scope of principles and concepts of Public International Law and the issues concerning legal status and relations of States and

 2.      To appreciate the contribution of International Law in conducting such relations with special regard to functional areas and dispute settlement.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: describe the nature of international law, and distinguish it from domestic law

CO2: list out and describe in detail the sources and subjects of international law

CO3: apply concepts of international law to situations of international relations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW
 

·         Nature, Scope, Basis and Binding Nature of International Law

·         Origin, History and Progressive Development

·         Distinction between Public and Private International Law

·         Relationship between International Law and Municipal Law and State Practices

 Cases for reference

1.      The Paquete Habana (1899) 115 US 677

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
SOURCES AND SUBJECTS OF INTERNATIONAL LAW
 

·         Sources of International Law and States Practices

·         Subjects of International Law

Cases for Study:

  1. Case concerning the right of passage over Indian territory Case India v Portugal (1960)ICJ6
  2. Military and Paramilitary Activities in and against Nicaragua (Nicaragua v United States) (Provisional Measures) ICJ Rep 1984, P 169; (Merits) ICJ Rep 1986 P 14

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
STATE IN INTERNATIONAL LAW - IMPORTANT PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS
 

·         Essentials of State and Modern Developments

·         State Recognition

·         State Jurisdiction

·         State Responsibility

·         Succession to Rights and Obligations

·         Diplomatic Immunity

·         Nationality and Statelessness

·         Extradition and Asylum

·         Privileges and Immunities of Internationally Protected Persons

Cases for Study

Essentials of State

·       Island of Palmas Case (Netherlands v US) (1928) 2 RIAA 829

  • Western Sahara Case Advisory Opinion ICJ Reports 1975 P 12

State Recognition

·         Jurisdiction of the Courts of Danzig (1928) PCD, Series B No 15

·         Luther Co v James Sagar and Co (1921) 3 KB 532

·         Mavromattis Palestine concessions Case (Jurisdiction) PCIJ Series A, No 2 (1924), (Merits) PCIJ Series A No 5, (1925)

State Jurisdiction

          Amoco International Finance v Iran 15 Iran-US, CTR 189

          Barcelona Traction Power and Light Company Case (Preliminary Objections) ICJ Rep 1964 p 44, Final Verdict (1970) ICJ 3

State Responsibility

          Nuclear Test Cases (Interim Protection) (ICJ Rep 1973 99); (Judgment) (1974) ICJ 253

          Rainbow Warrior Arbitration (New Zealand v France) 1990 20 R.I.A.A.A 217

 

Succession to Rights and Obligations

·         International Status of South West Africa (1950) ICJ 79

 

Diplomatic Immunity

·         The Teheran Hostages Case ICJ Reports (1980), 3

·         DRC v. Uganda ICJ Reports (2005) p168

Nationality and Statelessness in International Law

         Nottebohm's Case ICJ Reports (1955), 4

Extradition and Asylum

         Attorney General of Government of Israel v Alfred Eichmann Case (1962) 36 ILR 277

         Haya De la Torra Case, (Columbia v Peru) (1951) ICJ 71

Privileges and Immunities of Internationally Protected Persons

·       U.S. Diplomatic and Consular Staff in Tehran Case ICJ Rep 1980 pp3.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to the Law of the Sea
 

·       Territorial sea

 

·       Contiguous zone

 

·       Exclusive economic zone

 

·       Continental shelf

  • Maritime delimitation 

 

Cases for Study

1.     Qatar v. Bahrain, ICJ Reports, 2001

2.     North Sea Continental Shelf cases, ICJ Reports, 1969

3.     The Fisheries jurisdiction (UK v. Iceland) case, ICJ Reports, 1974

 

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1.  Malcolm N Shaw, "International Law" Cambridge University Press, Cambridge,- 6th Edition 2008
  2. Sir Robert Jennings and Sir Arthur Watts, Oppenheim's International Law, Volumes 1 and 2, 9th Edition, Universal Law Publishing Company Private Limited, New Delhi, First Indian Reprint 2003
  3. Antonio Cassese, "International Law," Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1st Edition, 2001
  4. J G Starke, "International Law", 11th Edition, Aditya Books/Butterworth's Publications, London, 2003
  5. Martin Dixon, "International Law", Universal Law house, New Delhi, 4th Edition, 2nd Indian Reprint, 2001
  6. Ian Brownlie, ""International Law", Oxford University Press, Oxford, 6th Indian Edition,2004
  7.   Armstrong, Farrell & Lambert, “International Law and International Relations”, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2nd Edition, 2012
  8.   Andreas Lowenfeld, “International Economic Law”, Oxford  University Press, 2008, 2nd Edition\
  9. World Trade Organization, “Understanding the WTO”, WTO, Geneva, 5th Edition, 2010 available at www.wto.org/english/thewto_e/whatis_e/tif_e/understanding.e.pdf
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1.  Malcolm N Shaw, "International Law" Cambridge University Press, Cambridge,- 6th Edition 2008
  2. Sir Robert Jennings and Sir Arthur Watts, Oppenheim's International Law, Volumes 1 and 2, 9th Edition, Universal Law Publishing Company Private Limited, New Delhi, First Indian Reprint 2003
  3. Antonio Cassese, "International Law," Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1st Edition, 2001
  4. J G Starke, "International Law", 11th Edition, Aditya Books/Butterworth's Publications, London, 2003
  5. Martin Dixon, "International Law", Universal Law house, New Delhi, 4th Edition, 2nd Indian Reprint, 2001
  6. Ian Brownlie, ""International Law", Oxford University Press, Oxford, 6th Indian Edition,2004
  7.   Armstrong, Farrell & Lambert, “International Law and International Relations”, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2nd Edition, 2012
  8.   Andreas Lowenfeld, “International Economic Law”, Oxford  University Press, 2008, 2nd Edition\
  9. World Trade Organization, “Understanding the WTO”, WTO, Geneva, 5th Edition, 2010 available at www.wto.org/english/thewto_e/whatis_e/tif_e/understanding.e.pdf
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

CIA III – Research Topic – 10%

 Attendance – 05%

End Semester Examination – 50%

TOTAL 100%

MAIS333 - CENTRAL ASIA AND RUSSIAN STUDIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Central Asia, the home of some of the world's greatest art, epic literature, and empires, is the vast heartland of Asia extending from Central Europe to East Asia and from Siberia to the Himalayas. This course provides students a comprehensive understanding of the region a multidisciplinary approach.   The paper explores transitions that characterized the region and focuses on the former Soviet Central Asia or the "Orient" of the Russian Empire. It examines five distinct experiences: Muslim society and tradition, the epoch of the emirates, the annexation of the region into the Russian empire, Central Asians under Soviet rule, and the new states of Central Asia after independence in 1991. Central Asia has been a crossroads for commerce and conflict for centuries which gave rise to the expression the “Great Game”. The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and the current “War on Terror” lend contemporary relevance to the region. The course also studies the challenges that face the transition societies of Central Asia Moreover the creation of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (Shanghai-5) shapes the strategic environment of and adds the importance to region. Contemporary issues in the region include: ethnicity and nationalism, political development, terrorism, economic reform and post-independence foreign policy formulation. This course will help the students to comprehend the Russia’s relations across the globe with special emphasis upon the foreign policy doctrine and it’s making vis-a- vis global issues and challenges.

 

Course Objectives: 

  • Course seeks to foster interdisciplinary academic pursuit of the Central Asia& Russia and promote research on the region’s politics, economics, culture and its relations with India as well as its interconnections to a larger global milieu.
  •  Course will impart specialist knowledge of the region to its students, in order to enable them to pursue careers in research and teaching, journalism, business, government and non-governmental organisations, and others. 

 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop capacities to collect and interpret information about the region;

CO2: Analyse arguments, policies and developments in the region;

CO3: Construct cogent verbal and written arguments on international relations subjects specifically in Central Asia and Russian issues.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Central Asia
 

1. What is Central Asia and what is its ‘place’ in the world? 

2. Geopolitical importance of Central Asia (Machinders Heart Land Theory)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
History of Central Asia
 

1. History of Central Asia from prehistory era to Islamic empires

2. History of Islam in Central Asia Region

3. Russian presence in Central Asia, Great game

4. The Sovietization of Central Asia and the Creation of Nationalities

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Central Asia since 1991
 

1.      State formation and Nation Building process in Central Asia region

2.      Shanghai Cooperation Organiation (Shanghai-5)

3.      Economic Reforms since independence

4.      New-Great Game

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
The Silk Road: Pre- and Post- Modern Travel Narrative
 

1.      General history of Silk Road

2.      Silk Road and India

3.      Concept of Maritime Silk Road

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Central Asia and the World
 

1.      The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and the current “War on Terror” 

2.      Ethnicity and Nationalism, the core issues in all Central Asian countries

3.      Problems of building Democracy

4.      Xinjiang Problem

5.      Foreign Policy of Central Asian Countries

6.      India and Central Asia relations

7. Climate change and its impacts on Central Asian water resources

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Russia and the world
 

1.      The Soviet Legacy.(Changing relationship between Russian State and society)

2.      Contemporary Russian Policy Perceptions and Postures to Global and Regional Issues: Global Terrorism, Nuclear Non-Proliferation, Energy Security, NATO Expansion and EU Enlargement, NATO/ Proposed European Security architecture- Consensus, Probability and Possibilities in the  future Eg: Russian interference in Ukraine

3.      Russian Foreign Policy after the collapse of the Soviet Union

Text Books And Reference Books:

Olivier Roy, The New Central Asia: the Creation of Nations, New York: New York University Press, 2000, pp.1-24, (ch. 1 ‘History and Identity’)

 Elizabeth E. Bacon, Central Asians under Russian Rule: A Study in Culture Change, Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1966, pp.xxxv-91 (‘Preface,’ ‘The Land and the People,’ ‘Before the Conquest: The Pastoral Nomads,’ ‘Traditional Oasis Culture’)

 Olivier Roy, The New Central Asia: the Creation of Nations, New York: New York University Press, 2000, pp.25-34 (ch.2 ‘The Russian Conquest’)

 Adeeb Khalid, The politics of Muslim cultural reform: Jadidism in Central Asia, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998, pp.45-113 (‘The Making of Colonial Society ‘and ‘The Origins of Jadidism’)

 Gail Lapidus, “From Democratization to Disintegration: The Impact of Perestroika on the National Question,” in From Union to Commonwealth: nationalism and separatism in the Soviet Republics, Gail Lapidus, eds., New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992, pp.45-70

Gregory Gleason, Central Asian States: Discovering Independence. London: West view 1997. Chapter1.

Martha Brill Olcott, Central Asia’s New States: Independence, Foreign Policy and Regional Security (Washington, D.C.: United States Institute of Peace Press, 1996): 3-20.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Rashid, Ahmed.  “The Two Revolutions – 1917 and 1991,” in the Resurgence of Central Asia: Islam or Nationalism (London: Zed Books 1994), pp. 25-48.

Mark R. Beissinger, "State Building in the Shadow of an Empire-State," in Karen Dawisha and Bruce Parrott (eds.), The End of Empire? : The Transformation of the USSR in Comparative Perspective (Armonk, N.Y.: M.E. Sharpe, 1997), pp. 157-185.

 

Martha Brill Olcott, “Central Asia’s Catapult to Independence,” Foreign Affairs 71 (3) (1992): 108-130.

 

Bruce Parrott, “Perspectives on post communist democratization,” in Conflict, Cleavage and Change: 1-39.

 

Martha Brill Olcott, “Emerging Political Elites” in Ali Banuazizi and Myron Weiner (ed.s) The New Geopolitics of Central Asia and its Borderlands (London: I.B. Taurris 1994): 44-67.

 

Martha Brill Olcott, “Democratization and the Growth of Political Participation," in Conflict , Cleavage, and Change in Central Asia and the Caucasus (Karen Dawisha and Bruce Parrot, eds.) (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997), pp. 201-241.

 

Cummings, S., “Understanding Central Asia: Politics and Contested Transformations” (Routledge, 2012)

 

Cooley, A., Great Games, Local Rules: The New Great Power Contest in Central Asia (OUP, 2012)

 

Dina Rome Spechler, “Russian Foreign Policy During the Putin Presidency: The Impact of Competing Approaches,” Problems of Post-Communism, Vol. 57, No. 5

(September/October 2010), pp. 35-50.

 

Edwards, M., "The New Great Game and the New Great Gamers: Disciples of Kipling and Mackinder," Central Asian Survey, 22, 1 (2003), pp.83-102.

 

Levi, S.C.,"Early Modern Central Asia in World History," History Compass, 10, 11 (2012), pp.866-878

 

International Crisis Group, “Central Asia: Decay and Decline," Asia Report, no. 201 (3 Feb.2011) Available on Internet

 

Yemelianova, G.M. "The Rise of Islam in Muslim Eurasia: Internal Determinants and Political Consequences," China and Eurasia Forum Quarterly, 5,2(2007), pp.73-91. Available on Internet

 

Peter B. Golden, “Central Asia in World History (The New Oxford World History)”, (Oxford University Press 2011)

 

Zehra Akbar, “Central Asia: The New Great Game” The Washington Review, October 2012

 

Canfield, Robert and Gabriele Paleczek. 2011. Ethnicity, authority and power in Central Asia. London: Routledge.

 

 Morgan, Gerald. 1973. “Myth and Reality in the Great Game.” Asian Affairs 64:55-65.

 

Warikoo K., “Central Asia and South Asia: Energy Cooperation and Transport Linkages” Published by Pentagon Press, 2011

 

Dash, P.L, “India and Central Asia: Two Decades of Transition” October 18, 2012

 

Donaldson, Nogee, and Nadkarni, The Foreign Policy of Russia, 5th ed., ch. 5.

 

Nikolas K. Gvosdev and Christopher Marsh, Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors (Los Angeles, CA: CQ Press, 2014), ch.2.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%

CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

CIA III – Research Topic – 10%

 Attendance – 05%

End Semester Examination – 50%

 

TOTAL 100%

MAIS334 - COMPARATIVE POLITICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Objectives:

·        To familiarize students with the basic concepts and approaches to the study of comparative politics.

·        To critically examine politics in historical and contemporary perspectives while engaging with various themes of comparative analysis in developed and developing countries.

·        To understand governmental systems of US, UK, China and Japan in comparative perspective.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the diversity of key aspects of political systems around the world and how they affect important outcomes.

CO2: Analyse differences across countries such as social movements, political culture, political parties, party systems, regimes, states and policy-making processes.

CO3: Evaluate fundamental concepts in comparative political analysis, like the state, nations and society, regimes, markets, development, and multi-level governance by comparing four cases: US, UK, China and Japan.

CO4: Understand various theories of ?Modernisation? and ?Movements?

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Comparative Government and Politics
 

Nature and scope of Comparative Politics

Why compare?

Going beyond Eurocentrism

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Comparative Methods and Approaches
 

Comparative methods: An overview of the field of Comparative Political Analysis

b. Approaches to Comparative Political Analysis

i. Formal – Institutional

ii. Political Systems and Structural Functional Approach

iii. Culture-centric

iv. Political Economy v. New Institutionalism

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Development
 

a. Theories of Modernisation

b. Underdevelopment

c. Dependency

d. World System

 e. Post Development 

 f. Theories of Movements

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:25
Comparative governments of US, UK, China and Japan (25 Hours)
 

a. a. Constitutionalism

b  b. Executive

c  c. Legislature

d. d. Political parties

Text Books And Reference Books:

A. Roy, (2001) ‘Comparative Method and Strategies of Comparison’, in Punjab Journal of Politics. Vol. xxv (2), pp. 1-15.

J. Blondel, (1996) ‘Then and Now: Comparative Politics’, in Political Studies. Vol. 47 (1), pp. 152-160.

M. Mohanty, (1975) ‘Comparative Political Theory and Third World Sensitivity’, in Teaching Politics, Nos. 1 and 2, pp. 22-38

N. Chandhoke, (1996) ‘Limits of Comparative Political Analysis’, in Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 31 (4), January 27, pp.PE 2-PE2-PE8

Todd Landman and Neil Robinson, Sage Handbook of Comparative Politics, London, Sage Publications, 2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Essential Readings:

Blondel, J., ‘Then and Now: Comparative Politics’, in Political Studies. Vol. 47 (1), 1996, pp. 152-160.

Rod Hague, Martin Harrop, John McCormick, Comparative Government and Politics: An Introduction, London: Palgrave, 2016

Mohanty, M., ‘Comparative Political Theory and Third World Sensitivity’, in Teaching Politics, Nos. 1 and 2, 1975, pp. 22-38

Chandhoke, N., ‘Limits of Comparative Political Analysis’, in Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 31 (4), January 27, 1996, pp.PE 2-PE2-PE8

Landman, Todd and Neil Robinson, Sage Handbook of Comparative Politics, London, Sage Publications, 2009.

Stone, Lawrence, ‘Theories of Revolutions,' World Politics, Vol. 18, No. 2, Jan., 1966, pp. 159-176.

Additional Readings:

Adil Khan, Politics of Identity: Ethnic Nationalism and the State in Pakistan. Sage, New

Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison, The Federalist Papers (edited with Introduction and notes by Max Beloff) New York, Basil Blackwell Inc. 1987

Angelo Panebianco, Political Parties, Organisation and Power, Cambridge University Press, New York, 1998.

Arend Lijphart, Thinking About Democracy, Routledge, London, 2008

Barrington Moore Jr., Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy: Lord and Peasant in the Making of the Modern World, Penguin 1967

Daniel Caramani, Comparative Politics, OUP, Oxford, 2008

Gerado L. Munck and Richard Snyder, Passion, Craft and Method in Comparative Politics, John Hopkins University Press, 2008.

Giovanni Sartori, Parties and Party System: A Framework for Analysis, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1976.

Hamza Alavi and Teodor Shanin eds. Introduction to the Sociology of ‘Developing Societies’, Macmillan, London and Basingstoke, 1982.

Howard J. Wiarda (ed.), Comparative Politics, Vol. I-V, Routledge.

Timothy Lim, Doing Comparative Politics: An Introduction to Approaches and Issues (Second Edition), Lynne Reiner, Colorado, 2010.

Almond, Gabriel A. ‘Comparative Political Systems,’ Journal of Politics, Vol. 18, 1956, 391–409.

Almond, Gabriel A.; and Coleman, James, The Politics of the Developing Areas. Princeton Univ. Press. 1960. 

Almond, Gabriel A.; and Verba, Sidney, The Civic Culture: Political Attitudes and Democracy in Five Nations. Princeton Univ. Press, 1963 .

Apter, David E. Ghana in Transition. Rev. ed. New York: Atheneum, 1963.

Apter, David E. ‘A Comparative Method for the Study of Politics,’ American Journal of Sociology1958, Vol. 64, 221–237.

Apter, David E. 1965 The Politics of Modernization. Univ. of Chicago Press.

Benedict, Ruth (1934) 1959 Patterns of Culture. 2d ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. → A

Berelson, Bernard; Lazarsfeld, Paul F.; and Mcphee, William N. 1954 Voting: A Study of Opinion Formation in a Presidential Campaign. Univ. of Chicago Press.

Bryce, James 1921 Modern Democracies. 2 vols. New York: Macmillan.

Dahl, Robert A. 1963 Modern Political Analysis. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.

Deutsch, Karl W. 1963 The Nerves of Government: Models of Political Communication and Control. New York: Free Press.

Duverger, Maurice (1951) 1962 Political Parties: Their Organization and Activity in the Modern State. 2d English ed., rev. New York: Wiley; London: Methuen. → First published in French.

Easton, David 1953 The Political System: An Inquiry Into the State of Political Science. New York: Knopf.

Easton, David 1965 A Systems Analysis of Political Life. New York: Wiley.

Eckstein, Harry; and Apter, David E. (editors) 1963 Comparative Politics: A Reader.New York: Free Press.

Finer, Herman (1932) 1949 The Theory and Practice of Modern Government. Rev. ed. New York: Holt.

Friedrich, Carl J. (1937) 1950 Constitutional Government and Democracy: Theory and Practice in Europe and America. Rev. ed. Boston: Ginn.

Heckscher, Gunnar 1957 The Study of Comparative Government and Politics. London: Allen & Unwin.

Herring, E. Pendleton 1940 The Politics of Democracy: American Parties in Action. New York: Norton.

Herring, E. Pendleton 1953 ‘On the Study of Government,’ American Political Science Review 47:961–974.

Kahin, George Mct.; Pauker, Guy J.; and Pye, Lucian W. 1955 ‘Comparative Politics of Non-Western Countries’. American Political Science Review 49: 1022–1041.

Key, V. O. Jr. (1942) 1964 Politics, Parties, and Pressure Groups. 5th ed. New York: Crowell.

LaPalombara, Joseph G.; and Weiner, Myron (editors) 1966 Political Parties and Political Development. Studies in Political Development, No. 6. Princeton Univ. Press.

Lasswell, Harold D. 1948 Power and Personality. New York: Norton.

Lazarsfeld, Paul F.; Berelson, Bernard; and Gaudet, Hazel (1944) 1960 The People’s Choice: How the Voter Makes up His Mind in a Presidential Campaign. 2d ed. New York: Columbia Univ. Press.

Leites, Nathan 1948 Psycho-cultural Hypotheses About Political Acts. World Politics1:102–119.

Linton, Ralph 1945 The Cultural Background of Personality. New York: Appleton.

Macridis, Roy C. 1955 The Study of Comparative Government. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday.

Michels, Robert (1911) 1959 Political Parties: A Sociological Study of the Oligarchical Tendencies of Modern Democracy. New York: Dover.

Michigan, University Of, Survey Research Center 1960 The American Voter, by Angus Campbell et al. New York: Wiley.

Neumann, Sigmund 1957 Comparative Politics: A Halfcentury Appraisal. Journal of Politics 19:369–390.

Pye, Lucian W. 1966 Aspects of Political Development: An Analytic Study. Boston: Little.

Pye, Lucian W.; and Verba, Sidney (editors) 1965 Political Culture and Political Development. Princeton Univ. Press.

Riggs, Fred W. 1964 Administration in Developing Countries. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Rustow, Dankwart A. 1957 New Horizons for Comparative Politics. World Politics9:530–549.

nd History.

Tocqueville, Alexis De (1835) 1945 Democracy in America. 2 vols. New York: Knopf.

Truman, David B. (1951) 1962 The Governmental Process: Political Interests and Public Opinion. New York: Knopf.

Weiner, Myron 1962 The Politics of Scarcity: Public Pressure and Political Response in India. Univ. of Chicago Press.

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern
  •  CIA I – Assignment / Presentation          – 10%
  • CIA II – Mid Semester Examination         – 25%
  • CIA III – MOOC Course                          – 10%
  • Attendance                                           – 05%
  • End Semester Examination                    – 50%

                  TOTAL                                          - 100%

MAIS335 - EAST AND SOUTH EAST ASIA (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description