CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, POLITICAL SCIENCE AND HISTORY

School of Social Sciences

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (English, Political Science, History)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BEST331 LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY Core Courses 5 5 100
BEST341 EDITING AND CONTENT WRITING Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
BHIS331 CONCEPTUAL APPROACHES TO ANCIENT INDIAN HISTORY Core Courses 5 5 50
BHIS341A TOWARDS MODERNITY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 50
BHIS341B GENDERED HISTORIES Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 50
BPOL331 INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS-I Core Courses 5 5 100
BPOL342 POLITICS OF DEMOCRACY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 3 3 100
SDEN311 SKILL DEVELOPMENT Skill Enhancement Courses 2 0 50
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BEMP441C RESEARCH METHODOLOGY - 4 4 100
BEST431 RESEARCH WRITING FOR ENGLISH STUDIES - 5 5 100
BEST441 VISUAL CULTURE STUDIES - 3 3 100
BHIS431 PANORAMA OF MEDIEVAL INDIAN HISTORY - 5 5 50
BHIS441 HISTORIOGRAPHY AND RESEARCH METHODS - 4 4 50
BPOL431 INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS-II - 5 5 100
SDEN411 SKILL DEVELOPMENT - 2 0 50
5 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BEPH581 INTERNSHIP Skill Enhancement Courses 0 2 50
BEST531 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES Core Courses 4 4 100
BEST541A UNDERSTANDING WAR LITERATURES Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BEST541B CYBERCULTURE AND CONTEMPORARY CONCERNS Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BEST541C FOOD POLITICS IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BEST541D FANTASY AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BHIS531 BECOMING INDIA: A PLACE IN HISTORY Core Courses 4 4 100
BHIS541A MILITARY HISTORIES Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BHIS541B SPORTS HISTORIES Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BHIS541C POST-COLONIAL ASIA Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BPOL531 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Core Courses 4 4 100
BPOL541A WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
BPOL541B CONCEPTS AND THEORIES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 100
SDEN511 CAREER ORIENTED SKILLS Skill Enhancement Courses 2 0 50
6 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BEPH681 DISSERTATION - 3 4 100
BEST631 INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES - 4 4 100
BEST641A READING DISSENT - 4 4 100
BEST641B GENDER STUDIES - 4 4 100
BEST641C CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS - 4 4 100
BHIS631 ARCHAEOLOGY:AN INTRODUCTION - 4 4 50
BHIS641A POST WAR DISCOURSES - 4 4 100
BHIS641B ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY - 4 4 100
BHIS641C ART AND ARCHITECTURAL IDENTITIES - 4 4 100
BPOL631 ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS - 4 4 100
BPOL641A COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS: SWITZERLAND, UK, USA AND CHINA - 4 4 100
BPOL641B PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION - 4 4 100
SDEN611 SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILL - 2 0 50

BEST331 - LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualised to initiate the students to unlearn some of their conventional notions about what is literature and introduces them to varied schools of literary criticism and critical theory. This course equips them to frame their own sense of 'literature' and 'theory' and apply it to everyday life and events along with written and visual texts. Designed as an intermediate course towards engaging in literary and cultural Studies, the course will equip the student with critical skills and professional orientations in reading, analysing, and interpreting texts in local, regional, national, and global contexts. The concepts and theories in the course will sensitise them about ethical issues, gender and environmental concerns, and questions about human values.

The course is conceptualised with the following objectives:

1. To make students understand the functions of literature and literary and cultural theory

2. To enhance the literary and aesthetic sensibility of students by equipping them with tools to approach texts more meaningfully

3. To make them informed critical readers of socio-cultural aspects of contemporary life

4. To make them understand the basic functions of the human mind and their reflections in works of creative imagination 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO 1: Identify the functions of literature and literary theories and discuss a variety of literary and cultural concepts that will strengthen the analytical and critical insights of the student

CO 2: Engage with the production of meanings, significations, and negotiations as evidenced in application-based research essays, and creative interpretations of local, regional, national, and global phenomena.

CO 3: Use literary texts to demonstrate the role of the sociocultural, economic, political, and material contexts that influence works and meaning-making processes which will then equip them to deal with the everyday in a more nuanced manner.

CO 4: Create critical and analytical writings and responses that are conscious of the ethical, political, and creative power of discourses and meaning-making as evidenced in their class presentations, class discussions, peer discussions, and personal essays across courses.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introducing Theory
 

This unit introduces the student to the notion of literary theory and discusses the significance of theory and

criticism in literary and cultural studies. It also provides an understanding of the functions of literature and discusses how the

early aestheticians of art and literature in the national and global contexts elucidate the role of literature and literary theories in

critically understanding human values and emotions.

1. What is literature? Introductory ideas on basic functions of literature and varied literary genres.

2. What is Literary Criticism; Literary/Critical Theory? The need for criticism and theory.

3. Aristotle, Plato, and the debates on the necessity of art and literature

4. Ancient Indian aesthetics: The theories of Rasa, Alamkara, and Dwani

 

Essential readings:

Barry, Peter: Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. 1995.

Chandran, Mini and Sreenath V S. An Introduction to Indian Aesthetics: History, Theory, and Theoreticians. Bloomsbury India, 2020.

Habib, M A R. Literary Criticism from Plato the Present: An Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell, 2011.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Structuralism and Poststructuralism
 

The unit helps the students to understand how meanings are constructed and the constructed-ness of the world. It also introduces the student to the radical possibilities that also accompany the limits of meaning-making. The texts and issues in the local, national, and global contexts will be used as examples to explain the concepts.

1. Structuralism: What is Structuralism? Key Ideas/Theorists: Ferdinand de Saussure and Claude Levi-Strauss

2. Poststructuralism: What is Poststructuralism? The Project of the Poststructuralists, Key Ideas/Theorist: Deconstruction and Jacques Derrida

Essential readings:

Barry, Peter: Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory, 1995.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The Pattern of the Mind, Language and Literature and Feminist discourses
 

This unit introduces the students to Psychoanalysis, the Freudian and Lacanian Schools. It also examines feminist discourses and discursive practices in regional and global contexts. The basic ideas of psychoanalysis will help the students to engage more meaningfully in social and professional contexts. The unit will also sensitise students to gender concerns in the global context.

1. What is Psychoanalysis? The Project of Psychoanalysis and its working in Literature, Key Ideas/Theorists: Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan

2. Feminisms-Anglo-American Feminisms, French feminism- Key Ideas/Theorists: Elaine Showalter, Helene Cixous, and Julia Kristeva

 

Essential readings:

Barry, Peter: Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. 1995

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Ideology and the Subject
 

This unit engages with notions of ideology and, ideological formations and questions of agency and subjecthood.

This unit also deals with questions of race and postcolonialism. The subaltern aspects in the national and global contexts will be

discussed. The manifestations of the agency and subjecthood in the regional, national, and transnational contexts will also form

part of the discussion and that will help them understand the evolving sensibilities. The analytical skills in this regard will help

them in professional contexts.

1. Ideology and Discourse, What is Ideology?, Key Ideas/Theorists: Karl Marx; Louis Althusser; and Antonio Gramsci

2. New Historicism, Stephen Greenblatt, and Cultural Materialism, Raymond Williams

3. What is Discourse and its implications? Key Ideas/Theorists: Mikhail Bakhti, Michel Foucault

4. Subaltern Aesthetics: Key Ideas/theorists-Sharankumar Limbale, Omprakash Valmiki

 

Essential readings:

Bakhtin, M M. The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays, the University of Texas Press, 1982.

Barry, Peter: Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. 1995

Habib, M A R. Literary Criticism from Plato the Present: An Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell, 2011.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Postcolonialism, Postmodernism and Beyond
 

This unit deals with the questions of theory and practice and of theory and activism. The concepts of postcolonialism and nationalism help the students understand the cultural consequences of colonialism in the postcolonial scenario in the national and global contexts. The theoretical understanding of postmodernism will help the students critically evaluate the contemporary regional, national, and global socio-cultural milieu.

1. What is Postcolonialism? Key Ideas/Theorists: Franz Fanon; Homi K Bhabha; Edward Said, Homi Bhabha

2. Nations, Nationalisms, Transnationalism, Questions of Identity and Subjectivity

 

Essential readings:

Barry, Peter: Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory.1995

Habib, M A R. Literary Criticism from Plato the Present: An Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell, 2011.

Mc Leod, John. Beginning Postcolonialism. Manchester University Press, 2000.

3. Postmodernism: Knowledge and Glocalization. Key Ideas/Theorists: Jean Baudrillard; Jean-François Lyotard, Fredric Jameson

4. Ecocriticism: Green Studies and Sustainability, Key Ideas/Theorists: Cheryl Glotfelty and Harold Fromm

Text Books And Reference Books:

Barry, Peter: Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. 1995.

Chandran, Mini and Sreenath V S. An Introduction to Indian Aesthetics: History, Theory, and Theoreticians. Bloomsbury India, 2020.

Habib, M A R. Literary Criticism from Plato the Present: An Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell, 2011.

Barry, Peter: Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory, 1995.

Bakhtin, M M. The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays, the University of Texas Press, 1982.

Mc Leod, John. Beginning Postcolonialism. Manchester University Press, 2000

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abrams, M H. A Glossary of Literary Terms, Seventh Edition, 2015.

Habib, M A R. Literary Criticism from Plato the Present: An Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. 

Lodge, David. Twentieth Century Literary Criticism: A Reader. Routledge, 2016

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks The students can be tested through the writing of argumentative essays, critical analysis of essays, research essays, class presentations, group discussions, creative writing, creative visualizations either as individual or group work.

CIA 2: MSE – 50 Marks Pattern

Section A: 2x10=20

Section B: 1x15=15

Section C: 1x15=15

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts through means that the facilitator deems appropriate and suitable for the students.

CIA 3: 20 marks The students can be evaluated through exhibitions, visual essays or visual stories, mini-documentaries, performances, creating social media content and promotions, cumulative portfolios, student seminars, organising public output, docudramas and other modes of creative evaluation suitable for the course.

ESE: 50 marks (Centralized exam) Pattern

Section A: 2x10=20

Section B: 1x15=15

Section C: 1x15=15

Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts.  

BEST341 - EDITING AND CONTENT WRITING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is conceived as a hands-on course in content writing, editing, and publishing. Writing has evolved as an indispensable skill for all media of communication. With digital media steadily gaining equal status to print media, writing becomes the newest skill in demand by both academia and the industry. Hence, a course in content writing for online and print that proposes to enhance the writing skills of the learners—with an aim to equip them with skills for online content development—will prove to be interesting, and useful for the employability of learners. The course will ensure that learners learn the basics of developing content and writing for print and digital media. Thus, the course aims to teach learners the skills of content generation and presentation, aiding in professional development and preparing them to meet the needs of local, national, and global industries. Learners will be introduced to the basics of different kinds of editing such as copy editing, proofreading, and content editing. They will be taught the nuances of each editing technique with the help of authentic materials collected from different sources. The course also aims to familiarise learners with editing for different purposes such as marketing editing, retail editing, journal editing (academic and non-academic), research editing, editing policy documents, financial documents, and editing for newspapers. One of the main aspects of the course will be the focus on publishing processes in print and digital media. This will also involve the development of professional ethics required for academic writing and working in the media industry. Thus, the course aims to provide learners with skills for both academic and industrial necessities, and by facilitating interactions with industry experts, explore future employment opportunities in the field of publishing.

Objectives

1. To introduce students to different writing styles and different formats of content creation

2. To introduce students to the processes of editing and proofreading

3. To enable students to conduct audience analysis and develop readership

4. To introduce students to processes and stages of publishing books and traditional print media

5. To enable students to create effective content for digital media 

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically evaluate and apply the varied methods and styles of content creation in their assignments

CO2: Produce socially sensitive content through multiple platforms (web/print) that allows for critical thinking and action

CO3: Create a readership through writing/blogging activities

CO4: Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of editing and proofreading in their assignments

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Writing as a Profession
 

This unit aims to explore writing as a profession which deals with technical writing, academic writing, creative

writing, and content writing. It develops professional skills and proves useful in enhancing the employability of students by

introducing them to global and local standards and styles of writing professionally.

1. Audience analysis.

2. Differences in content and creative writing.

3. Creative writing as an aspect of content writing

4. Technical writing (brief overview).

 

Kane, Thomas S., and Thomas S. Kane. The Oxford Essential Guide to Writing. Oxford University Press, 2003.

McCool, Matthew. Writing around the World a Guide to Writing across Cultures. Continuum, 2009.

Orwell, George. “Why I Write.” Renard Press, 2021.

https://www.orwellfoundation.com/the-orwell-foundation/orwell/essays-and-other-works/why-i-write/.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Content Writing
 

This unit is about the blooming field of writing for diverse media other than and focuses on the following topics. It

develops professional skills and proves useful in enhancing the employability of students by introducing them to globally and

nationally acceptable standards and styles of content writing.

1. Introducing content writing

2. World Wide Web

3. Digital media

4. Writing for the media

5. Issues with writing for the media

6. Historical overview of digital writing

 

Essential readings:

Redish, Janice (Ginny). Letting Go of the Words: Writing Web Content That Works. Morgan Kaufmann, 2007.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Content Generation and Development
 

This unit intends to explore the process of content generation and development with special emphasis on the following topics. It develops professional skills and proves useful in enhancing the employability of students by introducing them to global standards of content generation and development.

1. Aspects of content writing

2. Content analysis

3. Rules in content writing, the economy in writing

4. Writing for websites; writing for online advertisements

5. Writing for social media (blogs, Twitter, etc.)

6. Travel writing for blogs and travel websites

7. Web Copywriting

 

Essential readings:

Carroll, Brian. Writing and Editing for Digital Media. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2020.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Editing
 

This unit introduces students to the roles of editors and the various skills required for the same. After having learned

the basics of content creation in the previous units, the students will get a preliminary introduction to discipline-specific editing,

issues in content editing for academic journals, book editing, proofreading, and the like. It develops professional skills and proves

useful in enhancing the employability of students by training them in global standards of editing. The focus of this unit is the

following:

1. Introduction to editing and publishing in academia.

2. Differences in copy editing, proofreading, and content editing.

3. Grammar and usage editing.

4. Editing for Academic Journals; reading academic journals to identify major arguments.

5. Placing of issues in the journal; approaches to academic journals in different disciplines.

6. Discipline-specific editing.

7. Issues in content and language editing for academic journals.

8. Scrutinising articles for relevance in context; book editing; proofreading

 

Essential readings:

Gilad, Suzanne. Copyediting & Proofreading for Dummies. Wiley Publishing, Inc., 2007.

Einsohn, Amy, et al. The Copyeditor's Handbook: A Guide for Book Publishing and Corporate Communications. University of California Press, 2019.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Publishing and Ethics
 

This unit aims to prepare students to publish their works with ethical awareness. It deals with local, national, and

global norms of publication requirements and ethical concerns to be kept in mind while preparing work for publication. Through

discussions on the following topics, this unit leads to professional development and enables skill development and employability.

1. Publishing in Print and Digital Media Ethics in publishing

2. Requirements for publishing

3. Writing for research journals; writing for newspapers; writing Buzzfeed articles, blogs

4. Plagiarism and its impact

Essential readings:

Einsohn, Amy, et al. The Copyeditor's Handbook: A Guide for Book Publishing and Corporate Communications. University of

California Press, 2019.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Kane, Thomas S., and Thomas S. Kane. The Oxford Essential Guide to Writing. Oxford University Press, 2003.

McCool, Matthew. Writing around the World a Guide to Writing across Cultures. Continuum, 2009.

Orwell, George. “Why I Write.” Renard Press, 2021. https://www.orwellfoundation.com/the-orwell-foundation/orwell/essays-and-other-works/why-i-write/.

Redish, Janice (Ginny). Letting Go of the Words: Writing Web Content That Works. Morgan Kaufmann, 2007.

Carroll, Brian. Writing and Editing for Digital Media. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2020.

Gilad, Suzanne. Copyediting & Proofreading for Dummies. Wiley Publishing, Inc., 2007.

Einsohn, Amy, et al. The Copyeditor's Handbook: A Guide for Book Publishing and Corporate Communications. University of California Press, 2019. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Joan Didion. “Joan Didion: Why I Write.” Literary Hub, 26 Jan. 2021, https://lithub.com/joan-didion-why-i-write/.

Kane, Thomas S. The Oxford Essential Guide to Writing. OUP. 

Carroll, Brian. Writing and Editing for Digital Media. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2020.

Garrand, Timothy Paul. Writing for Multimedia and the Web: Content Development for Games, Web Sites, Education & More. Focal, 2006. 

Truss, L. (2004). Eats, shoots & leaves: The zero tolerance approach to punctuation. Gotham Books. 

Evaluation Pattern

MSE – 45 Marks (Submissions) Portfolios and other assignments that will be relevant to the course.

ESE: 50 marks (Submissions) Portfolios and other assignments that will be relevant to the course. Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts 

BHIS331 - CONCEPTUAL APPROACHES TO ANCIENT INDIAN HISTORY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:50
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

Revealing the ways in which the past is constructed, this course explains fundamental concepts, and illuminates contemporary debates, discoveries, and research. Situating prevailing historical debates in their contexts, the course looks at exploring balanced assessments, encouraging students to independently evaluate theories, evidence, and arguments. The post-colonial emphasis on the study of ancient India has been on interpretation and theorization of events. Several trajectories have emerged in the articulation of issues, events and ideas of this period. The paper highlights some of these approaches. It aims at broadly interrelating the political, economic, social and religious aspects of a period with the intention of showing where and why changes have occurred and how these in turn have had an effect on each aspect. The course is directed at understanding the pattern of change that moves from small societies and states with a relatively uncomplicated organization to the emergence of more complex societies, often accompanied by large states and the requirements of such states. In summary form, the latter included a variety of facets ; to administer extensive territory, literally, in terms of the reality on the ground; agrarian and commercial economies of varying kinds; diverse social forms, some of which were viewed as part of a uniform caste organization, while others were described as deviant forms; the structures of knowledge and the way in which their ideological formulations were linked to other aspects of society and culture; manifold religious sects expressing social concerns, as well as incorporating ideas that ranged from mythology to philosophical notions; creative literature of various kinds; the location of sacred sites that gave a tangible presence to religious sects and their varied forms of worship. Implicit in the listing of these items are the ways in which they are linked, and their forms are either influential or fade away. The course will thus look at the discussion of these links and the changes they bring about. The formation of a state is a recognized historical process, accompanied by concentrations of settlements that can evolve into towns. The presence of the state introduces more complexities into a situation than in societies where states are yet to evolve. The hierarchical ordering of society became uniform, but there were ways of handling the hierarchy that introduced regional  variations. Both agriculture and commerce allowed a different set of freedoms to, and restrictions on, castes. There has been a tendency to treat caste as a uniform social organization in the subcontinent. But there are variations in terms of whether landowning groups or trading groups were dominant, a dominance that could vary regionally. This course therefore raises the question of whether in some situations wealth, rather than caste-ranking, was not the more effective gauge of patronage and power. Equally important are the intellectual contestations between heterodoxy and the orthodoxy, between the nature of belief and the nature of doubt. The course will empower the students to assess how much was routine and how much was inspired by the ideals of their time, which means that historians have to recover 'the period eye'. Finally, the course strives to achieve a more integrated understanding of a complex society, its various mutations, its creativity and its efforts at enhancing its contributions to civilization.

Course Objectives: 

●To encourage the students to start by asking how histories of India came to be written, who the historians were, why they were writing and what were the intellectual and ideological influences that shaped their histories

●To familiarize the students with foundational concepts in Indian history and historical enquiries such as fact, fiction, truth, narrative, memory, conservationism and counterfactuals.

●To provide the students with a recognition of the intellectual context of Indian history, instead of setting this aside with a preference for just a narration of events.

●To familiarize them with the context to encourage a more sensitive understanding of the past

●To essentially underscore the significance of geography to history, particularly in understanding the location of settlements, the movements of peoples and the creation of states. 

●To explore that particular geographical regions do not remain pivotal to historical activity permanently. They can and do change, as do the regions that are their peripheries. Sometimes multiple centres share the same history and at other times the centres have diverse histories. 

●To make them aware that a region in the Indian subcontinent cannot become an isolated historical entity, and regional histories inevitably have to be related to larger wholes. 

●To acquaint them that Socio-linguistics provides evidence of how words can point to social relationships through the way in which they are used. 

●To explore current debates relating to the beginnings of Indian history involves both archaeology and linguistics, and attempts to differentiate between indigenous and alien peoples 

●It arrives at the understanding that it is precisely in the intermixture of peoples and ideas that the genesis of cultures is to be found. 

●To make students aware how historical explanation creates an awareness of how the past impinges on the present, as well as the reverse. 

●To help develop proficiency in research, analysis and writing; and to encourage wide, independent, selective reading on historical subject matter to foster a sustained, reasoned approach. 

 

●To identify arguments in historical works in order to be able to critique evidence used in support of the arguments

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically evaluate that with new evidence or fresh interpretations of existing evidence, a new understanding of the past can be achieved.

CO2: Map the settlements of the period sub- sequent to the decline of the first urban civilization in north-western India and this provides some clues to the successor cultures.

CO3: Reflect and analyse and thus raise important questions of whether there were continuities from the earlier cultures and subsequently perceive the significance of the identifying of the nature of successor cultures subsequently perceive the significance of the identifying of the nature of successor cultures.

CO4: Recognise how geology, geomorphology and human activity are linked and look at the effect of a change in landscape on history more closely.

CO5: Trace the process of origin of language-based regions, financial institutions, and urbanization to analyze the political, cultural and social issues in contemporary India from a historical perspective.

CO6: Recognize that human experiences are diverse and complex; and become aware of the many entangled threads of continuity and change that connect the present to the past.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Ancient Societies: Cultural Evolution
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/ Conceptual

 

a)Indian Historiography: Orientalism, Utilitarianism, William Jones and James Mill 

b)Geographical factors and cultural sustainability 

c)From Agricultural Communities to Urban Configurations: The Harappan State, Society and Commerce, Decline

d)Vedic Culture: Eastward Movement, Mahajanapadas - Kingship and Paramountcy, Social Differentiation; Second Urbanization – Buddhism, Jainism and Women in the Heterodoxies.

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical 

c) From Agricultural Communities to Urban Configurations: The Harappan State, Society and Commerce, Decline

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Early Political Structures
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

a)The Greek Intervention and its Impact: The Origins of Early State - The Mauryan State, Ashoka, From Mauryas to Guptas 

b)The Gupta Classical Pattern, State and Community, Social Mobility, Merchants, Guilds, Literature

c)From Guptas to Harsha: Harshavardhana, his Neighbors and the Samantas, the Question of Centralization.

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical 

a)The Greek Intervention and its Impact: Making the Students write their own Journal Entries as Traveler’s Account

b)The Gupta Classical Pattern: Activity on Primary Sources that actually help us define the idea of ‘Classical’

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Regional Kingdoms and Varying Processes
 

Level of Knowledge: Basic

 

a)Feudal Debate: North & South Subcontinent

b)Regionalization: Peninsular Kingdoms, Brahmins and Ritual Sovereignty of the King

c)The Merchant Guilds of South India; Ideology and Authority: Community Autonomy and Institutions. 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
New Developments
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Basic 

a)The Sangam Age; classical texts on the early cultural development in the south. 

b)Indian Peninsula contact with the west and Southeast Asia: production, trade and commerce.

c)In the Neighborhood: Early Medieval Karnataka – Velevali in Karnataka

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential References:

●Jha, D.N. (eds.) (2006). Ancient India in Historical Outline. New Delhi: Manohar Publisher & Distributer.

●Thapar, Romila. (2002). Early India from the origins to A.D 1300. New Delhi: Penguin Books.  

●Chattopadhyay, B.D. (1998). The Making of Early Medieval India. New Delhi: Oxford India Perennials. 

●Kulke, Hermann and Rothermund, Dietmar. (2004). A History of India. New York: Routledge. 

●Stein, Burton. (2003). A History of India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. 

●Veluthat, Kesavan. (2010). The Early Medieval in South India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended References: 

●Gottlab, Michael. (2003). Historical thinking in South Asia. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 

●Kulke, Hermann (1995), ‘The Early and the Imperial Kingdom: A Processual Model of Integrative State Formation in Early Medieval India’. The State in India: 1000-1700. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. 

●Ludder, David. (1999). The New Cambridge History of India IV. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 

●Settar, S. (Eds.). (2000). We lived together. New Delhi: Pragati Publications. 

●Sharma, R.S. (eds.) (2006). ‘Feudal Polity in Three Kingdoms’, Indian Feudalism, c. AD 300-1200. Calcutta: The University of Calcutta Press 

●Stein, Burton. (1980). Peasant State and Society in Medieval South India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. 

●Thapar, Romila. (2000). Cultural Pasts, Essays in Early Indian History. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. 

●Thapar, Romila. (2000). Interpreting early India, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code 

Course Title

Assessment Details 

BHIS331

Conceptual Approaches to Ancient Indian History

CIA

20 Marks 

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks 

ESE 

50 Marks

Group Assignment 

Written Exam

 

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment 

Written Exam

 

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

BHIS341A - TOWARDS MODERNITY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is intended to provide the learner with a broad overview of the process, phenomena and events which went into the construction of European modernities and a situation where Wars became inevitable. The learner will acquire a framework to understand and analyse complex phenomena such as nationalism, resistance movement and revolution. While the course will have a theoretical thrust, it will also be grounded in empirical history so that the learner will understand the pre-world War I period in Western history and then understand why the Great Wars took place. Modernity is generally understood as a specific form of social relations that people enter into in everyday life – but relations which are modified at the most fundamental level by the quality of intersubjectivity. Modern society is characterized by intersubjectivity as an ontological condition, and within which the difference between iso-ontology and poly-ontologies seems to be very vital in appreciating the distance between modern and pre-modern settings.

Modernity is ultimately about relations between people and not about traits in individuals. Keeping that in mind, the course is intended to provide the learner with a broad overview of the process, phenomena and events which went into the construction of the first European modernities and a situation where Wars became inevitable. This course will introduce some of the enduring features of modernity which are often overlaid and hidden from view because of contemporaneous diachrony or the coexistence of different temporal rhythms. The difference between ethical anonymity and morality will also be discussed. In addition, it describes the possible transformation of nation-states and then to knowledge states.

At the end of the course, the students will acquire skills that will familiarize them with approaches that examine the intersections of modernity, time and history as concepts and structures of ordering and explanation.

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically illustrate the construct of early modern and pre-world war histories.

CO2: Trace the evolution of different First and Second World War narratives.

CO3: Examine political, economic, and social changes of the last five centuries that have affected peoples across the world.

CO4: Analyze the emphasis placed on the emergence of modern notions of production, consumption, and trade from a global perspective.

CO5: Critically engage with prominent themes like growth and dynamics of colonization and decolonization, and the interplay of political, cultural, and religious values, and modern imperialism and its influence on global societies, economies, and political systems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Towards Modernity
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Analytical

a) Conceptualising Industrial Revolution and the industrialization of the European world

b) Analysing the Constructs: Capitalism – Imperialism – Colonialism

c) The Idea of the Individual – Renaissance and the Enlightenment

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

a) Conceptualizing Industrial Revolution: Using pictorial representations of Pre-Industrial European Society and Industrial European society-Using works of Literature- Jane Austen/Bronte Sisters to portray the idea of pre-industrialized and Industrialized society. The students will acquire skills of how historical event affects the social fabric.

b) Analysing the Constructs Capitalism – Imperialism – Colonialism: Case studies of nations state policies (USA, Britain and France) to make the students develop skills of how the constructs developed and impacted world order

c) The Idea of the Individual – Renaissance and the Enlightenment: Works of Rousseau, Voltaire and Montesquieu will be taken up as case studies to identify the idea of Enlightenment. Renaissance paintings, architecture will be studied through case studies on specific renaissance figures- Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and Copernicus which will enhance the analytical skills of the students and conceptualize the idea of Renaissance.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Nationalism(s) and Revolutions
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Interpretative

a) Glorious Revolution

b) American War of Independence – 1775-1783

c) The French Revolution d) Italian and German Unification

e) Russian Revolution – Tsarist Russia – Intellectual currents (Menshevik and Bolshevik) - Aftermath

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

a) Glorious Revolution – How the Reordering of English society was done will be taught.

b) American War of Independence – 1775-1783 – Early Capitalism - Slavery and Civil War- North vs South Debate will be taught through the case study of H.B Stowe Uncle Tom’s Cabin-The ideas of civil war and slavery will be analysed through the case study of Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind. The American Declaration of Rights will be studies to enhance the contextualizing skills of the students. Students use different types of sources including maps, images, diary entries, and letters to deepen their understanding of the Battle of Gettysburg. The lesson includes a close reading of Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address, working collaboratively, students take on the roles of historians and analyze primary sources from two Congressional debates in 1864 about whether to ratify the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery, Students explore the purpose of memorials and consider the idea of historical memory. Students then design a memorial to commemorate the Civil War.

c) The French Revolution – Socio-Economic Backdrop and Intellectual setting works of Rousseau, Voltaire and Montesquieu will be used as case studies, Literary works like Charles Dicken’s Tale of two Cities will also be used as case studies– Reign of Terror – aspects about Napoleon and stability that he bought forth– Aftermath of the French Revolution. Paintings associated with French Revolution will be analyzed to enhance the analytical and contextualizing skill of the students, Students participate in a simulation in which they assume the roles of members of the National Constituent Assembly and the French people debating their future, Students use primary sources to consider the arguments and issues around the trial of Louis XVI

d) Italian and German Unification: Students will take up a Historical Investigation on Bismarck and Garibaldi and their role on German and Italian Unification, Student will also analyze secondary source material to understand the role of Bismarck and Garibaldi. Students will make poster presentations to portray the idea of nationalism and process of unification achieved by both Germany and Italy, this will enhance their critical thinking and contextualizing skills.

e) Russian Revolution – Ideas of Tsarist Russia – Intellectual currents (Menshevik and Bolshevik) – Case Aftermath, Using maps and contemporary photographs, students consider how geography affected the governance of the Russian Empire and formulate questions about Russian history, Through investigation of statistics, photographs, and a painting, students explore the role of peasants in the Russian Empire, Students examine the Russian Fundamental Laws of 1906 and their impact on the tsar’s rule and then consider the relationship between the law and power, After assessing primary source documents representing perspectives of women in Russia about World War I, students consider the question of what it means to be a revolutionary, Drawing on primary sources, students work cooperatively and take on the roles of the Constitutional Democrats, Socialist Revolutionaries, Mensheviks, Bolsheviks, and undecided citizens to consider the political options debated in the Spring of 1917.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The War to End All Wars
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Basic

a) The Rise of Nationalism

b) The World at War

c) The aftermath

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

a) The Rise of Nationalism – competition for resources – intense rivalries – web of alliances – militarism will be taught through use of maps, pictures and political speeches to develop the analytical skill of the students

b) The World at War – the spark – the Western Front – Trench Warfare – the Gallipoli campaign – weapons of WWI will be taught by use of documentaries and political cartoons which will enhance conceptual and analytical skill of the students

c) The aftermath – Treaty of Versailles – the uneasy Peace – the legacy and memory will be taught by reading the mandate of the treaty of Versailles and having group discussions where students will represent the axis and allied powers to discuss the Peace Treaty, this will enhance the historical insight skill of the students.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
The Second World War
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Basic

a) The Rise of Fascism and Militarism in Europe

b) Hitler’s Germany goes to War

c) Fall of the Third Reich

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

a) The Rise of Fascism and Militarism in Europe – Appeasement – Japan and the Axis Powers – Pre-war events will be done through case studies of political figures which made changes in the course of world politics which will enhance the political insight skill of the students

b) Hitler’s Germany goes to War – Blitzkrieg – Battle of Britain – Attack on Pearl Harbour - Operation Barbarossa – Operation Overload and the Race to Berlin will be done through viewing of documentaries, reading the autobiography of Hitler which will enhance the critical thinking skill of the students

c) Fall of the Third Reich – Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki – the Holocaust – the Nuremberg Trials – The United Nations will be done through a study of pictures relating to these events, case study of Holocaust survivors, how Hiroshima, Nagasaki and the Holocaust are remembered in modern day, case study of Memorials relating to these events and lastly case study ofUnited Nations where students will organize mock United Nations General Assembly sessions. These will enhance the critical thinking, analytical and conceptual skills of the students.   

Text Books And Reference Books:

Berger, S. ed. Companion to Nineteenth Century Europe 1789-1914. Oxford: Blackwell, Publishing, 2006.

Davies N., Europe: A History. New York: Harper Perennial, 1998.

Hobsbawm, E. J., Age of Revolution. London: Weidenfield and Nicholson 1962; New York: Vintage, 1996.

Hobsbawm, E. J., Age of Capital 1848-1875. London: Vintage, 1996.

Mcphee, P., The French Revolution: 1789-1799. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.

Merriman, J., History of Modern Europe, From Renaissance to the Present in 2 Volumes New York: W.W. Norton, 2004.

Volker R. Berghahn, Europe in the Era of Two World Wars: From Militarism and Genocide to Civil Society, 1900-1950, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005.

Simkins, P., G. Jukes, M. Hickey, H., Strachan, The First World War: The War to End All Wars, Essential Histories Special 002, Osprey Publishing, 2003.

Feldman, G., and C. Slovey (eds.), World War II: Almanac, World War II Reference Library, Detroit: UXL publishing, 2000.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Anderson Benedict, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism.

Beaudoin S.M. ed., The Industrial Revolution. New York: Wadsworth Publishing, 2003.

Blackbourn, D., The History of Germany 1780-1918: The Long Nineteenth Century. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 1997.

Furet Francois, Interpreting the French Revolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1978.

Hobsbawm, E. J., “The Machine Breakers”. Past and Present 1(1952).

Hobsbawm, E. J., How to Change the World. London: Hachette Digital, 2011.

Horn, Jeff. “Machine Breaking in France and England during the Age of Revolution.”Labour/Le Travail, 55(2005).

Hunt L. Politics, Culture and Class in the French Revolution. California: University of California Press, 1984.

Bailyn, B., D. Wood, J. L. Thomas et. al. The Great Republic, A History of the American People. Massachusetts: D.C. Heath & Company, 2000.

Grob, G.N. and G.A. Billias., Interpretations of American History: Patterns and Perspectives. Vol.I. New York: The Free Press, 2000. edn. 2007.

Balleck B.J., “When the Ends Justify the Means: Thomas Jefferson and the Louisiana Purchase.” Presidential StudiesQuarterly, 22, Fall 1992.

Barrington, M. Jr., “The American Civil War: The Last Capitalist Revolution.” In Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy, Lord and Peasant in the Making of the Modern World by M. Barrington Moore Jr. Boston: Beacon Press, 2015.

White, D.B. “The Nature of Female Slavery.” In Ar’n’t I a Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South, by D.B. White. New York: W.W. Norton, 1985.

Young M. “The Cherokee Nation: Mirror of the Republic.” American Quarterly, Vol. 33, No. 5, Special Issue: American Culture and American Frontier (Winter 1981).

Allen, Richard, From Farm to Factory: A Representation of the Soviet Industrial Revolution. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2003.

Engel, Barbara Alpern., Women in Russia 1700-2000. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Hobsbawm, E., Age of Empire. London: Weidenfield and Nicholson, 1987: Abacus 2003.

Acton, E.V. Cherniaev and W. Rosenberg, eds. Critical Companion to the Russian Revolution 1914-1921. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. 1997; London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2001.

Davis, J.A., ed. Gramsci and Italy’s Passive Revolution. London: Croom Helm, 1979.

Eley, G., From Unification to Nazism: Reinterpreting Germany’s Past. London: Allen and Unwin, 1986.

Hobsbawm, E. J., Nations and Nationalism since 1780: Programme, Myth, Reality. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990.

Kemp. T., Theories of Nationalism. London: Dobson Books, 1967.

Winders, J.A., European Culture since 1848: From Modern to Postmodern and Beyond. New York: Palgrave, 2001.

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code

Course Title

Assignment Details

BHIS341A

Towards Modernity

CIAI

[20 Marks]

MSE

[50 Marks]

CIAII

[20 Marks]

ESE

[50 Marks]

 

Group Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

BHIS341B - GENDERED HISTORIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: 

The course seeks to understand gender through a multi-disciplinary perspective, refracting multiple historical and social phenomena through the lens of gender to understand its present shape and form. It will engage the students in forming ideas about the historical evolution of gender as a cultural phenomenon and attempt the students to probe the interaction of gender with other cultural artefacts such as the state, religion and tradition.

Gender is often a much-misunderstood concept and is yet to be fully recognized as an academic discipline. This course aims to develop an understanding of gender through a multi-disciplinary perspective, refracting multiple historical, political and social phenomena through the lens of gender to comprehend its present shape and form. The course addresses the evolution of gender as a cultural phenomenon and probes the interaction of gender with other cultural artefacts such as the state, religion and tradition. While examining the journey of gender through ages to the modern-day case studies, the students are encouraged to question existing notions regarding gender and examine its relevance in present day context.

Course Objectives: 

●To introduce the students to constructions of femininity, masculinity, and non-binary notions of gender.

●Problematize singular understanding of gender and recognize the necessity to engage with gender at the intersection of other kinds of identities.

●To encourage the students to analyse the mode in which power and privilege works in a societal structure.  

●To introduce the students to basic concepts of gender studies as a discipline.

●To demonstrate to the learner the complexities involved in shaping gender ideologies and gendered practices through the course.

●To provide a framework to the learner to use gender as a tool of analysis in academics and everyday life through engaging with the critical readings.

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically engage with the construct of gendered social roles in society.

CO2: Trace the evolution of different genders as biological & social entities.

CO3: Analyze and engage with issues pertaining to social discrimination and propose/practice relevant correctives for the same.

CO4: Develop the ability to use gender as a tool of analysis in social sciences.

CO5: Develop analytical skills to weigh how the many protest movements for rights of women, and queer communities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Gender and Sexuality
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Basic

a)Sex and Gender - Discourse and Praxis 

b)Gendered Hierarchies - Sexuality, Patriarchy and Social reproduction

c)Towards a Theoretical framework: Conceptualizing engendered narratives and its empirical challenges

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

a)Students will be made to work with Language – both the creation of English language words as well as their own vernacular words to understand the idea of gendered discourse.

b)A Sexual Harassment worksheet the students will made to work with in groups or pairs – to deconstruct the idea of sexuality and patriarchy.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Gender through the Ages
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Analytical

a)Appropriations and Expectations: From Apes to Women – Sexual Dimorphism; Experiencing Gender – Where are the Cavewomen?

b)Clans and the circulation of women - Women as private property

c)Performing the Past: Wives, Daughters and Daughters–in laws and the Husbands, Fathers, Sons - Gendered Expectations and Symbolism: Women as the Other and Woman as Mother

d)Locating Gender: Eunuchs, Effeminate men and Masculine Women, Transgender

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

a)b) and c) for all these units a Workshop in collaboration with Rajiv Gandhi Foundation will be organized to better situate these roles in society

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Interrogating Stereotypes of Gender
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual/Interpretative

 

a)Gendering religion: Devotion and Dissent

b)The Burden of culture: Queens and Courtesans– Subversion and Rebellion

c)Intersections, Interventions and Interstices – Inequality and Discrimination through time

d)The Question of Agency in Historiography – An Engendered View

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:16
Contesting Norms: Case Studies
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Conceptual/Interpretative

a)Gender (re)shaping politics

b)Finding the space in ‘law’ – Crime and sexuality

c)(Re)claiming social spaces – LGBTQ+ rights and movements

d)Representation in culture – art, music and films

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

a)b) and c) for all these units a Visit to the State Women’s Prison in collaboration with Advocate Nancy Shetty will be organized to better situate these roles in society

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential References:

●Yearning, Bell Hooks. 2014. Race, Gender, and Cultural Politics. London: Routledge.

●Beauvoir, Simone de. 2011. The Second Sex. London: Random House. 

●Butler, Judith. 2011. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. London: Routledge. 

●Chakraborty, Uma. 2003. Gendering Caste Through a Feminist Lens. Kolkata: Sthree.

●Fausto-Sterling, Anne. 2000. The Five Sexes: Why Male and Female Are Not Enough from Sexing the Body. New York: Basic Books.

●Foucault, Michel. 1990. The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1: An Introduction. New York: Vintage Books. 

●Friedan, Betty. 2013. The Feminine Mystique, New York: W.W. Norton &Company.

●Geetha V. 2002. Gender. Kolkata: Stree.

●Greer, Germaine. 2009. The Female Eunuch. New York: Harper Collins. 

●Scott, Joan Wallach. 1999. Gender and the Politics of History. New York: Columbia University Press. 

●Steinem, Gloria. 2012. Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions. New York: Open Road Media. 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended References: 

●Adkins, Lisa and Skeggs, Beverley. 2005. Feminism After Bourdieu. New Jersey: Wiley.

●Alcoff, Linda. 1995. Cultural Feminism Vs Post Structuralism: The Identity Crisis in Feminist Theory in N B Dirks, N.B., Aley G. and Ortner S.B. (ed.). Nature/Culture/Power, Princeton: Princeton University Press.

●Balme, Jane and Beck, Wendy. 1993. Archaeology and Feminism-Views on the Origins of the Division of Labour in Cros, Hilary du and Smith, Laura- jane (eds). Women in Archaeology; A Feminist Critique, Canberra: Australian National University.

●Behar, Ruth and Gordon, Deborah A. 1995. Women Writing Culture. Berkeley: University of California Press.

●Fausto-Sterling, Anne. 2005. The Bare Bones of Sex: Part I – Sex and Gender. Melbourne: Signs, 30(2).

●Friedan, Betty. 2013. The Problem that has No Name in Friedan, Betty. The Feminine Mystique. New York: W.W. Norton & Company. 

●Gero, Joan M. and Conkey, Margret W. (eds.). 1991. Engendering Archaeology; Women and Prehistory.  Oxford: Blackwell.

●Hiltebeitel, Alf and Erndl, Kathleen M. (eds). 2000. Is the goddess a feminist?: The politics of South Asian goddesses. United Kingdom: Sheffield Academic Press.

●Jaggar, Alison M. and Bordo, Susan R. (ed). 1989. Gender/Body/Knowledge: Feminist Reconstructions of Being and Knowing. New Jersey: Rutgers University Press.

●Jamison, Stephanie W. 1996. Sacrificed Wife/Sacrificer's Wife: Women, Ritual, and Hospitality in Ancient India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

●Janeway, Elizabeth. 1991. Man’s World, Woman’s Place; A Study in Social Mythology. New York: Morrow Quill.

●Kaufman, Michael and Kimmel, 2011. Michael. The Guy's Guide to Feminism, New York: Seal Press.

●Lerner, Gerda. 1986. The Creation of Patriarchy. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.   

●Mohanty, Chandra Talpade, Russo, Ann and Torres, Lourdes (eds.). 1991. Third World Women and the Politics of Feminism, Bloomington: Indiana University Press

●Morgan, Sue. (ed.). 2006. The Feminist History Reader. London: Routledge. 

●Nanda, Serena. 2001. Neither man nor women: the hijras of India in Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3rd edn.) by Brettell, Caroline B. and Sargent, Carolyn F. (ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

●Nelson, Sarah M. 2006. Handbook of Gender in Archaeology. United Kingdom: Altamira Press.

●Pomeroy, Sarah. 1995. Goddesses, Whores, Wives and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity. New York: Schocken Books.

●Roy Kumkum (ed.). 1999. Women in Early Indian Societies. New Delhi: Manohar. 

●Roy, Kumkum. 2010. The Power of Gender and the Gender of Power: Explorations in Early Indian History.  New Delhi: Oxford University Press. 

 

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code 

Course Title 

Assessment Details 

 

BHIS341B

Gendered Histories

CIA I

20 Marks

CIA II

50 Marks

CIA III

20 Marks

ESE

50 Marks

Group 

Assignment

      Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual Assignment  

Written Exam

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

BPOL331 - INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS-I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course examines the structural aspects of the Indian state. The course offers a detailed understanding of important parts of the Indian Constitution. Also, explains the important organs of the state and their structural equations.  Specifically, it provides debates on the principles of separation of powers by equating among legislature, executive and judiciary.

The course aims to help students to:

 ●        understand the contemporary issues and debates of Indian Constitution.

 ●        understand the structural importance of the Indian state.

 ●        understand the nature, structure and working of the Constitution and the functional implications involved in it.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse how constitutionalism evolved and legislature, executive and judiciary relations will be determined by various constitutional factors.

CO2: Illustrate the philosophy and structure of the India Constitution

CO3: Demonstrate the structural determinants of legislature, executive and judiciary in handling the state affairs.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Constitutional Development
 

1858 to 1909, 1919, 1935 and 1947 Acts. Framing of the Constitution – Role of Constituent Assembly. Preamble – Philosophy of the Constitution. Salient Features. Basic Structure Doctrine. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Key Aspects
 

Citizenship. Fundamental Rights. Fundamental Duties. Directive Principles of State Policy.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Union and State Legislature
 

Organisation and Working. Law-making process. Parliamentary Committees. Decline of Legislature and Reforms.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Union and State Executive
 

Offices of President, Vice President and Prime Minister. Union Council of Ministers – Organisation and Functions. Offices of Governor, Lt. Governor and Chief Minister. State Council of Ministers – Organisation and Functions. Parliamentary and Presidential forms of Government: A debate.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:13
Indian Judicial System
 

Organisation. Supreme Court: Composition and Jurisdiction. High Court: Composition and Jurisdiction. Judicial Review. Judicial Activism. Public Interest Litigation. Judicial Reforms.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Avasthi, AP. (2016). Indian Government and Politics. Agra: Lakshmi Narain Agarwal.
  • Bakshi, P.M. (2012). The Constitution of India. New Delhi: Universal Law.
  • Chakrabarty, B. and Pandey, R.K. (2008). Indian Government and Politics. New Delhi: Sage.
  • Fadia, B.L. (2016). Indian Government and Politics. Agra: Sahitya Bhawan.
  • Ghai, K.K. (2015). Indian Government and Politics. Noida: Kalyani.
  • Ghosh, P. (2014). Indian Government and Politics. New Delhi: PHI Learning.
  • Johari, J.C. (2014). The Constitution of India: A Politico-Legal Study. New Delhi: Sterling.
  • Kashyap, S. (2014). Our Parliament. New Delhi: National Book Trust.
  • Kashyap, S.C. (2011). Our Constitution. New Delhi: National Book Trust.
  • Saxena, R. and Singh, M.P. (2011). Indian Politics: Constitutional Foundations and Institutional Functioning. New Delhi: PHI Learning.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Basu, DD (2015). Introduction to the Constitution of India, Lexis Nexis; Second edition
  • Fadia, B.L. (2016). Indian Government and Politics. Agra: Sahitya Bhawan.
Evaluation Pattern

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

 

 

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

 

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

 

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 20 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 50 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 20 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 50 = 15 Marks

 

 

BPOL342 - POLITICS OF DEMOCRACY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Democracy as a system enables the individual to come into society and association; define the structures and goals of society; design the structures and organs of the political entity to realize the political, economic and social goals defined therein; and establish the relationship between authority and citizens – as individuals and groups. Despite the universality of democracy as value, which all individuals are entitled to, a variety of models have been tried since the ancient Athenians to realize its values. The course endeavours to make us understand the controversies surrounding the universality/relativity of democracy and its applicability in different societies and states.

 Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • understand the meaning and evolution of democracy 
  • critically reflect on the democracy and its shortcomings
  • develop conceptual framework for understanding the functioning of contemporary democracy

Course Outcome

CO1: Outline the nature, scope , evolution and relevance of democracy

CO2: Define the critical discourses related to democracy and its functioning

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Defining Democracy
 

Defining Democracy and its Elements, 

Communal Autonomy: Athenian Democracy

Plural Autonomy: Roman and Later Republicanism, 

Individual Autonomy: Liberal democracy

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Theorizing Democracy
 

Modern Democracy: Compound Autonomy, 

The Individual and the Group : Voting and Elections

 Federalism: Devolution and Cooperation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Functioning of Liberal Democracy
 

Role of Citizens, Role of Civil Society, Role of Judiciary, Role of Media

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Electoral Democracy
 

Role of Elections in Democratization Process, Election Process and Reforms.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hoppe, Hans Hermann(2001). Democracy : The God That Failed. New Jersey: Transaction Publishers.

Lakoff, Sanford(1996). Democracy : History, Theory, and Practice. Colorado: Westview Press.

Tilly, Charles(2007). Democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Jayal, N. G. (2007). Democracy in India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Quraishi, S. (2019). The Great March of Democracy: Seven Decades of India's Elections. New Delhi: Penguin Viking.

Yadav, Y. (2020). Making Sense Of Indian Democracy: Theory as Practice . New Delhi: Permanent Black

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Carter, April, and Geoffrey Stokes (1998). Liberal Democracy and its Critics. Malden: Polity Press.

Hoover, Joe, Meera Sabaratnam, and Laust Schouenborg (2011). Interrogating Democracy in World Politics. Oxen: Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline:

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

BPOL342 

 Politics of Democracy

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

 

SDEN311 - SKILL DEVELOPMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been designed to enable the students to acquire skills that would help them in the process of knowledge acquisition. Through this engagement, it will revisit and question different notions of knowledge and how it is constructed, created, disseminated, and acquired. The course would also enable the students to understand various research practices that are the focal point of the discipline. Also central to the course is an inquiry on the process and role of critical thinking in the discipline and in the larger context of society and nation.

Course Objectives

The course is designed to:

  • enhance skills required for knowledge acquisition
  • develop a comprehensive knowledge of the variety of research practices in the discipline
  • hone and nurture their critical thinking abilities

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate critical reading abilities in multiple contexts

CO2: Recognize the politics of knowledge production and dissemination

CO3: Apply various research methods introduced in the course in their areas of interest

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Data Interpretation "Show Me the Data"- Quantitative
 

This unit is primarily invested in the study of quantitative data. The unit will focus on the various ways in which data is elicited and analyzed. It will also give a brief idea about how quantitative data, which is highly monotonous in nature can be presented in an interesting way. Taking examples from the field of English, History, and Political Science, this unit will identify the sub-fields related to these disciplines which deal with large data sets.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Data Interpretation "Show Me the Data"-Qualitative
 

Data Interpretation Module will cover Qualitative Research Methods in Language Studies. This module will give students the opportunity to explore the different types of qualitative research methodologies used within applied linguistics, linguistics and language and culture research. This will be focused on to an examination of what counts as evidence within a qualitative research framework and how qualitative research evidence can be evaluated. Students will examine a range of qualitative research methodologies, such as case study, ethnography, participant observation, interviews, questionnaires, discourse analysis. Students will apply this knowledge to a personal research interest.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Critical Thinking: "To Think or Not to?"- Multiple Intelligences
 

The unit would primarily engage with the question of what it means to think and revisit some of the notions that are related to the act of thinking and the notion of intelligence. Focussing on the concept of multiple intelligence put forward by Gardener, the unit aims to provide a platform for the students to discuss and deliberate on intelligence and the possibility of exploring multiple intelligence.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Critical Thinking: "To Think or Not to" - Deferential thinking
 

Drawing from an informed understanding of the concept of multiple intelligence, this unit will explore the need to look at thinking as a multi-layered process. The aim here is to make students aware of the need to think differently than attempting to fit into what is normative.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Continuous Learning - The Holy Cycle: Unlearn, Learn and Relearn?
 

Continuing with the questions of thinking and intelligence, this unit focuses on the process of learning and assessing what it means to be a learner in the contemporary era. This unit aims to impart the skills which will make learners value and practice dynamicity and acknowledge the need for appreciating multiple perspectives.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Social Awareness: "Know Thy Neighbour"- Know Your Regime
 

Social awareness provides an individual the ability to understand and respond to the needs of others. This course focuses on social awareness - the ability to understand and respond to the needs of others. This is the third of the domains of emotional intelligence proposed by Daniel Goleman. Research indicates that emotional intelligence can be learned and be measurable differences directly associated with professional and personal success. Furthermore, it may be responsible for up to 80% of the success we experience in life. The course focuses on the basic areas of emotional intelligence namely self-awareness, self-management; empathy/social awareness and relationship management. Students will be able to comprehend how self-awareness reflects understanding, personal acceptance & an overall understanding of personal psychology.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Social Awareness "Know Thy Neighbour": " In Short - Of Reading"
 

This module will help students learn and understand the fundamental motivations for reading. The module will introduce students to the various aspects of reading and writing and will help focus on the need to read with a sense of social awareness, responsibility and ethical action towards reading. This module aims to help students acquire the cognitive domain-related skills in helping them to appraise, develop, value, critique and defend their acts of reading. The module will include introduction to thinkers like Borges, Scholes, Booth, Fish and others who have written about reading and its responsibilities.

Text Books And Reference Books:

_

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

_

Evaluation Pattern

General Evaluation Pattern: Unit-Wise Continuous Evaluation

 The evaluation will be based on the assessments formulated by the PTC student-instructors who facilitate each unit in the class. A continuous evaluation pattern will be followed whereby after the completion of each unit, an assignment will follow. The assessment will be done based on predefined rubrics and the score sheet needs to be tabulated. The cumulative score sheet is to be prepared at the end of the semester and the final Skill Development Score is to be computed.

BEMP441C - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Knowledge of how Political Science has to be researched and written is as important a component as studying the discipline. Issues that are contested, problems of ideological orientation as well as the structure in writing political phenomenon are areas that are relevant for a better understanding of the Discourse. As an extension this whole process translates well into understanding ‘Writing’ as a creative & intellectual activity that requires a certain extent of academic rigor for greater validation.

 Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • Understand the primacy of research as a vital component of academic activity.
  • Explore the various nuances of writing as a thought & as an activity

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge regarding the philosophy of research

CO2: Define and explain the techniques of data collection, field study and writing skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Philosophy of Methods
 

Epistemology, Ontology and Philosophy; Inductive-Deductive Logic; Empiricism, Rationalism and Skepticism; Positivism, Structuralism, and Post Structuralism/ Post Modernity; Hermeneutics, Semiotics, Ethnography, Content and Discourse Analysis

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Operating Philosophical Methods
 

Social Science Research – Types, Requisites & Stages of Research; Sources – Categorization and Usage; Selection of a Research Problem – Towards a Research Design

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Data Collection Methods
 

Data collection, processing and analysis Gathering data:  Primary source of data/information, Secondary source of data/information.  types of interviews, questionnaires, surveys, sampling and FGDs

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Research Writing
 

Methods of data processing, tabulating, and interpreting. Writing a Thesis – Review of Literature, Compilation of research analysis - the Format of the thesis; Referencing styles and the need for them. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

King, Gary, Keohane, Robert O. and Verba, Sydney. (1994). Designing Social Enquiry: Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research. Princeton University Press, New Jersey.

Flick, Uwe. (2015). Introducing Research Methodology. Sage Publications, Delhi.

Popper, K. (2009). Science: Conjectures and refutations. The Philosophy of science: a historical anthology. Oxford: Wiley.

Ricoeur, P. (1991). A Ricoeur Reader: Reflection and imagination. University of Toronto Press.

Heidegger, M. (1988). The basic problems of phenomenology (Vol. 478). Indiana University Press.

Gadamer, H. G. (2013). Truth and method (Bloomsbury revelations). London Bloomsbury.

Peter Lambert and Phillipp Schofield. (2008). Making History: An Introduction to the history and practices of a discipline. London. Routledge.

B. Sheik Ali. (2000). History its theory & method. New Delhi. Laxmi Publications.

Kothari, C.R.(2004). Research Methodology Methods and Techniques. New Delhi. New Age Publishers.

Alexander Rosenberg, Lee McIntyre (2020). Philosophy of Science A Contemporary Introduction. New York. Routledge.

Williams, Malcolm. (1996).  Introduction to Philosophy of Social Research . London. UCL Press.

A  M Novikov D  A Novikov. (2013). Research methodology from philosophy of science to research design. Florida. CRC Press.

 Zimmermann, Jens. (2015). Hermeneutics A Short Introduction. Oxford. OUP.

Daniel Chandler. (2002). Semiotics the basics. Oxford. Routledge,

David M. Fetterman. (2010). Ethnography Step-by-Step. California. Sage.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Austin, G. (1966). The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a nation. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Austin, G. (2003). Working a democratic constitution: A history of the Indian experience . New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Kaviraj, S. (1988). A critique of the passive revolution. Economic and political weekly, 2429-2444.

Chatterjee, P. (1993). The nation and its fragments: Colonial and postcolonial histories (Vol. 11). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Amin, S. (1995). Metaphor, Memory: Chauri Chaura, 1922-1992. Univ of California Press.

Pandey, G. (2006). Routine violence: Nations, fragments, histories. Stanford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

BEMP441C

Research Methodology

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

BEST431 - RESEARCH WRITING FOR ENGLISH STUDIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course, in accordance with global standards and ethical considerations, aims to equip undergraduate students in the humanities and social sciences with the necessary skills to conduct research, produce academic papers, and effectively communicate their ideas. The course covers the fundamentals of academic research, including formulating research questions, creating research methodologies, and locating and evaluating sources. Additionally, students will learn how to integrate data from multiple sources to support their arguments and critically analyse scholarly literature. Throughout the semester, ethical academic writing practices, such as proper citation styles, the responsible use of sources, decorum while doing primary research, etc., will be emphasised through ongoing discussions.

Course Objectives: By the end of the course, student will:

1. Develop research skills that adhere to global standards and enable students to critically assess and analyse academic materials, using evidence to support claims.

2. Cultivate research skills that align with global standards and enable students to find, evaluate, and synthesise sources while utilising appropriate citation styles.

3. Enhance employability through the development of research skills aligned with global standards, enabling students to create well-organized and scholarly academic papers.

4. Foster ethical research practices by emphasising the importance of proper citation and referencing to avoid plagiarism and demonstrate academic integrity.

5. Develop effective communication and collaboration skills through peer review sessions and group presentations, aligned with global standards for academic and professional settings.  

Course Outcome

CO1: Illustrate the principles of academic research by identifying and explaining key concepts and terminologies in their written assignments, class discussion, debates, and presentations.

CO2: Analyse and evaluate scholarly texts by comparing, contrasting, and synthesising information from multiple sources to develop a deeper understanding of the subject matter pertaining to various socio-cultural discourses through written assignments, MCQs, and class discussions.

CO3: Apply research skills by devising a research design for a chosen topic and evaluating the suitability of the chosen design through peer reviews, presentations, and written assignments.

CO4: Create original and well-crafted academic papers by applying research and writing skills to develop a cohesive argument, organise ideas effectively, and use appropriate citation styles.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Academic Research
 

The unit provides an overview of the essential concepts and principles of academic research. Ethical practices that is on par with global standards, including avoiding plagiarism and properly citing sources, are emphasised in this unit to ensure the integrity of the research process.

1. What is research? Importance of research

2. Types of Research: Primary Vs Secondary; Descriptive (Ex post facto research) Vs Analytical; Applied Vs Fundamental;

Conceptual vs Empirical.

3. Plagiarism and other questions on ethics.

4. Engaging with MLA and APA stylesheets: Annotated Bibliography, Summarizing & Paraphrasing, Citations.

 

Essential readings:

MLA Handbook. 9th ed. Modern Language Association, 2021.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Choosing and Developing a Research Topic
 

This unit teaches how to identify a good research topic, refine ideas, and express it as clear research questions, aims, and objectives. This unit also covers how to conduct a critical literature review, including planning and undertaking searches, evaluating the relevance and sufficiency of the literature, and referencing it accurately. It also covers how to apply this knowledge to draft a review for your research project, avoid plagiarism, and the systematic review process. Thus, the unit helps establish the fundamental skills pertaining to research and simultaneously through light on various Local, Regional, National, and Global concerns that must be taken into consideration while choosing a topic.

1. Generating and refining research topic ideas: Relevance tree, Brainstorming, Delphi Technique; formulating a

proposal/abstract

2. Developing your research proposal: Hypothesis, Thesis Statement, The Golden Thread (Research Aim, Objectives, Questions)

3. Review of Literature: Strategies & Approaches.

 

Essential readings:

Bailey, Stephen. Academic Writing: A Handbook for International Students. Routledge, 2006.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Research Philosophy and Approaches to Theory Development
 

This unit aims to enable students to define ontology, epistemology, and axiology, and understand their relevance to the

research. Additionally, the unit explores research paradigms, philosophical positions, and theory development approaches, while

encouraging students to reflect on their own philosophical stance towards their research, all in accordance with established global standards.

1. Research Assumptions: Ontology, Epistemology, and Axiology

2. Research Philosophies: Positivism, Critical Realism, Interpretivism, Postmodernism, & Pragmatism

3. Theory Development: Inductive, Deductive, and Abductive Reasoning.

 

Essential readings:

Griffin, Gabriele, ed. Research Methods for English Studies. Rawat Publications, 2007.

Kundu, Abhijit, et al. The Humanities: Methodology and Perspectives. Pearson Education, 2014.

Pickering, Michael eds. Research Methods for Cultural Studies. Rawat Publications, 2016.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Methods and Methodology
 

This unit emphasises the significance of methodological coherence in research design, selecting appropriate research strategies, considering time frames, ethical concerns, and the constraints of the researcher's role, all in accordance with global standards.

1. Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed-method Approaches

2. Research Strategies: Experiment, Survey, Archival and documentary research, Case study, Ethnography, Action Research, Grounded Theory, Narrative Inquiry.

3. Data Collection: Ethical Questions, Quantitative Data Collection, Qualitative Data Collection

 

Essential readings:

Griffin, Gabriele, ed. Research Methods for English Studies. Rawat Publications, 2007.

Kundu, Abhijit, et al. The Humanities: Methodology and Perspectives. Pearson Education, 2014.

Pickering, Michael eds. Research Methods for Cultural Studies. Rawat Publications, 2016.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Data Collection, Analysis, and Drafting the Paper
 

This unit provides a comprehensive guide on the essential considerations when preparing and analysing data and the strategies employed to infer the results. The unit also focuses on enabling the students to structure and draft a research paper of global standards.

1. Data Analysis: Quantitative Techniques, Qualitative Techniques

2. Results: Investigating the data, drawing inferences, and assessing limitations.

3. Research Paper: Structuring the draft, adhering to conventions, and writing for different audience.

 

Essential readings:

Griffin, Gabriele, ed. Research Methods for English Studies. Rawat Publications, 2007.

Kundu, Abhijit, et al. The Humanities: Methodology and Perspectives. Pearson Education, 2014.

Pickering, Michael eds. Research Methods for Cultural Studies. Rawat Publications, 2016.

Text Books And Reference Books:

MLA Handbook. 9th ed. Modern Language Association, 2021.

Bailey, Stephen. Academic Writing: A Handbook for International Students. Routledge, 2006.

Griffin, Gabriele, ed. Research Methods for English Studies. Rawat Publications, 2007.

Kundu, Abhijit, et al. The Humanities: Methodology and Perspectives. Pearson Education, 2014.

Pickering, Michael eds. Research Methods for Cultural Studies. Rawat Publications, 2016.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bailey, Stephen. Academic Writing: A Handbook for International Students. Routledge, 2006.

Harvey, Michael. The Nuts & Bolts of College Writing. Hackett Publishing, 2003.

Lipson, Charles. How to Write a BA Thesis: A Practical Guide from Your First Ideas to Your Finished Paper. U of Chicago Press, 2005.

Woolf, Judith. Writing about Literature. Routledge, 2005.

Evaluation Pattern

MSE – 45 Marks (Submissions) Portfolios and other assignments that will be relevant to the course.

ESE: 50 marks (Submissions) Portfolios and other assignments that will be relevant to the course. Students will be tested on their conceptual clarity, theoretical engagements, application and analysis of given texts and contexts 

BEST441 - VISUAL CULTURE STUDIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will mainly cover the aspects of meaning-making through the visual or visual texts. The course will discuss the politics of visuality as such. Dealing with the questions of the construction of meanings, social categories, and identities, the politics of the broader ‘visual world’ will be addressed through critical analysis and interpretation of various visual-cultural productions. The course will study how such productions function in terms of various intersectional aspects of life such as gender, caste, class, nation, ethnicity, individuality, freedom etc., especially with reference to the local, national, and global contexts.

The course shall enable the student to

1. Identify and assess through different theoretical lenses relevant visual elements from one’s surroundings and the way these elements are influencing the experience of life.

2. Critically evaluate the domain of visual culture in terms of both production an  consumption, and recognize its influence on making and maintaining certain positions, experiences, practices, privileges, assumptions, aesthetics, and power relations in one’s local, national, and global contexts.

3. Develop deeper and critical insight into the functioning of various visual elements in life thereby problematizing the various intersectional elements like gender, caste, class and identity.

4. Identify the problems involved in the politics and practice of visual culture linked to race, class, gender, nationality, ethnicity, and individuality to actively and creatively engage with viable solutions

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss through debate, different theoretical positions pertaining to the idea of visuality and talk about the ways in which these elements are influencing ones experience of life.

CO2: Highlight different aspects of both production and consumption of elements in the domain of visual culture and discuss their influence on maintaining certain positions, experiences, practices, rivileges, assumptions, aesthetics, and power relations in one?s local, national, and global contexts.

CO3: Explain in formal writing the functioning of various visual elements in everyday life, thereby problematizing intersectional elements such as gender, caste, class and identity and create arguments suggesting practical and creative solutions to real-world issues.

CO4: Respond to questions related to the local, national and global affairs and issues related to the politics of visual culture.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introducing Visual Culture
 

Introducing visual art as texts to explore the meaning within it using semiotic tools available. The texts selected focus mainly on the method of reading visuals. The unit also entails methodological analysis of visual texts like films, YouTube videos, video blogs, etc from across the world. The unit will enable students to develop their interpretive and critical skills and will enable them to understand the role and significance of visual culture in conversing and contesting the existing power structures in society.

1. Introducing Visual Culture

2. The Politics of Visuals

3. Visuals as Language

 

Essential readings:

Berger, John and Mike Dibb, creators. Ways of Seeing. BBC Two, 1972.

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “Introduction: What Is Visual Culture?” An Introduction to Visual Culture, Psychology Press, 2005, pp. 1–33.

Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. “Images, Power and Politics.” Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture, Oxford University Press, USA, 2017, pp. 10–44.

Samsara. Directed by Ron Fricke, Oscilloscope, 2011. https://watchdocumentaries.com/samsara/

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Exploring Visual Representation
 

This unit deliberates over the representative aspects and the problem spaces in from across the world. Apart from the

texts mentioned, the unit provides space for the semiotic analysis of visual constructs available in contemporary space like news

videos, advertisements, and propaganda videos. The problem space found in the representative spheres such as gender, caste, race, etc

in regional, national and global contexts is further subjected to deliberation based on the peripheral voices which the texts try to

present or hide. Besides the theoretical deliberations available in the texts recommended, the unit also involves critical analysis of

cultural constructs which employ different strategies of ‘othering’ as it is seen in visual representations of the marginalized

Teaching learning strategies: Class discussions, and peer-group discussions, Lectures, presentations, film screenings, and analysis of

visual texts

1. Visuals and Media

2. Cartoons, Anime, and Visual culture

3. Visuals as resistance- Graffiti

 

Essential readings:

Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. “Media and Everyday Life.” Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture. Oxford University Press, USA, 2017.

Poulo, Marc di. Introduction. Are Superheroes Republicans? On The Avengers, Star Trek, and Watchmen, McFarland & Company,

Inc., Publishers, 2011, pp. 11-48.

Sreenivas, Deepa. “The Muslim ‘Other’: Figures of Evil and Charisma From Popular Visual Culture in India.”

http://www.tasveergharindia.net/, www.tasveergharindia.net/essay/muslim-other-visual-india.html.

Graffiti Wars. Directed by Jane Preston, One Productions and Two Four Television Productions, 2011.

Exit through the Gift Shop. Directed by Banksy, Paranoid Pictures and Publikro London, 2010.

Poulo, Marc di. War, Politics and Superheroes: Ethics and Propaganda in Comics and Film, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers,

2011.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Exploring Visual Intersectionality
 

This unit is a continuation to the previous unit, wherein, the problem space found in the representative spheres are

further subjected to deliberation based on the peripheral voices which the texts try to present or hide. Besides the theoretical

deliberations available in the texts recommended; the unit also involves analysis of cultural constructs which employ different strategies of ‘othering’ as it is seen in visual representations of the marginalised. This unit will help students to understand the role visual plays in disseminating and contesting agency in global as well as national contexts. The unit also addresses issues related to human values, gender, ecology, and visuality. These discussions will enable them to develop their critical reading skills and interpretative skills.

Essential readings:

Mulvey, Laura. “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema.” Film Theory and Criticism : Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and

Marshall Cohen. New York: Oxford UP, 1999: 833-44

Satrapi, Marjane. Persepolis. United Kingdom, Jonathan Cape, 2006.

Payman and Sina. Persepolis 2.0 (Graphic Text)

Spiegelman, Art. The Complete MAUS. Viking, 2011.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Texts prescribed in units. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Boylan, Alexis L.. Visual Culture. United States, MIT Press, 2020.

Dikovitskaya, Margarita. Visual culture: the study of the visual after the cultural turn. Cambridge, Mass., 2005.

Evans, Hall. Visual Culture: The Reader. India, SAGE Publications, 1999.

Negreiros, Joaquim, and Howells, Richard. Visual Culture. United Kingdom, Wiley, 2012.

Smith, Marquard, and Joanne Morra. Visual Culture: Experiences in visual culture. United Kingdom, Routledge, 2006.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: MSE – 50 Marks

Pattern

Section A: 2x10=20

Section B: 1x15=15

Section C: 1x15=15

 

CIA 3: 20 marks

 

ESE: 50 marks (Centralized exam)

Pattern

Section A: 2x10=20

Section B: 1x15=15

Section C: 1x15=15

BHIS431 - PANORAMA OF MEDIEVAL INDIAN HISTORY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:50
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The colonial construction of Medieval Indian History as ‘Muslim’ had brought much aberration in the conceptualization of this period for a long time. It had been seen as an enigmatic phase of Muslim rule characterized by war, destruction and decline, that was ended only by the colonial masters. As an unfortunate colonial legacy, even in post-independence India, some parts of the larger colonial frameworks are still carried forward to diminish or devalue this period as largely insignificant in the history of India. This paper will deal with different aspects of the medieval centuries from the eighth to the eighteenth centuries to demonstrate the unprecedented developments of long-standing political consolidation, significant economic change and broad religious and cultural developments in the Indian subcontinent to provide a larger framework towards the understanding of this period

Course Objectives: 

●To facilitate and encourage the students to identify and analyze the key facets of medieval period in Indian history. 

●To develop the concept and understanding of what influenced the attitude and behavior of major participants in political situations. 

●To enable them to practice critical and analytical skills to analyze and identify the significant situations and problems in the medieval period which have a definite bearing on the current issues. 

●To facilitate the students to identify various events leading to the establishment of a new centralised political administration in the subcontinental soil 

●To develop an understanding of what influenced the attitude and behaviour of major participants in political situations

●To enable students to develop critical and analytical skills through a study of changes in social, economic and cultural life of medieval India

●To engage the students in critical thinking through a course of debates on feudalism, urbanisation, origin of Rajputs, and aspects of synthesis in culture.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically analyse the idea of the so-called 'Dark Age' of Indian history.

CO2: Possess a knowhow of a new political theory and ideology put into practise by the Islamic rulers in their territory newly conquered territory in India.

CO3: Develop a wider perspective which recognizes the political, economic and cultural interdependence of differing societies and their people that encourages a more inclusive view of the human experience in the period and their people that encourages a more inclusive view of the human experience in the period.

CO4: Demonstrate an ability of critical thinking and analytical skill to evaluate the consequences of economic reforms during the rule of Delhi Sultanate and Mughals.

CO5: Possess an outlook on changes in societal and cultural landscape that created a mosaic of religious, cultural and intellectual philosophies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Setting the Stage
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Basic 

a) Medieval in the Subcontinent: Sources and Historiography 

b) The Early Medieval – Feudalism Debate – Integrative Polity Model 

c) Foreign invasions and the changing politics in India 

d) The Rise of the Rajputs: Different Theories

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application 

a)Bringing sources to class – like works of art, coins, architecture, travelers’ accounts, poetry, prose etc as possible sources o medieval history and commenting upon their pros and cons

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Beginning of the Medieval
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Analytical 

a) Marauders or Settlers? 

b) Delhi Sultanate: kingship and institutional developments in India. 

c) Feudal Set-up to Urbanization 

d) Mughals: Theory of kingship, Consolidation of Empire and expansion into Deccan – Aesthetics and Cultural Landscapes

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application 

b)Relooking at Popular Culture (example Films) in the creation of modern-day narratives of the Sultanate Rulers

c)Class exercise to understand how a feudal system would work – creating a Feudal Society in Class (Role Play)

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
From Consolidation to Syncretism
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Analytical 

 

a) Administrative Advance and Expansion 

b) Economic and Social Life 

c) Insurgency and Conquest with Assimilation and Co-existence 

d) Monotheistic movements in Indian societies: the blend of religions and philosophical integrity 

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

For all the units – for a better understanding, bringing sources in original like Babarnama, Ain-i-Akbari in class for discussion and interpretation

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Developments in the South
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Conceptual

a) The Emergence of major kingdoms in the South and Temple cities 

b) The Vijayanagara and Bahmani Kingdoms 

c) The Portuguese Advent and the 18th Century: Continuity or Change?

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

A Class Field Trip to Hampi (for 2 days)

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

●Chandra, Satish. 2010. Medieval India, New Delhi: Orient Blackswan. 

●Habib, Irfan. 1999. Agrarian System of Mughal India, 1526-1707, New Delhi: Oxford University Press. 

●Mukhia, Harbans (ed.). 2003. The Feudalism Debate, New Delhi: Manohar Publishers. 

●Richards, J.F. 1996. The Mughal Empire, New Cambridge History of India, New Delhi: Cambridge University Press.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

●Alam, Muzaffar. 2004. The Languages of Political Islam in India, Delhi: Permanent Black. 

●Ali, Athar M. 1966. Mughal Nobility under Aurangzeb, Aligarh: Publishing House for the Department of History, Aligarh Muslim University. 

●Ali, Athar M. 2006. Mughal India: Studies in Polity, Ideas, Society, and Culture, New Delhi: Oxford University Press. 

●Asher, Catherine and Talbot, Cynthia. 2006. India Before Europe, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 

●Brown, Percy. 1956. Islamic Architecture, Mumbai: Taraporewala & Sons. 

●Chakravarti, Ranabir. 2013. Exploring Early India up to c. AD 1300, New Delhi: Macmillan.

●Jackson, Peter. 1999. The Delhi Sultanate: A Political and Military History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 

●Karashima, Noboru. 2002. A Concordance of Nayakas: The Vijayanagar Inscriptions in South India, Delhi: Oxford University Press.

●Khan, Iqtidar Alam. 2004. Gunpowder and Fire Arms: Warfare in Medieval India, New Delhi: Oxford University Press. 

●Lal, K.S. 1980. Twilight of the Sultanate, New Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers, revised edn. 

●Marshall, P.J. 2005. The Eighteenth Century in Indian History, Delhi: Oxford University Press. 

●Moosvi, Shireen. 1987. Economy of the Mughal Empire, c.1595, Delhi: Oxford University Press. 

●Rizvi, S.A.A. 1978. A History of Sufism, vol. 1. Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal. 

●Talbot, Cynthia. 2001. Precolonial India in Practice: Society, Region and Identity in Medieval Andhra, New Delhi: Oxford University Press. 

●Tripathi, R.P. 2012. The Rise and Fall of the Mughal Empire, 2 vol., Delhi: Surjeet Publications. 

●Veluthat, Kesavan. 1993. Political Structure of Early Medieval South India, New Delhi: Orient Longman.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code 

Course Title

Assessment Details 

BHIS431

The Panorama of Medieval Indian History 

CIA

20 Marks 

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks 

ESE 

50 Marks

Group

Assignment 

Written Exam

 

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Individual

Assignment 

Written Exam

 

Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

BHIS441 - HISTORIOGRAPHY AND RESEARCH METHODS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Knowledge of Historiography is vital for its components of technical and theoretical representation of the philosophy of History. And along with that, Research competencies and skills are essential for the effective conduct and understanding of research and ultimately for evidence-based decision-making, whether in business, government or civil society.

This course aims to introduce the process of construction and deconstruction of historical concepts as a foundation for setting a critical link system within and across the discipline. Apart from its intellectual strength, the field of Historiography is a tool to critique set notions and understandings. The course will look at issues that are contested, problems of ideological orientation as well as the structure in writing history which helps in a better understanding of the Discourse. As an extension this whole process translates well into understanding ‘Writing’ as a creative & intellectual activity that requires a certain extent of academic rigor for greater validation. 

The modules take you through the empirical research cycle step-by-step. The program balances theoretical knowledge with experience-based learning. We strongly believe that learning-by-doing will help you develop a unique set of skills to draft and execute your research proposal and then a research-based dissertation. The idea is to equip our students in the basics of Historical Research and its methods, so that they are able to effectively use these skills in the eventual dissertation that they have to complete by the end of the 6th semester. 

Skills to Learn:

The program follows a hands-on approach and teaches you step-by-step:

1.Design a sound and feasible research proposal

2.Collect reliable quantitative and qualitative data

3.Analyze qualitative and quantitative data through valid methods

4.Report on the research results according to academic standards.

The Research Methods and Skills program requires a disciplined work ethic.

Course Objectives: 

●To acquaint students with the basic concepts of historical studies, historiography and historical writing methods

●To introduce the students to the various schools of history and debates

●To provide an understanding as to how research is a vital component of academic activity

●To familiarize the students with challenges in identifying research problems and questions

●To prepare the students to explore the various nuances of historical writing as a thought and as an activity.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse the different schools and debates of history.

CO2: Apply their ability of critical thinking and writing skills which is a required quality for being a successful professional in academic and other areas.

CO3: Critically assess the following methods: literature study, case study, structured analysis, interviews, focus groups, participatory approaches, and narrative analysis.

CO4: Distinguish and select research methods pertinent to technique of data collection, field study and writing skills.

CO5: Critically engage with and reflect on the ethical dimensions of conducting applied research.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
The Scope of Social Sciences
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Conceptual

a)Historical Synthesis and ‘Objectivity’

b)Historiography: Time as a Concept

c)Causation – Emplotment – Epistemology – Discourse 

d)Historical Methods

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

a)Forum - Historical Synthesis and ‘Objectivity’: This is an introduction to the process of conducting research in History. The student will be introduced to the steps in the process of historical research and ideas of Counterfactual or “What If” Histories; Philosophies of History: Critical and Speculative theories

b)Case Studies – Bringing case studies to learn the applications of concepts like A Priori/A Posteriori - Empiricism – Historicism – Modernism – Historical Time

c)Exercise 1 - Identifying Hermeneutics & Heuristics – Reasoning – Inductive and Deductive – Contextual Analysis – Discourse Analysis – using current day newspaper articles.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Schools of History and Debates
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/ Analytical

a)Historical Materialism and Karl Marx 

b)The Annales School: Lucien Febvre, Marc Bloch, and Braudel

c)Deconstructionist History and Jacques Derrida

d)Post Modernism

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

a)Workshop – The purpose for which is to be aware of the planning and management skills that are required in undertaking critical thinking for your research. 

b)Pre-workshop TASK: the students will be expected to watch the videos provided, and also read the books/articles provided. In conjunction with their reflections on the learning material provided and also research planning and management in general, they will be expected to create an assignment titled 'My Project'. 

c)OUTCOME: Upon the completion of the full cycle of this Workshop, the student will have reflected on the skills required to enhance their research skills by applying the historical schools and the debates around them.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Research Design
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Basic

 

a)Historical studies as part of Social Science Research

b)Steps in the Process of Research: Types – Sources – Categorization and Usage

c)Selection of a Research Problem – Towards a Research Design

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

a)Exercise 1 - Creating a Research Design, from the areas of interest that each student has.

b)Exercise 2 - Reviewing Ethics of research and informed consent – via article review and using known cases of academic unethically researched cases.

c)Exercise 3 - Identifying a hypothesis and/or research problem, specifying a purpose, creating research questions – again, based on the student’s selected areas of interest as well.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Research: Methods and Writing
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Empirical

a)Methods of Data Collection – Qualitative and Quantitative; Data Analysis and Interpretation

b)Writing a Thesis – Review of Literature, Compilation of research analysis

c)Format of the thesis; Referencing styles and the need for them.

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

A series of exercises to be conducted

a)Exercise 1a: Identifying Qualitative Research Problems; Exercise 1b: Identifying Quantitative Research Problems – in your area of research interest.

b)Exercise 2a: Framing the Research Problem as a Qualitative Study; Exercise 2b: Framing the Research Problem as a Quantitative Study

c)Forum: Sampling and identifying poor data collection strategies.

d)Workshop: To familiarise yourself with the nature and benefits of conducting a literature review. Pre-Workshop Task: Students to read the three pieces on literature review, in conjunction with the interviews given to them. Then post their analysis to the ‘My Project’ tab of the peer review (400 words). 

 

OUTCOME: Upon the completion of the full cycle of this activity, you will be able to distinguish the qualities of a research hypothesis, data collection, analysis and literature review and begin to reflect on the value of a literature review to their own project

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

●Ali, Sheik B. 2000. History: its theory & method. New York: Macmillan. 

●Black, Jeremy and Macraild, Donald D. 2000. New York: Studying History. Macmillan. 

●Collingwood R.G. 2016. The Idea of History, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

●Lambert, Peter and Schofield, Phillipp. 2008. Making History: An Introduction to the history and practices of a discipline. London: Routledge.

●Munslow, Alan. 2000. The Routledge companion to Historical studies. London:  Routledge. 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

●Bullock, Alan & Stephen Trombley, Stephen (ed). 2000. The New Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought. New York: Harper Collins.

●Carr E.H. 1983. What is History? New York: Macmillan 

●Day, Mark. 2008. The Philosophy of History. New York: Continuum International. 

●Evans R.J. 1997. In defense of History. New York: Granta, W.W. Norton &Co.

●Jenkins, Keith. 1991. Rethinking History. London: Routledge. 

●Lemon. M.C. 2003. Philosophy of History. London: Routledge

●Loewenberg P. 1980. Psychohistory in M. Kammen (ed). The Past Before Us: Contemporary Historical Writing in the United States. New York: Cornell University Press.  

●Riach, Graham. Gayatri Chakravorty’s Can the Subaltern Speak? London: The Macat Library, Routledge.

●Sreedharan E. 2004. A Textbook of Historiography 500 BC to 2000. New Delhi: Orient Blackswan.

●Tucker A. 2004. Our Knowledge of the Past: A philosophy of Historiography. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

The following provides an approximate breakdown of how each assignment contributes to the overall performance in the class. 

●Class Participation (10%) 

The participation grade includes active engagement in the weekly class discussion forum, submitting reports on those forums on time, and conducting blind peer reviews. The discussion forums are a rich way to enhance the online/offline learning experience, however success depends on participation. Discussions include both student-instructor and student-student interactions. Please respond to other students’ prompts and propose discussion points as this is a chance to share your knowledge and experience. 

For most weeks there are two discussion forum types: 

1. Based on a question posed by the instructor

2. Based on a focused article

Students must post at least two peer responses each week—one to each forum topic as appropriate or to two different students if only one topic is required. The purpose of the discussion is to increase students’ understanding of the material and demonstrate their ability to complete and comprehend the readings. To achieve full credit for participation, students must respond thoughtfully to all weekly discussion prompts, post a response in both discussion forums, and write in full and complete sentences in the discussion forum. The participation grade will also include the peer review of the final paper. To achieve full credit, provide constructive criticism when conducting peer reviews of other students’ work. Students are expected to participate in supportive, collegial discussion in the classroom.

●Weekly Assignments (20%)

Weekly assignments include forum discussions and small-scale exercises aimed at helping students to apply the weekly lesson objectives. The time burden for each assignment is not expected to exceed two hours per week.

●Mock Proposal (30%)

The first major written assignment is to prepare the proposal for a research project in their chosen area of interest, along with a strategy of primary data collection. The students should address procedures for collecting, analyzing, and reporting of the facts/data. The Proposal should include a research hypothesis, statement, research questions, sample design, data collection method, data description, and if required, analysis technique employed. The Mock Proposal should be minimum 4-5 pages in length.

●Final Research Project (40%)

The final research paper requires students to write a report for decision-makers and other consumers. Research topics should be aligned to the Mock Proposal they had previously designed. Prior approval of the topic for the final research paper is required. Students will research the topic thoroughly in order to fully explore and analyze the varying perspectives regarding the selected issue. They must then formulate their own recommendations for resolution of the issue, including justifications and specific strategies for implementation of the recommendations. Students will properly cite all research referenced in the report, using the format laid out in the APA Manual of Style (7th Edition). The paper is expected to be between 20 and 25 pages in length, including front and back matter. Sections of the paper will be developed throughout the course. Students must have a draft of the report at least 75% complete and ready for peer review by another student by Week 14. During Weeks 15-16, students will review each other’s reports and provide constructive criticism. Students will have the remainder of the semester to complete the report. The Final Report is due at the end of the semester. 

 

BPOL431 - INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS-II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course examines the procedural aspects of the governments in India both at central as well as state level. The course offers an analysis with special reference to Constitutional bodies like Union Public Service Commission, Comptroller and Auditor General, Finance Commission, NITI Aayog and National Human Rights Commission.  Specifically, it provides knowledge relating to Local Self-Governments at various levels.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • understand the relationship between political equations and government System.
  • explore contemporary issues in procedural aspects of legislative, administrative, and financial relations between Union and state governments.
  • analyse the working equations of Constitutional and statutory bodies in India.

Course Outcome

CO1: Analyse the roles of legislature, executive and judiciary in handling the state affairs, structural, institutional and procedural aspects.

CO2: Examine the functional and procedural aspects of the governments in India both at central as well as state level.

CO3: Demonstrate how Union and state relations will be determined by various factors.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Union and State Relations
 

Unitary and Federal features. Legislative, Administrative and Financial Relations. State Autonomy debate. Sarkaria Commission recommendations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Major Constitutional and Statutory bodies
 

Union Public Service Commission. Comptroller and Auditor General. Finance Commission. NITI Aayog. National Human Rights Commission. Chief Information Commission.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:19
Party System and Election Process
 

Features of Party System. Rise of Regional Parties. Anti-Defection Law. Elections- Constitutional Provisions. Election Commission of India – Organisation and Functions. Pressure Groups and Public Opinion.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Local Self-Government
 

73rd, 74th Constitutional Amendments, Urban and Rural local bodies. Parallel organizations.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Key Issues and challenges
 

Social Justice-reservations. Secularism. Communalism. Regional Disputes. National Integration.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Avasthi, AP. (2014). Indian Government and Politics. Agra: Lakshmi Narain Agarwal.
  • Bakshi, P.M. (2014). The Constitution of India. New Delhi: Universal Law.
  • Chakrabarty, B. and Pandey, R.K. (2008). Indian Government and Politics. New Delhi: Sage.
  • Ghai, K.K. (2015). Indian Government and Politics. Noida: Kalyani.
  • Ghosh, P. (2012). Indian Government and Politics. New Delhi: PHI Learning.
  • Johari, J.C. (2004). The Constitution of India: A Politico-Legal Study. New Delhi: Sterling.
  • Kashyap, S. (2011). Our Parliament. New Delhi: National Book Trust.
  • Kashyap, S.C. (2011). Our Constitution. New Delhi: National Book Trust.
  • Saxena, R. and Singh, M.P. (2011). Indian Politics: Constitutional Foundations and Institutional Functioning. New Delhi: PHI Learning.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Fadia, B.L. (2020). Indian Government and Politics. Agra: Sahitya Bhawan.
  • Ghai, K.K. (2015). Indian Government and Politics. Noida: Kalyani.
Evaluation Pattern

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

 BPOL431

 Indian Government and Politics- II

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

SDEN411 - SKILL DEVELOPMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been designed to enable the students to acquire skills that would help them in the process of knowledge acquisition. Through this engagement, it will revisit and question different notions of knowledge and how it is constructed, created, disseminated, and acquired. The course would also enable the students to understand various research practices that are the focal point of the discipline. Also central to the course is an inquiry on the process and role of critical thinking in the discipline and in the larger context of society and nation.

Course Objectives

The course is designed to:

  • enhance skills required for knowledge acquisition.
  • develop a comprehensive knowledge of the variety of research practices in the discipline.
  • hone and nurture their critical thinking abilities.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate critical reading abilities in multiple contexts

CO2: Recognize the politics of knowledge production and dissemination

CO3: Apply various research methods introduced in the course in their areas of interest

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Data Interpretation "Show Me the Data"- Quantitative
 

 

This unit is primarily invested in the study of quantitative data. The unit will focus on the various ways in which data is elicited and analyzed. It will also give a brief idea about how quantitative data, which is highly monotonous in nature can be presented in an interesting way. Taking examples from the field of English, History, and Political Science, this unit will identify the sub-fields related to these disciplines which deal with large data sets.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Data Interpretation "Show Me the Data"-Qualitative
 

 

Data Interpretation Module will cover Qualitative Research Methods in Language Studies. This module will give students the opportunity to explore the different types of qualitative research methodologies used within applied linguistics, linguistics and language and culture research. This will be focused on to an examination of what counts as evidence within a qualitative research framework and how qualitative research evidence can be evaluated. Students will examine a range of qualitative research methodologies, such as case study, ethnography, participant observation, interviews, questionnaires, discourse analysis. Students will apply this knowledge to a personal research interest.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Critical Thinking: "To Think or Not to?"- Multiple Intelligences
 

 

The unit would primarily engage with the question of what it means to think and revisit some of the notions that are related to the act of thinking and the notion of intelligence. Focussing on the concept of multiple intelligence put forward by Gardener, the unit aims to provide a platform for the students to discuss and deliberate on intelligence and the possibility of exploring multiple intelligence.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Critical Thinking: "To Think or Not to" - Deferential thinking
 

 

Drawing from an informed understanding of the concept of multiple intelligence, this unit will explore the need to look at thinking as a multi-layered process. The aim here is to make students aware of the need to think differently than attempting to fit into what is normative.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Continuous Learning - The Holy Cycle: Unlearn, Learn and Relearn?
 

 

Continuing with the questions of thinking and intelligence, this unit focuses on the process of learning and assessing what it means to be a learner in the contemporary era. This unit aims to impart the skills which will make learners value and practice dynamicity and acknowledge the need for appreciating multiple perspectives.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Social Awareness: "Know Thy Neighbour"- Know Your Regime
 

 

Social awareness provides an individual the ability to understand and respond to the needs of others. This course focuses on social awareness - the ability to understand and respond to the needs of others. This is the third of the domains of emotional intelligence proposed by Daniel Goleman. Research indicates that emotional intelligence can be learned and be measurable differences directly associated with professional and personal success. Furthermore, it may be responsible for up to 80% of the success we experience in life. The course focuses on the basic areas of emotional intelligence namely self-awareness, self-management; empathy/social awareness and relationship management. Students will be able to comprehend how self-awareness reflects understanding, personal acceptance & an overall understanding of personal psychology.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Social Awareness "Know Thy Neighbour": " In Short - Of Reading"
 

 

This module will help students learn and understand the fundamental motivations for reading. The module will introduce students to the various aspects of reading and writing and will help focus on the need to read with a sense of social awareness, responsibility and ethical action towards reading. This module aims to help students acquire the cognitive domain-related skills in helping them to appraise, develop, value, critique and defend their acts of reading. The module will include introduction to thinkers like Borges, Scholes, Booth, Fish and others who have written about reading and its responsibilities.

Text Books And Reference Books:

--

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

--

Evaluation Pattern

General Evaluation Pattern: Unit-Wise Continuous Evaluation

 

The evaluation will be based on the assessments formulated by the PTC student-instructors who facilitate each unit in the class. A continuous evaluation pattern will be followed whereby after the completion of each unit, an assignment will follow. The assessment will be done based on predefined rubrics and the score sheet needs to be tabulated. The cumulative score sheet is to be prepared at the end of the semester and the final Skill Development Score is to be computed.

BEPH581 - INTERNSHIP (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:0
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

One of the requirements of B.A. (English, Political Science, History) students at CHRIST (Deemed to be University) is the ability to apply theoretical knowledge acquired in their course to practical applications.  Hence, the students are expected to complete a short internship during the summer break after the fourth semester as part of the course curriculum. Having undergone extensive understanding/training in English/Political Science/History theories, and Research Methodology, this course enables students to demonstrate an understanding of how to apply theoretical knowledge to practice in different organisations/institutions of their choice.  The minimum duration of the internship is stipulated as four weeks.  It is evaluated based on set criteria out of fifty marks and has a maximum of two (2) credits.

Course Objectives: 

The course aims to help students to:

  • apply theoretical knowledge to practical, real-life problems.
  • analyse data/information through a scientific method.
  • apply the acquired skills in practical application(s) and gain industry experience.

Course Outcome

CO1: identify socio/historical/linguistic/political issues and develop a framework to conduct an enquiry.

CO2: identify sources of data and tools to analyse the collected data.

CO3: utilise the theoretical knowledge acquired to solve socio/historical/ political issues and gain industry experience.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
The methodology adopted for internship: Political Science
 

The students need to fulfil the following criteria for internship evaluation:

The students are expected to identify and communicate to the organisation/ institution they want to pursue their internship.  The same should be communicated to the Department of International Studies, Political Science and History, and approved before the commencement of the internship.  A letter of confirmation from the organisation must be submitted to the department before the internship commences.  The student must undertake the internship for four weeks (minimum 24 days).  A Daily work report followed by weekly reports must be maintained and submitted on time by the student to the respective faculty mentor.  The student must submit a final internship report and the Internship dairy copy to the department after completing the four-week internship and along with all the required documents.  A Certificate of Completion issued by the organisation must be submitted to the faculty and the department.  VIVA will be conducted to review the work done by the student to assess the learning outcomes.

Text Books And Reference Books:

The mentor will suggest the essential readings for an internship at the interning organisation/institution.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The additional readings will include the materials suggested by the internship mentor for broad learning of concepts, theories, and methodologies to be used in the internship.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation at the beginning of the 5th semester is based on the following categories:

 

Political Science Internship: 

Particulars

Marks

 

BLUE-BOOK/Google Classroom (40% Weightage)

 

20 Marks

Quality of Weekly Reports

10 marks

 

Effective usage of Blue-Book/Google Classroom (interactions'/meetings with mentors)

10 marks

 

INTERNSHIP REPORT (30% Weightage)

 

15 Marks

Organisation of report writing

10 marks

 

Adherence to the timeline

05 marks

 

Sub Total

 

35 Marks

VIVA-VOCE EXAM (30 % Weightage)

 

 

Organization of Presentation

10 marks

 

Clarity in learning outcome(s) / Skill set(s) acquired

05 marks

 

Sub Total

 

15 Marks 

Grand Total

 

50 Marks

 

BEST531 - POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The effects of colonisation are not very visible as generations move from the experience historically, and the

impact becomes part of everyday life. This paper tries to sensitise students to think critically about a historical

occurrence and its impact on our lived experiences through literature. The focus of the paper is to introduce

ways of resistance to colonisation and its broad impacts on culture, the environment, and identity politics

through national and global texts and contexts.

Course objectives:

The course aims to:

1. Introduce interdisciplinary ways of understanding and engaging with colonialism

2. Critically engage with postcolonial theory as well as application in terms of not only historical contexts but also current issues

3. Dismantle binary approaches to creating epistemic categories

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify how the postcolonial situation is represented and interrogated in texts through reflective reading, writing and interrogations in class.

CO2: Discuss in writing or presentation the different concepts and theories in postcolonial studies, applying them to texts and contexts of local, regional, national and global import.

CO3: Develop arguments examining how identities are formed in the context of class, gender, and ethnicity in colonial contexts and exhibit those evaluations in class discussions, written assignments and class presentations.

CO4: Recognise and evaluate anthropocentrism as colonisation and develop a nuanced sensibility of the world and environment around them as reflected in critical essay writing and other guided assignments and class discussions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Postcolonial Studies - Key Terms
 

Terms chosen will introduce the key issues of colonialism and postcolonial literatures as a foundation to the rest of the

paper. The reference text is Key Concepts in Post-Colonial Studies, Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths and Helen Tiffin, will offer focus

to the discussions. Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with

cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

a. Centre/margin

b. Colonialism/imperialism

c. Decolonisation

d. Mimicry/hybridity

e. Post-colonialism/postcolonialism

f. Savage/civilised

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Poems
 

The poems chosen are responses to colonisation from America, Srilanka, England, Canada and the Caribbean. The

selection aims at introducing the resistance to colonisation articulated by Indigenous communities, Anglo-French communities, and

migrant slaves. Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with

cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

1. News, APTN National. “‘A Lament for Confederation’ A Speech by Chief Dan George in 1967.” APTN News, 29 June 2017,

www.aptnnews.ca/national-news/a-lament-for-confederation-a-speech-by-chief-dan-george-in-1967/.

2. Joe, Rita. “I Lost My Talk.” I Lost My Talk | Poetry In Voice, www.poetryinvoice.com/poems/i-lost-my-talk.

3. Belloc, Hilaire. “The Dodo.” The Dodo, by Hilaire Belloc, www.poetry-archive.com/b/the_dodo.html.

4. Sandburg, Carl. “Buffalo Dusk by Carl Sandburg.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation,

www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/53232/buffalo-dusk.

We have our Genealogies – Jean Arasanayagam. “The New Poetry.” Turner: New and Selected Poems, by David Dabydeen,

Peepal Tree Press Ltd., 2010.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Fiction
 

Description: Novel is one of the major genres that narrates national identity the nation. This module aims to introduce the form and

the process in the Indian context, especially with a Northeastern perspective that presents global concerns that are contextualised

through both regional/state-level concerns as well as more localised discourses, especially in terms of Indigenous identities.

Pariat, Janice. The Nine-Chambered Heart. HarperCollins, 2018.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Postcolonial Spatialities
 

This module will introduce students to position and locate questions of national postcoloniality not just temporally but

also spatially in terms of regional and local concerns. Therefore, a reading of mobility and spatiality is central to this unit, which also

contextualises the concerned discourses within global contexts.

Mackay, David. Warwick.ac.uk.

warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/history/students/modules/archive/hi916/week5/mackay_agents_of_empire.pdf.

Kincaid, Jamaica. A Small Place. Daunt Books, 2018.

Guha, Ramachandra. “Pluralism in the Indian University.” Economic and Political Weekly, 17 July 2018,

m.epw.in/journal/2007/07/perspectives/pluralism-indian-university.html.

Text Books And Reference Books:

The texts prescribed in the Unit. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Adam, Ian. "Oracy and Literacy: A Postcolonial Dilemma?" The Journal of Commonwealth Literature31.1 (1996): 97-109.

Ashcroft, Bill, et al. The Post-Colonial Studies Reader. Taylor & Francis, 2006.

Bjornson, Richard, et al. “Nationalism, Colonialism, and Literature.” Comparative Literature, vol. 45, no. 3, 1993, p. 300,

https://doi.org/10.2307/1771512.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 20 

MSE - 50

CIA III - 20

ESE - 50

BEST541A - UNDERSTANDING WAR LITERATURES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

War has been nearly a constant facet of human existence; it would be surprising if artists did not attempt to capture the realities of war within their works. People write partly from their own experience — though their imaginations are equally important to the process — and war has been a nearly ineluctable part of human experience. While war is mostly looked at from a singular perspective, the course explores multiple facets of wars from disparate positions. This course will introduce students to a variety of fiction and non-fiction that is produced within the context or as an aftermath of war and its effects on national and global contexts. In these narratives it is important to understand that war here does not merely provide a backdrop for human drama; it also becomes a medium through which the writer explores the interconnected themes of violence, heroism, morality, identity, and other human values. Through a nuanced understanding of the impact of war and institutions of war like armies on everyday lives and circumstances, the course also aims to help develop critical perspectives on war and the armed forces. 

The course will: 1. Introduce students to the socio-political contexts of war and associated practices 2. Initiate critical reflection on the representation of war in texts 3. Prompt evaluation on nuances of war, society and state 

Course Outcome

CO 1: Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the genre of war literature and critically evaluate the role literary works play in narrativizing war through literary analysis.

CO2: Identify the various intersections of war and its experiences and impact in local and global contexts through class discussions and presentations.

CO3: Create counter-narratives to dominant narratives on war and analyse war from multiple perspectives through critical assignments.

CO4: Evaluate the paradoxes of war and develop a critical perspective to take action-oriented initiatives to work against divisive ideologies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
War and its Soldiers
 

The unit will explore the war from the perspective of soldiers from different racial, political, social and gender positions on a global scale. The notions of heroism and its senselessness and other human value concerns would also be part of the engagement and enables skill development along the lines of critical reading. Topics will range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

1. Representations of experiences of soldiers at war

2. Politics of race, class, and disability in the context of war

3. Structural and Institutional concerns such as training, lack of medical facilities, etc

 

Essential Readings:

Any three of the following texts may be taught in class.

Remarque, Erich Maria. All Quiet on the Western Front. Fawcett Crest, 1975.

Dahl, Roald. A Piece of Cake. Penguin Books Ltd, 2012.

Captain Marvel. Directed by Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck. Marvel Studios.

Norman, Elizabeth M. We Band of Angels: The Untold Story of the American Women Trapped on Bataan. Random House, 2013.

Da 5 Bloods. Directed by Spike Lee. 40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Civilians and War
 

The mode in which war impacted civilians is the focus of this unit, prompting critical thinking on for whom war is fought. The unit explores narratives of suffering, trauma, survival, memory, and other global human value concerns. Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

1. Civilian engagement during war

2. Gender, Race, Class, Ethnic concerns and nuances during war

3. Children and War

 

Essential readings:

The Grave of the Fireflies. Directed by Isao Takahata, Studio Ghibli, 1988.

Bob Marley and The Wailers. “War.” Rastaman Vibration, 1976. Spotify.

https://open.spotify.com/track/1tmnYbe6jpcVuJYf2AQF40?autoplay=true

Jojo Rabbit. Directed by Taika Waititi, Fox Searchlight Pictures, 2019.

Ten Boom, Corrie, Elizabeth Sherrill, and John Sherrill. The Hiding Place. Chosen Books, 2006.

Blackboards. Samira Makhmalbaf. 2000.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Post-War: War Crimes and Trial
 

The unit enables insights into the nuances of war, ideologies that shape it, and the reevaluation of the same in judicial

and social institutions in global scenarios. It allows students to develop critical thinking skills that help them identify the

complexities of power and authority that determine wars and what it tells about questions of ethics, morality, responsibility and other

human values. Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

1. War crimes and Trials

2. Science and its role in War

3. Ethics and Morality in/after War

 

Essential readings:

Frayn, Michael. Copenhagen. Anchor Books, 2000.

Otsuka, Julie. When the Emperor Was Divine. Anchor, 2003.

The Reader. Directed by Stephen Daldry, Mirage Enterprises, 2008.

Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil. Hannah Arendt. 1963.

Judgment at Nuremberg. Directed by Stanley Kramer, 1961.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Narratives on War From India
 

India has had its fair share of wars and the unit discusses the wars, the significance and politics of the army, and the

internal conflicts that have shaped the national political and social existence. It helps develop critical thinking skills and a larger

awareness of the concerns around gender, caste, class, nationality, and other intersectional issues that have been shaped through wars.

Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues

such as gender and environmentalism.

1. Gender

2. Caste

3. Dissent

 

Essential readings:

Raazi. Directed by Meghna Gulzar, 2018.

Cohen, Stephen P. “The Untouchable Soldier: Caste, Politics, and the Indian Army.” The Journal of Asian Studies, vol. 28, no. 3,

[Cambridge University Press, Association for Asian Studies], 1969, pp. 453–68, https://doi.org/10.2307/2943173.

Rao, M.S. “Caste and the Indian Army.” The Economic Weekly, 1964.

Haider. Directed by Vishal Bharadwaj, 2014

Teresa Rehman. Mothers of Manipur, The Twelve Women Who Made History. Seagull Books, 2017.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Texts prescribed in each unit. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Das, Santanu, ed. The Cambridge Companion to the Poetry of the First World War. Cambridge University Press, 2013.

Osama. Directed by Siddiq Barmak. Barmak Films. 2003

Sharma, D. C. “THE NUREMBERG TRIALS : PAST AND THE PRESENT.” Proceedings of the Indian History Congress, vol. 53,

1992, pp. 586–92. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/44142874. Accessed 8 Mar. 2023.

Ruddick, Nick. “The Search for a Quantum Ethics: Michael Frayn’s ‘Copenhagen’ and Other Recent British Science Plays.” Journal

of the Fantastic in the Arts, vol. 11, no. 4 (44), 2001, pp. 415–31. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/43308478. Accessed 8

Mar. 2023.

Neumann, Franz. “The War Crimes Trials.” World Politics, vol. 2, no. 1, 1949, pp. 135–47. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.2307/2009112.

Accessed 8 Mar. 2023.

Divedi, Diksha. Letters from Kargil. Juggernaut Books, 2017.

Pandita, Rahul. Our Moon Has Blood Clots. Penguin, 2013.

Munnu: A Boy From Kashmir. Malik Sajad. 2015

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I- 20 MARKS 

MSE- 50 MARKS- WRITTEN EXAM 

CIA III- 20 MARKS 

ESE- 50 MARKS- WRITTEN EXAM 

BEST541B - CYBERCULTURE AND CONTEMPORARY CONCERNS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized in order to introduce students to Cyberculture Studies as an important domain of knowledge in the information society we live in and whose impact is seen across the globe and resonates at national levels as well. The course will help students to access the major forms, practices, and meanings in this field. The course is designed to engage with Cyberculture keeping in mind the situation in India and at the grass root levels. Interlinkages will be drawn from TV series to Netflix, cinema to streaming sites, video games, cyberpunk films, music, and fiction and how it represents narratives around gender, technology, human values, environment, and so on. It will also engage with the major theories and debates that surround the production, content, and reception of these two domains over the years and discuss their current role and their probable futures and develop critical reading skills. Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

The course will enable ways of active engagement with the cyber world and open avenues of documentation, critical evaluation, and primary and advanced familiarity with professions that demand close engagement with technologies and big data, also engaging with concerns around professional ethics.

The course will

1. Introduce students to cybercultures as a domain of study

2. The role of the internet today and it's future

3. The role of the internet in Indian society and the grassroots

4. The politics of the cyber world and its implications

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate understanding of the domain of cyberculture studies and evaluate and critique the production and consumption within these spaces in the form of presentations and class discussions..

CO2: Critically document and engage with the problematics of an information-driven society that is dominated by the visual and the virtual through practice-based research.

CO3: Reflect on their engagements with televised and streamed content and web narratives through critical-writing assignments.

CO4: Evaluate digital communities and the ethics of cyberspaces through nuanced reading, writing and class interrogations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to the Information Society
 

This unit will introduce the idea of the Information Society which is defined by multimedia content, dominated by the internet with television as a corollary in the game and shaping cultures and human interactions, human values, and belief systems across the world. It will also provide an introduction to Cyberculture studies in general and the politics and problems of the same and help students develop theoretical knowledge in the area of Cyberculture Studies. Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

1. What is an Information Society?

2. Technology and Implications

3. Cybercultures

Essential readings:

Webster, Frank. “Information and the Idea of an Information Society”, Theories of the Information Society. Routledge.1995, pp. 13–36, https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203991367-7.

Kelly, Kevin. “Convergence”, What Technology Wants. Penguin, 2010.pp.133-158.

Bell, David. “Storying Cyberspace 1: Material and Symbolic Stories”, An Introduction to Cybercultures. Routledge, 2006. pp 6-29.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Body Matters: Identities and Subjectivities
 

This unit will attempt to engage with how cybercultures create bodies that are material and symbolic through problematizing the notion of the ‘self’ and ‘other’ and the associated concerns that govern humanity like ethics and gender and how it plays out in cyberspace in a global context. The unit will look into theorizations and texts to understand the problematics of this constitution and its universal implications. This unit will engage with how data conditions our identities and subjectivities over a period of time. This section will enable students to read their presence and identities within the social media platforms they occupy which enable their ‘reduction’ into data and how these affect their corporeality. Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

1. Bodies and Identities in Cyberculture

2. Choice of a relevant film to showcase the problematics of the body and ethics within the technological space like Minority Report

3. A practical examination of students and their own social media presence

 

Essential readings:

Bell, David. “Identities in Cyberculture”, An Introduction to Cybercultures, Routledge, 2006. pp 113-136.

Bell, David. “Bodies in Cyberculture”, An Introduction to Cybercultures, Routledge, 2006. pp 137-162.

Padte, Richa Kaul. “Cybersexy”, Cyber Sexy: Rethinking Pornography, Penguin Random House India Private Limited, 2018.

Cheney-Lippold, John. “Subjectivity: Who Do They Think You Are”, We are Data: Algorithms and the Making of Our Digital Selves, NYU Press, 2017.

An episode from Black Mirror OR The Social Dilemma. Jeff Orlowski

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Information and Surveillance
 

This unit will enable an engagement with the problematics of information and how it interpolates us as citizens of a nation and as it implicates us in habits of consumption and dissemination and places narratives in global and national contexts. It enables students to develop theoretical and critical reading and engagement skills and evaluate nuances of gender, class, race, ethics, and other cross-cutting issues that play out in cyberspace. Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

1. The Nation and Cyberspace

2. Information, the Nation-State and Surveillance

Essential readings:

Chaturvedi, Swati. I Am a Troll: Inside the Secret World of the BJP's Digital Army. Juggernaut, 2019.

Padte, Richa Kaul. “The Fault Lines of Consent”, Cyber Sexy: Rethinking Pornography, Penguin Random House India Private Limited, 2018.

Webster, Frank, “Information, the Nation-State and Surveillance: Anthony Giddens”, Theories of the Information Society, Routledge, 2014.

Nayar, Pramod K. “I Sing the Body Biometric: Surveillance and Biological Citizenship” EPW, Vo. 47, Iss. 32. 11 Aug 2012.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Community Cultures
 

This unit engages with how cyberspace develops a sense of community among participants in its practices often leading to effective public space but at times problematic collective endeavors too and concerns itself with how these cyberspaces can allow radical discussions on everyday mores and other globally seen human values. Developing theoretical knowledge and critical reading skills will be the focus of the unit. Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

1. Communities and Cyberculture

2. Significance and politics in Video Games

3. Media and Internet Users. Practical engagements with community engagements like change.org, Archive of Our Own (AO3), LiveJournal, and other digital communities and social media platforms

 

Essential readings:

Bell, David. “Community and Cyberculture”, An Introduction to Cybercultures, Routledge, 2006.

Griffiths, Devin C. “...And We are Merely Players: Video Games and Society”, Virtual Ascendance: Video Games, Rowman & Littlefield, 2013.

Jenkins, Henry. “Interactive Audiences? The ‘Collective Intelligence’ of Media Fans”, Fans, Bloggers and Gamers: Exploring Participatory Culture, NYU Press, 2006.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Texts prescribed in each unit. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Webster, Frank. Theories of the Information Society. Routledge, 1995.

Cheney-Lippold, John. We Are Data: Algorithms and the Making of Our Digital Selves. NYU Press, 2017.

Lucas, Edward. Cyberphobia: Identity, Trust, Security and the Internet. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2015.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: MSE – 50 Marks

Pattern

Section A: 2x10=20

Section B: 1x15=15

Section C: 1x15=15

 

CIA 3: 20 marks

 

ESE: 50 marks (Centralized exam)

Pattern

Section A: 2x10=20

Section B: 1x15=15

Section C: 1x15=15

BEST541C - FOOD POLITICS IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized to locate how food practices and representations become

central to the negotiation between the Global South and North. While food practices are a

significant part of the everyday lives of communities across the world, the larger engagement

with food studies is from the perspective of the Global North. The course attempts to explore

the existing power hierarchy between the two regions and how it is reflected, mediated, and

negotiated through food practices and representations. Taking insight from various disciplinary

vantage points, the course explores how food practices have been shaped by identities, likes,

places, economies, and the imagination of regions, cultures, and nations. The course engages in

a discussion on some of the existing literature on food studies from the perspective of the

Global South and helps develop theoretical knowledge and critical reading skills.

Course Outcome

CO1: PDevelop an understanding of various frameworks and concepts in the process, and locate the discourses that shape the food practices in Global South through classroom discussions and writing critical essays.

CO2: Determine the mode in which food informs and shapes the lives of people by exploring the intersections between food and identities related to gender, caste, class, nation and religion through the production of creative content and writing application-based essays.

CO3: Evaluate the mode in which foodways, practices and histories shape discourses on ethics, sustainability, hunger, development and ecology through written essays, peer discussions and field engagements.

CO4: Curate knowledge around food practices that are relevant to local, regional and national contexts through infield engagements and documenting it in the form of social media content.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Food and the Global South
 

The food discourse has largely been engaged and produced from the perspective of the Global North indicating power

politics within this spatial segregation. Food practices within the regions become one of the significant sources through which structural hierarchy within these regions is established. The unit explores some of the significant debates on how food becomes the centre of the

cultural imagination of the self and the other that contributes to the idea of these spaces. The aim of the unit is to trace negotiations on

global engagements with food and how local, regional and national discourses shape the dynamic of knowledge production of food

from the Global South.

Unit details:

1. Cultural politics of Cannibalism - Oswald de Andrade’s Anthropophagic Manifesto” / Tiago Saraiva “Anthropophagy and

Sadness: Cloning Citrus in SãoPaulo in the Plantationocene era.”

2. Understanding Aesthetics of Hunger - Excerpts from Amartya Sen’s Poverty and Famine: An Essay on Enlightenment and

Deprivation.

3. Agrarian economy and the food practices - Cassava song & rice song by Flora Nwapa and Sidney W. Mintz and Daniela

Schlettwein-Gsell’s Food Patterns in Agrarian Societies: The “Core-Fringe-Legume Hypothesis”

4. Food Sovereignty and Global South-North Negotiation- Ian and Harrisson’s Cross over Food: Re-Materializing Postcolonial

Geographies’ Transactions of the Institut

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Food and Identity Politics
 

Description: Food has been understood as a semiotic system. Based on its varied guises, contexts, and functions, it can indicate power

hierarchy, position, solidarity, community, and exclusion and, therefore, a significant part in formulating and reformulating identities

related to class, caste, gender, and other intersectional identities. The unit explores some of the emerging debates and discourses in the

area in the national context and helps develop critical reading and writing skills.

 

1. Conflict and representation - Gastro-politics in Hindu South Asia by Arjun Appadurai or Food as a Metaphor for Cultural

Hierarchy by Gopal Guru.

2. Gasstronostaligia and Cultural Memory - Eating Satay Babi: sensory perception of Transnational movement by Simon Choo

and The Cultural Politics of Eating in Shenzhen by Mary Ann O'Donnell; Food, place, and memory: Bangladeshi fish stores on

Devon Avenue, Chicago

3. Taboo and Exclusion - Diets, Diseases, and Discourse: Lessons from COVID-19 for Trade in Wildlife, Public Health, and Food

by Angela Lee1 & Adam R. Houston. Pigs and their prohibition by Richard A Lobban; Systems Reform, Cultural identity and

beef festivals: Toward a ‘multiculturalism against Caste’ by Balmurli Natrajan

4. Identity negotiation: Human and Ecological interaction - Darwin’s Nightmare film and Documentary Rotten Netflix

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Tracing Histories of Food
 

The unit helps develop critical reading of history through food and food practices. Thereby attempting to understand how

food becomes a central element within the construction of the culture and history of places, nations, and empires. In the process, the

unit aims to address questions related to ethics, sustainability and crises – ecological and others – through food. Texts range in focus

and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts.

1. Locating the history of an Empire- Fish of the Field: Aubergines in the Ottoman Period.

2. Catastrophe and food histories -Wartime Recipes (Documentary - Youtube)

3. Diplomacy and Food Histories - Rudolph Matthee; The Hummus Wars Revisited: Israeli-Arab Food Politics and Gastro

Mediation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Food and Popular Culture
 

The unit explores some of the popular preparation of food culture and practices. It also brings into discussion the

experience of digitality and how it impacts food consumption and production practices and thereby bringing in negotiation between

Global South and North. One of the primary focuses of the paper is food content production and infield exposure to curate and produce

content related to food thereby developing research and critical reading skills. Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local,

national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

1. Gender politics and Food - Great Indian Kitchen Movie

2. Digital Commensality - Mukbang culture in Asia

3. Food Media and Content creation - China’s Emerging Food Media by Lanlan Kuang

Text Books And Reference Books:

Saraiva, T. “Anthropophagy and sadness: cloning citrus in São Paulo in the Plantationocene era.” History and Technology, 34(1),

89–99. 2018. https://doi.org/10.1080/07341512.2018.1516877

Sen, Amartya. “Understanding Aesthetics of Hunger.” Poverty and Famine: An Essay on Enlightenment and Deprivation. , Clarendon

Press Oxford, 1981

McMichael, Philip. “Reframing Development: Global Peasant Movements and the New Agrarian Question.” REVISTA NERA, no. 10,

2012, pp. 57–71., doi:10.47946/rnera.v0i10.1423.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Lévi-Strauss. C. “The culinary triangle”. New Society: December 937–40.1966 [1965].

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I -20 Marka 

MSE - 50 Marks

CIA III - 20 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

BEST541D - FANTASY AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 From The Lord of the Rings to the Fantastic Beasts universe, non-human animals have often played a pivotal role in the way we tell stories. In the contemporary context, ecological discourse has become a critical concern since human beings have caused immense damage to the planet, endangering all life on Earth. In this course, we will explore the disciplines of Ecopsychology and Animal Studies through literary and visual texts that not only tell enjoyable stories but also remind us of what it means to be human animals who share the planet with other species.

CCourse Objectives: 

 

  • Critically engage with representations and theories of ecopsychology as relating to literary, scholarly, and visual texts in the genre of fantasy.

  • Become sensitised to the ecological discourses relating to individual, communal, and national identities.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Examine different perspectives on how we view the environment and other species through discussions with peers who share their interest in the field.

CO2: Explore the disciplines of Ecopsychology and Animal Studies through guided discussions and assignments that introduce learners to critical ecological concerns of our time.

CO3: Exhibit learnings in the field through class discussions and assessments as well as attempt to bridge the gap between conceptual understanding and practical application.

CO4: Critically evaluate texts in the genre of fantasy and theories of ecopsychology through conceptual understanding as well as application-oriented assessments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT - I
 

This unit provides the theoretical/conceptual base using which the texts in subsequent units will be read. It provides an

overview of multiple disparate theoretical perspectives at local, regional, national, and global levels and encourages

application-oriented engagements with them. Texts range in focus and scope and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such

as gender and environmentalism.

1. Berger, John. Why Look at Animals? Penguin, 2009.

2. Wright, Laura. The Vegan Studies Project Food, Animals, and Gender in the Age of Terror. University of Georgia Press, 2015.

3. Gaard, Greta. “Toward a Queer Ecofeminism.” Hypatia, vol. 12, no. 1, 1997, pp. 114–137.,

doi:10.1111/j.1527-2001.1997.tb00174.x.

4. Mies, Maria, and Vandana Shiva. Ecofeminism. ZED Books LTD, 2014.

5. Nirmal Selvamony, “Oikopoetics”

6. Alex Johnson: “Earth Is Not Our Mother”

7. Roszak, Theodore, et al. Ecopsychology: Restoring the Earth Healing the Mind. Sierra Club Books, 1995.

8. Braitman, Laurel. Animal Madness: How Anxious Dogs, Compulsive Parrots, and Elephants in Recovery Help Us Understand Ourselves. Scribe Publications Pty Limited, 2014.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT - II
 

This unit introduces the ways in which fantasy as a genre reflects ecological concerns that are expressed through human-animal relationships. Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

Tolkien J R R., “The Legacy of Treebeard.” The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, Harper Collins Publishers, 2012.

 

Xen, Nine Moons in a River of Stars (Book 1). Black magic blues, 2022.

Vo, Nghi. The Empress of Salt and Fortune. Tordotcom, 2020.

 

The Last of Us, pilot episode.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT - III
 

This unit introduces the concept of ecopoetics and examines its relevance in the contemporary context.

Texts range in

focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such as gender

and environmentalism.

1. Emily Dickinson: Defining the “uncanny”

 

Department of English and Cultural Studies (BGR Campus)

 

98

 

2. Whitman, Walt, and David S. Reynolds. Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass. Oxford University Press, 2005.

3. Wordsworth, William. “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud by William Wordsworth.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation,

www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45521/i-wandered-lonely-as-a-cloud.

4. Keats, John. “La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad by John Keats.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44475/la-belle-dame-sans-merci-a-ballad.

5. Rymes, Betsy. “Modern Day Poetics: Internet Memes.” Citizen Sociolinguistics, 27 Jan. 2015, citizensociolinguistics.com/2015/01/27/modern-day-poetics-internet-memes/.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT - IV
 

This unit explores contemporary representations of human-animal relationships in popular culture, primarily through the lens of discourses in postcolonial ecocriticism and posthumanism.Texts range in focus and scope from regional, local, national, and global contexts and include engagement with cross-cutting issues such as gender and environmentalism.

1. Ackerman, Diane. The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story. W.W. Norton, 2017. / The film adaptation. 2. Novak, Jesse. Bojack Horseman. (Any one episode.) 3. Atypical and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime — Posthumanism and the neuro-atypical identity. 4. Shantanu Anand’s “Star Children” (poetry and dystopia) and other performance poems.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

All texts prescribed in the syllabus.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Aaltola, Elisa. Varieties of Empathy: Moral Psychology and Animal Ethics. Rowman and Littlefield, 2018. 

Agamben, Giorgio. 2004. The Open: Man and Animal, translated by Kevin Attell. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Ahuja, Neel. Postcolonial Critique in a Multispecies World. Publications of the Modern Language Association, Volume 124, Number 2, March 2019, pp. 556-563.

Alaimo, Stacy. “Jellyfish Science, Jellyfish Aesthetics: Posthuman Reconfigurations of the Sensible.” In Janine MacLeod, Cecilia Chen and Astrida Neimanis (eds.), Thinking with Water, 139-164. Montreal: McGill-Queens University Press, 2013.

Armstrong, Susan and Richard Botzler. The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge, 2003.

Braitman, Laura. Animal Madness: How Anxious Dogs, Compulsive Parrots, and Elephants in Recovery Help Us Understand Ourselves. Simon & Schuster, 2015. 

Carroll, Lewis. Alice in Wonderland. Grosset and Dunlap, Publishers, 1998.

Ende, Michael. The Never-Ending Story. Doubleday, 1983.

Jackson, Peter, dir. King Kong. United States of America: Studio Canal, Universal Studios, 2005. 

McHugh, Susan. Animal Stories: Narrating Across Species Lines. University of Minnesota Press, 2011.

Orwell, George. Animal Farm. Secker and Warburg, 1945.

Taylor, Nik and Tania Signal. Theorizing Animals: Re-thinking Humanimal Relations. Brill, 2011. 

Roszak, Theodore. Ecopsychology: Restoring the Earth, Healing the Mind. Sierra Club Books, 1995.  

Rowling, J K. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Bloomsbury, 1999.

Wells, Herbert George. The Island of Dr. Moreau. Heinemann, 1896.

 

Woolf, Virginia. Flush: A Biography. The Hogarth Press, 1933.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Fantasy and Ecopsychology

CIA

20 Marks 

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks 

ESE

50 Marks

Individual Assignment 

Written Exam

Section A: 1x15=15

Section B: 1x15=15

Section C: 1x20=20

Group

Assignment 

Written Exam

Section A: 1x15=15

Section B: 1x15=15

Section C: 1x20=20

BHIS531 - BECOMING INDIA: A PLACE IN HISTORY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

It can be reasonably argued that in India, from the beginning of its civilizational enterprise, nothing has remained singular for too long. Whether God or religion, philosophy or metaphysics, language or custom, cuisine or costume, every realm is marked by plurality. It is impossible, therefore, to talk about the ‘Indian’ tradition: there are multiple traditions, all authentically and robustly Indian. Central to the plural tradition, or sensibility, is the notion that there are many ways of looking at and living in the world. Plurality accommodates differences; and differences, in their turn, embody and enact dissent. Even in the ‘Nasadiya Sukta’, a major verse in the Rig Veda, the Vedic seers inserted a deeply metaphysical note of dissent – which arose because multiple perspectives on diversity was always accepted. 

But despite this, our image of the present is one which is tied to a series of contemporary assumptions and as a result can become restrictive and limited – especially when we try to understand what the identity of being an Indian subscribes to, especially in the contemporary context. And this is precisely where the danger of mixing faith, religion, beliefs with politics of identity begins. Especially when we keep in mind that – in this Nation – often ‘dissent’ has been either directly suppressed, by terming it anti-national, or the state has kept quiet when Dalits and minorities have been attacked, often brutally. A lot of this is sought to be justified on the grounds that Indian traditions, especially religious ones are being wrongly interpreted, and that there’s an urgent need to correct such distortions and prevent a civilizational collapse. Also central to this enterprise is propaganda and distortion of history. A massive cultural amnesia is often spread through biased, unpardonably partisan cultural events, education and media. Majority communities are told repeatedly that they have been wronged, discriminated against and unjustly treated. Selective facts and figures are being brazenly propagated by certain groups that have appropriated the right to speak for all.

Part of the problem lies in how we are educating our younger generations as well. And towards this end, this course seeks to engage the students with the myriad ways in which the past, though no longer present – is a presence in our lives today. This course is specifically designed to introduce students to methodologies that are required for understanding the Indian identity and history as a multiple, layered, and often a contested set of representations. The course is built as an in-depth series of case studies, with the aim of bringing together three distinct areas of analytical questions that are implied by its title’s key terms – ‘history’, ‘memory’ and ‘identity’. Questions like – what are main approaches to social and cultural memory of this Nation? What, and whose history is being remembered and narrated? And in this quagmire, how should the Indian identity be understood? – would be the prime focus of the course.

Course Objectives

       To emphasize on various discourses - like on communities, uniqueness and exceptionality, including the myths of origin and of cultural exclusivity, narratives of national history and even pantheons of national heroes, in the creation of an Indian memory and identity.

       To recognize the importance of the concepts of empire and post-coloniality, (post)socialism and (neo)liberalism as equally distinct forms of historical memory organization, with their own repertoires of referential imagery and understandings of boundaries.

       To explore the issues of memory of war, communal clashes and ethnic conflict. Archive, film, body and material objects, including buildings, are approached as culturally-specific memory devices and contested sites for historical memory, in turn leading to the construction of the said Indian identity.

       To trace the Indian past – its ideological foundations and historical evolution from Colonial experience to the 21st century.

       Within which they will be acquainted with religious diversity and politicization, as it becomes a topic of enormous contemporary relevance, with implications for the construction of national/international identity and responsibilities.

       To consider the moral and ethical choices made by the individuals/institutions involved in planning, perpetrating, witnessing, ignoring, or being victimized during mass atrocities.

       To educate students on the dangers of history when misused in the construction of national and other group identities – especially when religion and politics are intermixed, and ‘us and them’ dichotomies of difference are created and mobilized in genocides.

      To identify social and cultural factors that help shape our identities by analyzing firsthand reflections and creating their own personal identity charts.

  • To deconstruct the Indian identity is not only valuable for their own social, moral, and intellectual development, it also serves as a foundation for examining the choices made by individuals and groups in the past as well as in the present

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Critically engage with representations of the Indian Past in the present to enable them to analyze and use evidence in interrogating historical accounts and memory of the present Nation.

CO2: Recognize and relate to the memories of their own past and its multiple perspectives, which will enable them to read, write and reflect on the past, or in other words, make it more difficult for them to fall prey to the dangers of rhetoric and post-truth discourses.

CO3: Engage with issues of identity and negotiate with how memory factor into our historical understandings and how this can condition present day policies and decision-making.

CO4: Critically reflect and engage with the interface between the past and the present, fostering a healthy appreciation for history and its imprint on our present world.

CO5: Demonstrate an ability to analyze how historical memory and thereby identity are shaped by states, organizations and individuals.

CO6: Analyze the interaction between history, memory and politics when following the news and in examining historical cases.

CO7: Develop the ability to generate concepts and theoretical models, to test new methods and tools for professional and research-based activities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Colonization: The Many Afterlives
 
  1. Colonizing Knowledges: Racializing the ‘Other’; Latent and Manifest Orientalism.

  2. Endgames of Empire Building: British Revenue Systems; Commercialization of Agriculture, Deindustrialization; and Famines.

  3. Tryst with Destiny: Genesis of ‘National Identity’; Burgeoning of the Press; a New Social Order.

  4. Birth of a Nation: Making of Indian Identity; Struggling for Independence; Experiencing Freedom.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:21
Weaving Identities: Leaders, Legacies and Memory
 

 

  1. Unstuck in Time: Taste of Independence in a Valley of Blood; Indian Constitution and the Exercise of Democracy.

  2. A Tough Neighborhood: Wars with China (1962); Wars with Pakistan (1948, 1965, 1999); The Bangladesh Crisis (1971)

  3. The New Leaders: Nehru – the Promised Leader; Indira – Autumn of the Matriarch; Rajiv – the Prodigal Son. 

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Analytical

a)      Watch audio-visual content and analyse them - Speech by Gandhi, Nehru, Indira Gandhi

b)     Reading of newspaper articles/reports and analysing them

c)      Interpreting archival data on Indian National identity

d) Interpretation of photographs of Wars covered in the course

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Haunted by History: Geographies of Violence
 

 

  1. Tracing the Ghost: Drawing the New Map – Hyderabad, Kashmir & Junagadh; Peace in Our Time – The Language Question and Organization of States.

  2. The Dynamics of Conflict: The Aryan Debate; The Dravida Nadu; Akali Dal; Assamese Pride; Hindutva Ideology.

  3. Learning to Live with Ghosts: Indira and the Emergency Chronicles; Operation Blue Star and Aftermath; IPKF and Assassination of Rajiv Gandhi; Insurgencies of Northeast; The Gujarat Riots.

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Analytical

a)      Taking a critical look at the how popular culture has depicted the Kashmir Issue – through Films, Social Media and Art since 1950s

b)     Looking at the Pamphlets circulated by bodies like Akali Dal, speeches by contemporary leaders of Political parties, as well as excerpts from the ideological pamphlet on Hindutva by Vinayak Damodar Savarkar.

 

c) Watching, and analyzing speeches and interviews by Indira Gandhi during The Emergency as well as before Operation Blue Star

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Unnatural Nation: Politics of Remembrance
 

 

  1. Leftward Turns: Agrarian Struggles; Land Ceiling & Bhoodan Movement; Green Revolution.

  2. Minding the Minorities: Dalits; Muslims; Tribal Groups; Gender Rights and India.

  3. Decolonizing the Memory: India – The Death and the Everlasting Life of a Nation – Voices of Empowerment today.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Bose, Sugata, Ayesha Jalal. 1998. Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy, 2nd Edition, New York: Routledge.

  • Brass, Paul R. 1993. The Politics of India since Independence. London: Cambridge University Press.

  • Chandra, Bipan, Mridula Mukherjee, Aditya Mukherjee, K.N. Panikkar, and Sucheta Mahajan. 1989. India’s Struggle for Independence, New Delhi: Penguin.

  • Chandra, Bipan, Mridula Mukherjee, and Aditya Mukherjee. 1999. India After Independence 1947 – 2000, New Delhi: Penguin.

  • Corbridge, Stuart, Glyn Williams, René Véron and Manoj Srivastava. 2005. Seeing the State: Governance and Governmentality in India. New York: Cambridge University Press.

  • Guha, Ramachandra. 2011. India After Gandhi, New Delhi: Macmillan.

  • Metcalf, Barbara D., Thomas R. Metcalf. 2006. A Concise History of Modern India. 2nd Edition, New York: Cambridge University Press.

  • Sarkar, Sumit. 2002. Modern India, 1885-1947, New Delhi: Macmillan, India
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Bandyopadhyay, Sekhar. 2004. From Plassey to Partition: A History of Modern India. New Delhi: Orient Longman.

  • Batabyal, Rakesh. 2005. Communalism in Bengal: From Famine to Noakhali, 1943-47, New Delhi: Sage Publications.

  • Chakraborty, Bidyut, Rajendra Kumar Pandey. 2009. Modern Indian Political Thought: Text and Context, New Delhi: Sage Publications.

  • Chakraborty, Bidyut. 2008. Indian Politics and Society since Independence: Events, Processes and Ideology. New York: Routledge.

  • Chatterjee, Partha. 1993. The Nation and its Fragments: Colonial and Postcolonial Histories. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

  • Chatterjee, Partha. 2012. The Black Hole of Empire: History of a Global Practice of Power, Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press.

  • Desai, A.R. 1979. Peasant Struggles in India, Delhi: Oxford University Press, Delhi.

  • Dhar, P.N. 2001. Indira Gandhi, the Emergency and Indian Democracy, New Delhi:Oxford University Press.

  • Dube, Saurab. 2005. Postcolonial Passage, Contemporary History Writing on India, New Press:Oxford University Press.

  • George, K.M. 1993. Modern India and Literature: An Anthology of Fiction, Vol. 2, New Delhi: Sahitya Academy Press.

  • Gopal, S. 1980. Nehru an Anthology, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

  • Habib, Irfan. 2006. Indian Economy, 1858-1914, A People’s History of India, Vol. 28, Delhi: Tulika Books.

  • Harison, Selig S., Paul H. Kriesberg, Dennis Kun (eds). 1999. India and Pakistan: The First Fifty Years, London: Cambridge University Press.

  • Hasan, Mushirul. 2002. The Partition Omnibus, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

  • Heels, Peter. 2000. Nationalism, Terrorism, Communalism, Essays in Modern Indian History. London: Oxford University Press.

  • Kaarsholm, Preben and Menaka Bisvasa. 2004. City Flicks: Indian Cinema and the Urban Experience, New Delhi: Seagull Books.

  • Kulke, Herman. 1998. A History of India. New Delhi: Routledge.

  • Mukherjee, Mridula. 2004. Peasants in India’s Non-violent Revolution: Practice and Theory, New Delhi: Sage Publications.

  • Neumayer, Erwin and Christine Schelberger. 2008. Bharatmata: India’s Freedom Movement in Popular Art. London: Oxford University Press.

  • Panikkar, K.N. (ed). 1980. National Left Movements in India, New Delhi: Vikas.

  • Panikkar, K.N. 1998. Culture, Ideology, Hegemony:  Intellectuals and Social Conscious in Colonial India, Delhi: Tulika Books.

  • Ranjan, Sudarshan. 2002. Jayaprakash Narayan: Prophet of People’s Power,New Delhi: National Book Trust.

  • Raychaudhari, Tapan. 1999. Perceptions, Emotions, Sensibilities: Essays on India’s Colonial and Post-colonial Experiences, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

  • Sen, Amartya. 2005. The Argumentative Indian: Writings on Indian History, Culture and Identity, New Delhi: Penguin Books Ltd.

  • Srivastava, C.P. 1995. Lal Bahadur Shastri, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

  • Stein, Burton. 1998. History of India, London: Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - Evaluation Pattern

Assignment 1

Assignment 2

Total

20

20

40

 

Mid Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

3x5=15

2X10=20

1x15=15

50

 

End Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

3x5=15

2X10=20

1x15=15

50

 

BHIS541A - MILITARY HISTORIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

 The course is designed to examine the role of the military and conflict on both the ancient and modern world. Students will be able to understand the concepts of policy, strategy, and tactics as applied to military history.  Students will research and analyze the strategic, technological, cultural, and political influence of warfare on history. Additionally, this course will debate the many reasons why Military History is the most common theme of modern popular history.

 

Course Objectives: 

  •  To introduce students to key historiographical concepts and debates concerning the military history
  • To familiarize students with some important fields of nowadays historical studies applied to the military history
  • To make the students aware of the various forms of popular history.
  • To equip the students with a better understanding of  the role of technology in military history.
  • To identify and make the students aware of the societal and cultural views on warfare.
  • To provide students with basic methods used in the historical studies of warfare and to relate these methods to their own research fields

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise the main trends in the developments of the historiography and historical writing about warfare from the Antiquity to the Present

CO2: Engage with the main perspectives and problems of the operational military history as a subdiscipline

CO3: Demonstrate an ability to analyse and apply the main branches in the 'new history of war' relating to the problem of 'war and society'

CO4: Identify historical and social contexts that created diversity in military histories and its interaction in present human day cultures

CO5: Critically engage with how military historical narratives are shaped by states, organizations, and individuals.

CO6: Analyze the interaction between military history and politics which plays an important role in state formation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction: War in Histories
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual 

a)What is Military History: Basic Concepts of Military History

b)Why do we fight?  Examining war as an agent of change and “instrument” of politics: the ideas of Sun Tzu, Clausewitz, Mao, and Patton. 

c)Theories and Notions of Warfare: Changing perspectives of warfare

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Evolution of Indian Art and Science of War
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

a)Military system and Defence Mechanism in Vedic, Puranic and Epic Age.

b)Mauryan military system; Kautilya’s philosophy of war, concept of Defence, Security and Inter-State Relations

c)Comparative study of Turkish and Mughal Military system of war 

d)Maratha Military System with reference to irregular and regular warfare of Shivaji

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Evolution of Science of War in Europe
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual/Analytical 

a)The  rise of early Modern State and Military Organization in Europe

b)Guns and Sails: Discovery of Gunpowder and the rise Artillery, The rise of naval military power in Europe

c)Land and Sea: The rise of Britain and the French The French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars,

d)Industrial Revolution and Its Impact Upon Warfare

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Towards Modernity: War and State
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical 

a)The Discovery of Air Power and Its Military Implications

b)The strategic use of Air Power and Sea Power during World War I 

c)The War at Sea 1939-1945 (Including the Air War at Sea)

d)The Altered International Arena in the Post-1945 Era

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Application

 

  1. The Discovery of Air Power and Its Military Implications

  2. The strategic use of Air Power and Sea Power during World War I 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
The Rise of Modern Indian Military System
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual

a)The Nature of the Indian Military Resistance to the British (East India Co.): Army/ Aggression or expansion

b)The Making of the British Military forces (land forces): The Command Structure of the British (Company’s) Army, Case studies of the  British Military Operations in the 19th century: Anglo Mysore Wars; Anglo Maratha wars; Anglo Sikh wars and the Revolt of 1857 (any of the case studies can be taken )

c)British Indian Army: Rise of Presidency Armies

d)Indianisation of Indian Army:  Nationalization of Indian Armed Forces , The Indian National Army

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Conceptual

 

b) The Making of the British Military forces (land forces): The Command Structure of the British (Company’s) Army, Case studies of the British Military Operations in the 19th century: Anglo Mysore Wars; Anglo Maratha wars; Anglo Sikh wars and the Revolt of 1857 (any of the case studies can be taken)

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Banks, Arthur, A World Atlas of Military History, Vol. 1 (1973) 
  • Effenberger, David, A Dictionary of Battles (1966) 
  • Sloan, John F., The International Military Encyclopedia Vols. (1983-) 
  • Windrow, Martin and Francis K. Mason, A Concise Dictionary of Military Biography (1975) 
  • Vishwa Bandhu, Ideologies of War and Peace in Ancient India (Hoshiarpur: 1975). 
  • Gurcharan Singh Sandhu, A Military History of Ancient India, Delhi, 2000 
  • P. C. Chakravarty, The Art of War in Ancient India (Delhi: 1972). 
  • Paret Peter (ed) Makers of Modern Strategy : From Machiavelli to Nuclear Age (Oxford, 1986) 
  • Jagdish Narayan Sarkar, The Art of War in Medieval India (Delhi: 1984) 
  •  Sir Jadunath Sarkar, Some Aspects of Military Thinking and Practice in Medieval India (Calcutta: 1969) 
  • Gurcharan Singh Sandhu, A Military History of Medieval India, Delhi, 2003 
  • Pradeep Barua, “Military Developments in India, 1750- 1850,” Journal of Military History, vol. 58, 1994 12 G
  • J Brynat, “Asymmetric Warfare: The British Experience in Eighteenth Century India,” Journal of the Military History
  • Keegan, John. The Price of Admiralty: The Evolution of Naval Warfare from Trafalgar to Midway. England: Penguin Books, Ltd, 1990.
  • Kennedy, Paul M. The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers. New York: Vintage Books, 1989. 
  • McNeill, William Hardy. The Pursuit of Power: Technology, Armed Force, and Society since A.D. 1000. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984. 
  • Parker, Geoffrey. The Military Revolution: Military Innovation and the Rise of the West 1500-1800. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996. 
  • Van Creveld, Martin. The Age of Airpower. New York: Public Affairs, 2012.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  •  Barraclough, G (ed.), The Times Atlas of World History. London, 1978.
  • Barraclough, G. AnIntroduction to Contemporary History. New York: Basic Books, 1964.
  • Jones, Archer,The Art of War in the Western World. Urbana : University of Illinois Press, 1987.
  • McNeill, W.H. A World History. London: Oxford University Press, 1998.
  • McNeill, W.H. The Rise of the West: A History of the Human Community. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992.
  • Roberts, J.M. The New Penguin History of the World: Fifth Edition. New York: Penguin Books, 2007.
  • Gat, Azar. A History of Military Thought from the Enlightenment to the Cold War. Oxford: 2001.
  • Jones, Archer. The Art of War in the Western World. Urbana : University of Illinois Press, 1987.
  • Keegan, John. The Face of Battle: A Study of Agincourt, Waterloo and the Somme. Penguin: New York. 1983.
  • Stephen P. Cohen and Sunil Dasgupta Arming without Aiming: India’s Military Modernization, New Delhi: Viking, 2010
  • Gray, Colin.  Modern Strategy, Oxford: Oxford university Press, 1999
Evaluation Pattern

 

 

CIA

20 Marks 

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks 

ESE 

50 Marks

Individual Assignment 

Submission

(The Assignment will have 2 components related to each other)

Group

Assignment 

Submission

(Research based)

BHIS541B - SPORTS HISTORIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 Sports has a rich antiquity through world history and has had a deep influence in the society, both in the Indian and international context. This course aims to address major themes, theories and developments in the history of sports. Sport has become globally important and its role in helping to understand society and culture is significant. Sport in India can be understood in social and cultural themes. This course would look at the relevance and influence of sports over societes in a global context with specific attention to the Indian subcontinent. Sport historians and academicians use primary sources in their art of writing. One can trace a historical approach to autobiography, sports journalism and popular writing in relation to sports as well as many theoretical debates. The origin of modern sports has taken place along with the development of sports and physical culture. Over time, codification, modernization and globalization of sporting practices began to take place. History of sports is inclusive of sociology of the body; and concepts of gender, race, sexuality and homophobia are significant for an understanding of history of sports. A large number of institutions associated with sports are in existence and the field of sport does not lack controversies. Sport has become politicized over the years and is influenced by international politics in a significant way. The course aims to initiate discussions on issues like identity politics which plays a significant role in sports.

Course Objectives: 

  •  To introduce the students to sports and its history and its influence in the society, in the Indian and international context. 
  • To provide an overview of how sport became culturally and globally important
  • To critically analyse the role played by sports as a source to study society and culture. 
  • To introduce the students to how sports became politicized and the theoretical debates on modern sports. 
  • To familiarize the students with the primary sources available to historians of sport and how to use them.

Course Outcome

CO1: Trace the history of sports through antiquity to modern times.

CO2: Define the role of international politics in the history of society and sports.

CO3: Critically analyse the social and cultural themes of sports, sociology of the body and aspects of gender and sexuality in relation to sports.

CO4: Apply the historical methods of writings about sports and sports histories.

CO5: Engage with and analyse the recent trends in representations of various social groups in various sports and recent controversies in the field of sports

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Understanding Sports
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual 

a)What is Sports ? Amusement - Entertainment - Competition

b)Theory of Sports - Social theories

c)Value and significance of Sports

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Sports: From the antiquities to the contemporary
 

Level of Knowledge: Basic

a)Sports through antiquities of world history; Of Amphitheatres, Gladiators and Wrestling

b)Sports in India - a cultural history; From Chaturanga to Cricket

c)Sport and international politics

d)Identity politics in sports

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Sports: The modern and the power play
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

 

a)Commercialization of sports – Codification, modernization and globalization of sporting practice

b)Development of sports and institutions

c)Controversies in sports- Talent Or Money?

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Sports: Social and Cultural Themes
 

Level of Knowledge: Analytical

a)Development of sports and physical culture- emergence of Amateur Ideal

b)Social and cultural themes of sports

c)Sociology of the body; Sport, gender, race and sexuality.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Sports and Sports History: The Art of Writing
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual/Interpretative

 

a)Sports, Writing and History; Sources, Historiography of Sports

b)Written representation of sport in India and International context

c)Historical approach to autobiography, sports journalism and popular writing.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  •  Allison, Lincoln. 1986. The Politics of Sport, UK: Manchester University Press.·        
  • Anderson, Eric. 2010. Sport, Theory and Social Problems: A Critical Introduction. UK: Routledge.   
  • Majumdar, Boria. 2017. A History of Indian Sport Through 100 Artefacts, Noida: HarperCollins Publishers.
  • Molnar, Gyozo & Kelly, John. 2012. Sport, Exercise and Social Theory: An Introduction.UK: Routledge. 
  • Smith, Earl. 2010. Sociology of Sport and Social Theory. Illinois: Human Kinetics. 
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  •  Agnew, Jonathan., Cricket: A Modern Anthology, UK: HarperCollins, 2013. 
  • Allison, Lincoln., Amateurism in Sport: An Analysis and a Defense, UK: Cass Series, Sport in the global society, Psychology Press, 2001. 
  • Boddy, Kasia., Boxing, a Cultural History, USA: The University of Chicago Press, 2009. 
  • Brearley, Mike., The Art of Captaincy. The Principles of Leadership in Sport and Business, London: Pan, 2015. 
  • Denison, Pirkko Markula & Pringle, Richard., Foucault, Sport and Exercise: Power, Knowledge and Transforming the Self, UK: Routledge, 2006. 
  • Guha, Ramachandra., A Corner of a Foreign Field: The Indian History of a British Sport, England: Picador, 2003. 
  • Joshi, Sanjay., The Middle Class in Colonial India (Themes in Indian History), New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2010. 
  • Kuper, Simon., Soccer against the Enemy: How the World’s Most Popular Sport Starts and Fuels Revolutions and Keeps Dictators in Power,  New York: Bold Type Books, 2010. 
  • Sen, Ronojoy., Nation at Play: A History of Sport in India, UK: Contemporary Asia in the World Series, Columbia University Press, 2015. 
  • Tendulkar, Sachin., Playing it My Way- My Autobiography, UK: Hodder And Stoughton, 2014. 
  • Young, Christopher., The 1972 Olympics and the Making of Modern Germany, USA: University of California Press, 2010.
Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA

20 Marks 

MSE

50 Marks

CIAII

20 Marks 

ESE 

50 Marks

Individual Assignment 

Written Exam


Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

Group

Assignment 

Written Exam


Section A 3x5 = 15

Section B 2x10 = 20

Section C 1x15 = 15

BHIS541C - POST-COLONIAL ASIA (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

Postcolonialism as the academic study of the cultural legacy of colonialism and imperialism, focusing on the human consequences of the control and exploitation of colonized people and their lands, is critical in the analysis of the history, culture, literature, and discourses of not only European imperial powers but also the people they colonized. The name postcolonialism is modelled on postmodernism, with which it shares certain concepts and methods, and may be thought of as a reaction to or departure from colonialism in the same way postmodernism is a reaction to modernism. Postcolonialism encompasses a wide variety of approaches, and theoreticians may not always agree on a common set of definitions. On a simple level, it may seek through anthropological study to build a better understanding of colonial life from the point of view of the colonized people, based on the assumption that the colonial rulers are unreliable narrators. On a deeper level, postcolonialism examines the social and political power relationships that sustain colonialism and neocolonialism, including the social, political and cultural narratives surrounding the colonizer and the colonized. This approach may overlap with contemporary history and critical theory, and may also draw examples from history, political science, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and human geography. As an epistemology, as ethics (moral philosophy), and as a politics (affairs of the citizenry), the field of postcolonialism addresses the politics of knowledge—the matters that constitute the postcolonial identity of a decolonized people, which derives from (i) the colonizer’s generation of cultural knowledge about the colonized people; and (ii) how that Western cultural knowledge was applied to subjugate a non–European people into a colony of the European mother country, which, after the initial invasion, was effected by means of the cultural identities of ‘colonizer’ and ‘colonized’. And finally, how the consequence of all this has then led to the construction of the discourses in a post-colonial world. Post-1990s, the focus of the World’s attention turned towards Asia. The balance of power has shifted from Euro-American territory to strengthened economies of South-East Asia. There is a change in the practice of politics and economy in West & Central Asia. Development, Political Structure, and Cultural Identity are all issues that are being articulated by regional perspective, thus contesting the Western notions about them. Hence it becomes imperative to engage with these issues from a historical background – especially from within the paradigm of the post-colonial world while tracing the various binaries of positions and opinions in the process of constructing nations as well as national identities. 

Course Objectives:

  • To provide a basic know-how of the forces and events which molded the transition to decolonization from a colonised state, and the process behind it.
  • To both enhance the student’s general intellectual growth as well as foster a particular ability to think historically.
  • An investigation of the Asian past allows students to understand the foundations of the contemporary world as well as the ways modern historians view the past.
  • To provide a general understanding of the colonised period in global history, and then to understand why the world is shaped the way it is in the post-colonial era.
  • To engage the students in the multiple views on Asian histories – as well as the experience of it from colonial and post-colonial perspectives as well.
  • To provide the premises to trace the emergence of Asia as an important player in international relations through oil politics and liberalized economies.

Course Outcome

CO1: Examine political, economic, and social changes of the last two centuries that have affected peoples across the Asian continent.

CO2: Analyze the emphasis placed on the emergence of modern notions of production, consumption, and trade from a global vis-à-vis Asian perspective.

CO3: Critically engage with prominent themes like growth and dynamics of colonization and decolonization, and the interplay of political, cultural, and religious values, and modern imperialism and its influence on global societies, economies, and political systems.

CO4: Trace the evolution of contemporary problems that the world faces and also enable the learner to develop critical thinking and analytical skills.

CO5: Apply frameworks to analyse complex phenomena such as nationalism, resistance movement and revolution.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Near East (Global)
 

Level of Knowledge: Empirical

a) China: Mao and the communist victory – China and the Super Powers – New initiatives – Xinjiang & Tibet.

b) Japan: 19th century developments – Post war Japan: Emergence of a new economic power

c) Neutralism & Realignments

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
South East, South & Central Asia (Global, National)
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Conceptual

a) Cambodia and Vietnam, Indonesia

b) Sri Lanka – Ethnic and Nationalist conflicts

c) Afghanistan – Cold war and post-cold war developments

d) Central Asia, Decolonization & after

 

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Conceptual

b) Sri Lanka – Ethnic and Nationalist conflicts - Group discussion: Exploring the various stands of ethnic and nationalist

conflicts

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
West Asia (Global, Regional)
 

Level of Knowledge: Critical

a) Formation of Israel – Arab-Israeli frictions – The wars of Suez, Six days & Yom Kippur.

b) Destruction of Lebanon – Israel’s invasion – Civil War – Camp David

c) Palestinian state & Israel’s dilemma: Present day scenario

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Arab World (Global, Regional)
 

Level of Knowledge: Theory/Basic

a) Oil & Nationalism – The Shah & the Ayatollah

b) Arab world and the West – Iran and Iraq

c) Gendered narratives from Arabia

Level of Knowledge: Practical/Interpretative

a) Workshop: Deliberating the role of Oil in narratives of Nationalism - Exploring Gendered narratives from war

zones

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Calvocoressi, Peter. 2006. World Politics 1945-2000, New York: Pearson Education.
  2. Lowe, Norman. 1997. Mastering Modern World History, New York: Macmillan.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Aylett. J F. 1996. The Cold War & After, London: Hodder & Stoughton.
  2. Embree, Ainslie T. & Gluck, Carol. 2004. Asia in Western & World History, London: Spring Books.
  3. Hourani, Albert, Khoury, Philip & Wilson, Mary C. (Ed). 2004. The Modern Middle East, London: I.B. Tauris.
  4. Lynch. M. 1996. China: From Empire to People’s Republic, London: Hodder & Stoughton.
  5. Mansfield P. 1992. A History of the Middle East, New Delhi: Penguin.
  6. Tsu, Immanuel C.Y. 1983. The rise of Modern China, New York: Oxford University Press.
  7. Vinaike, Harold. 1996. A History of the Far East in Modern Times, Hyderabad: Kalyani Publishers.
Evaluation Pattern

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

BHIS541C

Post Colonial Asia

CIA1

20 MARKS

CIA II

50 MARKS

CIA3

20 MARKS

ESE

50 MARKS

Group Assignment

MSE

Section A 3x5= 15

Section B 2X10=20

Section C 1X15=15

Individual Assignment

ESE

Section A 3x5= 15

Section B

2X10=20

Section C

1X15=15

BPOL531 - INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is a comprehensive study of International Relations. It provides a foundational understanding of the theories and concepts of International relations. It will aid the students to analyse the major themes in international affairs and world politics.

Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of different schools of thought in International Relations.
  • Develop an ability to integrate the theories and contextualize contemporary global events.
  • Outline the behaviour of nation-states in the international arena.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: compare and contrast major schools of thought in International Relations.

CO2: identify various historical events that led to the development of contemporary International affairs.

CO3: develop an overview of the major contemporary challenges and issues in global politics.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Fundamentals of International Relations
 

International Relations: Meaning, nature, scope and importance; Concepts and Theories of International Relations – Realism and Neo – Realism Liberalism and Constructivism.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Traditional and Non-Traditional Security Threats
 

National Power: Meaning, elements, evaluation of national power.

National Security: Traditional and Non-Traditional concept of security

Human Security: Meaning and Importance        

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
War and Terrorism
 

War: Meaning, Nature, Causes, Types and Remedies.

Terrorism – Causes, Types, Role of State and Non-State actors in Terrorism, Counter terrorism.  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Approaches to International Peace
 

Concepts and Approaches to Pacific Settlement of International Disputes.                                                                                                  

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Instruments of Foreign Policy
 

Nature, Objectives, Determinants, Instruments of Foreign Policy

Diplomacy – Nature, Functions, Privileges and Immunities. Types of Diplomacy.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baylis, J. and Smith, S. (eds.) (2011), The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations, London: OUP.

Heywood, A (2014), Global Politics, Palgrave Foundation.

Martin Griffiths and Terry O Callaghan (2002) ‘International Relations: The Key Concepts’.     Routledge London and New York.

Brown, C and Kirsten Ainley (2005), ‘Understanding International Relations’ 3rd edition, Palgrave Macmillan New York.

Crenshaw, M. (1981). The causes of terrorism. Comparative politics, 13(4), 379-399

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Crenshaw, M. (2008). The debate over “new” vs.“old” terrorism. In Values and Violence (pp. 117-136). Springer, Dordrecht.

Devatak, D, Anthony Burke and Jim George (2007), ‘An Introduction to International Relations: Australian Perspectives’, Cambridge University Press.

Hans J Morgenthau (1948)‘Politics among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace’, Alfred A Knopf, New York.

Kenneth Waltz(1979) ‘Theory of International Politics’. Addison-Wesley Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline:

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

BPOL531

Introduction to International Relations

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15

Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 30 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

 

BPOL541A - WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

It would be a severe underestimation to consider Western Political Thought as just another discipline, as Western Political Thought is a testament of political creation. Western political Thought narrates the story of how to constitute an ideal body-politic, but the ideal has never been exhausted, which has inspired thinkers from Plato to Marx to articulate their own version of ideal body-politic. The course is designed to introduce students to main thinkers of Western Political Thought, to give them an idea as how Western Political Thought has developed. The course would attempt to give students a rigorous overview of Western Political thought by evoking the original text of thinkers concerned. The course would engage with texts like Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Politics and Machiavelli’s The Prince. The course would also attempt to develop a culture of doing a rigorous, hermeneutic way of reading a text which will also take into consideration the context into which thinkers ‘performed’ their philosophy.

Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

●        The nature, emergence and trajectory of Western Political Thought

●        The major ideas, thinkers and debates emerging from Western Political Thought

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Identify the views of major political thinkers in the west

CO2: Understand the concepts and ideas emerging from western political thinkers and the debates among them

CO3: Evaluate the relevance of these ideas in contemporary world

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Greek Political Thought
 

Initial Greek Political Thought; Plato: Philosopher King, Justice and the concept of Ideas; Aristotle: Classification of Constitutions and Politics 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Emergence of Modern Political Thought
 

Machiavelli: The Prince; Social Contract Theorists: Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau; Immanuel Kant.

                                                                                                                                              

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: The Utilitarian and the Idealists
 

Jeremy Bentham; John Stuart Mill; Karl Wilhelm Fredrick Hegel; T.H. Green.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Unit IV: Socialism and Critique of Capitalism
 

Karl Marx and Fredrick Engels: Dialectics and Historical Materialism, Class Struggle, Critique of Capitalism.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

§  Jha, Shefali. (2018) Western Political Thought: From the Ancient Greeks to Modern Times. New Delhi: Pearson.

McClelland, J.S. (1998). A History of Western Political Thought. Routledge.

Mukherjee, Subrata and Sushila Ramaswamy. (2011). A History of Political Thought – Plato   to Marx. Prentice Hall India Learning Pvt. Ltd.

Mukhopadhyay, A.K. (1980). Western Political Thought: From Ancient Greeks to Modern Political Scientists. Sage.

Mulgan, R.G. (1977). Aristotle’s Political Theory. Clarendon Press.

Nelson, B. (2008) Western Political Thought. New Delhi: Pearson Longman.

Rappe, Sara. (2000). Reading Neoplatonism, Non Discursive Thinking in the Texts of Plotinus, Proclus and Damascius.  Cambridge University Press.

Skinner, Quentin. (1981). Machiavelli: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Barker, Ernest. (1906). The Political Thought of Plato and Aristotle.

Popper, Karl. (1945). The Open Society and its Enemies.

Skinner, Quentin. (1978). The Foundations of Modern Political Thought, Vol. I. Cambridge University Press.

Wayper, C.L. (1954) Political Thought. English Universities Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline:

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

BPOL541A

 WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

BPOL541B - CONCEPTS AND THEORIES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course offers selected classical and modern concepts and theories of Public Administration. It introduces the evolution of public administration as a discipline and the significance of dichotomy between political science and public administration. Specifically, it provides basic concepts and principles like organisation, hierarchy, unity of command, span of control, authority, and responsibility etc. Besides, students learn core theories of public administration and new frontiers in the field of public administration.

Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

  • understand the nature and importance of public administration and its evolution as a discipline. 
  • critically reflect on theories in public administration and their general applicability in governmental context.
  • analyse new frontiers in the field of administrative science in general and administrative behaviour in particular.

Course Outcome

CO1: explain the major theoretical approaches to public administration.

CO2: understand the dichotomy between political science and public administration.

CO3: rationalize the importance of the administrative context and be able to analyze how various principles and techniques influence the administrative efficiency of the government.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Public Administration
 

Meaning, approaches, Scope and Significance. Evolution of the Discipline. Public Administration and its distinction with Political Science and Management.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
New Trends in Public Administration
 

State Vs Market Debate. Public-Private Partnership. New Public Management Perspective. E-Governance. SMART Governance. Digital Administration. Corporate Governance.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Basic Concepts and Principles
 

Organization. Hierarchy. Unity of Command. Span of Control. Authority and Responsibility. Coordination. Supervision. Centralization and Decentralisation. Line, Staff, and Auxilliary Agencies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Select Theories of Administration and Administrative Behaviour-I
 

Taylor’s Scientific Management. Fayol’s Administrative Management. Herbert A. Simon on Decision Making in an organization, David Easton and Chester Bernard’s Systems Approach.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Select Theories of Administration and Administrative Behaviour-II
 

Elton Mayo’s Theory of Human Relations. Socio-psychological Approach: Views of Abraham Maslow and Frederick Herzberg, Views of Douglas McGregor and Victor Vroom, Follett’s Theory of Conflict and Integration.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Basu, R. (2005). Public Administration: Concepts and Theories. New Delhi: Sterling.
Bhagwan, V. and Bhushan, V. (2005). Public Administration. New Delhi: S. Chand.
Bhattacharya, M. (2015). New Horizons of Public Administration. New Delhi: Jawahar.
Fadia, B.L. and Fadia, K. (2016). Public Administration: Administrative Theories and Concepts. New Delhi: Sahitya Bhawan.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Sharma, M.P. et al. (2012). Public Administration in Theory and Practice. Allahabad: Kitab Mahal.
Henry, N. (2012). Public Administration and Public Affairs. New Delhi: PHI Learning.
Polinaidu, S. (2013). Public Administration. New Delhi: Galgotia.
Sapru, RK. (2011). Public Policy: Art and Craft of Policy Analysis. New Delhi: PHI Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - Evaluation Pattern

Assignment

Case Study

Presentation

Test

Mid Semester

20

10

10

10

25

Mid Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

3X5=15

2X10=20

1X15=15

50

End Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Total

3X5=15

2X10=20

1X15=15

50

SDEN511 - CAREER ORIENTED SKILLS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The primary objective of this course is to familiarize the database management and various discipline specific software packages to the students and help them to analyse the basic statistical methods for data analysis. The theme identified for the fifth and sixth semester is Data management and Technical Knowledge.

The course aims to:

  • develop discipline specific skills for professional and personal growth.
  • provide a platform to nurture and hone skills necessary for professional development. 

Course Outcome

CO1: demonstrate working in discipline specific software package and database for professional development

CO2: utilise these transferable skills which can be used in multiple domains across time.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
MOOC Courses
 

Students must choose MOOC courses offered by various online platforms in the specific themes given for the Fifth and sixth semesters. This consists of various discipline software packages, SPSS, Excel, R, Adobe, Python, Tableau, Nvivo etc

Text Books And Reference Books:

_

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

_