CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS

School of Social Sciences

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Science (Economics, Mathematics)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN121 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
ECO131Y INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS Core Courses 3 3 100
ECO132Y HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT Core Courses 3 3 100
ENG122 DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - I Core Courses 3 2 50
FRE121 FRENCH - 3 3 100
GER121 GERMAN Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
KAN121Y FOUNDATIONAL KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2 0 100
MAT131 DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS Core Courses 4 4 100
SPA121 SPANISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 0 100
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN221 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH - 3 3 100
ECO231Y INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS - 3 3 100
ECO232Y FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT - 3 3 100
ENG222 DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - II - 3 3 100
FRE221 FRENCH - 3 3 100
GER221 GERMAN - 3 3 100
MAT231 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS - 4 4 100
SPA221 SPANISH - 3 3 100

AEN121 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Additional English course is offered as a second language course and seeks to introduce the students to the nuances of English literature in its varied forms and genres. The students who choose Additional English are generally proficient in the English language. Hence, instead of focusing on introducing them to language, challenging texts in terms of ideas, form, and technique are chosen. Additional English as a course is designed for students in place of a regional language. Non-Resident Indians (NRIs), foreign nationals and students who have not taken Hindi, Kannada, Tamil or French at the Plus 2 or Class XII levels are eligible to choose Additional English. The course is taught for students from different streams, namely, BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA in the first year and for BA, BSc and BCom (Regular) in the second year.

The first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian and Indian sub-continental voices in English in English translation for the Additional English students of the first year. This effort aims to familiarize the students with regional literatures in translation, Indian Writing in English (IWE) and literatures from Pakistan, Nepal and Srilanka, thereby, enabling the students to learn more about Indian culture and ethos through writings from different regions of the country. We have tried to represent in some way or the other the corners of India and the Indian sub-continent in this microcosmic world of short stories, poems and essays

 

There is a prescribed text bookfor the first year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

The first semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Nepal. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. An important addition to this syllabus is the preponderance of North-Eastern writing which was hitherto not well represented. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

  

 

Course Outcome

CO1 CO 2: iv) Understand the cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities of India v) it will be able to be analytical and critical of the pluralistic society they live in through the activities and assignments conducted vi) be aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Keki N Daruwala     “Migrations”

 

2.      Kamala Das            “Forest Fire”

 

3.      Agha Shahid Ali      “Snow on the Desert”

 

4.      Eunice D Souza       “Marriages are Made”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Rabindranath Tagore    “Babus of Nayanjore”

 

2.      Ruskin Bond  “He said it with Arsenic”

 

3.      Bhisham Sahni       “The Boss Came to Dinner”

 

4.      N. Kunjamohan Singh    “The Taste of Hilsa”

 

5.      Mohan Thakuri                “Post Script”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Mahatma Gandhi       “What is True Civilization?” (Excerpts from Hind Swaraj)

 

2.      Ela Bhatt                    “Organising for Change”

 

3.      Sitakant Mahapatra     “Beyond the Ego: New Values for a Global Neighborhood

 

4.      B R Ambedkar             “Waiting for A Visa”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Contemporary knowledge of the soci-political situation in the sub-continent

The text book copy "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

On-line resources to appreciate the text through the Comprehension Questions

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  Classroom assignment for 20 marks keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

Total                   50

ECO131Y - INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: 

This course is designed to introduce the students to the basic principles of microeconomic theory. The course shall begin with an introduction to the institutional and economic structures under capitalist system, and thereafter introducing students to the models and concepts of economic decision making. The course shall then discuss markets and game theory, and conclude with the discussions on principal and agent interaction.

 

Course Objectives:

The course has been conceptualised in order to help students:

  • develop the understanding of the conceptual foundations and analytical methods used in micro economics.
  • familiarize with the basics of consumer behaviour and decision-making criteria.
  • analyse and understand relationships and interactions.

Course Outcome

CO1: Learner will be able to understand that economics is about the allocation of scarce resources and how those results in trade-offs.

CO2: Learner will be able to understand the role of prices in allocating scarce resources in market economies and explain the consequences of government policies in the form of price controls.

CO3: Learner will be able to appreciate positive as well as normative viewpoints to analyse and understand relationships and interactions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
The Big Question About the Economy
 

The Capitalist Revolution – Private property, markets and firms – Institutions, Government and Economy - Income, Inequality and living standards – Trade.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Economic Decision Making
 

Economic Models – Technology and Costs – Innovation and Profits – Population and Growth – Scarcity, Work and Choice – Labour and Production – Opportunity Costs – Decision Making – Income and Substitution Effect.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Economic Relationships and Interactions
 

Social interaction and Game theory – Behavioural Experiments – Cooperation, Negotiation, Conflict of Interest and Social Norms – Institutions and Power – Allocations, Feasibility and Efficiency – Firms, Markets and Division of Labour – Ownership and Control – Work and Wages – Principal and Agents Interactions.

Text Books And Reference Books:

The CORE team, The Economy. Available at: https://www.core-econ.org.

The CORE team, The Economy: A South Asian Perspective. Available at:  https://www.core-econ.org/the-economy-south-asia/

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ahuja, H. L. (2016). Principles of Microeconomics (22nd Edition). S Chand, New Delhi.

Lipsey, R. G. and Chrystal, K.A. (1999). Principles of Economics (9th Edition). Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Mankiw, N. G. (2012). Principles of Microeconomics (4th Edition). Cengage Learning India.

Pindyck, R. S. and Rubinfeld, D. L. (2017). Microeconomics (8th Edition). Pearson Education. 

Ramsfield, E. (1997). Microeconomics (9th Edition). W.W Norton and Company, New York.

Ray, N. C. (1975). An Introduction to Microeconomics, Macmillan company of India Ltd, New Delhi.

Samuelson, P. A. and Hague, W. D. (1972). A textbook of Economic Theory, ELBS Longman group, London.

Samuelson, P. A., & Nordhaus, W.D. (2010). Economics (19th edition). New Delhi:  McGraw-Hill Companies.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

10

25

10

50

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

ECO132Y - HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description 

The course is designed to be intellectually stimulating and charts out the economic thought from mercantilism to the contemporary period. This course aims to make students familiar with the famous thinkers and their thoughts that form the basis for current practices and policies; to demonstrate that knowledge is created by the successive building of ideas on earlier ones, and to show how most of the theoretical concepts in economics and policy today have their roots in ideas born centuries before.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • trace the historical beginnings of economic theories, doctrines and postulates of the different schools of thought
  • associate the economists and the schools of thought that they belong to.
  • understand the reasons for ideological differences in different counties. 

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction and Pre-Classical Thought
 

Mercantilist thinking - Physiocracy - major economic ideas, with special reference to Quesnay.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Classical and Socialist Thoughts
 

Classical thought - Smith - Malthus - Ricardo – Mill - Marx - post Marxists - Fabian socialists - Robert Owen.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Neo-Classical Thought
 

Marginalist school – Walras – Marshall – Edgeworth (2x2 model).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Modern Economic Thinkers
 

Modern economic thinkers: Keynes - Schumpeter - Rawls – Sen

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Indian Economic Thought
 

Economic thoughts of: Kautilya – Dadabhai Naoroji – M K Gandhi – B R Ambedkar

Text Books And Reference Books:

Haney, L. H. (1913). History of Economic Thought: A Critical Account of the Origin and Development of the Economic Theories of the Leading Thinkers in the Leading Nations. New York: The Macmillan Company.

Roncaglia, A. (2017). A Brief History of Economic Thought. UK: Cambridge University Press.

Screpanti, E. & Zamagni, S. (2006). An Outline of the History of Economic Thought. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Gide, C. and Rist, C. (2007, Indian Reprint). A History of Economic Doctrines. New Delhi: Surjeet Publications

Heilbroner, R. L. (1999). The Worldly Philosophers - The Lives, Times, and Idea of the Great Economic Thinkers. Simon & Schuster.

Roll, E. (1938). A History of Economic Thought. London: Feber and Feber.

Screpanti, E. and Zamagni, S. (2006). An Outline of the History of Economic Thought. First Indian Edition, Oxford University Press.  

Taylor, O. H. and Harris, S. E. (2011). A History of Economic Thought. Literary Licensing.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

10

25

10

50

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

ENG122 - DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Academic Skills are a blend of theoretical ability to recognize the nuances of language aspects and hands-on training to exercise the acquired knowledge in reasoning, reading and writing. Academic Skills focus on developing research skills through careful reading and critical writing that are considered foundational and crucial in textual scholarship and knowledge production. The participants of this course will determine their areas of interest in conceptualizing their seminal work and constructing a reasoned argument. This course prompts the participants to take their learning-receptive skills and productive skills in a purpose-driven and practice-oriented mode on a contextual basis.

The course deals with receptive skills (reading) and productive skills (writing). In fact listening and speaking skills are not directly involved but act as a higher cognitive process. This course facilitates the participants with varied practices, tasks, exemplars, sample papers to practice with context-driven reading material. It runs for one full academic year with specific learning outcomes which are two-fold – conceptual grasp and textual application. The whole course and its structure involve Bloom’s taxonomy of knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, evaluation and synthesis.

Objectives

To enable the learner

       acquire higher order receptive and productive skills

       develop reading skills at the higher education level

       be aware of functional grammar to improve research writing skills

       grasp and apply the mechanics in academic writing skills

       use study skills for research-based knowledge dissemination (writing a paper or presentation)

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Awareness of different approaches to knowledge, a critical and creative bent of mind that leads to a content-based investigation.

CO2: Working knowledge of different purposes of writing, especially persuasive (argumentative), analytical, and informative writings paves the way for research-based reading and writing.

CO3: Application of functional grammar and mechanics that enhance conceptual clarity, communicative style, and style of writing

CO4: Hands-on experience in a research culture which is discipline-specific in nature

CO5: Experiential learning through participatory learning and service learning

CO6: Awareness of problem-based learning and need-based learning

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Basic skills
 

To enable learners to fine tune their expressions through better choice of words and sentence structures with clarity of idea.

       Expanding vocabulary, spelling nuances, refreshing grammar, avoiding common errors and pitfalls, learning sentence structures, and use of punctuation (mechanics).

       Use of dictionary

       Use of Word document tools

       Use of Library resources

       Concept mapping- mind mapping

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Reading skills
 

To enable students to develop appropriate reading comprehension skills through nuanced understanding of reading techniques.

       Previewing

       Reading for Main Ideas

       Using Contexts for Vocabulary

       Skimming/Scanning for Details

       Making Inferences

       Restating

       Phrasing

                                                                       

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Study Skills
 

To enable students to use basic study skills to organize knowledge received and to streamline their ideas into appropriate academic discourse.

 

       Understanding the text

       Critical thinking

       Mnemonics

o   Introduction to the need for mnemonics?

o   Memory organisation through pegging practices

o    Word, acronym, models, note cards, images, etc

 

 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Language skills
 

to enable students to understand and appreciate different kinds of literature and express their understanding in the form of short paragraphs or essays

       Language focus

       Literary appreciation- language devices-literary devices

       Grammar-university grammar (functional grammar)

       Sentence structure

       Vocabulary

       Use of Formal and informal language

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Listening Skills
 

To enable students to listen to lectures and take notes and organize these to discuss or write about concepts or show application of knowledge

       Listening Skills

       Concept Building

       Approaches to LS

       Features of LS

       Function

       Importance of LS at university level education

       Practical sessions

 

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Critical Reading
 

To enable students to develop the art of critical reading through close reading formulas

 

       Pre-reading

       Annotating

       Outlining

       Summarizing

       Finding oppositions

       Inventoring

       Identifying thesis and related arguments

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
portfolio organisation
 

Set of hours for application

Exemplars

(Self Study Learning, Portfolio Building, teaching on Formative and Summative assessment mode, Problem Based Learning modules and project Submission)

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Langan, J. (1995). English Skills With Reading (3rd Ed.). McGraw Hill. New York.

2.      Osmond, A. (2013). Academic Writing and Grammar for Students. Sage. Los Angeles.

3.      Robitaille, J. and Connelly, R. (2002).  Writer’s Resource: From Paragraph to Essay. Thomson Heinle. Australia.

Please note that the teacher in charge will also be bringing in authentic material to the class apart from the books mentioned in the reference.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Please note that the teacher in charge will also be bringing in authentic material to the class apart from the books mentioned in the reference. (through google classroom) 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (weightage) = 50 marks

 

ESE (weight) = 50 marks

 

 

CIA I – 20 MARKS- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit I

CIA II- 50 Marks- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit I and II

CIA III- 20 Marks- Tasks done in the portfolio based on Unit III

Internal Assessment Breakup:

CIA I -10 Marks

CIA II- 25 Marks

CIA III- 10 Marks

Attendance- 5 Marks

End Sem- 50 Marks Portfolio Submission

 

FRE121 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
Course Description:  “Latitudes 1”  A1/A2guides the learner in a process of acquisition.  This method leads naturally to communicate and to carry out tasks in French. Learning language skills goes hand in hand with discovering the socio-cultural realities specific to France and the Francophonie.
Course Objectives:  “Latitudes 1”A1/A2 is composed of 4 modules of 3 units. Each module has a general objective and more specific to define the linguistic knowledge with the help of which the learners will implement various skills such as to understand, to speak, to interact and to write. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Student will able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written French

CO2: Student will able to recognize the value of French language learning and francophone cultures through participation in a variety of activities.

CO3: Student will able to demonstrate language learning skills and strategies as cognitive and social development.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Parler de soi - Salut!
 

o   Salutation

o    Getting acquainted with people

o    Introducing oneself

o    Excusing oneself

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Enchante
 
  • Asking someone to introduce himself/herself
  •  Introducing someone
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
J?adore
 

o   Expressing one’s tastes

o   Speaking about one’s plans

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Echanger - Tu veux bien
 

o   Asking  someone to do something

o   Asking politely

o   speaking about past actions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
On se voit quand ?
 

o   proposing, accepting, refusing an invitation

o   Indicate the date

o   Fixing an appointment

o   asking and specifying time

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Bonne Idee
 

o   Expressing one’s positive and negative point of view                 

o   finding out rates

o   asking about quantity

o   expressing quantity

Text Books And Reference Books:

Latitudes 1 Methode de Français A1/A2 , Regine Merieux , Yves Loiseau

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     French websites like Duolingo, Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Quiz/ self-introduction and introducing someone

10%

 

CIA 2 – Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 –  poster making / Role play

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Evaluation Pattern:

(CIA1:20 marks + CIA2:50 marks + CIA3:20 marks)/2 + Attendance: 5 marks + End Sem: 50 marks

 

 

 

GER121 - GERMAN (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • Course Description: This course mainly deals with the listening, speaking, writing, reading modules of basic German by using different pedagogies and effective strategies in order to meet the requirements of various situations. This course also enables the students to have cross-cultural competencies and cognitive skills. Students will learn how to introduce themselves. Students will be able to create a profile in internet. Students will be able to describe the way and ask for the specific location. Students will be able to have a conversation in Restaurant. Students will be able to schedule an appointment on phone. Students will be able to talk about birthdays.

 

Course Objectives:

·       To achieve language proficiency skills on the basic level

     To develop the skills demonstrated in the ability to interpret simple text

     To attain some transcultural competency: an awareness of cross-cultural differences between societies.

     To develop the ability to formulate basic questions

 

 

     

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Through this course student should be able to Introduce him/herself and others as well as ask others about themselves

CO2: Understand and use familiar, everyday expressions and very simple sentences related to the basic needs.

CO3: Recall the words and communicate in a very simple manner

CO4: Write simple phrases related to personal details.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Guten Tag
 

Grüßen und verabschieden, sich und andere vorstellen, über sich und andere sprechen, Zahlen bis 20, Telefonnummer und E-mail-Adresse nennen, buchstabieren, über Länder und Sprachen sprechen.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Freunde, Kollegen und ich
 

über Hobbys, sich verabreden, Berufe und Arbeitszeiten sprechen, Wochentage benennen, über Arbeit, Zahlen ab 20 nennnen, über Jahreszeiten sprechen, ein Profil im Internet erstellen. Artikel der, die, das, verben und Personalpronomen II, Ja-/Nein- Frage, Plural der Substantive, die verben haben und sein.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
In Hamburg
 

Plätze und Gebäude benennen, fragen zu Orten stellen, Texte einer Bildergeschichte zuordnen, Dinge erfragen, Verkehrsmittel benennen, nach dem Weg fragen und einen Weg beschreiben, Texte mit internationalen Wörtern verstehen, Artikel lernen. Bestimmter Artikel: der, die, das, unbestimmter Artikel: ein, eine, ein, Negationsartikel: kein, keine, kein, Imperativ mit Sie.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Guten Appetit
 

über essen sprechen, einen Einkauf planen, Gespräche beim Essen führen, mit W-fragen Texte verstehen, Wörter ordnen und lernen, Positionen im Satz, Akkusativ, Verben mit Akkusativ.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Tag für Tag
 

Die Uhrzeit verstehen und nennen, Zeitangaben machen, über die Familie sprechen, sich verabreden, sich für eine Verspätung entschuldigen, einen Termin telefonisch vereinbaren. Zeitangaben mit am, um, von.... bis, possessiveartikel: mein, dein..., Modalverben im Satz: Satzklammer, Modalverben müssen, können und wollen.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Zeit mit Freunden
 

Etwas gemeinsam planen, über Geburtstage sprechen, eine Einladung verstehen und schreiben, im Restaurant bestellen und bezahlen, über ein Ereignis sprechen, bestimmte Informationen in Texten finden, Veranstaltungstipps im Radio verstehen. Datumsangaben: am ...., trennbare Verben, Präposition für + Akkusativ mich, dich ..., Präteritum von haben und sein.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Netzwerk neu Deutsch als Fremdsprache A1 Textbook, workbook, glossar and 2cd ‘s by Stefanie dengler, Paul rusch, Helenschmitz, Tanja sieber, klett -Langenscheidt publishers

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

1.     Studio d A1 set of three books and CD by Herr Mann Funk, Cornelsen publishers

2.     Deutsch Sprachlehre für Ausländer and Glossar Deutsch-English by Heinz Griesbach-Dora Schulz, Max Hueber publishers

3.     Deutsch für den Beruf text book by adelheid h, Max Hueber publishers

4.     Deutsch für den Beruf work book by adelheid h, Max Hueber publishers

5.     Grammatik intensiv trainer A1 Deutsch – Langenscheidt by Mark lester, larry beason, langenscheid publishers

6.     Fit für Goethe Zetifikat A1 start Deutsch 1 by Johaness Gerbes, Frau ke van der Werff, Hueber publishers

7.     Learn german through games and activities level1 Deutsch als Fremdsprache/Kursbuch und Arbeitsbuch and CD by Sabine Emmerich & Federica Colombo, eli publishers

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Quiz / Introduction

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Role Play /Assignment Ex:  Describe the house / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

KAN121Y - FOUNDATIONAL KANNADA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: It is a thirty hours course. Students will be exposed to the use of Kannada Language both in oral and written forms. In the introductory sessions Kannada alphabets, words, simple sentence writing and basic grammar will be taught. At the end of the course students will be able to Read, Write and Speak in Kannada Language

Course Objective:
•    To enable students to communicate in the State Language Kannada.  
•    Helps the students, particularly coming from other states in their day to day conversations.
•    The course mainly focusses on Conversational Kannada and writing Kannada.

Course Outcome

CO1: On completion of the course, students will be able to read and write in Kannada.

CO2: Students will be exposed to Kannada Reading, Writing, and speaking language skills.

CO3: Students will be aware of the culture and heritage of Karnataka.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
TOPIC -1
 

Kannada Varnamale- Swargalu, Sandhyakshara, Anuswara & Visarga              

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Topic - 2
 

Vargeeya Vyanjana, Anunasikagalu 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Topic 3
 

Avargeeya Vyanjana, Ottakshargalu

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Topic - 1
 

Kaagunitha

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Topic - 1
 

1.     Parts of Speech: Noun, Pronoun, Verb, Conjunction, Interjection,

Exclamatory.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Topic - 1
 

Linga, Vachana, Vibhakti Pratyagalu 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Topic - 1
 

Verb Root, Verb- Past and Non Past

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:9
Topic - 1
 

Sentence making, Translation & Question form, Negation, Opposite words

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:9
Topic - 2
 

Comprehension, Letter Writing

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Kannada Alphabets, Number, Days Chart

2. Thili Kannada - K S Madhusudana, H N  Muralidharan

3. Spoken Kannada for Absolute Beginners - Sanjay D

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Spoken Kannada for Absolute Beginners - Sanjay D

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 Alphabets (Vowels and Consonats), Otthakshara, Kagunitha. 10%

CIA-2 Noun, Verb, Number, Gender, Tense, Days, Name of Things. 15%

CIA-3  Conversation Practice, Vachana, Opposite Word, Sentance making (Animals, Birds, Vegetables, things) Translation, Letter Writing. 15% 

Attendance 10%

End Semester Exam:

Question Paper Pattern

·       Section A - Test of linguistic ability through grammar components –15 marks

·       Section B - Test of translating abilities and comprehension, short answers - 15 marks

·       Section C - Test of writing skills / Originality in letter writing, dialogue and essay

writing – 20 marks 

MAT131 - DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at enabling the students to know various concepts and principles of differential calculus and its applications. Sound knowledge of calculus is essential for the students of mathematics for the better perceptions of the subject and its development.

Course objectives​: This course will help the learner to

COBJ1. Gain familiarity with the concepts of limit, continuity and differentiability.

COBJ2. Understand the relationship between the concepts of differentiability and continuity.

COBJ3. Analyse and interpret the different versions of mean value theorems.

COBJ4. Learn successive differentiation and nth derivative of product of two functions.

COBJ5. Find derivative of functions of more than one variable.

Course Outcome

CO1: Compute limits, derivatives and examine the continuity, differentiability of a function at a point.

CO2: Understand the properties of continuous functions and prove that differentiability implies continuity

CO3: Prove Mean value theorems and analyse its geometric interpretation.

CO4: Compute derivatives of any order and apply Leibniz? theorem to find nth derivative of product of two functions.

CO5: Master the fundamental concepts of partial differentiation and apply Euler?s theorem for homogeneous functions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Limits, Continuity and Differentiability
 

Functions, limit of a function, precise definition of a limit, limit laws, one sided limits, continuity, types of discontinuities, limits involving infinity, asymptotes of graphs, properties of continuous functions on a closed interval, boundedness theorem, extreme value theorem, sign preserving property of continuous functions, intermediate value theorem, differentiability, derivative as a rate of change, differentiability implies continuity, chain rule.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Application of Derivatives and Successive Differentiation
 

Mean value theorems: Rolle’s theorem, Lagrange’s and Cauchy’s first mean value theorems, Taylor’s theorem (Lagrange’s form and Cauchy’s forms of remainder), Maclaurin’s theorem, series expansions, indeterminate forms, curvature and radius of curvature, singular points, successive differentiation, nth derivatives of functions, Leibnitz theorem and its applications.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Partial Differentiation
 

Functions of several variables, limits and continuity for functions of two variables, partial derivatives, the chain rule, homogeneous functions, Euler’s theorem, extreme values and saddle points, Taylor's formula for two variables, Lagrange multipliers, partial derivatives with constrained variables, Jacobians.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. G. B. Thomas, M. D. Weir, J. Hass, Thomas Calculus, 12 Ed., Pearson Education India, 2015.
  2. H. Anton, I. Birens, S. Davis, Calculus, John Wiley and Sons Inc., 2002.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. G. B. Thomas, R. L. Finney, Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 9th Ed., Addison-Wesley Pub. Co., 1998.
  2. F. Ayres and E. Mendelson, Schaum's Outline of Calculus, 6th Ed., USA: Mc. Graw Hill, 2013.
  3. N. P. Bali, Differential Calculus, New Delhi, Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd., India, 2012.
  4. J. Stewart, Single Variable Essential Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 2nd Ed., Belmont, USA: Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning., 2013.
  5. S. Narayanan, T. K. M. Pillay, Calculus, Reprint, S. Viswanathan Pvt. Ltd., India, 2009. (vol. I & II.)
  6. M. Spivak, Calculus, 3rd Ed. Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  7. T. M. Apostol, Calculus, Vol-II, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd., 2011.
  8. J. Edwards, An elementary treatise on the differential calculus: with applications and numerous examples, Reprint, Charleston, USA: Biblio Bazaar, 2010.
Evaluation Pattern

 

Component

Mode of Assessment

Parameters

Points

CIA I

MCQ,

Written Assignment,

Reference work, etc.,

Mastery of the core concepts

Problem solving skills

 

10

CIA II

Mid-semester Examination

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

25

CIA III

Written Assignment, Project

Problem solving skills

10

Attendance

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

05

ESE

 

Basic, conceptual and analytical knowledge of the subject

50

Total

100

SPA121 - SPANISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description:

To teach verbal communication through grammar, vocabulary and exercises.

Teaching of language to form sentences and progress towards paragraph writing.

Teaching of language for dialogue writing in given situation presenting oneself

To talk about daily routine

Telling the time

Comprehension

Speaking skills

Course Outcome

CO1: Learn to communicate through grammar, vocabulary and exercises.

CO2: To learn general vocabulary and technical terminologies related to hotel management.

CO3: Enable the student to speak in a given situation.

CO4: To express themselves and comprehend through dialogues.

CO5: To answer questions, give and take orders.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 1
 

Reflexive verbs

Conjugations

Uses: sentences

Daily routine

Telling time

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 2
 

Dialogue Writing

In the cafeteria

At the restaurant

In the class

At the bus station, etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3
 

Irregular verb conjugation

Uses: sentences

Conditional tense for being more courteous and polite

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit 4
 

Uses of auxiliary verbs

Conjugation

Sentences

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Unit 5
 

Gerunds

Uses

Conjugation

Auxiliary verbs for gerunds

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dictionary, preferably Collins, 501Verb Conjugation Book from Barron’s, Aula 01, Suena 01, Pasaporte 01.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

**

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assesment and the final marks will be sent ito the Examination office.

AEN221 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The second semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Srilanka. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

 

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

 

Course Outcome

CO1 CO 2: iv) Understand the cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities of India v) it will be able to be analytical and critical of the pluralistic society they live in through the activities and assignments conducted vi) be aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Jayanta Mahapatra    “Grandfather”

 

2.      Meena Alexander    “Rites of Sense”

 

3.      K.Satchidanandan      “Cactus”

 

4.      Jean Arasanayagam   “Nallur”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Temsula Ao             “The Journey”

 

2.      A. K Ramanujan       “Annaya’s Anthropology”

 

3.      Sundara Ramswamy   “Waves”

 

4.      Ashfaq Ahmed            “Mohsin Mohalla”

 

5.      T.S Pillai                      “In the Floods”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Salman Rushdie        “Gandhi Now”

 

2.      Amartya Sen             “Sharing the World”

 

3.      Suketu Mehta            “Country of the No”

 

4.      Rahul Bhattacharya     “Pundits From Pakistan” (An Excerpt)

Text Books And Reference Books:

The textbook "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Online references for Comprehension Questions in the textbook

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Classroom assignment/test for 20 marks keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.


Question Paper Pattern        

Mid Semester Exam: 2 Hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 5 x 5 = 25

Section B: 5 x 15= 75

Total                   100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ECO231Y - INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course provides strong foundations in both theoretical as well as empirical understanding of macroeconomics. The course begins by introducing students to the idea of Macroeconomics, its past and present, and its scope and relevance. The course then systematically introduces students to the major macroeconomic aggregates such as GDP and CPI. The course also discusses the impact of monetary and fiscal policy on these variables, in the goods and money markets

Course Objectives

The course aims to:

  • introduce the students to the fundamental concepts and theories in Macroeconomics.
  • enable the students to understand the characteristics of major macroeconomic variables.
  • equip students to analyse the dynamic interactions between the major macroeconomic variables and understand their impact on the macroeconomy.

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction
 

Introduction of macroeconomics - a brief history of economics - Conceptualising the macroeconomy: past and present -The macroeconomy as an embedded system - The macroeconomy as a web of flows.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Measuring a Nation?s Income and Cost of living
 

Economy’s Income and Expenditure - Measurement of GDP - Components of GDP - Real versus Nominal GDP - The GDP Deflator - The Consumer Price Index- Calculation of CPI- GDP deflator versus the CPI- Correcting economic variables for the effects of inflation, Real and Nominal Interest rates - The limitations of using national income statistics

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Goods Market
 

Saving and Investment in the National Income Accounts- The Market for Loanable Funds - Policy changes and impact on the market for Loanable funds.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Money Market
 

Meaning and Functions of Money- Banks and Money Supply; Money creation with 100 percent reserve banking and Fractional, reserve banking- Central Bank tools of Monetary Control, The financial architecture of India, Theories of money, Money in the open economy

Text Books And Reference Books:

Froyen, R. (2014). Macroeconomics: Theories and Policies (10th ed.). Pearson Education.

Mankiw, N. G. (2015). Macroeconomics (9th ed.). USA: Worth Publishers.

Thomas, A. M. (2021). Macroeconomics: An Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ackley, G.  (1976). Macroeconomics, Theory and Policy. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.

Dornbusch, R., Fischer, S., & Startz, R. (2015). Macroeconomics. (11th ed.). McGraw Hill Education.

Heijdra, B. J. & Ploeg, F. V. (2001). Foundations of Modern Macroeconomics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

McConnell, C. R., & Brue, S. L. (2011). Macroeconomics, Principles, Problems and Policies.  New York: McGraw Hill Inc.

Shapiro, E. (1996). Macroeconomics Analysis. New Delhi: Galgotia Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

10

25

10

50

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

ECO232Y - FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description 

The course introduces the fundamental concepts, approaches and the classic theories in areas of economics of growth as well as economic development. The course provides focus on core issues like poverty, inequality by highlighting the discussions on the concept, measurement and extent of these problems.  In addition, the course throws light on the contemporary issues and hindrances in achieving economic development, especially in the context of urbanisation and the issues of the informal sector.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • give an understanding of the theoretical perceptions of economic growth and development together with the forces bringing about them. 
  • broaden the awareness of the challenges in the developmental process and thus motivate the students towards the thinking of alternative solutions.

Course Outcome

CO 1: The student will be able to identify and examine the role of theories of economics of development in the number of existing development issues.

CO 2: The student will be able to synthesize the inter links between various development economic theories and approaches.

CO 3: The student will be able to categorize and find the nuances surrounding the issue of economic development.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Meaning of Development and Relevant Concepts
 

Distinction between Growth and Development; PQLI; Human Development Index; Gender Development Index; Sen’s Capabilities Approach; Environmental Sustainability and Development; Common Characteristics of Developing Nations; Alternative Measures of Development.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Growth Models and Empirics
 

The Harrod-Domar model; the Solow model and its variants; Theories of endogenous growth with special reference to Romer’s model; the Big Push Theory and Theory of Critical Minimum Efforts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Approaches to Development
 

Balanced and Unbalanced Growth; Low Income Equilibrium Trap; Dual Economy Models of Lewis.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Poverty, Inequality and Development
 

Measurement of Poverty – Absolute and Relative; Head-Count Index and Poverty Gap Indices; Policy options for Alleviation of Poverty; Measurement of Income Inequality; Economic Growth and Income Inequality – Kuznet’s Inverted Hypothesis, Impact of Inequality on Development.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Urbanization and Informal Sector
 

Causes and effects of urbanization; Rural-Urban Migration; Policies for the Urban Informal Sector.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Todaro, M. P. and Smith, S. C. (2014). Economic Development (12th Edition). New Delhi: Pearson Education Pvt. Ltd.

Lekhi, R. K. (2013). The Economics of Development and Planning (15th Edition). New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Banerjee, A., Benabou, R. and Mookerjee, D. (2006). Understanding Poverty, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Sen, A. (2000). Development as Freedom. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Basu, K. (1997). Analytical Development Economics: The Less Developed Economy Revisited. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Acemoglu, D. and Robinson, J. (2006). Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. Cambridge University Press.

Ray, D. (2009). Development Economics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Basu, K. (2007). The Oxford Companion to Economics in India. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Dasgupta, P. (2007). Economics, A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Thirlwall, A.P. (2006). Growth, and Development with Special Reference to Developing Economies (8th Edition). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

10

25

10

50

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

ENG222 - DEVELOPING ACADEMIC SKILLS - II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course introduces the learners to six important areas: Principles of Writing, Features of Writing, Essay Organization, Précis Writing, Academic Presentation and Research Writing. The course design gives more weightage to productive skills based on their rudimentary receptive skill acquisition occurred in semester one. The participants of this course will exercise their textual scholarship and translate their areas of interest into meaningful writing. This course directs the learners to produce basic academic presentations which should be career-oriented and of social relevance. Bloom’s taxonomy of knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, evaluation and synthesis becomes the substructure of this course instruction.

 

 

 

Objectives

 

 

 

       To acquire critical and creative thinking

 

       To develop the taste for theory of knowledge

 

       To be aware of professional and research driven presentation skills

 

       To apply the mechanics in academic writing skills

 

       To use research skills to take a position in writing (writing a paper or presentation)

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Awareness of different approaches to knowledge, a critical and creative bent of mind that leads to a content-based investigation.

CO2: Working knowledge of different purposes of writing, especially persuasive (argumentative), analytical, and informative writings paves the way for research-based reading and writing.

CO3: Application of functional grammar and mechanics that enhance conceptual clarity, communicative style, and style of writing

CO4: Hands-on experience in a research culture which is discipline-specific in nature

CO5: Experiential learning through participatory learning and service learning

CO6: Awareness of problem-based learning and need-based learning

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Principles of Academic Writing
 

       Cohesion

       Clarity

       Logical Order

       Consistency

       Unity

       Conciseness

       Completeness

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Features of Academic Writing & Essay Organisation
 

Anchoring the context

Building Thesis

Taking a position

Organizing ideas

Developing Paragraphs

Essay Organization

The Basics: What does a good essay need? Basic steps in writing an essay

Characteristics/ Features

Types

Research

Formal and Informal Essays

Focus on the writing stages

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Study Skills
 

       Time management

       Organisation of study material

       Organisation of research writing works

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Précis writing
 

       Introduction/ what is a Précis?

       Essentials of a Good Précis

       Methods of Compressing Passages

       Features of a Good Précis/ Techniques involved in Précis writing

       Step in Précis Writing/Précis in the making

       Writing a Précis of a given passage

       Précis of Correspondence

       Précis of Speeches

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Academic presentation
 

                   Starting a Presentation;

                   Presentations – signposting;

                   Presentations – Survival Language;

                   A Friendly Face;

                   Microphones;

                   Nerves; Stand Up;

                   Stating your purpose;

                   Describing change – verbs;

                   Describing change – adjectives;

                   Describing change – giving figures;

                   Commenting on visuals;

                   Dealing with questions;

                   Rhetorical questions;

                   Focusing attention;

                   Cause and effect

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Research Skills Research Writing
 

                   What is research

                   Importance of Research

                   Primary and Secondary Research

                   Research Methodology

                   Introduction to MLA

                   Introduction to APA

                   Plagiarism

                   Abstract

                   Literature Review

                   Annotated Bibliography

                   Writing Introductions, chapters and conclusions

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:7
Application
 

(Self Study Learning, Portfolio Building, teaching on Formative and Summative assessment mode, Problem Based Learning modules and project Submission)

(Textual reading, Types of essays, Exemplars for all the areas and varied areas of interest in writing and reading will be part of self study learning)

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Langan, J. (1995). English Skills With Reading (3rd Ed.). McGraw Hill. New York.

2.      Osmond, A. (2013). Academic Writing and Grammar for Students. Sage. Los Angeles.

3.      Robitaille, J. and Connelly, R. (2002).  Writer’s Resource: From Paragraph to Essay. Thomson Heinle. Australia.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Langan, J. (1995). English Skills With Reading (3rd Ed.). McGraw Hill. New York.

2.      Osmond, A. (2013). Academic Writing and Grammar for Students. Sage. Los Angeles.

3.      Robitaille, J. and Connelly, R. (2002).  Writer’s Resource: From Paragraph to Essay. Thomson Heinle. Australia.

Evaluation Pattern

The participants will take part in Formative Assessment mode. It aims at the learners’ teaching-learning process. A series of mini feedback driven practices and tasks plays a crucial role to measure their grasp of content, its application and performance. Maintaining Portfolio, Mini Project Submission, Self-paced or Time based Skill Specific Online Courses, Conceptual Presentation on Certain Areas of Interest

So the evaluation would include portfolio submissions for all the three CIAs and the End Semester

FRE221 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
Course Description:  “Latitudes 1”  A1/A2guides the learner in an acquisition process. This method leads naturally to communicate and to carry out tasks in French. Learning language skills goes hand in hand with discovering the socio-cultural realities specific to France and the Francophonie.
Course Objectives:  “Latitudes 1”  A1/A2 is composed of 4 modules of 3 unites. Each module has a general objective and more specific to define the linguistic knowledge with the help of which the learners will implement various skills such as to understand, to speak, to interact and to write. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Student will able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written French

CO2: Student will able to recognize the value of French language learning and francophone cultures through participation in a variety of activities.

CO3: Student will able to demonstrate language learning skills and strategies as cognitive and social development.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Agir dans l?espace - C?est où ?
 

o   Asking and specifying a direction

o   Preposition

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
N?oubliez pas
 

o    expressing an obligation or refusing

o   Advising

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Belle vue sur la mer
 

o    describing a place

o   Locating a place

o    Specifying time

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Se situer dans le temps - Quel beau voyage
 

o   narrating

o   describing the stages of an action

o   expressing intensity and quantity

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Oh ! Joli !
 

o   describing someone

o   Comparing

o   expressing agreement and disagreement

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
Et après
 

 

  • Et après
  •  speaking about the future
  • Expressing one’s wishes

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Latitudes 1 Methode de Français A1/A2 , Regine Merieux , Yves Loiseau

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

French websites like Duolingo, Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE, etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments/Creative projects

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Viva- testing of the four language skills

10%

 

Attendance

05%