CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS

School of Social Sciences

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Psychology, Economics)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECO331Y INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS Core Courses 3 3 100
ECO332Y INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Core Courses 3 3 100
ECO333Y BASIC MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMICS Core Courses 3 3 100
PSY331Y BASIC COGNITIVE PROCESS Core Courses 4 4 100
PSY351Y EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Skill Enhancement Courses 4 3 100
PSY352Y SERVICE LEARNING Skill Enhancement Courses 0 2 50
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECO431Y INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS - 3 3 100
ECO432Y INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC FINANCE - 3 3 100
PSY431Y DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100
PSY432Y SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY - 4 4 100

ECO331Y - INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is designed to give a systematic introduction to mainstream approaches to the study of microeconomics. The course begins by introducing students to the theories and derivation of demand and supply. Then the course proceeds with a systematic introduction to the theories of production. With the understanding of laws of production, cost, revenue, and functioning of various markets are introduced. The course has been designed in such a way that it stimulates awareness on essential variables for the understanding of how consumers and firms derive various decisions.

 

Course Objectives

The course has been conceptualised in order to help students:

  • Develop an understanding of the conceptual foundations and analytical methods used in Microeconomics.
  • Familiarise with the basics of consumer behaviour and decision-making criteria.
  • Analyse and understand relationships and interactions in various forms of markets.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and interpret the factors influencing consumer behaviour and derive market demand and supply.

CO2: Understand and evaluate the production function and various laws of production.

CO3: Distinguish between the various approaches on theories of cost.

CO4: Understand various concepts of revenue and analyse the dynamic interactions between demand and supply in various market structures.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Theory of Demand and Supply
 

Theory of Consumer Behaviour: The Cardinal Utility Theory, The Indifference Curves Theory, Derivation of demand curve; The Market Demand: Derivation of the Market Demand- Determinants of Demand -Elasticities of Demand; Market Supply: Individual supply- Derivation of the Market Supply- Determinants of Supply -Elasticities of Supply.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Theory of Production
 

Production Function; Laws of Production: The Law of Variable Proportions, Laws of Returns to Scale; Technological Progress and the Production Function.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Theory of Costs
 

The Traditional Theory: Short-Run Costs- Long-Run Costs, Economies and Diseconomies of scale, The 'Envelope Curve'; Modern Theory of Costs: Short-Run Costs, Long-Run Costs, The 'L-Shaped' Scale Curve.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Theory of the Firm
 

Concepts of Revenue: Total, Marginal and Average; Market structure: Perfect Competition - Output Determination; Monopoly - Price and Output Determination, Price Discrimination; Monopolistic Competition - Price and Output Determination; Oligopoly – Cournot Model, Cartel.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Koutsoyiannis, A. (1979). Modern Microeconomics. London: Macmillan Press.

Pindyck, R. S., & Rubinfeld, D. L. (2013). Microeconomics (8th ed.). New York: Pearson Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Mankiw, N. G. (2017). Principles of Microeconomics (8th ed.). MA: Cengage Learning.

Salvatore, Dominick. (2017). Microeconomics Theory and Applications (5th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Samuelson, P. A., & Nordhaus, W.D. (2010). Economics (19th ed.). New Delhi: McGraw-Hill Companies.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

10

25

10

50

05

Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

ECO332Y - INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides the basics of international trade theory stems from classical to new trade theories, and international economic policies on domestic and world welfare. This course begins with an introduction to international trade. Then the neo classical trade theories and new trade theories are discussed. The course concludes with a discussion on trade policies and its controversies. The course uses the empirical evidences to explain the theories and models in international trade.

Course Outcome

CO1 : demonstrate a strong foundation in the theories of international economics

CO2: examine the trade policies and practices adopted globally

CO3: analyse the effects of economic integration on the economy

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Unit I: Introduction to International Trade
 

Introduction: What is international economics about? An overview of world trade. Stylized facts about international trade, Components of Balance of Payments: Current account and Capital account.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Unit II: Theories of International Trade
 

Smith’s absolute advantage theory of trade, Ricardo’s comparative advantage theory of trade, concepts of offer curve and terms of trade; Heckscher-Ohlin theory, Rybczinski and Stolper-Samuelson theorems; factor price equalisation theorem; Leontief Paradox; Krugman’s New Trade Theory.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Trade policies
 

Instruments of trade policy; tariffs, quotas, export subsidies, voluntary export restraints, Global value Chain (GVC’s).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Unit IV: Contemporary issues in international trade
 

Political economy of trade policies, Controversies of trade policies, Free trade agreements

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dominick Salvatore. (2021). International Economics, 13th ed. Wiley

Francis Cherunilam. (2020). International Economics, 6th ed. McGraw Hill

Feenstra, R., Taylor, A. (2014). International Economics, 3rd ed. Worth Publishers.

Krugman, P., Obstfeld, M., Melitz, M. (2018). International Economics - Theory and Policy, 11th ed. Pearson Education

Pugel, T. (2015). International Economics, 16th ed. McGraw-Hill.

Soderstein, B and Geoffrey Reed (1999). International Economics, 3rd ed. Palgrave Macmillan

Dominick Salvatore. (2021). International Economics, 13th ed. Wiley

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Bagwell, Kyle, and Robert W. Staiger. The Economics of the World Trading System. MIT Press, 2004. ISBN: 9780262524346

Antweiler, Werner and David Trefler. “Increasing Returns and All That: A View from Trade.” American Economic Review 92 no. 1 (2002): 93–119.

Bernhofen, Daniel M, and Brown. “Testing the General Validity Of the Heckscher-Ohlin Theorem: The Natural Experiment of Japan.” (PDF) University of Nottingham Working Paper, 2009.

Bowen, Harry P, Leamer, et al. “Multicountry, Multifactor Tests of the Factor Abundance Theory.” (PDF - 2.43MB) American Economic Review 77, no. 5 (1987): 791–809.

Dornbusch, R., S. Fischer, et al. “Comparative Advantage, Trade, and Payments in a Ricardian Model with a Continuum of Goods.” American Economic Review 67, no. 5 (1977): 823–39.

Eaton, J., and S. Kortum. “Technology, Geography and Trade.” Econometrica 70, no. 5 (2002): 1741–79.

Broda, Christian, Nuno Limão, and David E. Weinstein. “Optimal Tariffs and Market Power: The Evidence.” American Economic Review 98, no. 5 (2008): 2032-2065.

Limao, Nuno. “Preferential Trade Agreements as Stumbling Blocks for Multilateral Trade Liberalization: Evidence for the United States.” American Economic Review 96, no. 3 (2006): 896–914.

Rose, Andrew K. “Do We Really Know That the WTO Increases Trade?” American Economic Review 94, no. 1 (2004): 98–114.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE

Attendance

Weightage

10

25

10

50

05

ECO333Y - BASIC MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to introduce some branches of mathematics used to understand microeconomic theory and macroeconomic theory in a lucid manner. The course begins by introducing students to the idea of basic concepts of mathematics and its application in economics. The course then systematically introduces students to the higher level of mathematics such as, differential calculus and integral calculus; and their applications in the field of microeconomics and macroeconomics at the rudimentary level.

The course aims to help students to:

  • understand the basic concepts, procedures and techniques of mathematical economics.
  • apply mathematical techniques to economic theory in general.

Course Outcome

CO1: apply mathematical methods to analyse and solve economic problems.

CO2: build economic modelling using some basic mathematical tools.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Concept and Types of Functions- limits and continuity. Elementary Algebra-Linear and Non- linear- quadratic, Cubic, Parabolic, Hyperbolic, Logarithmic and Exponential functions and their graphs. Simultaneous equations- applications to market equilibrium analysis, one and two commodity case, specific tax and subsidy case.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Derivatives with Economic Application
 

Meaning and Rules of Differentiation, Marginal concept, First and Second Order Derivatives, Concept of Elasticity, Elasticity of substitution, Partial Derivatives- First and Second Order Partial Derivatives, Cross partial derivatives, Application in Economics: Relationship among Total, Marginal and Average Concepts; Homogenous functions and its application in Economics: Cobb-Douglas Production Function and CES Production.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Maxima and Minima of Functions and Economic Application
 

Single and Multivariable Functions- Unconstrained and Constrained optimization: Lagrangian Multiplier Method-Applications on Consumer Equilibrium-Utility maximization, Application on Production and Cost Theory: Output Maximisation and Cost Minimisation; Profit Maximization under Perfect Competition, Monopoly, and Oligopoly markets (Cournot and Cartel) for Determination of Price and Output.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Concept of Integration and Economic Applications
 

Integration; Indefinite and Definite Integral, Application of Integral Calculus in Economics: Marginal Revenue to Total Revenue, Marginal Cost to Total Cost, Investment and Time Path, Consumers’ and Producers’ Surplus in Market Equilibrium.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chiang, A.C. & Wainwright, K. (2013). Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics. (4th ed.). McGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited.

Sydsaeter, K. & Hammond, P. (2016). Mathematics for Economic Analysis. New Delhi: Pearson Education Inc.

Dowling, E. T. (2012). Schaum’s Outlines-Introduction to Mathematical Economics. (3rd ed.). New York: McGraw Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bradley, T. (2013). Essential Mathematics for Economics and Business. London: John Wiley & Sons.

Renshaw, G. (2011). Maths for Economics. (4t h ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

10

25

10

50

5

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

PSY331Y - BASIC COGNITIVE PROCESS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Cognitive Processes are the most basic aspects in the attempt to understand the psychology of

individuals. This course will help students to understand the structure and functioning of

senses; the principles of perception, and how perception helps an individual to understand

their world; principles, and theories of memory and attention. Through classroom discussions

and research discussions, the student will also be able to apply this knowledge in their daily

lives to improve their own functioning, as well as apply it to evaluate various real-world

issues such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, design thinking and so on. The

experimental psychology laboratory practicum taken alongside the course during the semester

will help students understand various psychophysical experiments and connect the theoretical

underpinnings of such tests to concepts learned in this course.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe basic concepts, historical trends, scope, debates, and methods in cognitive psychology.

CO2: Explain different components of cognition, including sensation, perception, attention, consciousness, memory, and language, and their underlying process and theories.

CO3: Evaluate the relevance of higher cognitive processes, including problem-solving, critical thinking, decision-making and creativity, in determining people's behaviour

CO4: Apply cognitive psychology principles to explain how people evaluate, make decisions, and act in various situations and contexts.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Unit 1
 

What is cognition?

what are the frameworks of studying cognition?- Information processing, history -classic works, debates- arguments.

Can animals and machines think? Human and animal cognition;

machine learning-robotics

Scope- cognitive neuroscience and computational neuroscience information processing model, cognitive models, parallel distributed processing model

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and human cognition, neurocognitive techniques, evolutionary and cultural cognitive psychology.

How do we study cognition? experimental and theoretical methods

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Unit 2
 

Definitions and theories of sensation, perception- illusion ; Absolute and difference threshold; Signal detection theory; Sensory adaptation;Perception: Understanding perception, Gestalt laws of organization, Perceptual constancy - depth perception, size perception, perception of movement; Various sensory modalities; Extrasensory perception.

 

attention-Concept of attention, bottleneck theories of attention - Broadbent’s filter model, Treisman’s attenuation model, Deutsch-Norman’s memory selection model, capacity theory, automatic processing.

A cognitive perspective on consciousness -alertness and arousal states

 

memory and forgetting- Definition of memory, Atkinson and Shiffrin model, the neural network models, short term memory and working memory, long term memory and its types, forgetting, memory disorders, techniques to improve memory. 

Language as a cognitive process-Chomsky’s theory, linguistic-relativity hypothesis, bilingualism and dialect, neuropsychology of language–aphasia

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Unit 3
 

problem-solving, reasoning;

decision-making: representativeness

creativity-functional

fixedness -Evaluate using examples to educational

settings - design-thinking;

Artificial intelligence and machine learning-application to mental health

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Unit 4
 

Social setting- heuristics, availability heuristics, anchoring and adjustment heuristics, framing effect, hindsight bias

Clinical settings- cognitive deficits; eye-witness testimony

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Reisberg, D (2009). Cognition: Exploring the science of the mind. (4thEdition). 

2. Norton. Goldstein, E. (2007). Cognitive Psychology: connecting mind, research and everyday experience (2ndEdiction). Wadsworth.

3. Matlin, M W (2009). Cognition (7th Edition), Wiley.

4. Galotti, K.M. (2001). Cognitive Psychology in and out of the Laboratory. SAGE Publications.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Russell, S. and Norvig, P. (2014). Artificial Intelligence – A Modern Approach. 3rd Ed, India: Pearson Education.

Evaluation Pattern

5 marks for attendance as per University Policy

CIA 1 & 3 will be individual assignments

CIA2- will be mid-semester exam- case study based questions

End Semester Pattern- 2 hrs- 50 Marks

Section A (Very short Answer). 2 Marks X 5Qs= 10 Marks

Section B (Short answers). 5 Marks X 2Qs= 10 Marks

Section C (Essay questions). 10 Marks X 2Qs= 20 Marks

Section D (Case study). 10 Marks x 1Q= 10 Marks

PSY351Y - EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The coursework aims to provide undergraduate psychology students with the knowledge and hands-on practice of experimental psychology. The course imparts training in classic and contemporary experiments from the domains of sensation and perception and other cognitive processes. The course introduces students to traditional psychophysical experiments and contemporary computer-assisted experiments. In the process, they will be provided with an understanding of central concepts, such as ethics, lab protocols and major elements of a psychological experiment, including variables and hypothesis. The course adopts a problem-based learning approach where students will get an opportunity to conduct a computer-assisted experiment to explain a given psychophysical phenomenon. Due attention is given to issues of identifying and selecting experiments, conducting experiment processes in an ethical manner and writing APA-style reports. The course has two components of lecture and laboratory work. The lecture classes will consist of a mixture of lectures and group discussions. Lectures are designed to clarify and deepen understanding of experimental methods and descriptive statistics. The laboratory sections will be a space to practice conducting psychological experiments and to begin learning some basics of data analysis.

Course Outcome

CO1: Define basic principles and techniques in experimental psychology.

CO2: Analyze experimental data with the knowledge of basic statistical techniques and software packages like SPSS, MS-Excel or JAMOVI.

CO3: Conduct and report psychological experiments following ethical protocols and APA guidelines.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Basic principles and techniques in experimental psychology
 

Experimental methods and designs-variables, hypothesis, testing, Ethical issues; Principles of experimental design and analyse the strengths and weaknesses of experimental methodology in different esearch contexts.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Analyze experimental data with the knowledge of basic statistical techniques and software packages
 

Understand the meaning of descriptive statistical concepts (e.g. population, sample, measures of central tendency, variance, representation using graphs, pie charts and histogram) and statistical inference (e.g. significance, significance level, within- and between-subject comparisons, t-test), and be able to discuss and implement statistical analysis of simple experimental data using Excel or JAMOVI

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:30
Psychological Experiments
 

Introduction to Psychology Laboratory and experiments- Introduction to the ethical standards and lab protocols 

Two experiments each from the major domains mentioned below in a total of six-eight experiments, of which at least two should be computer-assisted tests

a. Sensation and Perception,

b. attention, and memory

c. Problem-solving, decision-making, creativity and cognitive errors or biases

APA style report writing and formatting for Lab reports- students will be able to discuss their own as well as other students' experimental lab reports from a statistical, methodological, conceptual and ethical perspective 

Problem-based learning approach- in pairs (group to two members only) plan and carry out a laboratory session in the form of a smaller experiment and in writing be able to analyse, report and discuss its results

Text Books And Reference Books:

Myers, A., & Hansen, C. (2006). Experimental psychology. Thomson Wadsworth.

Cohen, R. J. & Swerdlik, M. E. (2013). Psychological Testing and Assessment: An Introduction to Tests and Measurement (Eighth Edition). McGraw-Hill.

Gravetter, F.J. &Wallnau, L.B  (2009). Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (9th Ed.). Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Rajamanickam, M (2004). Experimental psychology with advanced experiments, Vol 1 & 2, Concept Publishing Company. 

Woodworth, R.S., Schlosberg, H (1971). Experimental Psychology, Oxford & IBH Publishing Company, Private Limited.

Baron, J. (2000). Thinking and Decision Making. Cambridge University.

Kaur, H (2012). Experimental Psychology. Phi Learning Private Ltd.

Martin, D. W. (2008). Doing psychology experiments. Thomson-Wad sworth.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Course outcomes 

CIA1 

(Total 30 marks)

CIA2 


(Total 20 marks) 

ESE (Total 50 marks)

CO1: 

10 

15

CO2: 

 

15

CO3: 

20 

10 

20

Note (if any): 

CIA 1: Lab Report (25 marks) + Class engagement and Supervisor Feedback (5 marks) CIA 2: Mini Project (20 marks) 

ESE: Department Level Exam- Viva/demonstration, written exam,

PSY352Y - SERVICE LEARNING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Service learning combines community service with academic instruction, focusing on critical, reflective thinking and personal and civic responsibility. Service-learning programs involve students in activities that address community-identified needs while developing their academic skills and commitment to their community. It not only helps students to observe, analyze and understand the community but also allows the student to identify themselves in the community, build community partnerships and take up civic responsibilities. The course gives a first-hand opportunity for a student to utilize academic knowledge and skills by adopting a participatory learning approach. The course expects students to complete a minimum of 30 hours of community work under faculty supervision. There would be weekly class meetings that help students to reflect on their learning and learn from peers. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply disciplinary knowledge and skills to become effective and contributing members of society.

CO2: Demonstrate personal and social skills needed for effective community engagement

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Unit 1
 

Service learning: The concept, Objectives and Scope; Need for community and Academia (University) interface. The role of the psychologist in community service:  The action plan for service learning: Awareness, Planning, prototype, support, expansion and evaluation. Outcomes of service learning: Personal outcome; Social outcome, Learning outcome and Career outcome.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 2
 

Planning and carrying out a community service project under supervision - 30 hours of community work

Weekly reflections & supervision

Text Books And Reference Books:

Astin, A. W., Vogelgesang, L. J., Ikeda, E. K., & Yee, J. A. (2000). How service-learning affects students

Lerner, J. V., Phelps, E., Forman, Y. E., & Bowers, E. P. (2009). Positive youth development. Handbook of adolescent psychology.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Astin, A. W., Vogelgesang, L. J., Ikeda, E. K., & Yee, J. A. (2000). How service-learning affects students

Lerner, J. V., Phelps, E., Forman, Y. E., & Bowers, E. P. (2009). Positive youth development. Handbook of adolescent psychology.

Evaluation Pattern

Course outcomes

CIA1

(Total 20 marks)

 CIA2

(Total 25 marks)

 

 

CO1:

10

10

 

 

CO2:

10

15

 

 

Note (if any):

5 marks class engagement and supervisor feedback

CIA 1 & 2 will be individual assignments

ECO431Y - INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is in continuation to the Introductory Macroeconomics course offered in the second semester. The course first introduces students to the mathematical framework for Keynesian economics – ISLM. Then the links between output, inflation, and unemployment and the effectiveness of policies are discussed from the Keynesian and the Monetarist perspectives. The third unit then introduces students to the open economy framework, and the course concludes with a discussion on the contemporary debates in the field of macroeconomic theory and policies.

Course Objectives

The course aims to:

  • enhance the understanding of the learners regarding the macroeconomic dynamics in the short-run closed as well as open economy.
  • understand and analyse the nexus between output, inflation and unemployment in both the short-run and in the long-run.
  • understand and critically evaluate contemporary macroeconomic policies, create reports and deliver presentations

Course Outcome

CO1: Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to explain the macroeconomic dynamics in the short-run closed economy as well as open economy.

CO2: Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to test and discover the nexus between output, inflation, and unemployment in both the short run and the long run.

CO3: Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to evaluate the pros and cons of various macroeconomic policies in the real-world context, create reports following APA guidelines; and deliver presentations before peers.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
The Closed Economy in the Short Run
 

The goods market and derivation of IS curve; real influences and Shift in IS schedule; the money market and derivation of LM curve; monetary influences and the shift in LM curve; determination of equilibrium income and interest rates; the relative efficacy of fiscal and monetary policy under IS-LM framework; Critiques of IS-LM.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Output, Inflation and Unemployment
 

Links between output and unemployment: Okun’s law; Estimates of potential GDP and their limitations; Natural rate of unemployment; Factors affecting natural rate of unemployment; Links between inflation and unemployment: Phillips curve; Friedman-Phelps expectations augmented Phillips curve; Output-inflation trade-off: Keynesian vs. Monetarists view.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Open Economy Models
 

The Mundell-Fleming model: assumptions; determining equilibrium output and exchange rate in a small open economy; the monetary and fiscal policy under floating and fixed exchange rates regimes.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Recent debates in Macroeconomic Policy
 

Economic Stabilization-Monetary vs. Fiscal Policy; Handling Recession- Higher Spending vs. Tax Cuts; Monetary Policy-Rule vs. Discretion Based; Central Bank Goal: Zero vs. non-zero Inflation; Government Budget - Balanced vs. Unbalanced; Tax Laws for Savings – Reformed vs. Not Reformed.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dornbusch, R., Fischer, S., & Startz, R. (2015). Macroeconomics (11th ed.). New Delhi: Tata McGraw.

Froyen, R. (2014). Macroeconomics: Theories and Policies (10th ed.). Pearson Education.

Mankiw, N. G. (2014). Principles of Macroeconomics (7th ed.). Cengage Learning.

Mankiw, N. G. (2015). Macroeconomics (9th ed.). USA: Worth Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abel, A. B. & Bernanke, B. S. (2011). Macroeconomics (7th ed.) New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Blanchard, O. (2009). Macroeconomics (5th ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Heijdra, B. J. & Ploeg, F. V. (2001). Foundations of Modern Macroeconomics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

McConnell, C. R., & Brue, S. L. (2011). Macroeconomics, Principles, Problems, and Policies.  New York: McGraw Hill Inc.

Moorthy, V. (2017). Applied Macroeconomics. New Delhi: I. K. International Publishing House.

Thomas, A. M. (2021). Macroeconomics: An Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

10

25

10

50

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

ECO432Y - INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC FINANCE (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Public Economics is the study of government policy from the point of view of economic efficiency and equity. This course introduces students to allocation,distribution, stabilisation and regulatory functions of government. The course discusses about concept of public goods, club goods, and merit goods, andanalyses causes of externalities and market failures. It then does a systematic analysis of sources of government revenue, expenditure, public debt which is inclusive of theories on taxation, public expenditure and Economist views on public debts to provide students a broader perspective to analyse such issues. Last unit, provides a thorough understanding on fiscal institutions with a careful analysis of the issues pertaining to budgetary policies in general and Indian experience in particular.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop an understanding about the various functions of government.

CO2: Understand the sources of market failure and the need for government intervention and its possible outcomes.

CO3: Develop a critical understanding of the key theories of public economics.

CO4: Explain the various component of government budget and its wider impact on the economy.

CO5: Examine the role of government institutions in centre-state financial relationship.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Unit I: Role of Government in an Organised society
 

The nature, scope and significance of public economics – Principle of Maximum Social advantage: Approaches and Limitations- Functions of Government - Economic functions - allocation, distribution and stabilization; Regulatory functions of the Government and its economic significance

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Unit II: Public Goods and Market failure
 

Concept of public goods - characteristics of public goods, national vs. local public goods; Externality - concept of social versus private costs and benefits, merit goods, club goods; Provision versus production of public goods - Market failure and public Provision.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Unit III: Taxation
 

Concept of tax, types, canons of taxation-Incidence of taxes; Taxable capacity; Approaches to the principle of Equity in taxation -Ability to Pay principle, Benefit Approach; Sources of Public Revenue; VAT, Goods and Services Tax.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Unit IV: Public Expenditure and Public Debt
 

Structure and growth of public expenditure; Wagner’s Law of increasing state activities; Wiseman-Peacock hypothesis Different approaches to public debt; concepts of public debt; sources and effects of public debt; Methods of debt redemption- Trends of Public expenditure, Public debt and subsidies in India.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Unit V Government Budget and Policy
 

Government budget and its structure – Receipts and expenditure - concepts of current and capital account, balanced, surplus, and deficit budgets, concept of budget deficit vs. fiscal deficit- FRBM Act. Federal Finance: Different layers of the government; Inter governmental Transfer; horizontal vs. vertical equity; Principle of federal finance; Theory of Grants; Finance Commission.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Rosen. S., Harvey & Ted Gayer. (2008). Public Finance, Mc- Graw Hill Companies: New York

Bhatia A.K. (2018). Public Economics, Wisdom Press, New Delhi.  Chapter -1.

Musgrave, R.A. and P.B Musgrave (1989). Public Finance in Theory and Practice, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi.

Jha, R (2010). Modern Public Economics, Rutledge, London.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Rosen. S., Harvey & Ted Gayer. (2008). Public Finance, Mc- Graw Hill Companies: New York.

Cullis, John G. & Jones, Philip R. (2009). Public finance and public choice: analytical perspectives.  Oxford ; New York :  Oxford University Press

Tyagi B.P., Public Finance, Jai Prakash Nath Pub. Meerut (UP).

Government of India Budget Report, various issues

Citizen Report, various issues

Srivastava, D. K (2000). Fiscal Federalism in India, New Delhi, Har-Anand Publication Ltd.

Finance Commission Reports.

Economic Survey, Government of India, various issues.

State Finances: A Study of Budgets, Reserve Bank of India, various issues.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

10

25

10

50

05

PSY431Y - DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course will help the students to develop an understanding of human development from conception to the later stages of life. This course has been conceptualized in order to provide a general introduction to various developmental concepts across the different stages of the lifespan, with the nature versus nurture debate as a concurrent theme. The primary purpose of this course is to examine the physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional development of infants, children, adolescents, and adults and the various factors (e.g., genetics, parenting, peer groups, culture) that influence development. Prominent theories of development and research methods in developmental psychology are reviewed. Specific topics that are covered include prenatal development, aggression, attachment, gender development, language development, moral development, cognitive development, cultural influences, and ageing.

Course Outcome

1: Describe basic concepts, principles, debates, stages and domains of developmental psychology

2: Describe physical and cognitive development from the prenatal to adolescence with focus on the interplay of genetic and environmental factors

3: Explain changes in socio-emotional and identity development, examining the role of gender, peers and parents

4: Describe how developmental theories extend to explain adulthood and later-life challenges like a midlife crisis, ageing and facing death

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Developmental Psychology
 

Concept and principles of human development;

Naturevs Nurture debate;

developmental milestones;

Periods of lifespan development;

Domains of human development;

methods to study developmentlongitudinal, cross-sectional and sequential

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Explain risk behaviours in adolescents and its impact
 

biological and cognitive development theory; the role of brain development, Bronfenbrenner ecosystem mode -

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Cognitive Development
 

cognitive, moral, language, thought- Cognitive-Piaget and Vygotsky theory-play and language;

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
Physical Development
 

Prenatal development - stages, development of brain and body; the impact of teratogens (downs syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome);

growth spurts inchildren and adolescents- motor, speech and puberty

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:22
morality and values
 

Kolhberg and Gilligan; the role of school and technology on value orientation, play and learning

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Development of Identity
 

Erickson and Marica, gender identity, the role of peers and media

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Emotional Development stages
 

Socio-emotional aspects- development of empathy,

emotional regulation

temperament- cycle of aggression/transgenerational trauma

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Development of attachment
 

Bowlby and Ainsworth: stages and types;

Parenting -Diana Bauimrind-

Cross-cultural views on family and parenting

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Later adult life and ageing
 

myths and misconceptions; biological and psychological perspectives- Levinson; successful ageing; dealing with losses and grief- death, retirement and abilities.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Entering adult life
 

stages-emerging adult- Arnette; adult life stages-Havigrust; quarter and mid-life crisis; cross-cultural views on choosing a partner and marriage

Text Books And Reference Books:

Santrock, J. W. (2009). Life Span Development: A Topical Approach (3rd Edition). McGraw Hill Education

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Dixon, W. E. (2003). Twenty studies that revolutionized child psychology. Prentice Hall.

Berk, L. E. (2016). Exploring lifespan development. Pearson.

Arnett, J. J. (2014). Adolescence and emerging adulthood. Pearson Education Limited.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 10 Marks

CIA 2 (Mid Semester Examination): 25 Marks

CIA 3: 10 Marks

5 marks for attendance as per University Policy

CIA 1 & 3 will be individual assignments
CIA2- will be mid-semester exam- case study based questions

End Semester Pattern- 2 hrs- 50 Marks
Section A (Very short Answer). 2 Marks X 5Qs= 10 Marks
Section B (Short answers). 5 Marks X 2Qs= 10 Marks
Section C (Essay questions). 10 Marks X 2Qs= 20 Marks
Section D (Case study). 10 Marks x 1Q= 10 Marks

PSY432Y - SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualised for students to understand the historical and scientific developments in the field of social psychology. Students will explore the theoretical bases of the development of the social self and the dynamics of social perception and cognition, interpersonal attraction, prosocial behaviour, aggression, prejudice, attitudes, social influence and group processes in a social context. The course will engage students through pedagogy designed for a hands-on experience, critical reading of journal articles, discussion of contemporary social issues, and small study groups to facilitate a deeper understanding of human social behaviour. Further, the course aims to use a multicultural and intersectional lens to build on the student's understanding.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the evolution of the field of social psychology through research methods and classic studies

CO2: Identify social psychological concepts to understand themselves in social situations.

CO3: Relate theory in social psychology to understand real-world problems and contemporary issues in prejudice, conformity and obedience.

CO4: Examine cross-cultural perspectives and factors influencing prosocial behaviour and interpersonal relationships.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Unit 1
 

Introduction : What is Social Psychology?; Overview of social psychology ; Recent advances in social psychology: Role of affect, emotions and cognition , social relationships, social neuroscience, implicit (non-conscious) processes, multicultural perspective, using intersectional lens ; Role of Theory in social psychology; Qualitative research methods in social psychology: Interviews, Ethnographic methods, Focus group discussion, Diaries and Ambulatory assessments,  Secondary data and Archival method, Discourse analysis, Action research; Quantitative research methods in social psychology: Experimental method , Correlational method, Surveys and “Big data”; Classic studies : Triplett’s competition studies ; La Piere’s hospitality study, Sherif’s autokinetic study, Zimbardo’s Stanford prison experiment, Milgram’s shock experiment ; Asch’s line judgment study ; Discussion topic : Ethical considerations in the study of social behaviour

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit 2
 

Automatic and controlled processing, Affect and cognition, Potential sources of error in social cognition;  Social self – Origins and sources of self-knowledge –Introspection, Self-perception, Social comparison, Past and possible selves, Culture;  Regulating and controlling the self;  Self-esteem -Types and consequences; Self- presentation - Strategic self-presentation,  False modesty, Self-handicapping, Impression management, Self-monitoring; Impression formation (central and peripheral traits and implicit personality theory, self -fulfilling prophecy, confirmation bias, belief perseverance) ; Social perception - Attribution theories (Kelly’s covariation theory and Jones’ and Davis correspondent inference theory, Attribution biases (Fundamental attribution error, Actor-observer effect; Motivational biases).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:24
Unit 3
 

Attitudes, Stereotypes , Prejudice, and Discrimination :  Attitudes : Definition, How attitudes influence behaviour, Attitude change : Persuasion and Cognitive dissonance ; Definitions  : Equality, equity, and social justice ; The nature and origins of stereotyping : Illusory correlation, Ingroup-bias, Outgroup homogeneity , Subcategorization ; Prejudice: Nature of the problem : Stigma,  Stereotype threat ; Sherif’s Boy’s camp studies, Tajfel’s minimal group studies ;  Contrasting perspectives on origins of prejudice:  Prejudiced personality, Threat to self-esteem, Competition for resources, Social categorization ; Ways to reduce prejudice: Social learning, Contact, Superordinate goals , Recategorization ; Discrimination: Sexism (hostile, benevolent, tokenism , glass cliff effect, glass ceiling effect), Modern racism (aversive, ambivalent) ; Discussion topic :Casteism in the Indian context.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Unit 4: Prosocial Behaviour & Interpersonal relationships:
 

Prosocial Behaviour & Interpersonal relationships :

Motives for Prosocial behaviour: Evolutionary perspective, Social exchange perspective, Empathy-altruism hypothesis, Negative-state relief, Empathic joy, Defensive helping, Social norms ; Influences on Helping –Social learning of prosocial behaviour ,Positive emotions (gratitude and empathy), Interpersonal factors (similarity and responsibility),  Social exclusion, Darkness, Putting an economic value on one’s time and effort ; Emergency responses : Bystander effect , Latane and Darley’s bystander studies; The effects of being helped; Relationship between prosocial behaviour and aggression (how prosocial behaviour can counter aggression). Interpersonal relationships : Internal sources of attraction (social needs and emotions), External sources of attraction (proximity and physical beauty) ;  Factors based on social interaction (similarity and mutual liking);  Close relationships: attachment styles, threats to intimate relationships (virtual contexts, jealousy and ending relationships) ; Cross-cultural perspectives in intimate relationships, trust and altruism ; Discussion topic : Bullying (including cyberbullying) ;  Loneliness and social isolation among youth.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Benet-Martínez, V.(2012).Multicultura lism : Cultural, social and personality processes.pp. 1-7. (In Eds.)Kay Deaux and Mark Snyder.The Oxford Handbook of Personality and Social Psychology.Oxford University press.

Branscombe, N.R & Baron, R.A (2023). Social Psychology, (15th Global Ed.). Pearson Education Limited. 

Bowleg, L. (2017).Intersectionali ty : An Underutilized but Essential Theoretical Framework for Social Psychology.pp 515-522. (In Eds.)

Brendan Gough. Palgrave Handbook of Critical Social Psychology.Palgrave Macmillan Figgou, L. & Pavlopoulos, P.(2015). Social psychology :Research methods. International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (2nd Ed.) Volume 22. Pp. 544–552. http://dx.doi.org/10.1 016/B978-0-08-0970 86-8.24028-2

Smith. J.R. & Haslam, S.A. (2012). Social psychology : Revisiting the classic studies. Sage publications.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Misra, G. & Dalal, A.K. (2001). Social Psychology in India: Evolution and Emerging trends. (In Eds) Ajit. K. Dalal and Girishwar Misra. New Directions in Indian Psychology : Social Psychology (Volume 1).Sage Publications.

 Qui,L., Chan, S.H.M., & Chan, D (2018). Big data in social and psychological science: theoretical and methodological issues. Journal of Computational Social Science 1,pp. 59–66. https://doi.org/10.100 7/s42001-017-0013-6

 

Crisp, R.J. & Turner, R.N. (2020). Essential Social Psychology, (4th ed.) .Sage Publications.

Reicher.S & Haslam,S.A. (2006). Tyranny revisited : Groups, psychological well-being, and the health of societies. The Psychologist, 19 (3)

Kassin, S. Fein, S. & Markus, H. (2014). Social Psychology, (9th ed.). WadsworthCengage learning. Myers, D.G , Sahajpal ,P. & Behera, P. (2019) Social Psychology, (10th Ed). McGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited). 

Evaluation Pattern

 

Course outcomes 

CIA1 

(Total 10 marks)

MSE/ CIA2 

CIA3 

(Total 25 marks) 

(Total 10 marks)

ESE 

(Total 50 marks)

CO1: 

10 

10

CO2: 

 

20 

10

CO3: 

 

20

CO4: 

 

10