CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS_AND _DATA_SCIENCE

School of Sciences

Syllabus for
BSc (Data Science, Statistics/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA141B MARKETING AND SELLING SKILLS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141D TALENT MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BLS141 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 03 100
BLS142 PRINCIPLES OF FORENSIC SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CHE141B NUTRICHEM Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM142 BRAND MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM144 FINANCIAL LITERACY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 03 100
COM145 CREATIVE ADVERTISEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
COM146 INTRODUCTION TO EXCEL FOR MANAGERS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC141 PROGRAMMING IN C Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC143 WEB DESIGNING USING HTML, PHP AND MYSQL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC149 INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DMT141 DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY Multidisciplinary Courses 2 3 100
DSC001-1 PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING Bridge Courses 2 0 50
DSC101-1 PRINCIPLES OF DATA SCIENCE AND DIGITAL COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
DSC161-1 PYTHON PROGRAMMING Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO145 ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG181-1 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST142 READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST143 STORYTELLING, GAMES AND ETHICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST145 POETICS , POLITICS AND PIVOTAL PEOPLE OF ROCK N ROLL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST146 FOOD AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST147 HISTORY OF INDIAN BUSINESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST148 THE OCEANS IN CINEMA: A BLUE HUMANITIES READING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW141 CYBER LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW145 PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MAT001 BRIDGE COURSE FOR MATHEMATICS I Bridge Courses 3 0 50
MAT121-1 MATHEMATICS -I Minor Core Courses 3 3 100
MED142 AUDIO AND VIDEO PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MED143 CELEBRITY PR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
MED145 SOCIAL MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
PHY141 FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PHY142 ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL142 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY156 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY158 STRESS MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
STA101-1 DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
STA161-1 COMPUTATIONAL STATISTICS Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
THE141 THEATRE APPRECIATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
THE142 IMPROVISATION AND DEVISED THEATRE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA142B EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND MANAGERIAL EFFECTIVENESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142G GROUP AND TEAM EFFECTIVENESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BLS143 PRINCIPLES OF HORTICULTURAL TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
BLS144 PRINCIPLES OF AYURVEDA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM147 E-COMMERCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM149 INVESTMENTS AND TRADING STRATEGIES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM150 FINANCIAL LITERACY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COM151 DIGITAL MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC152 INTRODUCTION TO BLOCKCHAIN Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
CSC153 INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (DBMS) Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC155 USER DESIGN EXPERIENCE (UX) Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC157 VISUALIZATION TECHNIQUES USING EXCEL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
DSC101-2 DATA STRUCTURES Major Core Courses-I 3 3 100
DSC102-2 OPERATING SYSTEMS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
DSC111-2 DATA STRUCTURES LAB Major Core Courses-I 2 1 50
ECO146 GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ECO147 THINKING THROUGH THE ENVIRONMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ENG181-2 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 2 100
EST150 GENDER AND POPULAR CULTURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST151 COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY: DARSANA AND PHILOSOPHY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
EST152 SKILLS FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
EST153 PARTITION NARRATIVES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST156 RETELLING OF EPICS IN INDIAN LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION - 3 3 100
LAW144 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW - 3 3 100
LAW147 CORPORATE LAW Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
LAW148 LEGAL DIMENSIONS OF MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
MAT122-2 MATHEMATICS-IIB Minor Core Courses 3 3 100
MED147 MIDDLE CINEMA IN INDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED149 INTRODUCTION TO SEMIOTICS Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
POL144 INDIA AND THE WORLD Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
PSY144 BASICS OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
STA101-2 PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS Major Core Courses-II 4 4 100
STA102-2 R PROGRAMMING Major Core Courses-II 5 4 100
SW141 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SW142 INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE144 ACTING FOR MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
  

Introduction to Program:

The undergraduate programme of BSc (Data Science, Statistics) is a novel three-year dual major, interdisciplinary degree programme. The students are given the option to pursue fourth year for the award of Honors degree. It has been specifically designed for the current Information and Knowledge Creation Era. This Programme will equip the student to learn about querying, acquiring and understanding the categories of data and its analysis, methods to extract insights from data and to visualize and report the results. It also helps students to make formal and informal inferences on the basis of statistical data and to understand classical and modern data- analytics techniques, artificial intelligence techniques and statistical machine learning concepts. The progressive approach in the design of the curriculum facilitates students to pursue research/career in the areas of Data Science or Statistics.       Lance A. Berger, Dorothy Berger (2017): Talent management handbook, McGraw Hill New York.

 

       Mohapatra.M & Dhir.S (2022); Talent Management-A contemporary perspective (2022), Sage Publications

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

       Mark Wilcox (2016), Effective Talent Management: Aligning strategy, people and performance, (1st ed.), Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.

       Marshal Gold Smith and Louis Carter (2018): Best practices in talent management, A Publication of the practice institute, Pfeiffer, A Wiley Imprint.

       Atheer Abdullah Mohammed (2019), Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management: Theory and practice, Lamber Publishing co.,

       Cappeli Peter: Talent on Demand –Managing Talent in an age of uncertainty, Harvard Business press.

Sphr Doris Sims, Sphr Matthew Gay(2007),Building Tomorrow’s Talent : A Practitioner’s Guide to Talent Management and Succession Planning, Author House

Evaluation Pattern

Component

 

Maximum marks

Weightage

Total Marks in Final Grade

CIA1

20

50%

10

CIA2

20

50%

10

CIA3

50

50%

25

Attendance

5

100 %

05

Total = 50

 

BLS141 - INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 This course introduces students to the basic principles of biology. Students will learn about the organization of life, including the cell theory and taxonomy, the chemistry of life, genetics, evolution, and ecology. The course will also cover current issues in biology such as biotechnology and environmental sustainability.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to describe the fundamental principles and concepts of biology, including the organization of life and the chemistry of living systems.

CO2: Students will be able to explain the role of genetics in inheritance, diversity, and evolution.

CO3: Students will be able to analyze the impact of human activities on the environment and the measures that can be taken to promote sustainability.

CO4: Students will be able to evaluate the ethical implications of advances in biotechnology and their impact on society.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Biology
 

 

The scientific method and experimental design; The organization of life: cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems; Taxonomy and the diversity of life; Chemical elements and molecules essential to living systems

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Genetics and Evolution
 

 

Mendelian genetics and inheritance patterns; DNA structure and function, gene expression and regulation; Genetic diversity and evolution; Natural selection and adaptation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecology and Environmental Biology
 

 

Ecosystems and biomes; Population dynamics and community interactions; Biodiversity and conservation; Human impact on the environment and sustainability

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Biotechnology and Ethics
 

 

Applications of biotechnology in medicine, agriculture, and industry, Ethical issues related to biotechnology; The impact of biotechnology on society; Regulations and policies related to biotechnology

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Campbell, N. A., & Reece, J. B. (2018). Biology (11th ed.). Pearson.
  2. Freeman, S., Quillin, K., Allison, L., Black, M., Taylor, E., & Podgorski, G. (2017). Biological Science (6th ed.). Pearson.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1.  Begon, M., Townsend, C. R., & Harper, J. L. (2006). Ecology: From Individuals to Ecosystems (4th ed.). Blackwell Publishing.
  2. Ricklefs, R. E., & Relyea, R. A. (2019). The Economy of Nature (8th ed.). W.H. Freeman.

  3. Kuby, J., Owen, J., & Kindt, T. J. (2019). Kuby Immunology (8th ed.). W.H. Freeman.

  4. Thompson, P. B., & Kaplan, D. M. (2019). Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics (2nd ed.). Springer.

Evaluation Pattern

Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

Midterm Examination- 30%

Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

Seminar presentation – 10%

Final Examination - 30%

 

BLS142 - PRINCIPLES OF FORENSIC SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Forensic science is the application of scientific principles and techniques to the investigation of crimes and legal issues. This course covers the fundamental principles of forensic science, including various scientific analysis techniques used in criminal investigations, legal and ethical issues, and types of evidence collected at crime scenes.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to Understand the principles and techniques used in forensic science investigations

CO2: Students will be able to describe the legal and ethical considerations associated with forensic science.

CO3: Students will be able to identify and analyze different types of evidence collected at crime scenes

CO4: Students will be able to evaluate scientific evidence in a legal context using proper documentation and reporting techniques

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Forensic Science
 

 

Introduction to forensic science; Historical development of forensic science; Branches and applications of forensic science; Legal and ethical issues in forensic science

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Physical Evidence
 

 

Types of physical evidence; Collection and preservation of physical evidence; Analysis of physical evidence; Interpretation and evaluation of physical evidence

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Biological Evidence
 

 

Types of biological evidence; DNA analysis; Serology analysis; Analyzing and interpreting biological evidence

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Digital Forensics
 

 Digital forensic investigations; Evidence collection in digital forensics; Analyzing and interpreting digital evidence; Legal and ethical considerations in digital forensics

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

  1. Saferstein, R. (2019). Forensic science: From the crime scene to the crime lab. Pearson Education.

  2. Criminal Justice & Forensics. (2017). Cengage.

  3. Fisher, B. A. (2019). Techniques of crime scene investigation. Taylor & Francis Group.

  4. Richard Saferstein, R. (2018). Criminalistics: An Introduction to Forensic Science. Pearson Education.

  5. Houck, M. M., & Siegel, J. A. (2010). Fundamentals of forensic science. Academic Press.

  6. Casey, E. (2018). Digital evidence and computer crime: Forensic science, computers, and the internet. Academic Press.

  7. Nelson, B., Phillips, A., & Steuart, C. (2016). Guide to computer forensics and investigations. Cengage

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Lee, H. C. (2016). Forensic science : an illustrated dictionary. CRC Press.

  2. Barry, J., & Cooper, J. (2018). Introduction to forensic science. Routledge.

  3. Houck, M. (2018). Trace evidence analysis: More cases in mute witnesses. Academic Press. 

  4. Brown, T. W. (2018). Handbook of Forensic Pathology, Second Edition. CRC Press.

  5. Barbara, J. (2011). Forensic anthropology: An introduction. CRC Press.

  6. Hall, M. (2017). Current practice in forensic medicine. John Wiley & Sons.

  7. Sammons, J., & Jenks, M. (2017). Digital forensics trial graphics: Teaching the jury through effective use of visual aids. Academic Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Attendance and Class Participation- 10%

Midterm Examination- 30%

Review paper/Research Paper- 20%

Seminar presentation – 10%

 

Final Examination - 30%

CHE141B - NUTRICHEM (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course gives an insight into nutrition and its importance in leading a healthy life.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Discuss about nutrition and its importance in leading a healthy life.

CO2: Explain the elements of nutrition and dietry requirement.

CO3: Summerise about food analysis, food microbiology and therapeutic nutrition

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Fundamentals of nutrition
 

FaFactors Influencing Food Selection: Flavours, appearance and other aspects of food,     Demographics Culture and Religion, Health, Social-Emotional Influences, and Environmental Concerns, Food Industry and the Media.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Basic Nutrition Concepts
 

NNutrition, Energy content in food, Nutrients, Nutrient Density, Characteristics of a Nutritious Diet.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Nutrient Recommendations
 

Dietary Reference Intakes, Digestion, Absorption, and Metabolism, Gastrointestinal Tract and secretions, Food groups, Organic Foods, GM foods.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Nutrition biochemistry
 

Elements of nutrition - Dietary requirement of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Biological value of proteins. Concepts of protein quality. Protein sparing action of carbohydrates and fats. Essential amino acids, essential fatty acids and their physiological functions.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Vitamins
 

Dietary sources, biochemical functions, requirements and deficiency diseases associated with vitamin B complex, C and A, D, E and K vitamins.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Minerals
 

Nutritional significance of dietary sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, iodine, zinc and copper.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:2
Malnutrition
 

Prevention of malnutrition, supplementary foods.

     

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:2
Food science and food analysis
 

Food additives and preservatives.

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:6
Food microbiology
 

Food safety, Fermentation, food spoilage and food borne pathogens, food processing.

 

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:6
Therapeutic nutrition
 

Life style diseases and personalized nutrition therapy, nutraceuticals and its classifications.

Unit-11
Teaching Hours:2
Public nutrition
 

Health organizations, NGO’s etc. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  Ganesh Narayanan Chauhan,  5th ed Foods that heal. Popular Book Depot 2012

[2]   Mohinder Singh, 2nd ed. Health and  food Gyan Publishing House 2003.

[3]   S. A. Iqbal and Y. Mido 1st ed Food Chemistry. Discovery Publishing House, 2008.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  Kittler and Sucher, 5th ed. Food and Culture Thomson Wadsworth 2007.

[2]   Anita Tull, 3rd Food Nutritioned.Oxford University Press, 1997.

            

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3,

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Internal

2 Hrs (50 marks)

50

Total

100

Final score is calculated out of 50

 

COM142 - BRAND MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Brand Management course will enable student to have a fundamental understanding of how to build, measure, and manage a brand.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate concepts, principles, techniques and application of contemporary branding management process.

CO2: Evaluate the taxonomy in designing brands.

CO3: Summarise the measures and manage brand-equity and extension.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Strategic Brand Management Process
 

Brands – Brands Vs Products – Different Product Levels - Things that can be branded

 Branding Challenges and Opportunities – Strategic Brand Management Process, PRACTICAL: SBM Process, Trends and innovations in brand management,  Emerging technologies and their impact on branding

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Branding identity, architecture and taxonomy
 

Brand Image, Developing a brand identity, Brand Identity – Kapferer’s Brand Identity Prism,  Creating a brand positioning statement,  Understanding the importance of brand consistency, Developing a brand architecture strategy, Managing brand portfolios, Brand extensions and sub-brands.  Criteria for choosing brand elements – Brand Names – Landor’s Brand Name Taxonomy – Brand Name Linguistic Characteristics – Trademark Issues and Concerning Names – PRACTICAL: Naming Hypothetical Brands 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Brand Messaging, Designing and Aesthetics
 

Developing a brand messaging strategy, Creating effective brand communications, Managing brand reputation, URLs – Logos and Symbols – Characters – Slogans and Jingles – Packaging and Signage – PRACTICAL: Creating Logos and Mascots for Hypothetical Brands. Impact of digital technologies on brand management, Developing digital branding strategies, Managing online brand reputation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Brand Equity & Brand Communication
 

Customer Based Brand Equity – CBBE Pyramid – PRACTICAL: Constructing CBBE Pyramid. Understanding the impact of consumer behavior on brand management, Consumer decision-making process, Building brand relationships with consumers, Understanding the role of advertising in brand management, Developing effective advertising campaigns, Measuring and analyzing advertising effectiveness

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Brand Extension & International Brand Management
 

Brand Extension - Merits and Demertis of Extension – Types of Brand Extension. Building brand loyalty, Measuring and analyzing brand equity and brand loyalty, Understanding the challenges of international brand management, Adapting branding strategies for international markets, Managing global brand portfolios

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.       Keller, M. (Latest Edition). Brand Management. Delhi: Pearson Education India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Rajagopal, M. (Latest Edition). Brand Management. New York: Nova Science Publisher

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I MCQ (5 Marks)

Google Form/Google Classroom based Quiz consisting of MCQs to test the basic concepts relating to Unit 1 and 2. This would be an individual assessment with a set of 10 questions, 5 each from unit 1 and 2.  The details of this assignment, and the penalties for not attending shall be posted in the Google Classroom.

CIA 2 (a) Video Content Creation 10 marks

Every student shall for a group of four members and they need to identify a brand and prepare a 10 minutes video. Later a Google spread sheet of students list shall be sent to the students.  Within a week the students need to enter the name of the brand identified so as to avoid repetition in their selections and start preparing the video. The video shall discuss the history of the chosen brand and discuss the possibilities of changing different attributes of the brand for positive outcome. The video needs to describe and display the new brand. Any delay in submission without prior consent or approval shall lead to a penalty of marking the student ZERO in this component.   The video shall be assessed based on the following rubrics. Report submitted will be valued for 10 marks.

CIA 2(b) - Case Study (5 marks)

The same group formed for video assignment shall identify a case study related to brand extension. The group shall prepare a presentation regarding the case. They shall develop questions related to the case and also provide answers. The group also needs to provide references for their case study and Q&A.

CIA III Written Examination (25 marks)


Every student shall sit for a written examination of marks covering all the units. The students will be evaluated based on their understanding and learning about different concepts of branding. The higher order thinking is assessed by one case analysis included in the question paper. There will be 7 questions of 2 marks each and the case analysis will be of 6 marks.

COM144 - FINANCIAL LITERACY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims at enhancing their financial skills as well as training the students to be financial educators with family and friends. There is a need for students to effectively plan and monitor their spending. The course aims at effectively training students and equipping them with the knowledge and tools to manage their finances and also teach others the same.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the basic concepts of financial literacy.

CO2: Apply financial planning and budgeting decisions on a personal and professional front.

CO3: Understand the purpose and functions of the Banking system.

CO4: Understand the role and importance of financial instruments and insurance products.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Financial Literacy
 

Introduction, Evolution, Meaning and importance of -  Income, Expenses, Savings, Budget, Money, Currency, Bank account, savings investment, JAM-balance sheet – purpose features, format – Technology in finance – FinTech, TechFin, Regtech, sandox, Mobile-based Banking – post offices – Savings vs investments – Power of Compounding – risk and Return-Time Value of Money- Simple Interest-Compound Interest-

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Planning and Budgeting
 

Introduction to Financial Planning - Analysing the resources of the person - Concepts in Financial Planning:The time value of money, Diversification - 'spreading risk', Investment Timing - Financial Products for Savers: Financial Products options for savers, personal budget – family budget – financial planning procedure.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Banking Products and Services
 

Introduction and evolution of Banking – Banking in India – RBI – Role of RBI in India– Savings and Deposits – Deposits, Accounts, KYC,e/v KYC Types of Deposits - Saving Bank Accounts, Fixed Deposit Accounts, Recurring Deposit Account, Special Term Deposit Schemes, Loans and Types of loan advanced by Banks and Other secondary functions of Bank – PAN, NSDL: PAN, Meaning of Cheque and types of cheques – CTS_MICR-IFSC – e- Banking – ATM, Debit, Credit, Smart Card, UPI, e-Wallets, Payment Banks-NPCI: Products and role in regulating the online payments, CIBIL – Banking complaints and Banking Ombudsman. Mutual Funds_ Types of Mutual Funds-NAV. Digital Currency-Bitcoin- NFO

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Post Office Products, Retirement planning and Investment Avenues
 

Post Office Savings Account(SB)​​​​​, National Savings Recurring Deposit Account (RD)​​, ​National Savings Time Deposit Account (TD), National Savings Monthly Income Account (MIS), Senior Citizens Savings Scheme Account (SCSS)​, Public Provident Fund Account (PPF)​, Sukanya Samriddhi Account (SSA)​, National Savings Certificates (VIIIth Issue) (NSC), Kisan Vikas Patra (KVP), PM CARES for Children Scheme, 2021, Interest rates (New)​, How to avail services, Schedule of Fee – IPBS – KYC. Employees Provident Fund (EPF) - Public Provident Fund (PPF), Superannuation Fund, Gratuity, Other Pension Plan, and Post-retire Counselling-National Pension Scheme(NPS)

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Life Insurance and Related Services
 

Life Insurance Policies: Life Insurance, Term Life Insurance, Pension Policies, ULIP, Health Insurance, Endowment Policies, Property Insurance: Policies offered by various general insurance companies. Post office life Insurance Schemes: Postal Life Insurance and Rural Postal Life Insurance (PLI/RPLI). Housing Loans: Institutions providing housing loans, loans under Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana – Rural and Urban-Atal Pension Yojana (APS),

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Chandra, P. (2012). Investment Game: How to Win. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill Education
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. Mittra, S., Rai, S. K., Sahu, A. P., & Starn, H. J. (2015). Financial Planning. New Delhi: Sage Publications India Pvt. Ltd.
  2. https://rbidocs.rbi.org.in/rdocs/content/pdfs/GUIDE310113_F.pdf

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1 25 marks

CIA2  25 marks 

ESE  50 marks 

COM145 - CREATIVE ADVERTISEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:45
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The main objective of this course is to enable students to develop creative concepts for advertising of any product or service.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the critical role of creativity in advertising and develop creative strategies to be able to position the product/service.

CO2: To become familiar with the approaches and forms of advertising

CO3: To gain technical knowledge in the development of advertising for a company

CO 4: To learn to empathize with the client's needs and create content that meets the purpose in a creative manner.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Creativity and Aesthetics
 

Introduction to Creativity- The creativity process- Difference between a creative mind and non creative mind- Patterns of thoughts indicating creativity- How to bring out your creative genius- Philosophy of Aesthetics - Introduction to Creative works of the century

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
 
Syllabus Unit Mapping
1.Development Needs:Global,
2.Skill Focused:Employability,
3.Integration of Cross Cutting Issues:Environment,Professional Ethics,
Creativity and Aesthetics

 

Introduction to Creativity- The creativity process- Difference between a creative mind and non creative mind- Patterns of thoughts indicating creativity- How to bring out your creative genius- Philosophy of Aesthetics - Introduction to Creative works of the century

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Functions and Forms of Advertising
 

Types of advertisement, Ethics in advertisement, Position of Products/Services, Interplay of Branding and Advertising- Meaning of Advertising, Creative Ad makers and Advertising Agencies in India and World - Indian and Foreign creative advertisements, the controversial advertisements- The most memorable advertisements - Highly impactful and Creative advertisements.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
 
Syllabus Unit Mapping
1.Development Needs:Global,
2.Skill Focused:Employability,
3.Integration of Cross Cutting Issues:Professional Ethics,Environment,
Functions and Forms of Advertising

 

Types of advertisement, Ethics in advertisement, Position of Products/Services, Interplay of Branding and Advertising- Meaning of Advertising, Creative Ad makers and Advertising Agencies in India and World - Indian and Foreign creative advertisements, the controversial advertisements- The most memorable advertisements - Highly impactful and Creative advertisements.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Advertising and campaign Planning
 

 

Marketing strategy and situation analysis; Advertising plan; Advertising objectives; DAGMAR approach; Advertising campaign planning process. The art of copywriting; Advertising copy testing; Creativity in communication; motivational approaches; types of appeals used in advertising; Advertising budget process.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
 
Syllabus Unit Mapping
1.Development Needs:Global,
2.Skill Focused:Employability,
3.Integration of Cross Cutting Issues:Professional Ethics,Environment,
Elements and Principles of Design

Principles of Design- Lines, Scale, Color, Repetition, Negative Space, Symmetry,

 

Transparency, Texture, Balance, Hierarchy, Contrast, Framing, Grid, Randomness, Direction, Rules, Movement, Depth, Typography, Composition.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Elements and Principles of Design
 

Principles of Design- Lines, Scale, Color, Repetition, Negative Space, Symmetry,

 Transparency, Texture, Balance, Hierarchy, Contrast, Framing, Grid, Randomness, Direction, Rules, Movement, Depth, Typography, Composition.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
 
Syllabus Unit Mapping
1.Development Needs:Global,
2.Skill Focused:Employability,
3.Integration of Cross Cutting Issues:Professional Ethics,
Designing Advertisements

Creative brief - Value Questions -Research -Conceptual framework- Development of multiple ideas- Creative concept development process- creative brainstorming- creative differences- editing -refining creative concepts- concept presentation to the client- Appeals in advertising copy writing-print copy elements, headlines-body copy-slogans - Designing print ad- choosing –-choosing layout- -choosing Typefaces

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Designing Advertisements
 

Creative brief - Value Questions -Research -Conceptual framework- Development of multiple ideas- Creative concept development process- creative brainstorming- creative differences- editing -refining creative concepts- concept presentation to the client- Appeals in advertising copy writing-print copy elements, headlines-body copy-slogans - Designing print ad- choosing –-choosing layout- -choosing Typefaces

Text Books And Reference Books:

Batra, A. M. (2010). Advertising Management. Delhi: Pearson Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Chunawala, S .A.(2015). Advertising Management. Mumbai: Himalaya Publishers.

  • Moriarty, W. B. (2020). Advertising Principles and Practices. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India.

Evaluation Pattern

100 marks divided into 20 marks each assignment.

COM146 - INTRODUCTION TO EXCEL FOR MANAGERS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides the knowledge base for understanding the workings of Excel. The primary objective of the course is to familiarize the students with the basics of Microsoft excel. The course introduces the students to financial analysis. Further, the course also deals with the practical application of Microsoft Excel in day-to-day business activities. As a prerequisite, the students should have basic knowledge of computers and MS Office.

Course Outcome

CO1: To provide students with the fundamental knowledge of the use of computers in business.

CO2: To provide exposure to the students on MS Office Excel.

CO3: To apply MS excel functions in business.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Excel
 

Understanding the concept of a spreadsheet - Identifying the components of a spreadsheet

 

Navigating the Excel interface – Comparison of various version of Microsoft excel - Creating a new spreadsheet- Entering data into cells - Formatting data (fonts, colors, borders) - Adjusting column width and row height - Merging and splitting cells - Basic Excel functions: Structure of an excel function, functions such as SUM (), MIN (), MAX (), AVERAGE (), COUNT (), AUTOSUM, AUTOFILL. Working with an Excel List: Understanding Excel List Structure, Sorting a List Using Single Level Sort, Sorting a List Using Multi-Level Sorts, Using Custom Sorts in an Excel List, Filter an Excel List Using the AutoFilter, Creating Subtotals in a List, Format a List as a Table, Using Conditional Formatting to Find Duplicates, Removing Duplicates.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:2
Validation
 

Excel Data Validation: Understanding the Need for Data Validation, Creating a Validation. List, Adding a Custom Validation Error, Dynamic Formulas by Using Validation Techniques – Protecting range, formula, entire workbook – inserting header and footer

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Excel PivotTables
 

Understanding Excel PivotTables, Creating an Excel PivotTable, Modifying Excel PivotTable Calculations, Grouping PivotTable Data, Formatting PivotTable Data, Drilling Down into PivotTable Data, Creating Pivot Charts, Filtering PivotTable Data, Filtering with the Slicer Tool

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Conditional Functions and Working with Large Excel Data Sets
 

Conditional Functions: Working with Excel Name Ranges, Using Excel's IF () Function, Nesting Functions, Using Excel's COUNTIF () Function, Using Excel's SUMIF () Function, Using Excel's IFERROR () Function. Working with Large Sets of Excel Data: Using the Freeze Panes Tool, Grouping Data (Columns and/or Rows), Consolidating Data from Multiple Worksheets. Printing of excel worksheet – alignment, printing of selection, range, entire workbook – mail merge using excel

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
LookUp, Text Based Function and financial function
 

Excel's Lookup Functions: Using Excel's VLOOKUP() Function, Using Excel's HLOOKUP() Function, Using Excel's INDEX() and MATCH() Functions. Excel's Text-Based Functions: Using Excel's functions such as LEFT(), RIGHT() and MID(), LEN(), SEARCH(), CONCATENATE(). Time value of money - present value of money - capital budgeting, Net present value, Internal rate of return. Statistical function - Introduction to macros. Creation of simple macro functions

Text Books And Reference Books:

Microsoft Excel 2016 Step by Step Curtis Frye, Microsoft Press, A division of Microsoft Corporation, 2015 edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Microsoft Excel Essential Hints and Tips Fundamental hints and tips to kick start your Excel skills By Diane Griffiths Published, 2015 edition

 

Excel 2010 Formulas, by Wiley Publishing, 2010 Edition.

Evaluation Pattern

MCQ Test and Practical excercise 

CSC141 - PROGRAMMING IN C (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the C programming language, covering its history, features, data types, and program structure. Students will learn to apply decision control and loop structures, along with various operators, to create basic programs. Additionally, the course covers functions, recursion, arrays, and pointers to provide a solid foundation for C programming and problem-solving.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the fundamentals of C programming, including its history, features, variables, and data types.

CO2: Apply decision control statements, loop control structures, and various operators to write basic C programs.

CO3: Analyze and design functions, including recursion and passing values/arrays, and understand storage classes in C.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to C
 

 

Types of Programming Language- History of C, Features of C , C Tokens, variables and keywords and identifiers ,Types of C constants and variables, Rules for constructing variable names, Structure of C program, Input /output statements in C

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Data types and Control Structures
 

Data Types, Type declaration, Different Operators in C - Arithmetic, Logical, Relational, Bitwise, Conditional, Expressions, Hierarchy of operations.

Control structures

 

Decision control statements-if, switch, go to statement, conditional operator statement. Loop control structures- while, do-while, for loop, Break statement, Continue statement.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Function
 

Introduction, function definition and prototyping, Types of functions, passing values to function, recursion, passing arrays to functions. I/O functions- formatted & unformatted console I/O functions Storage classes in C- Automatic, Register, Extern and Static Variables.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Arrays
 

 

One dimensional and multidimensional arrays, Declaration, initialization, Reading values into an array, Displaying array contents and Array Manipulations. String-Basic Concepts, Library Functions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Pointers
 

Definition, notation, pointer and arrays, pointers and functions-call by value and call by reference.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Balagurusamy, E. Programming in ANSI C 4th Edition. Tata McGraw-Hill, 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Kanetkar, Yashavant. Let Us C. 4th Edition. BPB Publications, 2012.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

CSC143 - WEB DESIGNING USING HTML, PHP AND MYSQL (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the fundamentals of HTML and PHP for web development. Students will learn HTML tags for content structuring and essential PHP scripting concepts, including variables, conditional statements, and error handling. Additionally, they will explore form handling, loops, and MySQL database interactions using PHP. By the end, students will be equipped to create dynamic web applications and understand the essentials of web programming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply HTML basics, including tags for structure, lists, images, hyperlinks, and tables.

CO2: Develop PHP scripts with variables, data types, conditional statements, and error handling techniques.

CO3: Utilize PHP for form handling, switch-case statements, loop structures, and working with arrays in MySQL database.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-1
 

 

Basic HTML tags- HTML, HEAD, BODY, TITLE, Paragraphs, Headings, Line Breaks, Dividers- P, H1, …H6, BR, HR, Character Entity References- Quotes, ampersands, angle brackets, and non-breaking spaces Lists- OL, UL, DL, Formatting-URL and Paths, Images- IMG, Hyperlinks, Table-TABLE, TR, TD, TH, Form-FORM, INPUT, TEXTAREA, SELECT, OPTION, Frames-FRAMESET, FRAME

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
PHP Basic
 

Writing PHP scripts - Writing PHP scripts, learn about PHP code structure, how to write and execute a simple PHP script and to add comments within your code.

Variables and Data Types- Learn about Variables, values and Data Types in PHP: boolean, integer, float, string, array, object, Resource, null.

Numbers and mathematical Operators- Introducing Numbers and mathematical 0perators, some PHP functions for more complex operations with numbers.

PHP Strings- Working with strings, using simple and double quotes, escaping quotes and other characters, concatenating strings, some functions for strings.

 Constants- Introducing Constants, syntax for defining constants, differences between variables and defined constants.

PHP Error Handling and Debugging-Error Handling, debugging and trigger errors and how to adjust the level of error reporting, handling exceptions.

 

If ... Else conditionals, Comparative and Logical operators - Make PHP script takes decisions with If, Else, Elseif conditional statements. Compare two values with Comparative and Logical operators. The ternary operator.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-3
 

Using HTML Forms - Using HTML Forms, PHP form handling, get data sent from form fields through GET and POST method, form validation.

$_GET, $_POST Variables - How to send data with get and post methods to a PHP script and access it with superglobal $_GET, $_POST variables.

Switch ... Case ... - PHP MySQL course - Switch ... Case ... conditional statement, switch with break and default instructions.

While Loops - Using While and Do Wile Loops. End the While loops with the break instruction. Syntax and examples.

For and For each Loops - Using for () and for each () Loops. End the "For" loops with the break instruction. Syntax and examples.

 

PHP Arrays - Creating Numeric (indexed) Arrays and Associative arrays. Accessing, modifying and traversing array elements.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-4
 

PHP MySQL Introduction, Data Types - PHP MySQL Introduction, database structure, tables. MySQL naming rules, and column's data types.

PHP MySQL - INSERT INTO - Insert data in MySQL table, INSERT INTO query. Insert data from a form into a database.

 

PHP MySQL - SELECT, ORDER BY - Retrieve and display data from a MySQL table, SELECT SQL command. Determine the number of records. Sort query results with ORDER BY clause (ASC and DESC).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-5
 

PHP MySQL - WHERE and LIKE - Selecting specific data from a database with the WHERE clause and Conditionals. Check for string matching with LIKE and NOT LIKE terms.

PHP MySQL – UPDATE - UPDATE query to edit / change existing records in MySQL table.

 

PHP MySQL – DELETE - The DELETE statement, used to entirely remove records from a database table.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Powell, HTML & XHTM: The Complete Reference, 4th Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill Edition
[2] Steven Holzner, PHP: The Complete Reference, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2008


Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

[1] Robin Nixon, Learning PHP, My SQL and Java Script, Kindle Edition, O'Reilly Media 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

CSC149 - INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introductory-level training will be given software and tools for solving data science problems.

This course is designed to provide the theoretical foundations of data science.

Standard problems in data science, such as pre-processing, classification, clustering, and visualization, will be addressed.

Practical sessions will provide demonstrations, training, and discussions on results and interpretation methods.

Course Outcome

CO1: Collect the data from various sources.

CO2: Understand the problem scenario.

CO3: Solve data science problems with appropriate tools.

CO4: Interpret the results through visualizations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 1
 

Introduction – Concept data – types of data – sources of data – data sets – terminologies – pre-processing – classification – clustering – association rule mining – visualization – approaches – statistics – machine learning and soft computing.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Preprocessing & Data Transformation:
 

Data cleaning – handling missing values – errors and outliers

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Classification
 

Decision trees – naïve based methods – neural networks – SVM.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Data Transformation
 

Application of normalization methods – min-max method – 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Clustering
 

K-Means – Distance-based methods – Association Rules – finding frequent itemsets – apriori method.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Post-processing
 

Performance metrics of tasks – drawing various charts from the results – interpretation of results.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Tools for data science
 

Exploring the open source tools: Weka, Orange, Rapid Miner.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques, Han, Kamber and Pei, 2013

2. Data Mining and Predictive Analytics, Daniel T. Larose & ChantalD Lorose, Wiley Publisher, 2017

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Data Mining and Analysis Fundamental Concepts and Algorithms, Zaki and  Meira, MK Publisher,  2014.

2. Data Mining: The Text  Book, Aggarwal, Springer, 2015.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

DMT141 - DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description:

This course has been conceptualized in order to Understanding and exploring theory and practice as two sides of the same coin for academic 

excellence in Performing Arts. Benchmarking quality, understanding and exploring adaptability to situations and taking leadership tasks.

Maintaining emotional and aesthetics sensitivity in verbal and non-verbal communication

Course Outcome

CO1: To work on the body schema, body image and physical self-concept To examine the concept of creativity and imagination.

CO2: To understand and gain practical understanding about the human body expression through the Gross Motor Skills Development, the Global Motor Coordination Schemes according Bartenieff, the Effort/Shape system of movement analysis according Laban.

CO3: To gain the ability to express emotions To improved confidence and self-esteem

CO4: To analyse and to gain practical understanding about the concept of Dance: from ancient social function to performance, from performance to therapy. To learn how Dance Movement Therapy dances with life: instances of different social areas in which Dmt is practised.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction on Dance Movement
 

  Definition of Dance and its history 

 Definition of creativity 

 History of Dance Movement Therapy theory 

 

To understand and to gain practical understanding about the human body expression 

the Gross Motor Skills Development,

the Global Motor Coordination Schemes according Bartenieff,  

the Effort/Shape system of movement analysis according Laban.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Practice
 

Explore the body: The warm –up in Dance Movement Therapy 

The social function of the dance 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential references: (in APA format)

- Bellia , V. (2020). A body among other bodies. Relational Expressive Dance Movement Therapy. Catania A&G

- Hackney, P. (1998). Making connections. Total body integration through Barrtenieff Fundamentals. Routledge, New York.

- Laban R. (1950). The mastery of movement on the stage. McDonald & Evans, London

- Laban R., Lawrence F.C. (1947). Effort. McDonald & Evans, London

- Schilder P., (1935) The image and appearance of the human body. Taylor & Francis

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Essential references: (in APA format)

- Bellia , V. (2020). A body among other bodies. Relational Expressive Dance Movement Therapy. Catania A&G

- Hackney, P. (1998). Making connections. Total body integration through Barrtenieff Fundamentals. Routledge, New 

- Schilder P., (1935) The image and appearance of the human body. Taylor & Francis

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation patterns  - final assessment 100 marks

DSC001-1 - PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To enable the students to understand the fundamental concepts of problem solving and programming structures. The Objective of the course is to teach students the basic principles of programming. These principles will help lay a solid foundation for the students in pursuing courses related to programming during the program. The Course lays emphasis on the fundamentals of programming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand main control structures of procedural programming languages.

CO2: Apply major programming logic in problem solving.

CO3: Use modern object-oriented programming paradigm.

CO4: Understand the principles of data storage and manipulation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
General Problem-Solving concepts
 

 

 

Types of Problems – Problem solving with Computers – Difficulties with problem solving – problem solving concepts for the computer – Constants and Variables – Rules for Naming and using variables – Data types – numeric data – character data – logical data – rules for data types-examples of data types – storing the data in computer - Functions – Operators – Expressions and Equations

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Fundamentals of Programming and Data Types
 

How a Computer Solves a problem-Various stages, Execution, Constants and Variables, Syntax and Logical Errors, Data Types, Tokens, ASCII code, Characters, Strings, Variables, Assignments, Input/Output/Assignment Statements.

 

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Programming Paradigms and Logic
 

Functional Paradigm, Logic Programming Paradigm, Sequence Logic, Selection Logic-Boolean Expressions, if/if-else constructs, Repetition Logic-Looping statements, for/while construct, increment/decrement operators, keep a count problem-Object-oriented Paradigm.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Functions, Arrays and Strings
 

Functional Programming, Functions-Header, Parameters/Arguments, Return, Types of Functions, Array- Structure, Declaration, Array storage, Array of Characters, String- Representation in memory, String Processing, String Operations.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  Noel Kalicharan, Learn to Program with C, 1st Edition, Apress Publishers, 2015

[2]Maureen Sprankle and Jim Hubbard, Problem-solving and programming concepts, PHI, 9th Edition, 2012

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

[1] A. K. Sharma, Object Oriented Programming with C++, 1st edition, Pearson India, 2014

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-100%

DSC101-1 - PRINCIPLES OF DATA SCIENCE AND DIGITAL COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To provide a strong foundation for data science and the application area related to it, train toexplore the process of data pre-processing and machine learning, and to inculcate the importancevof ethics while handling data and problems in data science. To provide students with a fundamental understanding of the digital computing concepts from hardware and software perspective.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the fundamental concepts of data science.

CO2: Explore the concepts of data pre-processing and visualization.

CO3: Learn the basic concepts of machine learning.

CO4: Learn to practice the ethics while handling data.

CO5: Provide a basic understanding of the architecture and organization of digital computers.

CO6: Introduce the principles of digital logic and the design of digital circuits

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE
 

What is data science? – Why data science? – Data science venn diagram – Terminologies –  Application case studies. Types of data – Structured vs unstructured data – Quantitative vs qualitative data – Four levels of data.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
DATA SCIENCE PROCESS
 

Five steps of data science – Ask an interesting question? – Obtain the data -  Explore the data – Model the data – Communicate and visualize results – Basic question for data explorations – case studies for EDA

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
DATA VISUALISATION
 

 

Communicating data – Identifying visualization – Importance of graphs and statistics – Verbal communication – The why, how and what strategy of presenting.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
MACHINE LEARNING ESSENTIALS
 

Machine learning – Modeling Process – Training model – Validating model – Predicting new observations –Supervised learning algorithms – Unsupervised learning algorithms.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
ETHICS AND RECENT TRENDS
 

 

Data Science Ethics – Doing good data science – Owners of the data - Valuing different aspects of privacy - Getting informed consent - The Five Cs – Diversity – Inclusion – Future Trends.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
NUMBER SYSTEMS
 

Introduction to Numbers Systems, common terms,  representation in binary, equivalent, conversion- Binary Codes - Different types of Binary Codes - Digital Arithmetic: Basic Rules of Binary Addition and Subtraction, Multiplication, Division

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
LOGIC GATES
 

Introduction to Logic Gates and universal Gates, type of Gates, some common applications of logic gates- Logic Families: Significance and types, Characteristics, Transistor Logic, CMOS logic family

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:6
BOOLEAN ALGEBRA AND SIMPLIFICATION TECHNIQUES
 

 

Introduction to Boolean Algebra- postulates- Theorems.

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:6
SIMPLIFICATION TECHNIQUES
 

 

SOP, POS, k-map- Arithmetic Circuits: Introduction to arithmetic circuits, basic building blocks, BCD adder.

 

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:6
MULTIPLEX AND DEMULTIPLEXERS
 

Multiplexer, Encoders, Demultiplexers, Decoders- Flip Flops: Introduction of Flip Flops, types of Flip Flops

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Sinan Ozdemir, Principles of Data Science learn the techniques and math you need to start making sense of your data. Birmingham Packt December, 2016.

[2] Davy Cielen and Arno Meysman, Introducing Data Science. Simon and Schuster, 2016.

[3] M. Loukides, H. Mason, and D. Patil, Ethics and Data Science. O’Reilly Media, 2018.

[4] Digital Electronics Principles, Devices and Applications, Anil K. Maini, DRDO, India, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

[5] Computer Organization and Design : the hardware/software interface by david a patterson and john l hennessy

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Data Science from Scratch: First Principles with Python, Joel Grus, O’Reilly, 1st edition, 2015

 

[2]  Doing Data Science, Straight Talk from the Frontline, Cathy O'Neil, Rachel Schutt, O’Reilly, 1st edition, 2013

 

[3]  Mining of Massive Datasets, Jure Leskovec, Anand Rajaraman, Jeffrey David Ullman, Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition, 2014

 

[4] Computer Systems: Digital Design, Fundamentals of Computer Architecture and Assembly Language,  ATa Elahi , Springer 2019

 

[5] Floyd, Thomas L: Digital Computer Fundamentals, 11th Edition, Pearson International, 2015. 

 

[6] Malvino, Paul Albert, Leach, Donald P,GautamSaha: Digital Principles And Applications, TMH ,8th Edition, 2015.

 

[7] Bartee, Thomas C: Digital Computer Fundamentals, 6 Edition,TMH, 2010. 

 

 

 

References

 

https://www.ntnu.edu/studies/courses/TFE4105/2014#tab=omEmnet

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50%

ESE-50%

DSC161-1 - PYTHON PROGRAMMING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the programming paradigms associated with Python. It provides a comprehensive understanding of Python data types, functions and modules with a focus on modular programming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply core programming concepts.

CO2: Demonstrate significant experience with python program development environment.

CO3: Design and implement fully-functional programs using commonly used modules and custom functions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
INTRODUCING PYTHON
 

Theory 5hrs

Introduction, Python Fundamentals, Features of Python, Components of a Python Program, Understanding the Interpreter.

Python basics: Identifiers, Basic Types, Operators, Precedence and Associativity, Decision Control Structures, Looping Structures, Console Input, Output.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Exercises:
 

Lab 10 hrs

1. Implement Basic data types, operators and I/O

2. Implement Control structures and loops

3. Implement Strings and Lists 

4. Implement Tuples

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
PYTHON DATA TYPES: LISTS AND TUPLES
 

 

Strings, Lists: Accessing elements, Basic List operations, Built-in methods.

Tuples: Working with elements, Basic Tuple operation, Tuple methods and Type of Tuples.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
PYTHON DATA TYPES: SETS AND DICTIONARIES
 

Theory 5 hrs

Sets: Definition, Set Elements, Built-in methods, basic set operations, Mathematical Set operation, Variety of Sets.

Dictionaries: Defining a dictionary, accessing elements, basic operations, methods.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
COMPREHENSIONS, FUNCTIONS AND MODULES
 

Comprehensions: List Comprehensions, Set Comprehension, Dictionary Comprehension.

Functions: Defining a function, Types of arguments, unpacking arguments. Recursive functions.

Main module, built-in, custom modules, importing a module.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Exercises:
 

Lab 10 hrs

5. Implement Sets and Dictionaries

6. Implement List, Set and Dictionary Comprehensions

7. Implement function

8. Implement Recursive function

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
INTRODUCTION TO NUMPY AND PANDAS
 

Theory 5 hrs

Introduction to NumPy, Aggregations Computation on Arrays, Comparisons, Sorting Arrays.

Introduction to Pandas: Data indexing and Selection, Operating on Data, Handling Missing Data.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Exercises:
 

Lab 10 hrs

9. Implement the modules of NumPy 

10. Implement the modules of Pandas

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Martin Brown, Python:The Complete ReferenceMcGraw Hill, Publications, 4th Edition March 2018.

[2] Yashavant Kanetkar, Aditya Kanetkar, Let Us Python, BPB Publications, 4th Edition 2022.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Reema Thareja, Python Programming using problem solving Approach, Oxford University, Higher Education Oxford University Press, 2017.

[2] Zhang Y, An Introduction to Python and Computer ProgrammingSpringer Publications, 2015.

Evaluation Pattern

 CIA : 50%  ESE : 50%

ECO143 - DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates on democracy and emerging issues in economies.  The course discusses how various socioeconomic factors act as constraints on economic growth and development. This basic framework allows a student to delve into the causes and consequences of various strategies/methods taken/applied by policymakers and practitioners and how it affects the overall objective of the state/economy through a trifocal analysis of the economy, society, and market keeping the central theme of ‘Democracy.’This course will introduce students to:

  • Growing crisis of wealth distribution and income inequality.
  •  Sectoral significance and state intervention in policy making.
  • Informal sector and labor market participation and rights.
  • Analyze corruption in emerging economies through various case studies.
  • Discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory, and measurement.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise the growing crisis of wealth and income inequality among the members of the economy.

CO2: Understand the economic crisis in different sectors and government interventions in practices.

CO3: Get familiar informal sector and labour market participation and rights.

CO4: Understand debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption.

CO5: Investigate issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing challenges in economies through the lens of democracy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratization and Society
 

Theories of Democratization; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratization; The Global Wave of Democratization; Causes and Dimensions of Democratization: The Political Economy of Democracy; Political Culture, Mass Beliefs and Value Change; Gender and Democratization; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratization Processes: Role, impact on policy reforms and cultural change.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratisation and Society
 

Theories of Democratisation; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratisation; The Global Wave of Democratisation; Causes and Dimensions of Democratisation: The Political Economy of Democracy: Political Culture, Mass Beliefs, and Value Change; Gender and Democratisation; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratisation Processes: Role, Impact on Policy Reforms and Cultural Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation;   Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratization; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation; Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratisation; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of political transitions: Choice of the economic and political regime; Theoretical extensions: growth, trade, political institutions; Democracy and the public sector; the state, the treat of expropriation and the possibility of development: Social and economic wellbeing and policy reforms.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of Political Transitions: Choice of Economic and Political Regime; Theoretical Extensions: Growth, Trade, Political Institutions; Democracy and the Public Sector; the State, the Threat of Expropriation and the Possibility of Development: Social and Economic Wellbeing and Policy Reforms

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development
 

A Marxian theory of democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development
 

A Marxian Theory of Democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; The Case Study of India; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development Indian Experience
 

India’s Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality, and Public Reasoning; A case study on Gujarat experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome; Kerala experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development: Indian Experience
 

India's Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality and Public Reasoning, A Case Study on Gujarat's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome; Kerala's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhagwati, J. N., & Panagariya, A. (2012). India's Tryst with Destiny: Debunking Myths that Undermine Progress and Addressing New Challenges. HarperCollins Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Boix, C. (2003). Democracy and Redistribution. Cambridge University Press.

Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2015). An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions. Economics Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 20 Marks

CIA 3: 45 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

ECO145 - ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to provide a holistic and a deeper understanding of the trade-off between ecology and development. Through an inter-disciplinary lens an organic approach is adopted to understand the trade-off. This course, therefore, seeks to cultivate not only the moral and ethical thinking of the ecology but also it tries to put forth an action plan from a policy front. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To evoke a sense of deep ecology and social justice.

CO2: To familiarize the students with the development paradigms and how it affects the ecology.

CO3: To examine the problems behind value designations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Value
 

The Value Problem in Ecological Economics- Values in Ecological Value Analysis: What Should We Be Learning from Contingent Valuation Studies? - Natural Capital in Ecological Economics-Entropy in Ecological Economics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Development
 

The environmental impact of land development-Development of water resources-Development and changing air quality- Urban development and environmental change-Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?- Power Inequality and the Environment.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecofeminism and Ecocriticism
 

Gender and environment; Ecofeminism; androcentrism; Deep ecology – ecofeminism debate; Ecocriticism; Nature writings; Thinking like a mountain; The forgetting and remembering of the air - The Varna Trophic System An Ecological Theory of Caste Formation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Action Plans
 

Reading Ecology, Reinventing Democracy-Scientists or Spies?- Revisiting the Debates on Man-Nature Relation- Lecture of Medha Patkar- Ecological Fiscal Transfers and State-level Budgetary Spending in India- -Bourgeois Environmentalism, the State, the Judiciary, Urban Poor, Significance of Silent Valley- Silent Valley: A controversy that focused global attention on a rainforest 40 years ago- Equity and Justice

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      1.Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

2.Daly & Farley. (2011). Ecological Economics (Principles and Applications). Island Press

3.Pepper, D. (2002). Eco-socialism: from deep ecology to social justice. Routledge

1.      4.Gupta, Avijit. (1998).Ecology and Development in Third World. Routledge

4. Patel, S. (1997). Ecology and Development. Economic and Political Weekly, 2388-2391.

5. Sankar, U. (ed.) (2000). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press

6. Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

7.Venkatachalam, L. (2007). Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?. Ecological economics, 61(2-3), 550-558.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.    1. Plumwood, V. (1993).  Feminism and the Mastery of Nature. London: Routledge

2. Warren, K.J. (ed), (1994).  Ecological Feminism. London: Routledge.

3.Shiva, V. (2016). Staying alive: Women, ecology, and development. North Atlantic Books.

4.Kavoori, P. S. (2002). The Varna Trophic system: an ecological theory of caste formation. Economic and Political Weekly, 1156-1164. 

5.Gill, K. (2009). Bourgeois environmentalism’, the State, the Judiciary, and the ‘urban poor’: The political mobilization of a scheduled caste market. Of Poverty and Plastic (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2010), 209.

6. Kaur, A., Mohanty, R. K., Chakraborty, L., & Rangan, D. (2021). Ecological fiscal transfers and state-level budgetary spending in India: Analyzing the flypaper effects. Levy Economics Institute, Working Papers Series July.

7.Parameswaran, M. P. (1979). Significance of Silent Valley. Economic and Political Weekly, 1117-1119.

8. Lewis, M. (2002). Scientists or spies? Ecology in a climate of Cold War suspicion. Economic and Political Weekly, 2323-2332.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 25 Marks

CIA 2- 25 Marks

CIA 3- 50 Marks 

ENG181-1 - ENGLISH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities, and politics and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO2: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO3: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare
 
  • 1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde
  • 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors  Just a minute talk, cubing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer
 

 Why We Travel-Pico Iyer 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
1. Thinking Like a Mountain By Aldo Leopold
 

Thinking Like a Mountain  By Aldo Leopold

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article
 

 

Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
1. My Story- Nicole DeFreece
 

 

 My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Casey at the Bat- Ernest Lawrence Thayer
 
  • Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer
Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Additional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20 

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks

EST142 - READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:3
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Reading Sports and Literature

Course Description: The Sports and Literature course aims to explore the relationship between sports and literature through the analysis of various literary works. By examining texts that center around sports themes, this course will delve into the cultural, social, and personal aspects of sports as portrayed in literature. Students will develop critical thinking, analytical, and communication skills as they engage with a diverse range of texts, including novels, short stories, poems, and essays. Through class discussions, readings, and written assignments, students will gain a deeper understanding of the literary representation of sports and its significance in society.

Course Objectives:

To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

 

To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Course Outcome

CO1: To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

CO2: To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

CO3: To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

CO4: To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

CO5: To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Sports and Literature
 

Defining the relationship between sports and literature

Historical perspectives on sports in literature

 

The role of sports in society and culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The Heroic Athlete
 

 

Exploring the archetype of the hero in sports literature

Analysis of sports heroes and their portrayal in literary works

 

Themes of triumph, perseverance, and sacrifice

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Gender and Sports
 

 

Gender representation in sports literature

Examination of gender roles and expectations in athletic contexts

 

Sports as a means of empowerment and resistance

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Identity
 

 

Sports as a vehicle for personal and collective identity

Intersectionality and the portrayal of race, ethnicity, and class in sports literature

 

The relationship between sports and national identity

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Sports and Coming-of-Age
 

 

Analysis of sports as a backdrop for personal growth and maturation

The challenges and conflicts faced by young athletes in literature

 

Themes of ambition, dreams, and disillusionment

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Society
 

Unit 6: Sports and Society

Critical examination of the social issues depicted in sports literature

Sports as a reflection of broader societal dynamics

 

Ethics, values, and controversies in the world of sports

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. "The Natural" by Bernard Malamud
  2. "Friday Night Lights" by H.G. Bissinger
  3. "The Art of Fielding" by Chad Harbach
  4. "Seabiscuit: An American Legend" by Laura Hillenbrand
  5. "The Contender" by Robert Lipsyte
  6. "The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner" by Alan Sillitoe
  7. "A Fan's Notes" by Frederick Exley
  8. "The Boys of Summer" by Roger Kahn
  9. "The Sportswriter" by Richard Ford
  10. "Open" by Andre Agassi
  11. "Fever Pitch" by Nick Hornby
  12. "The Crossover" by Kwame Alexander (young adult literature)
  13. "The Runner" by Cynthia Voigt (young adult literature)
  14. "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" by Sherman Alexie (young adult literature)
  15. "The Fighter" by Michael Farris Smith
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. "The Boxer" by Joyce Carol Oates
  2. "The Runner" by Don DeLillo
  3. "Blindside" by Michael Lewis
  4. "The Tennis Partner" by Abraham Verghese
  5. "Basketball" by John Updike
  6. "The Chariot" by Ray Bradbury
  7. "The Trophy" by Alberto Alvaro Ríos
  8. "The Catch" by W.P. Kinsella
  9. "In the Ring" by Andre Dubus
  10. "Roller Derby Queen" by Margot Livesey
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-20

CIA 2- MSE 50

CIA 3- 30

ESE- 50

EST143 - STORYTELLING, GAMES AND ETHICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: In the last 20-25 years the field of game studies has evolved significantly. It is globally recognised. Video games have been studied using inter, multi and transdisciplinary methods to understand culture, identity, media, narration and communication. The course will provide a historical, social, cultural and critical foundation about games, digitality, storytelling and its moral and ethical world. This will enable students to understand the connection between identities, moralities and our current engagement with the gaming world. This will help in broadening the interdisciplinary focus and assessment of storytelling in diverse forms and connect it with the ethical issues of the contemporary world.

 

Course Objectives: The course will survey the evolution of ideas connecting storytelling, gaming and ethics and morality. It will introduce the latest research in gaming and ethics as evidenced in the globalised world. It will provide a methodology for students to assess and critically evaluate the meaning, content, intent, narration (compared to other broader media), ideology and ethical implications of gaming in the contemporary world.

Course Outcome

CO1: ? will be able to understand the narrative conventions of gaming, their uses and ideological effects

CO2: ?will evaluate how narrative choices reflect ethical contextualisation

CO3: ?will be able to analyse and evaluate contemporary social, cultural and political issues and perspectives reflected in games

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: What is gaming ? Basic introduction
 

While gaming has been popular, studying games with its historical, social and cultural context requires a foundation in history of games. Locating games within cultures of social transactions and strategic implications will provide the required base to begin the course.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Gaming, Society and Narration
 

This unit is divided into three smaller subunits. The students will be divided into smaller groups in class and asked to explore the following blog to choose any one area of interest within the subcategories mentioned. The class will progress accordingly. They have to choose between games and colonialism, games and gender, games and philosophy (utopia/dystopia).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Games and Ethics
 

This unit is focussed on ethical framework of games.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Unit IV: Storyboard ? design a game (basic story line)
 

The students are expected to narrate and design a basic concept for a game to respond to the questions raised in the course.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Unit I: What is gaming – Basic introduction                                                         (10 hours)

While gaming has been popular, studying games with its historical, social and cultural context requires a foundation in history of games. Locating games within cultures of social transactions and strategic implications will provide the required base to begin the course.

1.     Roberts, J. M., Arth, M. J., & Bush, R. R. (1959). Games in culture. American anthropologist61(4), 597-605.

2.     Chapter 1 from Grace, L. D. (2019). Doing things with games: Social impact through play. CRC Press.

Unit II: Gaming, Society and Narration                                                                (15 hours)

This unit is divided into three smaller subunits. The students will be divided into smaller groups in class and asked to explore the following blog to choose any one area of interest within the subcategories mentioned. The class will progress accordingly. They have to choose between games and colonialism, games and gender, games and philosophy (utopia/dystopia).

https://coe-gamecult.org/

Reading: Shaw, A. (2010). What is video game culture? Cultural studies and game studies. Games and culture5(4), 403-424.

Salter, A., & Blodgett, B. (2017).  Toxic Geek Masculinity: Sexism, Trolling, and Identity Policing (Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2017), 73-99.

Case study: Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice

Unit III: Games and Ethics                                                                                      (15 hours)

Kowert, R., & Quandt, T. (Eds.). (2015). The video game debate: Unravelling the physical, social, and psychological effects of video games. Routledge. (Chapter 2/4/5).

Gotterbarn, D. The ethics of video games: Mayhem, death, and the training of the next generation. Inf Syst Front 12, 369–377 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10796-009-9204-x

Schrier, K. (2015). EPIC: A framework for using video games in ethics education. Journal of Moral Education44(4), 393-424.

Sicart, M. (2015). Playing the good life: Gamification and ethics. The gameful world: Approaches, issues, applications, 225-244.

Unit IV: Storyboard – design a game (basic story line)

The students are expected to narrate and design a basic concept for a game to respond to the questions raised in the course.

1.     Workshop by gaming planner/designer

2.     https://www.pluralsight.com/blog/film-games/creating-game-concept-first-step-getting-game-ground

3.     https://uxdesign.cc/a-board-game-design-process-a-game-is-a-system-5469dfa4536

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended readings:

Bolter, J. et al. (1999). Remediation. Understanding New Media. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 20-52; 88-102.

Burrill, D. A. (2008). Die tryin': videogames, masculinity, culture (Vol. 18). Peter Lang. (13-44).

Mukherjee, S. (2017). Videogames and Postcolonialism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 1-52. (Rise of the Tomb Raider).

Schrier, K. (2017). Designing role-playing video games for ethical thinking. Educational Technology Research and Development65(4), 831-868.

Sicart, M. (2013). Beyond choices: The design of ethical gameplay. MIT Press.

Zhang, Y. (2009). Ian Bogost, Persuasive Games: The Expressive Power of Videogames.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Examination and Assessment

Assessment Pattern    

20 (CIA 1)

20 (CIA 3)

50 (CIA 2)

50 (End Semester)

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I and III can be either written analysis/presentation of an author, book review, narrative analysis of a dominant idea of the contemporary time, debates or seminar/panel discussions.

Mid semester exam (class test) – A written paper on the modules covered for 50 marks. Section A (10 marks) will have objective questions (20, ½ marks each). Section B will have 4 questions (10 marks each) to assess conceptual clarity. Section B will have one compulsory question which will be analytical.

End-semester exam (class test) – Three sections: Section A (10 marks) will have objective questions (20, ½ marks each). Section B will have 1 conceptual question (10 marks each). They will be conceptual. Section C (15 marks each) will be having two case studies - one purely based on identification of features, styles, and narrative devices, and second question will be evaluative and analytical.

Consolidated marks will be sent after the final examination.

EST145 - POETICS , POLITICS AND PIVOTAL PEOPLE OF ROCK N ROLL (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

 Rock Music is a sound and dissonance rich discourse with its own socio-cultural practices and aesthetics. This course is an academic introduction to this space and its role in the identity formation of a generation, of a people and a Nation in motion.

 

Course Objectives

 

  • To engage with popular music as aural texts 
  • To study the popular music practitioner as an activist and artist
  • To appreciate the significance of  social critique and a counter cultural aesthetic

Course Outcome

CO1: ? To critically appreciate characteristics and concerns of popular music

CO2: To read popular music as cultural artefact and socio-political entities

CO3: ? To regard popular music as the voice and identity of a generation and locate its historical trajectory

CO4: ? To engage with artists and performances as cultural texts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
A brief history of Popular Music before the Beatles
 

Tin Pan Alley and song pluggers, World War II

Sheet Music

Swing and ragtime

Vaudeville

Frank Sinatra: My Way. Strangers in The Night, New York, New York

Nashville, Music Row, Elvis Presley

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Birth of a Genre (From Gospel to Rock)
 

 Bill Haley 

Chuck Berry

  Buddy Holly   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Classic Rock and the British Invasion
 

The Beatles and Beatlemania

Establishing an aesthetic of Mod

  TV and bands 

The Rolling Stones  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Art Rock and the Album Era: Concept Albums and Album Art
 

 

Bands as Artists                                                                                                                 

Beatles / Sgt Pepper’s  

Pink Floyd /The Wall

The Who / Tommy

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
The Politics of Rock n Roll Folk rock: People power; Guerrilla Minstrels Folksong as Protest
 

 

Counter Culture: Vietnam, Draft, Gender, the Mystic East, Woodstock, Ban the Bomb   

Woody Guthrie

Bob Dylan

Joan Baez

Janis Joplin

Simon and Garfunkel

Jimi Hendrix

Pearl Jam

Riot bands

Text Books And Reference Books:

Whats that sound? An introduction to Rock and its history .

 

Jon CovachUniversity of Rochester

and the Eastman School of Music

Andrew Flory

Carleton College

 

W. W. NORTON AND COMPANY

NEW YORK • LONDON

fifth Edition

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Baugh, Bruce. “Prolegomena to Any Aesthetics of Rock Music”. The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 51, No. 1 (Winter, 1993): 23-29. JSTOR. The American Society for Aesthetics. Web. 26Jul, 2016. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/431967>

Camilleri, Lelio. “Shaping Sounds, Shaping Spaces”.  Popular Music, Vol. 29, No. 2 (May 2010): 199-211. JSTOR.  Cambridge University Press. Web. 16August, 2016. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/40926918>

Chrysalis, Thanos. “Spatio-Aural Terrains”. Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 16, Noises Off: Sound Beyond Music (2006):40-42. JSTOR. The MIT Press. Web. 29 April, 2015. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4540592

Denisoff R.S. The Sounds of Social Change: Studies in Popular USA Culture. 1972. Rand Mcnally& Co.

Denisoff, R. S.  Great Day Coming.  1991. Ann Arbor, MI: U-M-I Out-of-Print Books on Demand.

Denisoff, R. S. "Sing a Song of Social Significance": Political Consciousness and the Song of Persuasion.  1972.  Ohio: Bowling Green State University Popular Press.

Denisoff, R. S. Solid Gold Popular Record Industry.  1975. New Brunswick, New Jersey Transactions Inc

Ewen, D. Great Men of American Popular Song: The History of the American Popular Song told through the Lives, Careers, Achievements, and Personalities of its Foremost Composers and Lyricists--from William Billings of the Revolutionary War through Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Burt Bacharach.  1972. Englewood Cliffs, NJ, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

Forcucci, S. L. A Folk Song History of America: America through its Songs.  1984. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall

Fox, Aaron A.. “The Jukebox of History: Narratives of Loss and Desire in the Discourse of Country Music”. Popular Music, Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan,1992): 53-72. JSTOR, Cambridge University Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/853227 >

Ganchrow, Raviv. “Perspectives on Sound-Space: The Story of Acoustic Defense”. Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 19, Our Crowd—Four Composers Pick Composers (2009): 71-75. JSTOR. The MIT Press. Web. 29April, 2015. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/40926354>

Hamm, C.  Music in the New World. 1983. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Hampton, W. Guerrilla Minstrels.  1986. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Kingman, D.  American Music: A Panorama. 1979. New York: Schirmer books.

Klonsky, M. “Down in The Village: A Discourse on Hip”. New American Review, 13. 1971. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Kostelanetz, Richard. “Text-Sound Art: A Survey (Concluded)”. Performing Arts Journal, Vol. 2, No. 3 (Winter, 1978): 71-84. JSTOR. Performing Arts Journal, Inc. Web. 16 August,2016. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/3245364 >

 

Kramer, Lawrence. “Music, Metaphor and Metaphysics”.  The Musical Times, Vol. 145, No. 1888 (Autumn, 2004): 5-18. JSTOR.  Musical Times Publications Ltd. Web. 26 March,2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/4149109>

Kun, Josh D. “The Aural Border”. Theatre Journal, Vol. 52, No. 1, Latino Performance (March. 2000): 1-21. The John Hopkins University Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/25068738 >

Poulin, A. The American Folk Scene: Dimensions of the Folksong Revival.  1967. New York: Dell Pub. Co.

Qureshi, Regula Burckhardt. “Music Anthropologies and Music Histories: A Preface and an Agenda”. Journal of the American Musicology Society, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Autumn 1995): 331-342. JSTOR. University of California Press. Web. 18March, 2011. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/3519830 >

 

Račić, Ladislav. “On the Aesthetics of Rock Music”. International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music, Vol. 12, No. 2 (Dec.1981): 199-202. JSTOR. Croatian Musicological Society. Web. 1Dec., 2017. < http://www.jstor.org/stable/836562>

Ricks, C.  The Force of Poetry. 1995. Oxford University Press.

Rodnitzky, J. L.  Minstrels of the Dawn: The Folk-Protest Singer as a Cultural Hero. 1976. Chicago: Nelson-Hall.

Tagg, Philip. “Analyzing popular music: theory, method and practice.” Popular Music 1 (1979): 68-70. Web.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment: (20 marks).

Choose a song that has been an effective anthem for a cause or genre and analyse it in about 500-750 words.  

CIA II: (Mid Sem 50 marks) Choose a pivotal figure from Rock history and trace their career and impact on society. Consider image and sound in the construction of this image.

CIA III:(20marks) The class in groups of 5-6 will anthologise a series of songs, artists and their work.

 

Archiving:

End Semester:

 Identify a Bangalore based band or genre of popular music with approval of your course instructor . Conduct a study of their work and evolution and impact on the city and vice versa. Use data beyond library sources and provide due evidence. Your archive entry must include a 750-1000word reflective essay that validates your choice of artist, understanding of the form and significance of the work. You must also identify, interview and record these interactions. Provide clips from concerts duly cited. Include memorabilia like tickets, album art, newspaper or magazine clips  

 

EST146 - FOOD AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

 

This course offers an interdisciplinary exploration of the connections between food and literature, focusing on how food has been represented in literary works from different cultures and time periods. In addition, the course will provide an overview of the history and evolution of food culture, as well as the politics and economics of food production and consumption. By examining culinary themes in literary works, students will gain a deeper understanding of how food functions as a powerful symbol and narrative device in literature, reflecting social, cultural, and historical contexts. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the rich connections between food and literature, fostering critical thinking, cultural awareness, and personal reflection.

 

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

 

 

 

1.     To enhance the ability to identify and interpret the symbolic, metaphorical, and cultural significance of food within literary works.

 

2.     To help explore how food reflects and shapes social, historical, and cultural aspects of different societies and communities, shaping individual and collective identities and reflect social hierarchies and inequalities.

 

3.     To develop the ability to craft vivid and evocative descriptions by learning techniques for using sensory details, imagery, and figurative language to bring culinary experiences to life in their own writing.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will develop a deeper understanding of the cultural context of food and its representation in literature and its portrayal journalistic genres.

CO2: Students will be able to appreciate the influence of food on individual and collective identities.

CO3: They will understand how food can reinforce or challenge social hierarchies and inequalities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Unit I- Introduction to Food and Literature
 

Definition and scope; cultural, historical, and social significance of food; overview of how literature incorporates culinary themes

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

Anton Chekhov: "Gooseberries"

 

Margaret Atwood: "Bread"

 

Borden Deal: “The Taste of Watermelon"

 

Mona Gardner: "The Dinner Party"

 

Shobha Narayan: “First Foods”Excerpt from Monsoon Diary: A Memoir with Recipes

 

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Poetry
 

Li-Young Lee: "Eating Together"

 

Gwendolyn Brooks: "Kitchenette Building"

 

Seamus Heaney: "At a Potato Digging "

 

Risa Potters: "In My Mother’s Things"

 

Choman Hardi: “My Mother’s Kitchen”

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Essays
 

Ligaya Mishan: What We Write About When We Write About Food (NY Times, 2022)

 

Roland Barthes: Wine and Milk

 

Jackie Varriano: “How Female Food writers penned their way out of the home kitchen” 

 

Nimisha Sinha: “Delicious Fictions: Reading Food in Literature”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

§  Chekhov, Anton. Gooseberries. United Kingdom, Penguin Books Limited, 2015.

 

§  Atwood, Margaret. “Bread.Women on War: An International Anthology of Women's Writings from Antiquity to the Present. United States, Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 2003.

 

§  Deal, Bordan “The Taste of Watermelon”. 1979

 

§  Gardner, Mona. “The Dinner Party.” The Saturday Review of Literature. 1941.

 

§  Narayan, Shoba. Monsoon Diar:  A Memoir with Recipes. India, Penguin Group, 2004.

 

§  Lee, Young- Li. “Eating Together” Poetry Foundation.< https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43015/eating-together-56d221af2bf26> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Brooks, Gwendolyn. “kitchenette building” Poetry Foundation. < https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43308/kitchenette-building> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Heaney, Seamus. “At a Potato Digging” < https://genius.com/Seamus-heaney-at-a-potato-digging-annotated> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Potters, Risa. “In My Mother’s Things”Rattle. https://www.rattle.com/in-my-mothers-things-by-risa-potters/ Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Hardi, Choman. “My Mother’s Kitchen” Poetry Archive. < https://poetryarchive.org/poem/my-mothers-kitchen/> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Mishan, Ligaya. “What We Write About When We Write About Food” The new York Time Style Magazine. 18 February 2022. < https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/18/t-magazine/food-writing-journalism-criticism.html> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Varriano, Jackie. “How Female Food writers penned their way out of the home kitchen”  02 March 2022. < https://www.seattletimes.com/life/food-drink/how-women-food-writers-penned-their-way-out-of-the-home-kitchen/ > Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Barthes, Roland. “Wine and Milk.”Mythologies: The Complete Edition, in a New Translation. United States, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013.

 

§  Sinha, Nimisha.Delicious Fictions: Reading Food in Literature.” Caffe Dissensus. 28 January 2020. < https://cafedissensus.com/2020/01/28/delicious-fictions-reading-food-in-literature/> Accessed on 22 July 2023

 

§  Shahani, Gitanjali G. Food and Literature. United States, Cambridge University Press, 2018.

 

§  Fitzpatrick, Joan. 2012a. "Food and Literature: An Overview." The Routlege International Handbook of Food Studies. Edited by Ken Albala. Routledge International Handbooks. London. Routledge. pp. 122-34

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

§  Gilbert, Sandra M.. The Culinary Imagination: From Myth to Modernity. United States, W. W. Norton, 2014.

 

§  Hosking, Richard. Food and Language: Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium of Food and Cookery 2009. United Kingdom, Prospect Books, 2010.

 

§  Waxman, Barbara Frey. “Food Memoirs: What They Are, Why They Are Popular, and Why They Belong in the Literature Classroom.” College English, Vol. 70, No. 4, Special Focus: Food (Mar., 2008): 363-383

 

§  Ferrier, Peyton. “Food in Popular Literature.” Choices, Vol. 29, No. 1 (1st Quarter 2014): 1-6

 

§  Jones, Michael Owen . “Food Choice, Symbolism, and Identity: Bread-and-Butter Issues for Folkloristics and Nutrition Studies (American Folklore Society Presidential Address, October 2005)” The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 120, No. 476 (Spring, 2007), pp. 129-177

 

§  Daly. Suzanne, and Ross G. Forman. “Introduction: Cooking Culture: Situating Food and Drink in the Nineteenth Century.” Victorian Literature and Culture, Vol. 36, No. 2 (2008), pp. 363-373

 

§  Holtzman, Jon D. “Food and Memory.” Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 35 (2006), pp. 361-378

 

§  Tigner, Amy L., and Carruth, Allison. Literature and Food Studies. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2017.

 

§  Fisher, Mary Frances Kennedy. The Gastronomical Me. United States, World Publishing Company, 1948.

 

§  "Feast and Famine: Food Imagery and Class Identity in Victorian Literature" by Debra L. Gimlin (Victorian Literature and Culture)

 

§  Albala, Ken. Routledge International Handbook of Food Studies. United States, Taylor & Francis, 2013.The Routledge Companion to Literature and Food. United States, Taylor & Francis, 2018.

 

§  Counihan, Carole, and Penny Van Esterik. Food and Culture: A Reader. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print.

 

§  Humble, Nicola. The Literature of Food: An Introduction from 1830 to Present. India, Bloomsbury Publishing.

 

§  J. Michelle Coghlan. The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food. India, Cambridge University Press, 2020.

 

§  Fitzpatrick, Joan, and Boyce, Charlotte. A History of Food in Literature: From the Fourteenth Century to the Present. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2017.

 

§  Kara K. Keeling, Scott T. Pollard. Critical Approaches to Food in Children's Literature. N.p., Taylor & Francis, 2012. Print.

 

§  < https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/18/t-magazine/food-writing-journalism-criticism.html>

 

§  Julia Rappaport: “Take a bite out of food writing”

 

§  < https://www.writermag.com/improve-your-writing/nonfiction/take-bite-food-writing/>

 

§  < https://www.seattletimes.com/life/food-drink/how-women-food-writers-penned-their-way-out-of-the-home-kitchen/>

 

§  Ceillie Clark- Keane: “Women Writing Food” < https://blog.pshares.org/women-writing-food/>

 

§  Barthes, Rolan. “Wine and Mild.” Mythologies. New York: Hill and Wang, 195: 58-61. Print.

 

§  Kapla, David M. “Introduction: The Philosophy of Food.” The Philosophy of Food. University of California Press, 2012:1-23. <https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt7zw2cx.3 >

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: Presentation (20 Marks)

 

Create a character diary or character letter in the voice of a character from any chosen literary work.

 

 

 

Mid Semester: Research paper (50 Marks)

 

Analyze literary works (novel/ poem/short story/ play) for food-related social issue addressed in their narrative and write a research paper in 1000- 1500 words considering the broader social, political or cultural significance of these issues/ representations.

 

 

 

CIA 3: Photo Essay (20 Marks)

 

Create a photo essay on a particular cuisine, street food, or food markets in Bangalore focusing on any kind of its presentation.

 

 

 

End Semester: Food Narrative Project (50 Marks)

 

Create a food narrative project based on a specific food culture (local/regional) or a family/ community recipe. The foodscape should focus on these four aspects- recipe, anecdote, history and relevance, the transformative culinary experience and the rationale for the choice of recipe. Recall specific sensory details associated with your chosen theme or focus. Consider the taste, smell, texture, and appearance of the food. Reflect on the ambiance, sounds, and emotions evoked by the culinary experience. Conduct research to explore the cultural, historical, or social context to your food narrative. It should include photographs, videos, or any other visual or auditory elements.

 

EST147 - HISTORY OF INDIAN BUSINESS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course seeks to historically explore the features, activities, phenomenon that shaped the Indian Business. Focus of the course is on history that has influenced and informed the contours of modern Indian business not to emphasize the capitalistic foundation of any business. The course traces the interaction between Europe and pre-colonial Indian approaches, caste system influencing the business, impact of Globalisation leading to the fourth industrial revolution shaping the businesses in India.

Objectives:

·       To trace the historical phenomenon influencing the Indian business  

·       To understand that business responds to different political, social, cultural aspects of a society, not a-historical money-making venture

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be familiar with the different business practices such as business communities/groups and multinational firms

CO2: Students will have ?historical? approach and understand the importance of historical sensibility in Management Studies

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Business History: Meaning and Scope
 

·       What is Business History?

·       Contours of Indian Business History

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Beginning of Indian Business
 

·       Precolonial trade in India - a. Agency Houses b. Opium Trade c. Banking Houses d. Anglo-Bania Alliance

·       European trading interests in India The East India Company and the manufactures upto 1757 British private trade in eighteenth century East India Company’s trade, 1757-1833

·       European Agency Houses Currency credit and indigenous bankers, 1800-1850 Origins and growth of Managing Agencies- new industries and technology

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Transition to Industrial Capitalism
 

·       The East India Company

·       The Industrial Revolution & Railroads 

·       Entrepreneurship and Rise of the Industrial Elite

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Second Industrial Revolution
 

·       The growth of big business in India and abroad

·       Mergers in the 19th and early 20th century

·       Family oriented firms and practices

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Business in Post-independent and Globalising India
 

·       Government industrial policy Growth of Business: 1947-1990

·       Technical innovations

·       Multinationals

·       Shifts in the policy and their critique

Text Books And Reference Books:

·       Tripathi, Dwijendra & Jumani, Jyoti. 2013. The Oxford History of Contemporary Indian Business. New Delhi: Oxford University Press

·       Roy, Tirthankar. 2011. The Economic History of India, 1857-1947. New Delhi: OUP.

·       Lectures delivered at Godrej Archives, Mumbai 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Roy, Tirthankar. Company of Kinsmen: Enterprise and Community in South Asian History 1700-1940

A Pictorial History of Indian Bussiness

Evaluation Pattern

2 Class tests to assess the concepts discussed in class for 20 marks each

Compiling the history of a Bangalore based family business; write a narrative based on the changes that the business has adopted to survive and responded to the changing business environment - 30 marks

Select a woman entreprenuer who is running a bussiness for the past 10years in Bangalore. Interview her to understand the business from its inception, her business philosophy and her journey as a business woman. Video record the interview. The interview should be atleast for 20min. The video should be accompanied by a reflective essay. - 30marks  

EST148 - THE OCEANS IN CINEMA: A BLUE HUMANITIES READING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Moving from land to ocean marks a shift in our understanding with fluidity as the focal point. ‘Blue Humanities’ or ‘Blue Cultural Studies’ uses the ocean as the lens to foreground diverse historical, social, cultural, economic and political aspects. The expansive field of Blue Humanities adopts a multidisciplinary approach, weaving together insights from environmental studies, oceanography, marine studies, cultural studies, film studies, history, etc. The course specifically focuses on revisiting the cliched conceptualization of the ocean as vast, alien, terra nullis and ahistorical. The ‘Oceanic Turn’ transitions from the surface to the depths below to explore the three-dimensional ocean through socio-cultural representations. Reading the ocean and the sea through cinema from across the world will help understand how the ocean is portrayed in myriad ways ‘foregrounding and problematizing issues connected to gender, race, pollution, social justice, maritime activities, privatization, globalization, capitalism ontologies’ to revisit our established thought regimes. 

Course Outcome

CO1: ? Appreciate and interpret the ocean in the light of Blue Humanities

CO2: ? Analyze and understand the changing relationships between societies and the ocean through the cinematic representations

CO3: ? Rethink and initiate action towards oceanic thinking and sustainability

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Knowing the Ocean: Re-visiting History and Origins
 

The unit will provide an alternative reading of our established understanding of ‘Origins’ with reference to the ocean – formation of the earth, the oceans, plants and animals and human beings. Destabilizing the pre-set reading of the formation of the world and prioritizing the land over the sea, the unit will help refocus the establishment of life in the Universe.

 

·       Excerpts from Rachel Carson, The Sea Around Us

·       Steve Mentz, “Two Origins: Alien or Core?”

·       Philip E. Steinberg and Kimberley Peters, “Wet Ontologies, Fluid Spaces: Giving Depth to Volume Through Oceanic Thinking”

 

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:13
Mapping the Ocean: Reading through Blue Humanities
 

The unit will throw light on the field of Ecocriticism with specific focus on Blue Humanities and its emerging engagement with the oceans around the world. The unit will help position the study of the oceans in the field of Humanities with specific reference to Cultural studies to frame the Blue Cultural Studies.

·       Excerpts from Sidney I. Dobrin, “Unearthing Ecocriticism”

·       John R.  Gillis – “The Blue Humanities”https://www.neh.gov/humanities/2013/mayjune/feature/the-blue-humanities

 

·       Helen M Rozwadowski, Oceans in three Paradoxes: Knowing the Blue through Humanities – Virtual Exhibition https://www.environmentandsociety.org/exhibitions/oceans-three-paradoxes

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Seeing the Ocean: Re-viewing the ocean through cinema
 

The unit will probe into pivotal aspects surrounding the construction of the ocean space through filmic representations of the ocean. The intent is to analyze through a range of issues informing the oceanic representations in films to unearth the pluri-focussed politics, both explicit and otherwise, manoeuvring through them - Maritime histories and activities, Aquatic world, Disasters, Conquests, Wars, Exploration, Adventure, Folk Tales and Myths, Colonialism and Postcolonialism, Gender, Race, Capitalism, International Relations, Globalization, Ecology and Medical Humanities.

·       James L. Smith and Steve Mentz - Learning an Inclusive Blue Humanities: Oceania and Academia through the Lens of Cinema

·       Stefan Helmreich, “Massive movie waves and the Anthropic Ocean”

·       Dilip M Menon, “Sea-Ing Malayalam Cinema”

·       Rie Karatsu, The Representation of the Sea and the Feminine in Takeshi Kitano's A Scene at the Sea (1991) and Sonatine (1993)” (SLA)

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carson, Rachel. The Sea Around Us. Canongate, 2021

Dobrin, Sidney I. Blue Ecocriticism and the Oceanic Imperative. Routledge, 2021.

Mentz, Steve. An Introduction to Blue Humanities. Routledge, 2023.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·       Blum, Hester. “Introduction: Oceanic Studies.” Atlantic Studies, vol. 10, no. 2, June 2013, pp. 151–55. 

·       Chen, Cecilia, Janine MacLeod, and Astrida Neimanis, editors. Thinking with Water. McGill-Queens Univ. Press, 2013. 

·       DeLoughrey, Elizabeth. “Toward a Critical Ocean Studies for the Anthropocene.” English Language Notes, vol. 57, no. 1, Apr. 2019, pp. 21–36.

·       Di Leo, Jeffrey R., editor. “Blue Humanities,” Symploke, vol. 27 no. 1, 2019, pp. 7-10· 

·       Gillis, John R. “The Blue Humanities.” HUMANITIES, vol. 34, no. 3, May/June 2013.

·       Jue, Melody. Wild Blue Media: Thinking through Seawater. Duke Univ. Press, 2020.

·       Mentz, Steve. “Toward a Blue Cultural Studies: The Sea, Maritime Culture, and Early Modern English Literature.” Literature Compass, vol. 6, no. 5, Sept. 2009, pp. 997–1013. 

·       Mentz, Steve. Ocean. Bloomsbury Academic, 2020.

·       Mentz, Steve. Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization, 1550-1719. Univ. of Minnesota Press, 2016.

·       Raban, Jonathan, editor. The Oxford Book of the Sea. Oxford Univ. Press, 1993.

·       Roorda, Eric. The Ocean Reader: History, Culture, PoliticsDuke Univ. Press, 2020. 

·       Steinberg, Philip E. The Social Construction of the Ocean. Cambridge Univ. Press, 2001.

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

As the course is multidisciplinary, the assessments will be done periodically to gauge the student’s level of understanding and learning. Review writing, weaving together a scrapbook, review tests and photo essays will form part of the assessment.

 End semester evaluation will be based on students setting up an online archive. They shall create an online archive selecting topics and presenting them by blending texts, theory and research. The submission will also have a viva component.  

LAW141 - CYBER LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Cyber law has emerged as a medium for growth with immense potential for solving many new and interesting challenges.  The course aims at appreciating one of the important emerging areas of law and the nitty-gritty involved in it. This introduces the students to the underlying philosophy of the subject and its relation to other areas focusing on human rights.

UNIT 1 is designed to introduce students to the role of law in technology, especially the internet and is designed to give a brief overview of the historical aspects of the internet. UNIT 2 acquaints the students with the regulation of cyberspace. UNIT 3 deals with digital contracts and information technology, while UNIT 4 deals entirely on cyber crimes which are rampant in the digital era.  UNIT 5 issues in E-commerce. Unit 6 deals with IPR issues in cyberspace and UNIT 7 deals with international regulation of cyberspace.

Course Outcome

CO1: Gain an understanding of the underlying philosophy of cyber law and its relation to information technology.

CO2: Facilitate an overall understanding on needs for regulation of information technology in India

CO3: Impart basic idea of information technology and its relation with digital signature

CO4: Acquaint with legal challenges arising out of privacy issues awareness about the various kinds of cyber crimes and legal issues and cases

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
UNIT 1 FUNDAMENTALS OF CYBER LAW
 

An overview of cyber world – Jurisprudence of cyber law – Scope of cyber law – Introduction to Indian cyber law

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 2 CYBERSPACE
 

Meaning, nature and emergence of cyberspace – Attributes of cyberspace – Classification of cyberspace – Legal framework for cyberspace

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 3 DIGITAL CONTRACTS
 

Law of digital contracts – Functions of digital signature – Electronic and digital signature – procedural and functional issues – Legal issues of digital signatures – Certifying authority – Regulatory framework of digital signatures

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 4 CYBER CRIMES
 

Salient features – Cyber crime and related concepts – Types of crimes – Regulation of cyber crime – International perspective

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 5 E-COMMERCE
 

Emerging significant of – e-Commerce – Transactions and Technology of e-Commerce – e-Commerce Contracts – Legal Issues of e-Commerce and Case Laws – e-Commerce Legislations

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 6 IPR ISSUES
 

IPR - An overview – Copyright issues in Cyberspace – Trademark issues in Cyberspace – Computer software and related IPR issues – Domain names and related issues

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 7 INTERNATIONAL SCENARIO IN CYBER LAWS
 

European convention of Cyber Crimes – UNCITRAL Model Law on e-commerce 1996 – International Legal Regime relating to IPR – Berne Convention, Rome Convention, WIPO Copyright, UDRP, OECD Convention on Database Protection – Domestic legal regime – Information Technology Act , 2000. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Seth Karnika, Computers Internet and New Technology Laws. Gurgaon: Lexis Nexis, 2013

Cyber Security & Cyber Laws - by Nilakshi Jain & Ramesh Menon, Wiley 2020

Cyber Crimes & Law - by Dr Vishwanath Paranjepe, 2nd Edtn 2019, Central Law Agency

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cyber Crimes & Law - by Dr Vishwanath Paranjepe, 2nd Edtn 2019, Central Law Agency

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I:   Assessment Description: Class test for 20 marks on assessing the understanding of the fundamentals of Cyber law. It is a class room test. 2 questions for 25 marks each carrying 12.5 marks.

CIA-II: Oral Presentation, shall be accompanied by PPT by a group of 5 students for maximum of 15 minutes on any Cyber  law issues.

CIA-III: Students will be given a specific topic or case law. They are required to identify the research issues and find an answer to it by analysing the available literature.

LAW142 - RIGHT TO INFORMATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

There is no gainsaying the fact that knowledge is the paramount source of empowerment and empowerment enriches democracy. The attributes of democracy, viz. the government- of, by and for the people, can be realized successfully if the people are well informed and participate in decision making.

To achieve this goal, the Parliament has enacted the Right to Information Act, 2005, and the same has conferred, the most invaluable right to be informed, on the people. Hailed widely as a vaccine against corruption and a multi-vitamin for nourishment of democracy, law relating to Right to Information has become an indispensable weapon for the citizens.

Course Outcome

CO1: To comprehensively understand the legal framework regarding the Right to Information in India.

CO2: To contextualise Right to Information in the broader realm of public law along with allied concepts such as open governance, rule of law, accountability, transparency etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Historical background; Shift in attitudes- secrecy, privilege, open government; Citizens’ right to know; Campaign for freedom of information; Constitutional Provisions; Technological revolution – Information technology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Legal Framework
 

Right to information Act. 2005  –  Overview – Objectives and reasons – Scope of the Act and Overall Scheme of the Act – What concerned citizens will want to know – Definitions

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
OBLIGATIONS OF PUBLIC AUTHORITIES
 

Right to information; Obligations of public authorities; Public information officers; Request for information; Disposal of request

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
RIGHT TO INFORMATION ? EXEMPTIONS
 

Grounds for rejection to access in certain cases; Severability; Third party information; Statutory exemptions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
INFORMATION COMMISSIONS
 

Constitution of Central Information Commission; State information commission; Powers and functions of commission; Appeal and Penalties; Freedom of information in commercial disputes; Right to Privacy v Right to information

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Sudhir NaibThe Right to Information Act 2005: A Handbook (1st edition ed. 2011).
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. N. V. Paranjape, Right To Information Law In India (First Edition ed. 2014).
Evaluation Pattern

As per University norms

LAW144 - ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The present decline in environmental quality calls for a stricter enforcement of laws relating to protection of environment. The objective of this course is to give an insight into various legislations that has been enacted in our country for protection of environment and also to create awareness among the citizens of the country about the duties cast on them under various legislations in relation to protection of environment.

 

Course Objectives:

  • To impart an in-depth knowledge of environmental legislations to students from diverse backgrounds.
  • To interpret, analyse and make a critique of the legislations and Case laws relating to environment
  • To provide a brief understanding of various developments that has taken place at international level to check various environmental harms.

Course Outcome

CO1: learn about environmental law

C02: make students environmentally conscious

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
INTRODUCTION
 

INTRODUCTION

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIRONMENT
 

INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIRONMENT

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
JUDICIAL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES AVAILABLE FOR ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION
 

JUDICIAL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES AVAILABLE FOR ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986
 

ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986
 

ENVIRONMENT (PROTECTION) ACT, 1986

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT 1974
 

WATER (PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF POLLUTION) ACT 1974

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
FORESTS AND CONSERVATION LAWS
 

FORESTS AND CONSERVATION LAWS

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
WILD LIFE PROTECTION AND THE LAW
 

 WILD LIFE PROTECTION AND THE LAW

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:5
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT
 

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT

Text Books And Reference Books:

MC Mehta Enviromental Law Book

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

MC Mehta Enviromental Law Book

Evaluation Pattern

Class Discussion: 50 Marks

MCQ exam: 50 Marks

LAW145 - PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Parliament is the heart and soul of any parliamentary democracy which is envisaged to reflect the expectations and aspirations of the people. In fact, it is the chief law-making organ and it comprises of members from different backgrounds, so as to represent the varied expectations of the people. As such, it has an onerous responsibility of making laws in a manner which caters to the requirements of the society cutting across the party lines.

In twenty-first century, the age of technology and information, the role of Parliament has increased manyfold as the impressions of “We the People” have also undergone a sea change with respect to the quality of the law made. In this context, a fundamental knowledge of the law-making process and the requisites of the same is essential for the citizens. Hence this course is devised to introduce the students to the essentials of law-making process by the Parliament as well as the privileges conferred on the members of Parliament.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the Constitutional framework on Parliamentary Practice and Procedure in India

CO2: Analyse the Parliamentary Privileges in India

CO3: Examine the Law-making process and role of Parliamentary Committees in India

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
INDIAN PARLIAMENT AND POLITY
 

Structure, powers and functions of Houses of Parliament – Loksabha,  Rajya  Sabha, Joint Sessions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
CONSTITUTION OF HOUSES
 

Members and presiding officers, election, powers and functions, Powers of President in relation to Parliament

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
LAW-MAKING PROCESS
 

Classification of Bills, procedures relating to passing of Bills, presentation of Budget

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
RULES OF BUSINESS IN PARLIAMENT
 

Summoning, petitions, resolutions, motions, question-answers, matters of urgent public importance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
PARLIAMENTARY PRIVILEGES
 

Sources of Parliamentary privileges, immunities, procedure

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEES
 

Parliamentary Committees, Government Committee, Ad hoc Committees, Joint Committee

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Anoop Mishra (Ed.), Practice and Procedure of Parliament, Metropolitan Book Co. Ltd. New Delhi (2016)

Durga Das Basu, Introduction to the Constitution of India (2022), Lexis Nexis, Gurgaon

Lok Sabha Secretariate, Parliamentary Privileges (2019), New Delhi

Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs, Manual of Parliamentary Procedures in India (2018), New Delhi

 

Subhash Kashyap, Our Parliament, National Book Trust (2020), New Delhi

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Apoorva Shankar and Shreya Singh, Parliamentary Procedures: A Primer [Rajya Sabha] (2015), PRS Legislative Research, New Delhi

Lok Sabha Secretariate, Budgetary Process (2019), New Delhi

M.P. Jain, Indian Constitutional Law (8th Edn., 2018) Lexis Nexis, Gurgaon

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I : 25 Marks (25%)

CIA-II: 25 Marks (25%)

CIA-III: 50 Marks (50%) 

 

MAT001 - BRIDGE COURSE FOR MATHEMATICS I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims at enabling the students to bridge the gap between the knowledge of the topics studied earlier and the current course Mathematics I.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply fundamental mathematical concepts in geometry, algebra and calculus

CO2: Gain competency in solving problems involving functions, limits and continuity

CO3: Attain mastery on basic concepts and standard results in differential calculus

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Sets and Functions
 

Number System, Sets and Set operations, Funcions and Relations -  Properties and Representation 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Algebra of Equations
 

Coordinate geometry - equations of standard curves and lines, Algebra - Solutions of simultaneous equations and quadratic equations, Resolving proper fractions into partial fractions

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Limits, continuity and differentiability
 

Limits, continuity and differentiability: basic concepts and standard results

Text Books And Reference Books:

G.B. Thomas, M.D.Weir and J. Hass, Thomas Calculus, 12th ed., Pearson Education India, 2015.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.   N. P. Bali, Differential Calculus, New ed. New Delhi, India: Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd., 2012.

2. Ralph P. Grimaldi, Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics – An applied introduction, Pearson Addison Wesley, 5th Edition, 2004.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignment Description

Marks

Library work, Problem Solving Assignments

 30

Test

20

Total

50

MAT121-1 - MATHEMATICS -I (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at enabling the students to know various concepts and principles of calculus and its applications. Sound knowledge of calculus is essential for the students of mathematics for the better perceptions of the subject and its development.

Course Objectives:

COBJ 1:  gain familiarity with the concepts of limit, continuity and differentiation.

COBJ 2:  understand the relationship between the concepts of limits, continuity and differentiability.

COBJ 3:analyse and interpret the different versions of mean value theorems.

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Limit, Continuity and Differentiability
 

Limit of a function, continuity, types of discontinuities, differentiability, successive differentiation, Maxima and minima.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Mean value theorems and Applications
 

Mean value theorems: Rolle’s theorem, Lagrange’s and Cauchy’s first mean value theorems, Taylor’s theorem (Lagrange’s form and Cauchy’s forms of remainder), Maclaurin’s theorem, series expansions, indeterminate forms.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Functions of two variables
 

Introduction, partial derivatives, Euler's theorem, total derivatives, Taylor's theorem, McLaurin's expansion, Maxima and Minima.

Text Books And Reference Books:

N. P. Bali, Differential Calculus, New Delhi, Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd., India, 2012.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      G. B. Thomas, J. Hass, C. Heil, and M. D.Weir, Thomas’ Calculus,  14th ed. New Jersey, USA: Pearson Education, Inc.,  2018.

2.      H. Anton, I. Bivens, S. Davis, Calculus, John Wiley and Sons Inc., 2002.

3.      F. Ayres and E. Mendelson, Schaum's Outline of Calculus, 6th Ed., USA: Mc. Graw Hill, 2013.

4.      J. Stewart, Single Variable Essential Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 2nd Ed., Belmont, USA: Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning., 2013.

5.      S. Narayanan, T. K. M. Pillay, Calculus, Reprint, S. Viswanathan Pvt. Ltd., India, 2009. (vol. I & II.)

6.      M. Spivak, Calculus, 3rd Ed. Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Evaluation Pattern

Component

Mode of Assessment

Parameters

Points

CIA I

MCQ,

Written Assignment,

Reference work, etc.,

Mastery of the core concepts

Problem solving skills.

 

10

CIA II

Mid-semester Examination

Basic, conceptual, and analytical knowledge of the subject

25

CIA III

Written Assignment, Project

Problem solving skills

10

Attendance

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality

05

ESE

 

Basic, conceptual, and analytical knowledge of the subject

50

Total

100

MED142 - AUDIO AND VIDEO PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course will introduce students to the basic principles and techniques of audio and video production. Students will learn how to use a range of equipment and software to produce high-quality audio and video content. This course is designed for non-media students who want to acquire basic skills in audio and video production.

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to identify different types of media software and their uses in the media industry.

CO2: Students will be able to describe the features and functions of software tools used for media production, editing, and distribution.

CO3: Students will be able to use media software tools to create and edit media content.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction to Audio and Video Production
 

Introduction to Audio and Video Production (10 hours)

Basic principles of audio and video production

Overview of equipment used in audio and video production

Introduction to software tools used in audio and video production

 

Audio Production Techniques (10 hours)

Microphone selection and placement

Recording techniques and best practices

 

Mixing and mastering audio content

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Video Production Techniques
 

Video Production Techniques (10 hours)

Camera selection and setup

Lighting techniques and best practices

Shooting and capturing video footage

 

Editing Audio and Video Content (10hours)

Introduction to audio and video editing software

Editing and arranging audio and video content

 

Adding transitions and effects to audio and video content

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Advanced Audio and Video Production
 

Creating soundscapes and sound effects

Advanced camera techniques and shot composition

 

Motion graphics and visual effects

Text Books And Reference Books:

"The Filmmaker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age" by Steven Ascher and Edward Pincus.

"Audio Engineering 101: A Beginner's Guide to Music Production" by Tim Dittmar

"The Art of Digital Audio Recording: A Practical Guide for Home and Studio" by Steve Savage

"Video Production Handbook" by Gerald Millerson and Jim Owens

 

"Pro Tools 101: An Introduction to Pro Tools 11" by Frank D. Cook

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

"The Filmmaker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age" by Steven Ascher and Edward Pincus

"Audio Engineering 101: A Beginner's Guide to Music Production" by Tim Dittmar

"The Art of Digital Audio Recording: A Practical Guide for Home and Studio" by Steve Savage

"Video Production Handbook" by Gerald Millerson and Jim Owens

 

"Pro Tools 101: An Introduction to Pro Tools 11" by Frank D. Cook

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 – Interview Project - Students could work in groups to produce a video where they interview employees of a local business or organization. The video could showcase the company culture and highlight different aspects of the business. (15Marks)

CIA 2 – Product Demo Video Project - Students could work in groups to produce a video that showcases a product or service. The video would need to be engaging and informative, and would aim to persuade the viewer to purchase or use the product or service. (20 Marks)

CIA 3 – Educational Video Project - Students could work in groups to produce an educational video on a topic of their choice. The video would need to be informative and engaging, and could cover topics like science, history, or current events. (15 Marks)

All CIAs   – Department level only

MED143 - CELEBRITY PR (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course attempts to understand the nature, process and issues related to celebrity actors and their presence, which inadvertently contribute to the success of films.

Course Outcome

CO1: Will be able to understand the concept of celebrity PR

CO2: Will be able to understand the role of celebrity presence in the success of a film

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding PR as Strategic Communication
 

PR concept, role and relevance in selling goods/services; Brief history & evolution of PR. Competing forces for PR-Advertising, Publicity, Marketing/Sales. PR as distinct from spin, hype & exaggeration. Top Bollywood PR firms in India-Dale Bhagwagar PR, Raindrops, Spice PR, Aspire PR.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Celebrity PR and Bollywood
 

Bollywood and the need and emergence ofCelebrity PR, early beginnings, and present status. Acquiring and sustaining celebrity status through PR, Celebrity brand building & nurturing. PR in celebrity reputation management. Building the celebrity profile through analysis and research. Case Study-The making of Shilpa Shetty (UK's Big Brother Reality TV), Amitabh Bachchan and KBC, Aamir Khan and Satyameva Jayate

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Celebrity PR Responsibilities & Activities
 

Interviews, Press conferences,Rejoinders,Official comments/no comments. Organising events-Public 'meet and greet', Social events of significance, Public gatherings-award functions, airport meets.  Helping to manage crisis--damaging details from celebrity past, social media criticism and backlash, dealing with success and failure with grace and dignity, Helping deal with paparazzi encounter

Text Books And Reference Books:

Barron, Lee. (2015). Celebrity Cultures: An Introduction. SAGE Publications Ltd. Bräu, Marlena. (2013), Twitter Kills The Publicity Star? How social media is influencing the business of Celebrity PR. Grin Verlag Publishing, Germany. Jonas, C Priyanka. (2021). Unfinished: A Memoir. Penguin Viking.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Raju, J Jeetu. (2020). Escape the rat race. Google Books, Thames Publication. Stewart, B James and Abrams, Rachel. (2023). Unscripted: The Epic Battle for a Hollywood Media Empire. Penguin Books.

Evaluation Pattern

Single assessment of 50 marks

MED145 - SOCIAL MEDIA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The Social Media course is designed as an engaging and comprehensive undergraduate elective that explores the dynamic and influential world of social media. In this course, students will gain a critical understanding of the social media , their impact on society, and their role in shaping communication and democracy.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop a comprehensive critical understanding of social media.

CO2: Identify the strengths and weaknesses of social media platforms.

CO3: Critically create social media content.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Social Media
 

Definition and characteristics of social media

Evolution and historical context of social media for democracy

 

Key technological features and functionalities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Social media for democracy
 

Cultural implications of social media use

Social media's impact on political mobilization and activism

 

Utilizing social media for positive social change and advocacy

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Social media and individual
 

Agency and social media

Personal data and issues

 Identity and Social media

Text Books And Reference Books:

Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism Is Turning the Internet Against Democracy  by Robert W. McChesney

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The Social Media Reader by Michael Mandiber

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1 – Submission of social media platform introduction video (5 marks)

CIA 2 –Submission of 3 Instagram posts and reels based on the class discussions (15Marks)

CIA 3 – Submission of 3 Snaps based on a critical view of social media. (15 Marks)

CIA4- Submission of 3 Tweets, A Facebook post, and Instagram Live on social media & democracy (15 Marks)

All CIAs   – Department level only; All submissions.

PHY141 - FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of forensic science. Student will be introduced to the different analytical tool to analyse the results. They will also learn the physics behind investigative method used to gather evident. Finally, students will study emerging use of nanotechnology in forensic science.  

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the different technique to analyse the results.

CO2: Understand the basic science underlying the motion of bullets, collisions, explosion and blood dynamics.

CO3: Learn about the advantage of nanotechnology in forensic science.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Analytical instruments and techniques of forensic physics
 

Introduction, electromagnetic spectrum, sources of radiation, their utility and limitations, refractive index, interaction of light with matter, idea on instrumentation and results analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Forensic physics
 

Scope and significance of forensic physics, basic physics in solving crime, motion of bullet and other projectile, vehicular collisions, blood stain analysis using fluid mechanics, physics of explosions, development and identification of latent fingerprints using optics.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Nanotechnology in forensic science
 

Nanotechnology, utilization of nanotechnology in analysis of physical evidence, applications of nanotechnology in forensic evidence analysis, introduction to nanomaterials, types of nanomaterials. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. B.B. Nanda and R.K Tiwari, Forensic Science in India: A vision for the Twenty First Centrury, select publishers, New Delhi (2001)
  2. CM Hussain, D Rawtani, G Pandey, M Tharmavaram, Handbook of Analytical Techniques for Forensic Samples: Current and Emerging Developments, ISBN: 978-0-12-822300-0, Elsevier, 2020
  3. M.K Bhasin and S.Nath, Role of Forensic Science in the New Millenium, University of Delhi, Delhi(2002).
  4.  S.H James and J.J Nordby, Forensic Science :An introduction to scientific and Investigative Techniques, 2nd Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton(2005)
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. W.G. Eckert and R.K. Wright in Introduction to Forensic Sciiences, 2nd Edition, W.G. Eckert (ED), CRC Press, Boca Raton(1997).
  2. R. Saferstein, M.L. Hastrup and C.Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013)
  3. W.J. Tilstone, M.L. Hastrup and C.Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013)
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation will be based on presentations by each student and class work.

PHY142 - ANALOG AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course on Basic Electronics and Gadgets is aimed at giving a feel of electronics to non science/core students. It helps them in knowing the fundamentals of various electronic gadgets they use in daily life and related technologies. The course covers  categories of consumer electronic systems, electronic audio systems, basic colour television and video systems, communication systems covering telephone , mobile phone fundamentals and basics of computerhardware. This programme also tries to create awareness about e-waste and its effective management.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand basics of electronic devices and circuits

CO2: Describe the working principles of audio , video and communication systems

CO3: Discuss the fundamentals of computer hardware and e-waste management.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Electronics
 

Electronics and its applications. Electronic components: Resistors, Capacitors, inductors- types, uses. Conductors, insulators, semiconductors- definitions. Semiconductor materials- Silicon, Germanium, semiconductor devices: Diode- working and application of diode as rectifier, Transistor- working, transistor as an amplifier, electronic switch. Electronic DC power supply- basic block diagram. Basics of measuring instruments- DMM and CRO. Hands on with tinkercad tool.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Fundamentals Of Electronic Communication Systems
 

Basic principle of electronic communication-. Basic operation of transmitter and receivers. AM and FM radio receivers- qualitative description. Frequency allotment. Basics of Microphone, Loud speakers Principle of TV transmission and reception, Colour TV principle,. Digital TV principle- set top converter box, Optical fiber cables- principle of operation, advantages. Fundamentals of cellular mobile phone- Cells, coverage area, roaming, operation (qualitative description). Latest trends in mobile phones, smart phones, generations.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Basics of Computer Hardware and e waste management
 

Fundamentals of Digital computer, microprocessors, motherboards, power supply - SMPS,  mouse, keyboard, memory devices, Modems, monitors, printers, latest trends in computers, specifications. Internet fundamentals

Electronic waste- brief description, qualitative discussion of hazards of e-waste, the materials responsible, management of e-waste, Indian and global current scenario of e-waste and its management.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]. V K Mehta and Rohit Mehta (2011),Principles of Electronics, S Chand and Co, New Delhi.

[2]. B R Gupta (2008) Consumer Electronics, 4th Edition, Kataria &sons, New Delhi.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[3]. Bob Goodman (2002. ),How electronic things work, TMH

[4]. https://www.tinkercad.com 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation will be based on internal assessment components and a written exam at the end of the course.

Internal assesment : 50 marks

Written exam : 50 marks

POL142 - SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The main objectives of the course are to:

      Present an overview of the major concepts, debates, and historical facets of STI in IR.

      Create a foundation for the students to pursue further research in various aspects of STI in IR, and provide a systemic understanding of its impact on the economy, politics, culture, society, and foreign relations of India and other countries.

Providing an academic understanding in the current context of emerging technologies, its impact and influences in the society, as well as create avenues for interdisciplinary understanding and research.

Course Outcome

CO1: - Understand the nature, scope and significance of STI in International Relations (IR). - Understand the concepts, ideas, and debates in Science, Technology and Innovation vis-a-vis International Relations.

CO2: - Learn to use conceptual tools to understand new developments which of Science, Technology and Innovation in International Relations. - Analyze the major theories/approaches of Science, Technol-ogy and Innovation. - Develop a critical perspective on the major international regimes/ issues in STI in International Relations.

CO3: - Develop a thorough understanding on the scientific, technological and innovation-related process in major powers and national economies, especially India. - Explore the ways and Science, Technology and Innovation issues confronted by the world from a foreign policy perspective.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction
 

Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) in International Relations;

History and Evolution of STI in International Relations;

STI and Globalization;

STI and Diplomacy;

State, non-State actors and Stakeholders;

STI and International Institutions;

International Scientific Relations (ISR)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Basic Concepts and Theories:
 

Digital Westphalia,

Technonationalism,

Cyberspace and related facets of sovereignty, warfare, security, espionage, terrorism, and crime;

Data sovereignty, Technocolonialism; Digital imperialism,

Security v Privacy debate,

STI and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Global STI Landscape
 

History and Evolution of Global STI Landscape;

Fourth Industrial Revolution;

Knowledge Economy;

STI and Human Capital;

International Political Economy of STI

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
India:
 

India’s STI Policies: history, evolution, implementation and challenges;

Spin-offs: civilian, military;

Research and Development (R&D);

Political Economy of India’s STI Ecosystem;

Institutions and Organisations

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Case Studies:
 

STI landscape in countries: Emergent Technologies and Institutions, Internet of Things; Artificial Intelligence; Big Data; Blockchain

Text Books And Reference Books:

Aghion, P., David, P.A. and Foray, D. (2008). Science, Technology and Innovation for Economic Growth: Linking Policy Research and Practice in 'Stig Systems'. Research Policy 38(4): 681-693.

Del Canto Viterale, F. (2021). International Scientific Relations: Science, Technology and Innovation in the International System of the 21st Century. Anthem Press.

Ogburn, W.F. (1949). Technology and international relations. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Colglazier, E.W. and Montgomery, K. (2022). Opportunities and Challenges for Science Diplomacy. Science & Diplomacy.

Hieronymi, O. (1987). Technology and International Relations. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Leijten, J. Innovation policy and international relations: directions for EU diplomacy. Eur J Futures Res 7, 4 (2019).

M. Mayer, M. Carpes, & R. Knoblich. (eds.). (2014). The Global Politics of Science and Technology - Vol. 1. Springer Berlin, Heidelberg.

Ruffini, P.-B. (2017). Science and Diplomacy: A New Dimension of International Relations. Paris: Springer International Publishing AG.

 

Klein, U. (2020). Technoscience in History: Prussia, 1750-1850. MIT: The MIT Press.

McIlwain, C.H. (1933). A Fragment on Sovereignty. Political Science Quarterly, Vol. 48(1), pp. 94-106.

Negroponte, N. (1995). Being Digital. Hodder and Stoughton: Great Britain.

Reghunadhan, R. (2022). Cyber Technological Paradigms and Threat Landscape in India. First Edition., Palgr