CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF LIFE SCIENCES

School of Sciences

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Science (Chemistry, Botany, Zoology)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN121 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
BOT131 BIODIVERSITY (MICROBES, ALGAE, FUNGI, BRYOPHYTES AND PTERIDOPHYTES) Core Courses 4 4 100
BOT151 BIODIVERSITY (MICROBES, ALGAE, FUNGI, BRYOPHYTES AND PTERIDOPHYTES) LAB Core Courses 4 2 50
CHE131 CHEMISTRY I-BASIC CHEMISTRY Core Courses 4 4 100
CHE151 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I Core Courses 2 2 50
ENG121 ENGLISH - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
FRN121 FRENCH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
HIN121 HINDI Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
KAN121 KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 03 100
SAN121 SANSKRIT Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
TAM121 TAMIL Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
ZOO131 ANIMAL DIVERSITY Core Courses 4 4 100
ZOO151 ANIMAL DIVERSITY LAB Core Courses 4 2 50
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN221 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH - 3 3 100
BOT231 GYMNOSPERMS, PLANT ANATOMY AND EMBRYOLOGY - 4 4 100
BOT251 GYMNOSPERMS, PLANT ANATOMY AND EMBRYOLOGY LAB - 4 2 50
CHE231 CHEMISTRY II-ORGANIC AND PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY - 4 4 100
CHE251 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - II - 2 2 50
ENG221 ENGLISH - II - 3 2 100
EVS211LIF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES - 2 2 50
FRN221 FRENCH - 3 3 100
HIN221 HINDI - 3 3 100
KAN221 KANNADA - 3 03 100
SAN221 SANSKRIT - 3 3 100
TAM221 TAMIL - 3 3 100
ZOO231 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OF VERTEBRATES - 4 4 100
ZOO251 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OF VERTEBRATES LAB - 4 2 50
3 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
BOT331 PLANT TAXONOMY AND ECONOMIC BOTANY Core Courses 4 4 100
BOT351 PLANT TAXONOMY AND ECONOMIC BOTANY LAB Core Courses 4 2 50
CHE331 CHEMISTRY III-ORGANIC AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Core Courses 4 4 100
CHE351 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - III Core Courses 2 2 50
ENG321 ENGLISH-III Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
FRN321 FRENCH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
HIN321 HINDI Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
KAN321 KANNADA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 03 100
SAN321 SANSKRIT Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
TAM321 TAMIL Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
ZOO331 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY Core Courses 4 4 100
ZOO351 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY LAB Core Courses 4 2 50
4 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH - 3 3 100
BOT431 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY AND PLANT ECOLOGY - 4 4 100
BOT451 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY AND PLANT ECOLOGY LAB - 4 2 50
CHE431 CHEMISTRY IV-INORGANIC AND PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY - 4 4 100
CHE451 CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - IV - 2 2 50
ENG421 ENGLISH-IV - 3 2 100
FRN421 FRENCH - 3 3 100
HIN421 HINDI - 3 3 100
KAN421 KANNADA - 3 03 100
SAN421 SANSKRIT - 3 3 100
TAM421 TAMIL - 3 3 100
ZOO431 GENETICS AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY - 4 4 100
ZOO451 GENETICS AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY LAB - 4 2 50
5 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BOT541A CELL BIOLOGY AND PLANT BREEDING Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
BOT541B GENETICS, PLANT BREEDING AND EVOLUTION Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
BOT542A ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES IN PLANT SCIENCES Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
BOT542B PHYTOCHEMISTRY AND PHARMACOGNOSY Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
BOT542C ECONOMIC BOTANY AND PLANT RESOURCE UTILIZATION Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
BOT551A CELL BIOLOGY AND PLANT BREEDING LAB Discipline Specific Elective 4 2 50
BOT551B GENETICS, PLANT BREEDING AND EVOLUTION LAB Discipline Specific Elective 4 2 50
BOT552A ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES IN PLANT SCIENCES LAB Discipline Specific Elective 4 2 50
BOT552B PHYTOCHEMISTRY AND PHARMACOGNOSY LAB Discipline Specific Elective 4 2 50
BOT552C ECONOMIC BOTANY AND PLANT RESOURCE UTILIZATION LAB Discipline Specific Elective 4 2 50
ZOO531 REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY Core Courses 3 3 100
ZOO541A AQUATIC BIOLOGY AND FISHERIES Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
ZOO541B PARASITOLOGY AND MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
ZOO551 REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY LAB Core Courses 2 2 50
ZOO551A AQUATIC BIOLOGY AND FISHERIES LAB Discipline Specific Elective 4 4 50
ZOO551B PARASITOLOGY AND MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY LAB Discipline Specific Elective 4 2 50
6 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BOT641A PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOINFORMATICS - 3 3 100
BOT641B MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETIC ENGINEERING - 3 3 100
BOT642A HORTICULTURAL PRACTICES AND POST-HARVEST TECHNOLOGY - 3 3 100
BOT642B AQUATIC BOTANY - 3 3 100
BOT642C FORENSIC BOTANY AND WILDLIFE FORENSICS - 3 3 100
BOT651A PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOINFORMATICS LAB - 4 2 50
BOT651B MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETIC ENGINEERING LAB - 4 2 50
BOT652A HORTICULTURAL PRACTICES AND POST-HARVEST TECHNOLOGY LAB - 4 2 50
BOT652B AQUATIC BOTANY LAB - 4 2 50
BOT652C FORENSIC BOTANY AND WILDLIFE FORENSICS LAB - 4 2 50
BOT652D RESEARCH PROJECT IN BOTANY - 5 5 150
ZOO631 IMMUNOLOGY - 3 3 100
ZOO641A APPLIED ZOOLOGY - 3 3 100
ZOO641B MEDICAL DIAGNOSTICS AND FORENSIC BIOLOGY - 3 3 100
ZOO641C SERICULTURE - 3 3 100
ZOO651 IMMUNOLOGY LAB - 4 2 50
ZOO651A APPLIED ZOOLOGY LAB - 4 2 50
ZOO651B MEDICAL DIAGNOSTICS AND FORENSIC BIOLOGY LAB - 4 2 50
ZOO651C SERICULTURE LAB - 4 2 50
ZOO651D RESEARCH PROJECT IN ZOOLOGY - 5 5 150
  

    

Department Overview:

The Department of Chemistry of CHRIST (Deemed to be University) aims at developing young talent for the chemical industry and academia. The curriculum is developed in such a way that the students are able to venture into allied fields too. The aim of the department through the programmes it offers is to provide “a cut above the rest” man-power to the ever growing demands of the industry and to prepare students for higher studies and research. The interactive method of teaching at Christ University is to bring about attitudinal changes to future professionals of the industry.

Equal importance is given to practical and theoretical aspects apart from experiential and digital modes of learning. Industrial projects form an integral part of the curriculum. Along with the syllabus, the University emphasizes on Value Addition Programs like Current Affairs, Holistic Education, open elective programmes and Placement Training Programs, which include training students in group discussions, facing interviews and so on.

  

Mission Statement:

Vision

  

Introduction to Program:

The CBZ program at CHRIST (Deemed to be University) emphasizes on making the students understand the structural and functional basis of life. The program aims to launch students to higher learning in biological and chemical sciences and contribute to the welfare of the society. It is designed to help the students to understand the importance of chemicals, chemical industries and the role of these in improving the quality of human life. It also helps the students to recognize and appreciate the contribution of every organism in maintaining harmony in nature.

Program Objective:
PO 1: Apply the fundamental principles, concepts and methods in key areas of science and multidisciplinary fields

PO 2: Demonstrate problem solving, analytical and logical skills to provide solutions for the scientific problems

PO 3: Exhibit critical thinking with scientific temper

PO 4: Communicate fundamental and applied concepts from the discipline to a scientific audience.

PO 5: Display understanding of the importance and judicious use of technology for the sustainable growth of people in synergy with nature

PO 6: Demonstrate an Understanding of the professional, ethical and social responsibility

PO 7: Undertake research with scientific integrity and objectivity

PO 8: Engage in continuous reflective learning in the context of technological and scientific advancements

PSO 1: Provide a comprehensive understanding of fundamentals of chemical and biological sciences

PSO 2: Express proficiency in oral and written communications to appreciate innovation in research.

PSO 3: Explain the impact of chemicals in societal and environmental contexts.

PSO 4: Apply ethical principles and responsibilities while conducting animal studies.

PSO 5 : Explain biodiversity and to apply the knowledge to conserve endangered species.

PSO 6 : Exhibit industry-focused skills to lead a successful career.

Assesment Pattern

Evaluation will be done on the basis of CIA1 (10%), CIA2 [Mid Semester Examination] (25%), CIA3 (10%), Attendance (5%) and End Semester Examination (50%).

Examination And Assesments

Continuous internal assessment (CIA) forms 50% and the end semester examination forms theother 50% of the marks in both theory and practical. CIA marks are awarded based on their performance in assignments (written material to be submitted and valued), mid-semester test (MST), and class assignments (Quiz, presentations, problem solving etc.) The mid-semester examination and the end semester examination for each theory course will be for two and three hours duration respectively. The CIA for practical sessions is done on a day to day basis depending on their performance in the pre-lab, the conduct of the experiment, and presentation of lab reports. Only those students who qualify with minimum required attendance and CIA will be allowed to appear for the end semester examination.

 

AEN121 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Additional English course is offered as a second language course and seeks to introduce the students to the nuances of English literature in its varied forms and genres. The students who choose Additional English are generally proficient in the English language. Hence, instead of focusing on introducing them to language, challenging texts in terms of ideas, form, and technique are chosen. Additional English as a course is designed for students in place of a regional language. Non-Resident Indians (NRIs), foreign nationals and students who have not taken Hindi, Kannada, Tamil or French at the Plus 2 or Class XII levels are eligible to choose Additional English. The course is taught for students from different streams, namely, BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA in the first year and for BA, BSc and BCom (Regular) in the second year.

The first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian and Indian sub-continental voices in English in English translation for the Additional English students of the first year. This effort aims to familiarize the students with regional literatures in translation, Indian Writing in English (IWE) and literatures from Pakistan, Nepal and Srilanka, thereby, enabling the students to learn more about Indian culture and ethos through writings from different regions of the country. We have tried to represent in some way or the other the corners of India and the Indian sub-continent in this microcosmic world of short stories, poems and essays

 

There is a prescribed text bookfor the first year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

The first semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Nepal. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. An important addition to this syllabus is the preponderance of North-Eastern writing which was hitherto not well represented. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

  

 

Course Outcome

CO1 CO 2: iv) Understand the cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities of India v) it will be able to be analytical and critical of the pluralistic society they live in through the activities and assignments conducted vi) be aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Keki N Daruwala     “Migrations”

 

2.      Kamala Das            “Forest Fire”

 

3.      Agha Shahid Ali      “Snow on the Desert”

 

4.      Eunice D Souza       “Marriages are Made”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Rabindranath Tagore    “Babus of Nayanjore”

 

2.      Ruskin Bond  “He said it with Arsenic”

 

3.      Bhisham Sahni       “The Boss Came to Dinner”

 

4.      N. Kunjamohan Singh    “The Taste of Hilsa”

 

5.      Mohan Thakuri                “Post Script”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Mahatma Gandhi       “What is True Civilization?” (Excerpts from Hind Swaraj)

 

2.      Ela Bhatt                    “Organising for Change”

 

3.      Sitakant Mahapatra     “Beyond the Ego: New Values for a Global Neighborhood

 

4.      B R Ambedkar             “Waiting for A Visa”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Contemporary knowledge of the soci-political situation in the sub-continent

The text book copy "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

On-line resources to appreciate the text through the Comprehension Questions

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  Classroom assignment for 20 marks keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

Total                   50

BOT131 - BIODIVERSITY (MICROBES, ALGAE, FUNGI, BRYOPHYTES AND PTERIDOPHYTES) (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 1)      To appreciate the fantastic commonness existing among organisms.

2)      The student will be able to appreciate the uniqueness of different groups and the way they are classified.

3)      To get a comparative knowledge of plants and their life cycle.

4)      To understand the interrelationships between plants.

5)      To enable the student to identify the different organisms by morphological and anatomical studies.

6)      To get a comparative account of plants in its life cycle, morphology, anatomy and reproduction with an evolutionary link

Course Outcome

CO1: A clear understanding on the structure, composition and importance of microbes (Bacteria and Viruses), algae and bryophytes will be imparted.

CO2: Ability to understand the fungal characteristics and life forms of fungi and the economic and ecological importance of fungi.

CO3: To enable the student to understand the unifying features of archegoniate and know the different forms of plants.

CO4: To get a comparative account of plants in its life cycle, morphology, anatomy and reproduction with an evolutionary link.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Microbes
 

Viruses – Discovery, general structure, replication (general account), DNA virus (T-phage); Lytic and lysogenic cycle, RNA virus (TMV); Economic importance; Bacteria – Discovery, General characteristics and cell structure; Reproduction – vegetative, asexual and recombination (conjugation, transformation and transduction); Economic importance.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Algae
 

General characteristics; Ecology and distribution; Range of thallus organization and reproduction; Classification of algae (Fritsch); Morphology and life-cycles of the following:Scytonema, Chlamydomonas, Volvox, Sargassum, Polysiphonia. Economic importance of algae

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Fungi
 

Introduction- General characteristics, ecology and significance, range of thallus organization, cell wall composition, nutrition, reproduction and classification by Ainsworth; True Fungi- General characteristics, ecology and significance, life cycle of Rhizopus (Zygomycotina) Penicillium, Peziza (Ascomycotina), Puccinia, Agaricus (Basidiomycotina). Symbiotic Associations-Lichens: General account, reproduction and significance;

Mycorrhiza: ectomycorrhiza and endomycorrhiza and their significance

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction to Archegoniate
 

Unifying features of archegoniates, Transition to land habit, Alternation of generations.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Bryophytes
 

General characteristics, adaptations to land habit, Classification, Range of thallus organization. Classification (up to family), morphology, anatomy and reproduction of Marchantia, Anthoceros and Funaria. (Developmental details not to be included). Ecology and economic importance of bryophytes with special mention of Sphagnum.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Pteridophytes
 

General characteristics, classification, Early land plants (Cooksonia and Rhynia). Classification (up to

 

family), morphology, anatomy and reproduction of Psilotum, Lycopodium, Selaginella, Equisetum and Marsilea. (Developmental details not to be included). Heterospory and seed habit, stelar evolution. Ecological and economical importance of Pteridophytes.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Haitet.al. A Text book of Botany, New Delhi: NCBA, 2012.

2. Pandey, B. P. College Botany, Vol. I: Algae, Fungi, Lichens, Bacteria, Viruses, Plant Pathology, Industrial Microbiology and Bryophyta. New Delhi: S. Chand & Company Ltd, 2001.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.         Kumar, H.D. (1999). Introductory Phycology. Affiliated East-West. Press Pvt. Ltd. Delhi. 2nd edition.

2.         Tortora, G.J., Funke, B.R., Case, C.L. (2010). Microbiology: An Introduction, Pearson Benjamin Cummings, U.S.A. 10th edition.

3.         Sethi, I.K. and Walia, S.K. (2011). Text book of Fungi & Their Allies, MacMillan Publishers Pvt. Ltd., Delhi.

4.         Alexopoulos, C.J., Mims, C.W., Blackwell, M. (1996). Introductory Mycology, John Wiley and Sons (Asia), Singapore. 4th edition.

5.         Raven, P.H., Johnson, G.B., Losos, J.B., Singer, S.R., (2005). Biology. Tata McGraw Hill, Delhi, India.

6.         Vashishta, P.C., Sinha, A.K., Kumar, A., (2010). Pteridophyta, S. Chand. Delhi, India.

7.         Bhatnagar, S.P. and Moitra, A. (1996). Gymnosperms. New Age International (P) Ltd Publishers, New Delhi, India.

8.         Parihar, N.S. (1991). An introduction to Embryophyta. Vol. I. Bryophyta. Central Book Depot, Allahabad.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

 CIAI – Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 CIAII – Midsemester exam – 25%

 CIAIII - Assignments/test/presentation/etc – 10%

 Attendance – 5%

 End Semester Theory Exam – 50%

 Section A:  Answer any eight of the following          8 X 2 = 16

 Section B: Answer any six of the following               6 X 6 = 36

 Section C: Answer any four of the following             4 X 12 = 48

BOT151 - BIODIVERSITY (MICROBES, ALGAE, FUNGI, BRYOPHYTES AND PTERIDOPHYTES) LAB (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

1)      To appreciate the fantastic commonness existing among organisms.

2)      The student will be able to appreciate the uniqueness of different groups and the way they are classified.

3)      To get a comparative knowledge of plants and their life cycle.

4)      To understand the interrelationships between plants.

5)      To enable the student to identify the different organisms by morphological and anatomical studies.

6)      To get a comparative account of plants in its life cycle, morphology, anatomy and reproduction with an evolutionary link

Course Outcome

CO1: Study of microbes will make students understand the cell structure, reproduction (replication), and their importance.

CO2: Study of Algal and fungal forms gives better insights on the identification of the organisms, their structural characteristics and reproduction and how each organism is unique in their own way

CO3: Study of Bryophyes and Pteridophytes gives better insights on the identification of the lower plants, their structural characteristics and reproduction and how each of these plants are unique and their importance in the environment.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
Biodiversity (Microbes, Algae, Fungi, Bryophytes and Pteridophytes) Lab
 

1.         EMs/Models of viruses – T-Phage and TMV, Line drawing/Photograph of Lytic and Lysogenic Cycle.

2.         Types of Bacteria from temporary/permanent slides/photographs; EM bacterium; Binary Fission; Conjugation; Structure of root nodule.

3.         Gram staining and streaking of bacterial culture

4.         Study of vegetative and reproductive structures of Scytonema, Chlamydomonas (electron micrographs), Volvox, Sargassum and Polysiphonia through temporary preparations and permanent slides.

5.         Rhizopus and Penicillium: Asexual stage from temporary mounts and sexual structures through permanent slides.

6.         Peziza: Specimens/photographs and tease mounts.

7.         Puccinia: Herbarium specimens of Black Stem Rust of Wheat and infected Barberry leaves; section/tease mounts of spores on Wheat and permanent slides of both the hosts.

8.         Agaricus: Specimens of button stage and full grown mushroom; Sectioning of gills of Agaricus.

9.         Lichens: Study of growth forms of lichens (crustose, foliose- Parmelia and fruticose - Usnea)

10.     Mycorrhiza: ecto mycorrhiza and endo mycorrhiza (Photographs)

11.     Marchantia- morphology of thallus, w.m. rhizoids and scales, V.S. thallus through gemma cup, W.M. gemmae (all temporary slides), V.S. antheridiophore, archegoniophore, L.S. sporophyte (all permanent slides).

12.     Funaria- morphology, W.M. leaf, rhizoids, operculum, peristome, annulus, spores (temporary slides); permanent slides showing antheridial and archegonial heads, L.S. capsule and protonema.

13.     Psilotum – Morphology, T. S of stem, T. S of synangium

14.     Selaginella- morphology, W.M. leaf with ligule, T.S. stem, W.M. strobilus, W.M. microsporophyll and megasporophyll (temporary slides), L.S. strobilus (permanent slide).

15.     Lycopodium- morphology, T.S. internode, L.S. strobilus, T.S. strobilus, W.M. sporangiophore, W.M. spores (wet and dry) (temporary slides)

16.     Equisetum- morphology, T.S. internode, L.S. strobilus, T.S. strobilus, W.M. sporangiophore, W.M. spores (wet and dry)(temporary slides); T.S. rhizome (permanent slide).

17.     Marsilea- morphology, T.S. Rhizome and Petiole, V.S. sporophyll, W.M. sporangium, W.M. spores (temporary slides), T.S. rhizome, w.m. prothallus with sex organs and young sporophyte (permanent slide).

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Haitet.al. A Text book of Botany, New Delhi: NCBA, 2012.

2. Pandey, B. P. College Botany, Vol. I: Algae, Fungi, Lichens, Bacteria, Viruses, Plant Pathology, Industrial Microbiology and Bryophyta. New Delhi: S. Chand & Company Ltd, 2001.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.         Kumar, H.D. (1999). Introductory Phycology. Affiliated East-West. Press Pvt. Ltd. Delhi. 2nd edition.

2.         Tortora, G.J., Funke, B.R., Case, C.L. (2010). Microbiology: An Introduction, Pearson Benjamin Cummings, U.S.A. 10th edition.

3.         Sethi, I.K. and Walia, S.K. (2011). Text book of Fungi & Their Allies, MacMillan Publishers Pvt. Ltd., Delhi.

4.         Alexopoulos, C.J., Mims, C.W., Blackwell, M. (1996). Introductory Mycology, John Wiley and Sons (Asia), Singapore. 4th edition.

5.         Raven, P.H., Johnson, G.B., Losos, J.B., Singer, S.R., (2005). Biology. Tata McGraw Hill, Delhi, India.

6.         Vashishta, P.C., Sinha, A.K., Kumar, A., (2010). Pteridophyta, S. Chand. Delhi, India.

7.         Bhatnagar, S.P. and Moitra, A. (1996). Gymnosperms. New Age International (P) Ltd Publishers, New Delhi, India.

8.         Parihar, N.S. (1991). An introduction to Embryophyta. Vol. I. Bryophyta. Central Book Depot, Allahabad.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA)

CIA-I – Performance – 20 Marks

CIA-II- Mid Semester Practical Examination – 20 Marks

CIA-III – Record – 10 Marks

 ESE - 50 Marks

CHE131 - CHEMISTRY I-BASIC CHEMISTRY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In this introductory paper the students acquire knowledge of the basic concepts of Physical, Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. 

Course Outcome

CO 1: Understand and recall the fundamentals of structure and properties of atoms, nature and types of chemical bonding, periodicity of elements in the periodic table, the concepts of nucleophiles, electrophiles, electronegativity, and resonance.

CO 2: Interpret the chemical bonding in simple inorganic and organic molecules, predicting structures and important bonding parameters

CO 3: Relate the basic principle of quantum mechanics with the contemporary understanding of atomic structure and electronic configurations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Atomic Structure
 

Prelearning topics: Bohr’s theory and its limitations, Black body radiation, dual behaviour of matter and radiation, de Broglie’s relation, Heisenberg Uncertainty principle. Hydrogen atom spectra. Need of a new approach to Atomic structure.

 

 

Quantum mechanics: Postulates of quantum mechanics, Introduction, time independent Schrodinger equation and meaning of various terms in it. Significance of ψ and ψ2, Schrödinger equation for hydrogen atom. Radial and angular parts of the hydrogenic wavefunctions (atomic orbitals) and their variations for 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3and 3orbitals (Only graphical representation). Radial and angular nodes and their significance. Radial distribution functions and the concept of the most probable distance with special reference to 1and 2atomic orbitals. Significance of quantum numbers, orbital angular momentum and quantum numbers ml and ms. Shapes of sand atomic orbitals, nodal planes. Discovery of spin, spin quantum number (s) and magnetic spin quantum number (ms).Rules for filling electrons in various orbitals, Electronic configurations of the atoms. Effective nuclear charge. Slater's Rules. *Stability of half-filled and completely filled orbitals,*concept of exchange energy. Relative energies of atomic orbitals, Anomalous electronic configurations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure
 

      Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure                                                

 

Ionic Bonding: General characteristics of ionic bonding. #Energy considerations in ionic bonding, lattice energy and solvation energy and their importance in the context of stability and solubility of ionic compounds. Statement of Born-Landé equation for calculation of lattice energy, Born-Haber cycle and its applications, polarizing power and polarizability. Fajan’srules, ionic character in covalent compounds, bond moment, dipole moment and percentage ionic character.

Covalent bonding: VB Approach: Shapes of some inorganic molecules and ions on the basis of VSEPR and hybridization with suitable examples of linear, trigonal planar, square planar, tetrahedral, trigonal bipyramidal and octahedral arrangements. Concept of resonance and resonating structures in various inorganic compounds.

MO Approach: Rules for the LCAO method, bonding and antibonding MOs and their characteristics for s-ss-p and p-p combinations of atomic orbitals, nonbonding combination of orbitals, MO treatment of homonuclear diatomic molecules (O2, N2) of 1st and 2nd periods (including idea of s-p mixing) and heteronuclear diatomic molecules such as CO, NO and NO+. Comparison of VB and MO approaches.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Environmental Chemistry
 

                                                               

Prelearning topics:Ecosystems. Energy flow and eco system stability, Bioelements, cycles of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur.

 

Air Pollution: 

Air pollutants: Photochemical smog: its constituents and photochemistry. Automobile emission.*Greenhouse effect,*Global warming, Ozone depletion by oxides of nitrogen, chlorofluorocarbons and halogens, Control of particulates. 

Water Pollution:

$Water purification and treatment (reverse osmosis, electro dialysis, ion exchange). 

#Effluent treatment plants (primary, secondary and tertiary treatment). 

 

 

 

Section B: Organic chemistry                                                                                   25 Hrs

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
 

 

Prelearning topics: Hybridizations, bond lengths, bond angles, bond energy. Localized and delocalized chemical bond, polarity of bonds, types of chemical reactions

 

IUPAC naming of bifunctional organic compounds

Electronic Displacements: Inductive Effect, Electromeric Effect, Resonance, Hyperconjugation and steric effect. Effect of the above on strength of organic acids and bases: Comparative study with emphasis on factors affecting pK values. Cleavage of Bonds: Homolysis and Heterolysis. Nucleophiles and electrophiles. Reactive Intermediates: Carbocations, Carbanions, free radicals and carbenes - Structure, shape and reactivity of organic intermediates. Types of organic reactions: Addition, elimination, substitution, rearrangement and redox reactions (definition and one example each). 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Aliphatic Hydrocarbons
 

                                                                                       

Prelearning topics: Classification, Nomenclature and sources of organic compounds. 

 

Alkanes: (Upto 5 Carbons)

Preparation: Catalytic hydrogenation, Wurtz reaction, Kolbe’s synthesis, from Grignard reagent. Reactions: Free radical Substitution: Halogenation. Selectivity and reactivity. (Mechanisms)

Cycloalkanes-Relative stabilities-Baeyer’s strain theory-Sache-Mohr theory of strainless rings. 

Alkenes: (Upto 5 Carbons) 

Preparation: Elimination reactions: Dehydration of alkenes and dehydrohalogenation of alkyl halides (Saytzeff’s rule); cis alkenes (Partial catalytic hydrogenation) and trans alkenes (Birch reduction). Mention stereoselective and regioselective reactions. Reactions: cis addition (alk. KMnO4) and trans-addition (bromine), Addition of HX (Markownikoff’s and anti-Markownikoff’s addition with mechanisms), Hydration, Ozonolysis, oxymecuration-demercuration, Hydroboration-oxidation. 

Dienes: Nomenclature and classification of dienes Methods of formation of 1, 3 - butadiene. Chemical reactions of butadiene - 1, 2 and 1, 4 additions Diels-Alder reaction.

Alkynes: (Upto 5 Carbons)                                                                                           

Prelearning topics: geminal and vicinal dihalides, basic concepts of addition and oxidation reactions.  Preparation: Acetylene from CaC2 and conversion into higher alkynes; by dehalogenation of tetra halides and dehydrohalogenation of vicinal-dihalides.

Reactions: formation of metal acetylides, addition of bromine and alkaline KMnO4, ozonolysis and oxidation with hot alkaline KMnO4.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Alkyl Halides
 

                                                                                                

Preparation - From alkenes and alcohols. Reactions - Types of aliphatic nucleophilic substitution reactions - SN1and SN2mechanisms with stereochemical aspects and effects of substrate structure, solvent, nucleophile and leaving group.  

 

* Topics identified for student seminar.

# Topics to enhance employability.

$ Service learning

** Self learning

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]   B.R. Puri, L.R. Sharma and K.C. Kalia, Principles of Inorganic Chemistry, 31st Edition, Milestone Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi, 2013. 

 

[2]   Bahl, A. &Bahl, B.S. Advanced Organic Chemistry, S. Chand, 2010.

 

[3]   B. Mehta, M. Mehta, Organic Chemistry, PHI Learning Private Limited, 2017.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]   J.A. Lee, Scientific Endeavour, Addison Wesley Longman 

[2]   D.A. Skoog, D.M. West, F.J. Holler and S.R. Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 8th Edition, Brooks/Cole, Thomson Learning, Inc., USA, 2004. 

[3]   J. D. Lee, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 5th ed., Blackwell Science, London, 2010. 

[4]   Satya Prakash, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, Volume 1, 5th Edition, S. Chand and Sons, New Delhi, 2012. 

[5]   R.K. Prasad, Quantum Chemistry, New Age International, 2001 

[6]   McQuarrie, J. D. Simon, Physical Chemistry – A molecular Approach, Viva Books. 

[7]   I. N. Levine, Physical Chemistry, Tata McGraw Hill, 

[8]   ManasChanda, Atomic structure and Chemical bonding in Molecular Spectroscopy” Tata McGraw Hill. 

[9]   J. D. Lee, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 5th edn., Blackwell Science, London. 

[10]    B. R. Puri, L. R. Sharma, Kalia, Principles of Inorganic Chemistry, Milestone Publishers, New Delhi. 

[11]    F. A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson and P. L. Gaus, Basic Inorganic Chemistry, 3rd ed., John Wiley. 

[12]    B. Douglas, D. Mc Daniel, J. Alexander, Concepts and models in Inorganic Chemistry. 

[13]    R. Gopalan, Inorganic Chemistry for Undergraduates, Universities Press, Hyderabad, 2009.

[14]    Jain and Sharma Modern Organic Chemistry 3rd edition, Vishal Publishing Company, 2009. 

[15]    R. T Morrison, and R. N. Boyd. Organic Chemistry.  7thed. New Delhi: Prentice-Hall of India (P) Ltd., 2010.

[16]    S.M. Mukherji, S. P. Singh, and R. P. Kapoor. Organic Chemistry. 3rd, 12th Reprint, New Delhi: New Age International (P) Ltd. Publishers, 2009.

 

[17]    I. L Finar, Organic Chemistry Vol. II, 5thed. New Delhi: ELBS and Longman Ltd., reprint 2008.

Evaluation Pattern

 

No.

Component

Schedule

Duration

Marks

CIA1

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

Before MST

--

10

 

CIA2

Mid-Sem Test

[MST]

2 Hrs (50 marks)

25

CIA3

Assignment/quiz/group task/ presentations

After MST

--

10

CIA3

Attendance (75-79 = 1, 80-84 = 2, 85-89 = 3, 

90-94 = 4, 95-100 = 5)

--

5

ESE

Centralized

3 Hrs (100 marks)

50

Total

100

CHE151 - CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is intended to impart basic analytical skills with an emphasis on volumetric analysis. It also emphasises the importance of organized and systematic approach in carrying out experiments.

Course Outcome

CO 1: Ability to apply volumetric techniques for the quantitative analysis of samples

CO 2: Ability to outline and interpret the chemical principles of acidimetry, alkalimetry, redox titrations and complexometric titrations

CO 3: Ability to systematically record and process data from volumetric analysis

CO 4: Ability to select suitable volumetric analysis for the quantification of various samples.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Inorganic Chemistry - Volumetric Analysis
 

1. Calibration of glassware.

2. Estimation of oxalic acid by titrating it with KMnO4.

3. Estimation of water of crystallization in Mohr’s salt by titrating with KMnO4.

4. Estimation of Fe (II) ions by titrating it with K2Cr2O7 using internal indicator.

5. Estimation of Fe (II) ions by titrating it with K2Cr2O7 using external indicator.

6. Estimation of Cu (II) ions iodometrically using Na2S2O3.

7.Estimation of total alkalinity of water samples (CO32-, HCO3-) using double titration method. 

8. Measurement of chlorides in water samples by titrimetry (AgNO3 and potassium chromate)

9. Estimation of Mg2+ by complexometric titrations using EDTA.

10. Estimation of Zn2+ by complexometric titrations using EDTA.

11. Estimation of total hardness of a given sample of water by complexometric titration.

12.Measurement of sulphate in water samples by titrimetric method.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]  Svehla, G. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Pearson Education, 2012.

 

[2]  Mendham, J. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Pearson, 2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]  Svehla, G. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Pearson Education, 2012.

 

[2]  Mendham, J. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Pearson, 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

No.

Component

Duration

Points

Marks

CIA1

Mid-Sem Test

3 Hrs

50

20

 

CIA2

Class work, PreLab Quiz, assignments

---

40

20

CIA3

Record book

-----

20

10

ESE

Centralized (two Examiners)              3 Hrs

 50

50

Total

25+25=50

ENG121 - ENGLISH - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities, and politics

CO2: Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO3: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO4: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 1 1. The Happy Prince By Oscar Wilde 2. Shakespeare Sonnet 18
 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
unit 2
 

1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer

2. What Solo Travel Has Taught Me About the World – and Myself -ShivyaNath- Blogpost

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Note taking

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
unit 3
 

1. Thinking Like a Mountain

By Aldo Leopold

2. Short Text: On Cutting a Tree

By Gieve Patel

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Paragraph writing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
unit 4
 

1. Violence in the name of God is Violence against God

By Rev Dr Tveit

 

2. Poem: Holy Willie's Prayer

By Robert Burns

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
unit 5
 

1. The Story of B24

By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 2. Short Text: Aarushi Murder case 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
unit 6
 

1.Long text:My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

2. short text: Why You Should Never Aim for Six Packs

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
unit 7
 

1.Long Text: Sir Ranjth Singh- Essay by SouravGanguly

2. Short text: Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
visual text
 

Visual Text: Before the Flood

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addfitional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks online and 50 marks written exam

FRN121 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as a second language in the UG program. The method Génération A1 consists of a student's book and an activity book, both included in the digital manual. It consists of 6 units preceded by an initial section of 'Welcome'. The structure of each unit marks a real learning journey.

 

Course Objectives

·       To develop linguistic competencies and sharpen oral and written communicative skills

·       To familiarize learners to certain aspects of francophone civilization.

·       To enable learners to engage in simple everyday situations

Course Outcome

CO1: To train the students in correct pronunciation of French.

CO2: To enable students to write correct sentences with appropriate grammar structure and vocabulary.

CO3: To familiarise students with the culture and expressions in French.

CO4: To enhance oral and written comprehension in French.

CO5: To make them proficient in reading, writing, listening and speaking skills in French.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
I discover
 

Lesson 1: Good Morning, how are you?

 Lexicon – Countries and nationalities, domestic animals, days of the week

 Grammar -Subject pronouns, verbs ‘to be’ and ‘to have’, definite and indefinite articles

 Speech acts – Greeting, asking how one is

 

Lesson 2: Hello, my name is Agnes.

Lexicon – Months of the year, numbers 0-69, the family

Grammar – Formation of the feminine / plural, possessive adjectives

Speech acts -Introducing oneself and others, asking and saying dates

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Les fables de la Fontaine
 

La cigale et la fourmis (The grasshopper and the ant)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Culture: Physical and Political France
 

 

Lesson 1: Who is it?

Lexicon - Professions

Grammar – Formation of the feminine, interrogative /negative phrases, it is

Speech acts – Asking and answering politely

   
 

Lesson 2: In my bag, I have......

Lexicon – Some objects, identity card

Grammar – First group verbs, verbs ‘to go’ and ‘to come’

Speech acts – Asking personal information

 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Les fables de la Fontaine
 

Le renard et le corbeau (The fox and the crow)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Video Workshop: How cute he is!
 

 

Lesson 1: How is he?

Lexicon – The physical aspect, character

Grammar – The formation of the feminine, contracted articles, tonique pronouns, there

                    is/are, interrogative adverbs

Speech acts – Describing the physical aspects and the character

   
 

Lesson 2: Hello?

Lexicon – Prepositions of place, numbers from 70

Grammar – Numbers, prepositions of place, second group verbs, verb ‘to do’

Speech acts – Speaking on the phone                                                                              

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Visual text
 

A French movie

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Cocton, Marie-Noelle. Génération A1. Paris : Didier, 2016 

      2.  De Lafontaine, Jean. Les Fables de la Fontaine.

           Paris, 1668

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN121 - HINDI (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The detailed text book “Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha” edited by Dr.N Mohanan is an anthology of contemporary Hindi Poems written by representative poets of Hindi Literature. From the medieval poetry ' Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur ke pad 'is also included.  The poets reflect on the social, cultural and political issues which are prevalent in our society since the medieval period. Hindusthani sangeeth-parampara eva kalakar is one of the module. Since translation is a significant area in language and literature, emphasis is being given on it in the syllabus.Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthik kalayein  Yakshagana,Kathakali,Ram Leela,Krishna Leela etc. included in the syllabus to enrich cultural values among students.

Course Objectves: 

Students will be exposed to read, analyse and appreciate poems by learning poetry. Through translation, students will be able to develop translation skills while translating from other language articles. Students will be able to analyses critically the different cultural art forms by learning about the Famous cultural art forms of India.

Course Outcome

CO1 : Improve the analytical skills through critical analysis of the poems.

CO2: Analyze the different aspects of Hindustani musical traditions and musicians.

CO3: Enhance the translation skills.

CO4: Improve the basic research skills while doing the CIAs.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection of contemporary Hindi Poems),Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur Ke Pad.
 

’  Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection ofcontemporary Poems)  Edited By: Mahendra Kulashreshta Rajpal and Son’s, New Delhi

 

Level of knowledge: Analytical

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Translation-Theory and Practice
 

                                                                                            

                                      

                                          

                                           

         

Translation-Practice                English to Hindi and vice- versa.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthic kalayen-
 

Ramleela,Krishnaleela,Yakshagaana,kathakali.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Hindusthani Sangeeth-parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav,Vikas aur paramparaein

Pramukh Sangeethkar-1.Bhimsen Joshi 2.Gulam Ali 3.Pandit Ravishankar 4. Bismillah Khan.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. 'Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha’ (Collection of Poems) Edited By: Dr.N Mohanan,  Rajpal and Son’s,New Delhi.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. A Hand Book of Translation Studies         By: Das Bijay Kumar.               

2. Saral Subodh Hindi Vyakaran,                 By: Motilal Chaturvedi. Vinod pustak mandir, Agra-2

3. Anuvad Evam Sanchar –                         Dr Pooranchand Tantan, Rajpal and Son’s, Kashmiri

4. Anuvad Vignan                                       By: Bholanath Tiwar

5. Anuvad Kala                                           By: N.E Vishwanath Iyer.

                                                                 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-Editing of Hindi article in Hindi Wikipedia )-20 marks

CIA-2(Mid semester examination)-50 marks

CIA-3(Digital learning-article creation in Hindi Wikipedia)-20 marks

End sem examination-50 marks

KAN121 - KANNADA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is taught in the  I Semester for BA/B.Sc. students. The selected Poems (Vachanas & Keerthanas ) from Medieval Literature  & Modern Kannada ( Navodaya)  literature are prescribed.  Texts will help students to understand the writings of  Poets as well as  story writers. Short stories of Sara Abubakar, Ravindranath Tagore, and K.P. Poornachandra Tejaswi  & Folk tales are prescribed. The syllabus will extend the concerns of family, family relationship, social justice and marginalization. Students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Kannada as well as to demonstrate cultural awareness.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: to understand the values in Medieval Kannada Literature.

CO2: to appreciate the aesthetic aspects of music in Keerthana

CO3 : to understand the art of developing short stories

CO4: to imbibe the cultural aspects in Modern Kannada Stories

CO5 : improves reading, writing and speaking skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Kannada Sahitya Samakshama
 

1.      Vachanagalu

(a) Devaradasimayya

(b) Basavanna

(c) Allamaprabhu

(d) Akkamahadvi

(e) Gajesha Masaniyya

(f) Aydakki Lakkamma

2.      Keerthanegalu

(a)    Purandaradasa

(b)   Kanakadasa

3.      B.M.Srikantiah- Kariheggadeya Magalu 

4.      Mumbai Jataka- G.S. Shivarudrappa

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Selected Short Stories
 

1. Chappaligalu- Sa Ra Abubakar

2. Mandannana Marriage- Poornachandra Tejaswi

3. Giliya Kathe- Ravindranatha Tagore

4. Dheerakumara- Janapada Kathe

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Language Skills
 

1.      Translation ( Passages from English to Kannada & Kannada to English) 

2.      Usage of alphabets in different contexts:  

3.      l & L

4.      a  & H

5.      n & N

6.      Hrasva and Deergha  alphabets

7.    Ottaksharas

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

1.      Basavannanavara vachanagalu: L. Basavarjaju
2.      Akkana vachanagalu: L. Basavarajau
3.      Allamana Vachanagalu; L . Basavaraju
4.      Purandara Sahitya Darshana: (Volume 1-2-3-4) S.K. Ramachandra Rao
5.      Kanaka Sahitya Darshana-. D. Javaregowda
6.      Kannada Sanna Kathegala Olavu- Giraddi Govindaraja

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      A comparative study of Sarana and Dasa literature, P. S Srinivasa,University of Madras (1981)

2.      Sharanara Anubhava Sahitya- H. Thipperudraswamy

3.      Vachana Kammata: (Ed)  K. Marulasiddappa and K. R. Nagaraj

4.      Basavanna: M. Chidananda Murthy

5.      Kanaka Kirana: Ka.Ta. Chikkanna

6.      Kannada Sanna Kathegalu: G.H. Nayak

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 Wikipedia - Knowledge of regional language - Typing skills (20 Marks) 

CIA-2 Mid Semester Exams (50 Marks)

CIA-3 Texting Self introduction in Sand box  (20 Marks) 

End Semester Exams ( 50 Marks) 

SAN121 - SANSKRIT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Janakiharana of Kumaradasa is the first Sanskrit mahakavya, so far as the extant literature goes, to deal solely with the whole of the Ramayana story. Its further interest is that it was produced in Ceylon, showing thereby the wider world over which Sanskrit had its sway. After manuscripts of the full text of the poem in twenty cantos had to come to light in South India, what is now presented was the first systematc and critical study to be undertaken to the author and the text and its position vis-a-vis other Mahakavyas. In addition to the above study and the critical edition of the cantos which were at that time unpublished the examination of the large number of extra-verses found in some MSS of the text and showing them as interpolations.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the theme of epics

CO2: To develop new perspectives..

CO3: To appreciate the styles and thoughts of individual poets.

CO4: To focus on the poetical, artistic, cultural and historical aspects of the poetic works.

CO5: To enhance translation and interpretation skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:35
Janaki Haranam
 

Selected shlokas 1-60 shlokas

Janakiharana of Kumaradasa is the first Sanskrit mahakavya, so far as the extant literature goes, to deal solely with the whole of the Ramayana story. Its further interest is that it was produced in Ceylon, showing thereby the wider world over which Sanskrit had its sway. After manuscripts of the full text of the poem in twenty cantos had to come to light in South India, what is now presented was the first systematc and critical study to be undertaken to the author and the text and its position vis-a-vis other Mahakavyas. In addition to the above study and the critical edition of the cantos which were at that time unpublished the examination of the large number of extra-verses found in some MSS of the text and showing them as interpolations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Grammar
 

Sandhi prakaranam Swarsandhi and vyajanasandhi

lakara´s 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Language skills
 

Translate the given passage from english to sanskrit 

write an aritcle in sanskrit on the topic given 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Books for References: -

1)      Janakiharanam of Kumaradasa edited by  C K Swaminathan

2)      Janakiharanam edited by G.R. Nandargikar

3)      Sanskrit Grammar Translation from English to Sanskrit by M.R. Kale

Sanskrit Grammar Kannada version by Satish Hegde.                                   

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ramayana of Valmiki

Champu Ramayana of Bhoja 

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

CIA 1 Wikipedia assignments

 

CIA 2 Mid semester examinations

 

CIA 3 Wikipedia assignments

 

TAM121 - TAMIL (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Poems of Bharatiyar and Bharatidasan and poems by women poets with feminine sensibilities  will initiate the students into the modern period with all its complexities. The short stories by Ambai offers a matured vision of life through a varied characters and situatins. A new concept, Cultural Studies, will take the students beyond prescribed syllabus to include music, theatre, painting and films out of whcih the art form of music is taken up for the first semester.

Course Outcome

CO1: To make the students experience the impact made by Bharathiyar and Bharathidasan during the 20th century and to bring them to the realities of 21st century.

CO2: They will also learn, on their own, about the nuances of music and a unique aesthetic experience it offers

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Modern Poetry- Bharathiyar
 

1. Kannan yen sevagan

2. Kannan yen kozhandhai

3. Kannan yen vilayatu pillai

4. Kannan yen kadhalan

5. Kannan yen kadhali

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Bharathi dasan
 

1. Kadal

2. Kundram

3. Nyaairu

4. Aal

5. Chittrur

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Contemporary Cultural Issues
 

Prose including reference to contemporary literary issues

1. Oru karupu silanthi udan oru iravu- Ambai

Cultural studies, Indian festivals

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Penniya kavithaigal
 

1.Ottadai -Thamarai

2. Kapinaani thozhudhal- Ponmani vairamutu

3. Yendhan tozha- Subhathra

4. Kadal konda pen puram- Andal priya dharshini

5. Pen- P. Kalpana '

 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:2
Grammer- Language skills
 

Pira mozhi chorkal

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
Common topic
 

Isai

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Malliga, R et al (ed).Thamilppathirattu I.Bangalore: Prasaranga,2011

     ‘Oru Karuppuchilanthiyudan Or Iravu’ by Ambai,

 

      published by Kalachuvadu Publications, Nagercoil, 2014

 

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Varadarajan, Mu.  Thamil Ilakkia Varalaru . New Delhi:Sahitya Akademi, 2008

 Sivathambi, Ka.Thamil Sirukathaiyin Thorramum Valarchiyum.Coimbatore: NCBH, 2009

 Ragunathan,C.Bharathi: Kalamum Karuthum, Chennai:NCBH, 1971

 

Ramakrishnan S 100 Sirantha Sirukathaigal, Chennai: Discovery Books, 2013

 

Evaluation Pattern

With a total of 100 marks, 50 marks will come from Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the remaining 50 marks will come from end semester exanination. While the end semester examination will be fully theory based the CIA will consist of  assignments, theatre production, book review and other activities

ZOO131 - ANIMAL DIVERSITY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To provide students with a thorough understanding of animal systematics, taxonomic position, general animal characteristics, diversity in form, structure, and habits of invertebrates and vertebrates, the origin and evolutionary relationship of different phyla, and an overview of economically important animals

Course Outcome

CO1: To learn the classification of animals

CO2: To understand the evolutionary relationships among different groups of animals

CO3: To understand the special features of every organisms, which enable the students to identify the economic importance of animals

CO4: To trace the evolutionary relationship among the different groups of animals

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Kingdom Protista
 

General characters and classification up to classes; Locomotion and reproduction in Protista

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:3
Phylum Porifera
 

General characters and classification up to classes; Spicules; Cell types; Canal system in Sycon

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:3
Phylum Cnidaria
 

General characters and classification up to classes; Polymorphism in Halistemma. Brief account of coral and coral reefs.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:2
Phylum Ctenophora
 

General characteristics and evolutionary significance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Phylum Platyhelminthes
 

General characters and classification up to classes; Life history and Parasitic adaptations of Fasciola hepatica

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Phylum Nemathelminthes
 

General characters and classification up to classes; Life history, pathogenicity and prophylaxis of Ascaris lumbricoides and its parasitic adaptations

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:3
Phylum Annelida
 

General characters and classification up to classes; Evolution of coelom; Metamerism in Annelida

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:4
: Phylum Arthropoda
 

General characters and classification up to classes; Vision in Arthropoda, Metamorphosis (Ametabolous, hemimetabolous, holometabolous) and Moulting in insects.

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:4
Phylum Mollusca
 

General characters and classification up to classes; foot & shell modification; Pearl formation in bivalves; Evolutionary significance of trochophore larva

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:5
Phylum Echinodermata
 

General characters and classification up to classes; Water-vascular system in Asteroidea

Unit-11
Teaching Hours:2
Phylum Hemichordata
 

General characters and Affinities of Balanoglossus with chordates and non- chordates

Unit-12
Teaching Hours:2
Protochordata
 

General features and Phylogeny of Protochordata

Unit-13
Teaching Hours:2
Division Agnatha
 

General features of Agnatha and classification of cyclostomes up to classes

Unit-14
Teaching Hours:2
Class Pisces
 

General features and Classification up to class; types of scales in fishes

Unit-15
Teaching Hours:4
Class Amphibia
 

General features and Classification up to orders; Parental care, Neoteny

Unit-16
Teaching Hours:4
Class Reptilia
 

General features and Classification up to orders; Poison apparatus, venom composition & its effects

Unit-17
Teaching Hours:5
Class Aves
 

General features and Classification up to orders; Flight adaptations in birds 

Unit-18
Teaching Hours:5
Class Mammalia
 

General characters, Classification up to orders; origin of mammals

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Cleveland Hickman, Susan Keen, Allan Larson, David Eisenhour (2021) Animal Diversity, 9th Ed. Mc Graw Hill
  • Ruppert and Barnes, R.D. (2006). Invertebrate Zoology, VIII Edition. Holt Saunders International Edition
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Barnes, R.S.K., Calow, P., Olive, P.J.W., Golding, D.W. and Spicer, J.I. (2002). The Invertebrates: A New Synthesis, III Edition, Blackwell Science
  • Young, J. Z. (2004). The Life of Vertebrates. III Edition. Oxford university press
  • Pough H. Vertebrate life, VIII Edition, Pearson International
  • Hall B.K. and Hallgrimsson B. (2008). Strickberger’s Evolution. IV Edition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers Inc
  • RL Kotpal Invertebrates 12th edition
  • P S Verma and E L Jordon (2009) Invertebrate Zoology
  • RL Kotpal A text book of Animal diversity, Rastogi publications
Evaluation Pattern

Internal (CIAs): CIA1 [assignment/ presentation/ quiz/ class test/ presentation/ model making] (20 marks), CIA2 (Mid semester exam) (50 marks), CIA3 [assignment/ presentation/ quiz/ class test/ presentation/ model making](20 marks) = Total 90 marks.

End semester exam: Centralized exam for 100 marks

Total marks: Internal 50 (90 scaled down to 45 + attendance 5) and end semester exam 50 (convert to 50) = 100 marks

ZOO151 - ANIMAL DIVERSITY LAB (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To provide practical knowledge to the students with a thorough understanding of animal systematics, taxonomic position, general animal characteristics, diversity in form, structure, and habits of invertebrates and vertebrates, the origin and evolutionary relationship of different phyla, and an overview of economically important animals

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the use of basic equipments related to the study of the animal diversity

CO2: To use the taxonomic key to identify an animal at species level

CO3: Students will be more familiar with the preparation of taxonomic keys of an organism

CO4: Differentiate poisonous and non-poisonous snakes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Study of microscope
 

Study of Simple and Compound microscopes and observation of protozoan culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:30
Study of the following specimens
 

Amoeba, Euglena, Paramecium, Sycon, Euplectella, Obelia, Physalia, Aurelia, Taenia solium, Male and female Ascaris lumbricoides, Aphrodite, Nereis, Pheretima, Hirudinaria, Palaemon, Limulus, Palamnaeus, Scolopendra, Julus, Apis, Chiton, Dentalium, Pila, Unio, Pentaceros, CucumariaandAntedon, Balanoglossus, Herdmania, Branchiostoma, Petromyzon, Sphyrna, Pristis,  Labeo, Exocoetus, Anguilla, Ichthyophis/Ureotyphlus, Salamandra, Bufo, Hyla, Chelone, Hemidactylus, Chamaeleon, Draco, Vipera, Naja, Any six common birds from different orders, Bat, Funambulus, Loris 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Study of the following permanent slides
 

T.S. and L.S. of Sycon, Study of life history stages of Taenia, T.S. of Male and female Ascaris, Types of scales in fishes

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Key for Identification of poisonous and non-poisonous snakes