CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

School of Engineering and Technology

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Technology (Computer Science and Engineering)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
3 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CS331P DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Core Courses 5 4 100
CS332P DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS Core Courses 5 4 100
CS333 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING Core Courses 3 3 100
CY321 CYBER SECURITY Core Courses 2 0 0
EC337 DIGITAL SYSTEMS Core Courses 3 3 100
HS311 TECHNICAL WRITING Core Courses 2 2 50
MA334 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS Core Courses 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BS451 ENGINEERING BIOLOGY LABORATORY - 2 2 50
CS432P OPERATING SYSTEMS - 5 4 100
CS433P PROGRAMMING PARADIGM - 5 4 100
CS434 FORMAL LANGUAGE AND AUTOMATA THEORY - 3 3 100
CS435P COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND ARCHITECTURE - 5 4 100
CSHO432AIP ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND MACHINE LEARNING - 5 4 100
CSHO432CSP MOBILE AND NETWORK BASED ETHICAL HACKING - 5 4 100
CSHO432DAP BIG DATA ANALYTICS - 5 4 100
EVS421 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE - 2 0 0
HS422 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS - 2 2 50
MA431 PROBABILITY AND QUEUING THEORY - 3 3 100
5 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CS531P COMPUTER NETWORKS Core Courses 5 4 100
CS532 INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICAL INTELLIGENCE Core Courses 3 3 100
CS533P DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS Core Courses 5 4 100
CS541E01 COMPUTER GRAPHICS WITH OPEN GL Core Courses 3 3 100
CS541E02 INTERNET AND WEB PROGRAMMING Discipline Specific Elective 3 3 100
CS541E04 CRYPTOGRAPHY AND NETWORK SECURITY Core Courses 3 3 100
CS581 INTERNSHIP - I Core Courses 2 1 50
EC535OE01 EMBEDDED BOARDS FOR IOT APPLICATIONS Generic Elective 3 3 100
EC535OE02 FUNDAMENTALS OF IMAGE PROCESSING Core Courses 3 3 100
EC535OE03 OBSERVING EARTH FROM SPACE Generic Elective 3 3 100
EE536OE01 HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES Generic Elective 4 3 100
EE536OE02 ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION Generic Elective 4 3 100
EE536OE03 SMART GRIDS Generic Elective 3 3 100
HS521 PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE Core Courses 3 3 100
IC521 INDIAN CONSTITUTION Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2 0 50
IT541E01 UNIX AND SHELL PROGRAMMING Core Courses 3 3 100
6 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BTGE631 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - 2 2 100
BTGE632 DIGITAL MEDIA - 2 2 100
BTGE633 FUNCTIONAL ENGLISH - 2 2 50
BTGE634 GERMAN - 2 2 100
BTGE635 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS - 2 2 100
BTGE636 INTRODUCTION TO AVIATION - 2 2 100
BTGE637 PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY - 2 2 100
BTGE651 DATA ANALYTICS THROUGH SPSS - 2 2 100
BTGE652 DIGITAL MARKETING - 2 2 100
BTGE653 DIGITAL WRITING - 2 2 100
BTGE654 PHOTOGRAPHY - 2 2 100
BTGE655 ACTING COURSE - 2 2 100
BTGE656 CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION - 2 2 100
BTGE657 PAINTING AND SKETCHING - 2 2 100
BTGE658 DESIGN THINKING - 2 2 100
CS631P INTERNET OF THINGS - 5 4 100
CS632P COMPILER DESIGN - 5 4 100
CS633P DESIGN PATTERNS - 5 4 100
CS642E01 MOBILE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT - 3 3 100
CS642E03 ADVANCED DATABASES - 3 3 100
CS642E07 DATA WAREHOUSING AND DATA MINING - 3 3 100
CS681 SERVICE LEARNING - 4 2 50
CSHO432DAP BIG DATA ANALYTICS - 5 4 100
CSHO631AIP ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND MACHINE LEARNING - 5 4 100
CSHO631CSP MOBILE AND NETWORK BASED ETHICAL HACKING - 5 4 100
CSHO631DAP BIG DATA ANALYTICS - 5 4 100
CSHO632AIP ROBOTICS AND PROCESS AUTOMATION - 5 4 100
CSHO632CSP CYBER FORENSICS AND MALWARE DETECTION - 5 4 100
CSHO632DAP BIG DATA SECURITY ANALYTICS - 5 4 100
IT642E02 FOUNDATIONS TO BLOCKCHAIN TECHNOLOGY - 3 3 100
7 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CEOE761E01 SUSTAINABLE AND GREEN TECHNOLOGY Generic Elective 3 3 100
CEOE761E03 GIS AND REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES AND APPLICATIONS Generic Elective 3 3 100
CS743E01 UNIX SYSTEM PROGRAMMING Core Courses 3 3 100
CS743E02 TCP/IP DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION Core Courses 3 3 100
CS743E03 SIMULATION AND MODELING Core Courses 3 3 100
CS743E04 SOFTWARE PROCESS AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT Core Courses 3 3 100
CS744E01 INFORMATION STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT Core Courses 3 3 100
CS744E02 DATA BASE ADMINISTRATION Core Courses 3 3 100
CS744E03 NETWORK STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES Core Courses 3 3 100
CS744E04 NETWORK ADMINISTRATION Core Courses 3 3 100
CS744E05 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Core Courses 3 3 100
CS781 INTERNSHIP - II Core Courses 2 1 50
CS782 SERVICE LEARNING Core Courses 4 2 50
CS783 PROJECT WORK PHASE - I Core Courses 8 4 100
IC721 CONSTITUTION OF INDIA Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2 0 50
MA736OE3 NUMERICAL SOLUTIONS OF DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Generic Elective 3 3 100
ME761E03 BASIC AUTOMOBILE ENGINEERING Generic Elective 3 3 100
ME761E05 BASIC AEROSPACE ENGINEERING Generic Elective 3 3 100
PH736OE1 NANO MATERIALS AND NANOTECHNOLOGY Generic Elective 3 3 100
8 Semester - 2019 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
CS845E01 QUANTUM COMPUTING - 3 3 100
CS845E02 MOBILE COMPUTING - 3 3 100
CS845E04 GRID COMPUTING - 3 3 100
CS846E01 COMPUTER AIDED DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS - 3 3 100
CS846E03 INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS - 3 3 100
CS846E04 HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING - 3 3 100
CS846E07 NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING - 3 3 100
CS881 PROJECT WORK - 20 10 300
CS882 COMPREHENSION - 2 1 50

CS331P - DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To learn the fundamentals of data models and to conceptualize and depict a database system using ER diagram. To make a study of SQL and relational database design. To understand the internal storage structures using different file and indexing techniques which will help in physical DB design. To know the fundamental concepts of transaction processing- concurrency control techniques and recovery procedure. To have an introductory knowledge about the emerging trends in the area of distributed DBOO DB- Data mining and Data Warehousing and XML. To implement the design of the tables in DBMS. To write queries to get optimized outputs. To store, retrieve and view the contents. To generate report based on customized need

Course Outcome

C01: Apply the Conepts of Entity-Relationship (E-R) model for the given application.

CO2: Apply Normalization principles to create and maniplulate relational databases

CO3: Apply the concepts of Non-Relational Models

CO4: Examine different file organization concepts for data storage in Relational databases

CO5: Apply the transaction management principles on relational databases

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION AND CONCEPTUAL MODELING
 

Introduction to File and Database systems- Database system structure – Data Models – Introduction to Network and Hierarchical Models – ER model – Relational Model – Relational Algebra.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
RELATIONAL MODEL
 

SQL – Data definition- Queries in SQL- Updates- Views – Integrity and Security – Relational Database design – Functional dependencies and Normalization for Relational Databases (up to BCNF).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
NON RELATIONAL MODEL
 

Introduction to NOSQL Systems ,The CAP Theorem, Document-Based NOSQL Systems and MongoDB, NOSQL Key-Value Stores, Column-Based or Wide Column NOSQL Systems, NOSQL Graph Databases and Neo4j 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
DATA STORAGE AND QUERY PROCESSING
 

Record storage and Primary file organization- Secondary storage Devices- Operations on FilesHeap File- Sorted Files- Hashing Techniques – Index Structure for files –Different types of Indexes- B-Tree - B+ Tree – Query Processing.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
TRANSACTION MANAGEMENT
 

Transaction management -Transaction Processing – Introduction- Need for Concurrency control- Desirable properties of Transaction- Schedule and Recoverability- Serializability and Schedules – Concurrency Control – Types of Locks- Two Phases locking- Deadlock- Time stamp based concurrency control – Recovery Techniques – Concepts- Immediate Update- Deferred Update - Shadow Paging.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Abraham Silberschatz, Henry F. Korth and S. Sudarshan- “Database System Concepts”, Seventh Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2021

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Andreas Meier · Michael Kaufmann "SQL & NoSQL Databases", Springer -2019

Raghu Ramakrishnan, “Database Management System”, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, 2003

Online Resources: W1.http://db-book.com/db6/slide-dir

Evaluation Pattern

CIA:70/100

ESE:30/100

CS332P - DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To understand the basic concept of data structures for storage and retrieval of ordered or unordered data. Data structures include: arrays, linked lists, binary trees, heaps, and hash tables.

Course Outcome

CO1: Implement various ADT and Calculate the complexity of the algorithm

CO2: Experiment with various operations on Linear Data structures

CO3: Experiment with various Non- Linear Data structures and Hashing techniques

CO4: Compare different sorting techniques with respect to time complexity

CO5: Make use of graph algorithms in various applications of graph traversal, shortest path and sorting techniques.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
INTRODUCTION and STACK ADT
 

Definition- Classification of data structures: primitive and non-primitive- Operations on data structures- Algorithm Analysis: Introduction. The Stack ADT: Definition, Array representation of stack, Operations on stack: Infix, prefix and postfix notations Conversion of an arithmetic Expression from Infix to postfix. Applications of stacks.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
LISTS AND QUEUES
 

The Queue ADT: Definition, Array representation of queue, Types of queues: Simple queue, circular queue, double ended queue (de-queue) priority queue, operations on all types of Queues. The List ADT: singly linked list implementation, insertion, deletion and searching operations on linear list, circular linked list implementation, Double linked list implementation, insertion, deletion and searching operations. Applications of linked lists.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
TREES
 

Preliminaries – Binary Trees – The Search Tree ADT – Binary Search Trees – AVL Trees – Tree Traversals – Hashing – General Idea – Hash Function – Separate Chaining – Open Addressing –Linear Probing – Priority Queues (Heaps) – Model – Simple implementations – Binary Heap

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
SORTING
 

Preliminaries – Insertion Sort, Selection sort – Shell sort – Heap sort – Merge sort – Quicksort – External Sorting

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
GRAPHS
 

Introduction to Graphs, Definitions –DFS, BFS, Minimum Spanning Tree – Prim’s and Kruskal's Algorithm. Single-Source Shortest Paths – Bellman-Ford algorithm and Dijkstra’s Algorithm – – Applications of Graphs

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Mark Allen Weiss, “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in Java”, 3rd Edition, Pearson Education 2013.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Fundamentals of data structure in C by Ellis Horowitz, Sarataj Shani 3rd edition, Galgotia book source PVT,2010.

R2.Classic Data Structures , Debasis Samanta ,2nd Edition, PHI Learning PVT,2011

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment 70%

End Semester Examination 30%

CS333 - SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Software engineering course provides: Different life cycle models, Requirement dictation process, Analysis modelling and specification, Architectural and detailed design methods, Implementation and testing strategies, Verification and validation techniques, Project planning and management and Use of CASE tools.

Course objectives:  To be aware of Different life cycle models; Requirement dictation process; Analysis modeling and specification; Architectural and detailed design methods; Implementation and testing strategies; Verification and validation techniques; Project planning and management and Use of CASE tools.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain the fundamental of Software development Life cycle and different software development process models.(L1)

CO2: Describe various requirement elicitation methods in software development process(L1)

CO3: Choose the software processes and concepts using various design techniques(L3)

CO4: Make use of different testing techniques and maintenance principles in software development process.(L3)

CO5: Identify the cost estimation techniques and project scheduling methods in software development Process.(L3)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
SOFTWARE PROCESS
 

Introduction –S/W Engineering Paradigm – life cycle models (waterfall, incremental, spiral, WINWIN spiral, evolutionary, prototyping, object-oriented) - system engineering – computer-based system – verification – validation – life cycle process – development process –system engineering hierarchy.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS
 

Functional and non-functional - user – System –requirement engineering process – feasibility studies – requirements – elicitation – validation and management – software prototyping – prototyping in the software process – rapid prototyping techniques – user interface prototyping -S/W document. Agile methods, Extreme Programming, SCRUM.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
DESIGN CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES
 

Design process and concepts – Modular design – design heuristic – design model and document. Architectural design – software architecture – data design – architectural design – transform and transaction mapping – user interface design – user interface design principles-Model representation- Real time systems - Real time software design – system design – real time executives – data acquisition system - monitoring and control system. SCM – Need for SCM – Version control – Introduction to SCM process – Software configuration items.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
TESTING
 

Taxonomy of software testing – levels – test activities – types of s/w test – black box testing – testing boundary conditions – structural testing – test coverage criteria based on data flow mechanisms – regression testing – testing in the large. S/W testing strategies – strategic approach and issues - unit testing – integration testing – validation testing – system testing and debugging.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
SOFTWARE PROJECT MANAGEMENT
 

Measures and measurements – S/W complexity and science measure – size measure – data and logic structure measure – information flow measure. Software cost estimation – function point models – COCOMO model- Delphi method.- Defining a Task Network – Scheduling – Earned Value Analysis – Error Tracking - Software changes – program evolution dynamics – software maintenance – Architectural evolution. Taxonomy of CASE tools – Agile based Case Study.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Roger S. Pressman, Bruce Maxim, Software engineering- A Practitioner’s Approach, McGraw-Hill International Edition, 9th Edition 2020.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Roger S. Pressman, Software engineering- A Practitioner’s Approach, McGraw-Hill International Edition, 6th Edition 2014.

R2. Ian Sommerville, “Software engineering,” Pearson education Asia, 9th Edition, 2013.

R3. Pankaj Jalote- “An Integrated Approach to Software Engineering,” Narosa Publishing house, 2011.

R4.James F Peters and Witold Pedryez, “Software Engineering – An Engineering Approach”, John Wiley and Sons, New Delhi, 2010.

R5.Ali Behforooz and Frederick J Hudson, “Software Engineering Fundamentals”, OUP India 2012.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment CIA Marks 50

End Semester Exams ESE 50

Total 100

CY321 - CYBER SECURITY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:0
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This mandatory course is aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the different facets of Cyber Security.  In addition, the course will detail into specifics of Cyber Security with Cyber Laws both in Global and Indian Legal environments

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe the basic security fundamentals and cyber laws and legalities

CO2: Describe various cyber security vulnerabilities and threats such as virus, worms, online attacks, Dos and others.

CO3: Explain the regulations and acts to prevent cyber-attacks such as Risk assessment and security policy management.

CO4: Explain various vulnerability assessment and penetration testing tools.

CO5: Explain various protection methods to safeguard from cyber-attacks using technologies like cryptography and Intrusion prevention systems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 1
 

Security Fundamentals-4 As Architecture Authentication Authorization Accountability, Social Media, Social Networking and Cyber Security.Cyber Laws, IT Act 2000-IT Act 2008-Laws for Cyber-Security, Comprehensive National Cyber-Security Initiative CNCI – Legalities

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 2
 

Cyber Attack and Cyber Services Computer Virus – Computer Worms – Trojan horse.Vulnerabilities -  Phishing -  Online Attacks – Pharming - Phoarging  –  Cyber Attacks  -  Cyber Threats -  Zombie- stuxnet - Denial of Service Vulnerabilities  - Server Hardening-TCP/IP attack-SYN Flood

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 3
 

Cyber Security Management Risk Management and Assessment - Risk Management Process - Threat Determination Process -Risk Assessment - Risk Management Lifecycle.Security Policy Management - Security Policies - Coverage Matrix Business Continuity Planning - DisasterTypes  -  Disaster Recovery Plan - Business Continuity Planning Process

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 4
 

Vulnerability - Assessment and Tools: Vulnerability Testing - Penetration Testing Black box- white box.Architectural Integration:  Security Zones - Devicesviz Routers, Firewalls, DMZ. Configuration Management - Certification and Accreditation for Cyber-Security.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 5
 

Authentication and Cryptography: Authentication - Cryptosystems - Certificate Services, Securing Communications:  Securing Services -  Transport  –  Wireless  -  Steganography and NTFS Data Streams. Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems:   Intrusion -  Defense in Depth  -  IDS/IPS  -IDS/IPS Weakness and Forensic AnalysisCyber Evolution: Cyber Organization – Cyber Future

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. Matt Bishop, “Introduction to Computer Security”, Pearson, 6th impression, ISBN: 978-81-7758-425-7.

R2. Thomas R, Justin Peltier, John, “Information Security Fundamentals”, Auerbach Publications.

R3. AtulKahate, “Cryptography and Network Security”,  2nd Edition, Tata McGrawHill.2003

R4. Nina Godbole, SunitBelapure, “Cyber Security”, Wiley India 1st Edition 2011

R5. Jennifer L. Bayuk and Jason Healey and Paul Rohmeyer and Marcus Sachs, “Cyber Security Policy Guidebook”, Wiley; 1 edition , 2012

R6. Dan Shoemaker and Wm. Arthur Conklin, “Cyber security: The Essential Body Of Knowledge”,   Delmar Cengage Learning; 1 edition, 2011

R7. Stallings, “Cryptography & Network Security - Principles & Practice”, Prentice Hall, 6th Edition 2014

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NIL

Evaluation Pattern

Only CIA will be conducted as per the University norms. No ESE

Maximum Marks : 50

EC337 - DIGITAL SYSTEMS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·

To study the fundamentals of digital circuits and concepts used in the analysis and design of various digital systems.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe the characteristics of various digital integrated circuit families, logic gates and classify digital circuits based on their construction. L2:Understand

CO2: Demonstrate the methods of minimization of complex circuits using Boolean Algebra.L3: Apply

CO3: Interpret the methods of Designing combinational circuit.L3: Apply

CO4: Illustrate the methods of Designing sequential circuits.L3: Apply

CO5: Analyze the digital circuits design using VHDL.L4:Analyze

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION
 

Switching Theory: Laws of Boolean algebra, Theorems of Boolean algebra, Switching functions, Methods for specification of switching functions - Truth tables and Algebraic forms, Realization of functions using logic gates. Digital Logic Elements: Electronic logic gates, Positive and negative logic, Logic families -TTL, ECL and CMOS, Realization of logic gates.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
BOOLEAN ALGEBRA
 

Simplification of Boolean Expressions and Functions: Algebraic methods,     Canonical forms of Boolean functions, Minimization of functions using Karnaugh     maps, Minimization of functions using Quine-McClusky method.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
COMBINATIONAL CIRCUITS
 

Design of Combinational Logic Circuits: Gate level design of Small Scale     Integration (SSI) circuits, Modular combinational logic elements - Decoders,     Encoders, Priority encoders, Multiplexers and Demultiplexers. Design of Integer     Arithmetic Circuits using Combinational Logic: Integer adders - Ripple carry adder     and Carry look ahead adder, Integer subtractors using adders, Unsigned integer     multipliers - Combinational array circuits, Signed integer multipliers - Booth's     coding, Bit-pair recoding, Carry save addition and Wallace tree multiplier, Signed     integer division circuits - Combinational array circuits, Complexity and propagation     delay analysis of circuits. Design of Combinational Circuits using Programmable     Logic Devices (PLDs): Programmable Read Only Memories (PROMs),     Programmable Logic Arrays (PLAs), Programmable Array Logic (PAL) devices,     Design of multiple output circuits using PLDs.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS
 

Sequential Circuit Elements: Latches -RS latch and JK latch, Flip-flops-RS, JK, T     and D flip flops, Master-slave flip flops, Edge-triggered flip-flops. Analysis and     Design of Synchronous Sequential Circuits: Models of sequential circuits - Moore     machine and Mealy machine, Flip-flops - Characteristic table, Characteristic     equation and Excitation table, Analysis of sequential circuits- Flipflop input     expressions, Next state equations, Next state maps, State table and State transition     diagram, Design of sequential circuits - State transition diagram, State table, Next     state maps, Output maps, Expressions for flip-flop inputs and Expressions for circuit     outputs, Modular sequential logic circuits- Shift registers, Registers, Counters and  Random access memories, Design using programmable logic sequencers (PLSs).     Design of Arithmetic Circuits using Sequential Logic : Serial adder for integers,     Unsigned integer multiplier, Unsigned integer division circuits, Signed integer     division, Floating-pint adder/subtractor - Design of control circuit, Floating - point multiplier.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
CASE STUDY AND INFORMAL LABORATORY
 

Case study: Learn the Fundamentals of Digital Logic Design with VHDL Informal Laboratory:

·         Design and implementation of binary adder / subtractor using basic gates

·         Design and implementation of applications using multiplexers

·         Design and implementation of Synchronous & Asynchronous Counters

·         Design and implementation of Shift Registers

Coding Combinational Circuits using Hardware Description Language (HDL)

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1 - Donald P Leach, Albert Paul Malvino&GoutamSaha, “Digital Principles and Applications” , Tata McGraw Hill 7th Edition, 2010.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1 -Stephen Brown. ZvonkoVranesic, “Fundamentals of Digital Logic Design with VHDL”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2nd Edition 2005.

R2- R D Sudhaker Samuel, “Illustrative Approach to Logic Design. Sanguine-Pearson”, 2010.

R3- Charles H. Roth, “Fundamentals of Logic Design”, Cengage Learning, 5th Edition, 2004.

R4- Ronald J. Tocci, Neal S. Widmer. Gregory L. Moss, “Digital Systems Principles and     Applications, ” 10th  Edition. Pearson Education, 2007

R5- M Morris Mano, “Digital Logic and Computer Design”, Pearson Education, 10th Edition, 2008.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment is based on the performance of the student throughout the semester.

Assessment of each paper

·         Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) for Theory papers: 50% (50 marks out

of 100 marks)

·         End Semester Examination(ESE) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

Components of the CIA

CIA I   :   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                    : 25 marks                  

CIA II  :  Assignments                                                            : 10 marks

CIA III            : Quizzes/Seminar/Case Studies/Project Work     : 10 marks

Attendance                                                                             : 05 marks

            Total                                                                                         : 50 marks

For subjects having practical as part of the subject

 

Assessment of Practical paper

Conduct of experiments                                                       : 25 marks

Observations/Lab Record                                                   : 15 marks

Viva voce                                                                                : 10 marks

Total                                                                                        : 50 marks

(All the above assessments are carried for each experiment during regular lab classes and averaged to max 50 marks at the end of the semester)

HS311 - TECHNICAL WRITING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description:

The course Technical Writing consists; Introduction to Technical Communication, Technical Writing, Soft Skills, Professional Presentation Skills and Professional Etiquette. It provides awareness and practice to the learners in all aspects required for effective technical writing. 

Course objective:

This course aims to equip engineering students with effective individual and collaborative technical writing and presentation skills which are necessary to be effective technical communicators in academic and professional contexts.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the basics of technical communication and the use of formal elements of specific genres of documentation

CO2: Demonstrate the nuances of technical writing, with reference to English grammar and vocabulary.

CO3: Recognize the importance of soft skills and personality development for academic and professional success.

CO4: Understand various techniques involved in oral communication and its application in the professional contexts.

CO5: Realize the importance of having ethical work habits and professional etiquettes.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Technical Communication
 

Communication Process, Flow, Barriers.

Analyzing different kinds of technical documents, Reports/Engineering reports.

Types, Importance and Structure of formal reports, information and document design 
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Technical Writing
 

Vocabulary for professional writing. Idioms and collocations.

Writing drafts and revising, writing style and language.

Writing Emails, Resumes, Video resume, Interviews, Types of interviews.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Soft Skills
 

Self development process, Personality development, Types of personality, Perception and attitudes, Emotional intelligence, Time Management, Values and beliefs, Personal goal setting, Creativity, Conflict management, Career planning

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Professional Presentation Skills
 

Writing a speech, Formal presentations, Public speaking, Presentation aids, Group communication, Discussions, Organizational GD, Meetings & Conferences.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Professional Etiquette
 

Email etiquettes, Telephone Etiquettes, Engineering ethics, Role and responsibility of engineer, Work culture in jobs.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1: David F. Beer and David McMurrey, Guide to writing as an Engineer, John Willey. New    York, 2004

T2: Diane Hacker, Pocket Style Manual, Bedford Publication, New York, 2003. (ISBN 0312406843)

T3: Raman Sharma, Technical Communications, Oxford Publication, London, 2004

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Dale Jungk, Applied Writing for Technicians, McGraw Hill, New York, 2004. (ISBN: 07828357-4)

R2. Sharma, R. and Mohan, K. Business Correspondence and Report Writing, TMH New Delhi 2002.

R3. Xebec, Presentation Book, TMH New Delhi, 2000. (ISBN 0402213)

Online Resources:

 

 

 

W1. Watch Hans Rosling’s presentation on TED Talks: “The best stats you’ve ever seen.” Watch the opening to this presentation.

 

W2.  Use your search engine and search for “The Brand Called You.” The result you're looking for should be from the Fast Company website

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Marks

25

ESE Marks

25

Exam Hours

2

MA334 - DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is to:

                 Develop the knowledge of the concepts needed to test the logic of a program.

                 Create logical knowledge which has applications in Data Structures, Analysis of  Algorithms, Programming languages, Theory of Compilers, Artificial Intelligence and

             Database

                 Identify structures on discrete levels

                 Construct relation matrix and graph , define partially ordered set and Boolean algebra

                 Classify types of error correction in coding and decoding using binary digits

                 Interpret the concepts and properties of algebraic structures such as semigroups, monoids and groups.

Course Outcome

CO1: Distinguish the compound logical statements with logical connectives {L2} {PO1, PO2}

CO2: Apply the rules of inference and Predicate/Quantifiers to validate the set of arguments. {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO3: Analyze Lattices and Boolean algebra by using the concept of bounded and partial order set. {L4} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO4: Predict permutation functions as even or odd and solve on inverse functions {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3, PO10}

CO5: Compute coding and decoding problems using group theory and appropriate coding and decoding schemes. {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3, PO10}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Propositional Calculus:
 

Propositions Logical connectives Compound propositions Conditional and bi conditional propositions Truth tables Tautologies and contradictions Contrapositive Logical equivalences and implications De Morgans Laws - Normal forms Principal conjunctive and disjunctive normal forms Rules of inference Arguments - Validity of arguments.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Predicate Calculus:
 

Predicates, Statement Function , Variables - Free and bound variables , Quantifiers , Universe of discourse,  Logical equivalences and implications for quantified statements , Theory of inference, The rules of universal specification and generalization , Validity of arguments

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Set Theory
 

Basic concepts Notations Subset Algebra of sets The power set Ordered pairs and Cartesian product Relations on sets Types of relations and their properties Matrix and Graph representation of a relation Partial ordering Poset Hasse diagram Lattices and their properties Sublattices Boolean algebra.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Functions:
 

Definitions of functions Classification of functions Types of functions - Examples Composition of functions Inverse functions Characteristic function of a set Hashing functions Permutation functions.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Groups:
 

Groups - Properties Subgroups - Cosets and Lagranges theorem Normal subgroups Algebraic system with two binary operations Preliminaries of Coding - Hamming Metric - group codes: Basic notions of error correction - Error recovery in group codes.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books

T1. Trembly J.P and Manohar R, Discrete Mathematical Structures with Applications to Computer Science, Tata McGrawHill Pub.Co. Ltd, New Delhi, 2003. 

T2. Ralph. P. Grimaldi, Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics: An Applied Introduction, Fifth Edition, Pearson Education Asia,Delhi, 2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books 

1.      R1. Bernard Kolman, Robert C. Busby, Sharan Cutler Ross, Discrete Mathematical Structures,  Fourth Indian reprint, Pearson Education Pvt Ltd., New Delhi, 2003.

2.      R2. Kenneth H. Rosen, Discrete Mathematics and its Applications, Fifth Edition, Tata McGraw Hill Pub. Co. Ltd., New Delhi, 2003.

3.      R3. Richard Johnsonbaugh, Discrete Mathematics, Fifth Edition,Pearson Education Asia, New Delhi, 2002.


Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

End Semester Examination(ESE)      : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks) 

 

 

S.No

Assessment

Marks

Weightagemarks

1

CIA I

20

10

2

CIA II

     (MSE: Mid Semester Examination)

50

25

3

CIA III

20

10

4

Attendance

10

05

5

ESE

(End Semester Examination)

100

50

Total

100

Components of the CIA

CIA I  :  Subject Assignments / Online Tests                  : 10 marks

CIA II :   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                : 25 marks            

CIAIII:Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications : 10 marks

Attendance                                                                           : 05 marks

            Total                                                                                       : 50 marks

Mid Semester Examination (MSE) : Theory Papers:

  • The MSE is conducted for 50 marks of 2 hours duration.
  • Question paper pattern; Five out of Six questions have to be answered. Each  question carries 10 marks

End Semester Examination (ESE):

The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration.

The syllabus for the theory papers are divided into FIVE units and each unit carries equal Weightage in terms of marks distribution.

Question paper pattern is as follows.

Two full questions with either or choice will be drawn from each unit. Each question carries 20 marks. There could be a maximum of three sub divisions in a question. The emphasis on the questions is to test the objectiveness, analytical skill and application skill of the concept, from a question bank which reviewed and updated every year

The criteria for drawing the questions from the Question Bank are as follows

50 % - Medium Level questions

25 % - Simple level questions

25 % - Complex level questions

BS451 - ENGINEERING BIOLOGY LABORATORY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Understanding and application of MATLAB and TINKERCAD for biological analysis which would results in better healthcare and any engineer, irrespective of the parent discipline (mechanical, electrical, civil, computer, electronics, etc.,) can use the disciplinary skills toward designing/improving biological systems. This course is designed to convey the essentials of human physiology.

 

The course will introduce to the students the various fundamental concepts in MATLAB and TINKERCAD for numerical analysis and circuit design using arduino.

 

 

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Perform basic mathematical operation and analysis on biological parameters as BMI, ECG using MATLAB.L4

CO2: Perform basic image processing on RGB images pertaining to medical data using MATLAB. L4

CO3: Perform analysis on biological parameters using TinkerCad and design mini projects applicable for healthcare and biosensing.L4

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
 

1.      To familiarize with Matlab Online and getting used to basic functionalities used in Matlab (arrays, matrices, tables, functions)

2.      To calculate the Body Mass Index (BMI) of a person and determine under what category the person falls under – underweight, normal, overweight

3.      To determine the R peaks in given ECG and to find HRV using Matlab.

4.      To determine the R peaks in given ECG and to find HRV using Matlab.

5.      To determine the R peaks in given ECG and to find HRV using Matlab.

6.      Introduction to Tinkercad and using the various tools available for running a simple program of lighting a LED bulb using Arduino (digital).

7.      To design a driver motor in Tinkercad using Arduino and driver motor

8.      To design a temperature sensor in Tinkercad using Arduino and TMP36

9.      To design and simulate gas sensors using potentiometers, Arduino and servo motors

10.  To design and simulate measuring pulse sensors using photodiodes, IR LED and Arduino

11.  Preparation of biopolymers (polylactic acid) at home using home-based ingredients.

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

 

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

As per university norms

CS432P - OPERATING SYSTEMS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:  This course is an overview of different types of operating systems. They also include understanding of the components of an operating system, process management, and knowledge of storage management and the concepts of I/O and file systems is also covered as an introductory level.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the Structure, Components and its basic functionalities of Operating System

CO2: Distinguish various process management principles for given problem using appropriate tool

CO3: Elucidate the process synchronization mechanisms, deadlock environment and its solutions in the given processes

CO4: Inspect various memory management strategies for the given problems in memory systems

CO5: Build file structure to distribute the same across the memory

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION
 

Introduction : What operating systems do, Computer System Architecture, Operating System Structure, Operating System Operations, Process Management,  Memory Management, Storage Management, Protection and Security; System Structures: Operating System Services, User Operating System Interface, System Calls, Types of System Calls.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
PROCESS MANAGEMENT
 

Process Management: Process Concept, Process Scheduling, Operations on Processes, Inter-process Communication; Threads: Overview, Multithreading Models, Thread Libraries; CPU Scheduling: Basic Concepts, Scheduling Criteria, Scheduling Algorithms, Multiple- Processor Scheduling

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
PROCESS SYNCHRONIZATION AND DEADLOCKS
 

Process Synchronization: Background, The Critical Section Problem, Peterson’s Solution, Synchronization Hardware, Semaphores, Classical Problems of Synchronization, Monitors, Synchronization Examples

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
MEMORY MANAGEMENT AND VIRTUAL MEMORY
 

Memory Management: Background, Swapping, Contiguous Memory Allocation, Paging.

Virtual Memory : Background, Demand Paging, Copy on Write, Page Replacement, Allocation of frames, Thrashing, Allocating Kernel Memory

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
FILE SYSTEM INTERFACE AND FILE SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION & MASS STORAGE STRUCTURE
 

File System Interface: File System: File Concept, Access Methods, Directory Structure, File System Mounting, File Sharing, Protection.

File System Implementation & Mass Storage Structure: Implementing File Systems: File System Structure, File System Implementation, Directory Implementation, Allocation Methods, Free Space Management. Disk structure, Disk Attachment, Disk Scheduling Methods, Disk Management, Swap-Space Management

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. Abraham Silberschatz, , Peter Baer Galvin and Greg Gagne “Operating System Concepts”, John Wiley & Sons (ASIA) Pvt. Ltd,Ninth Edition ,2013.                                            

T2.  Martina Seidl, Marion Scholz, Christian Huemer and GertiKappel , “UML @ Classroom An Introduction to Object-Oriented Modeling Series: Undergraduate Topics in Computer Science”, Springer, 2015

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Harvey M. Deitel, “Operating Systems”, Pearson Education Pvt. Ltd, Third Edition, 2007.                    

R2. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, “Modern Operating Systems”, Prentice Hall of India Pvt.Ltd, 2009.        

R3. William Stallings, “Operating System”, Pearson Education, 2009.                                      

R4. Pramod Chandra P. Bhatt – “An Introduction to Operating Systems, Concepts

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous internal assement 70%

End Semester Examination 30%

CS433P - PROGRAMMING PARADIGM (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Software development in business environment has become more sophisticated, the software implementation is becoming increasingly complex and requires the best programming paradigm which helps to eliminate complexity of large projects. Object Oriented Programming (OOP) has become the predominant technique for writing software at present. Many other important software development techniques are based upon the fundamental ideas captured by object-oriented programming. The course also caters to the understanding of event driven programming, generic programming and concurrent programming. By the end of this COURSE, the student should acquire the basic knowledge and skills necessary to implement the concepts of various programming paradigms.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the fundamental concepts of Object-Oriented Programming.

CO2: Make use of the inheritance and interface concepts for effective code reuse.

CO3: Develop dynamic and interactive graphical applications using AWT and SWING

CO4: Examine the generic programming and exception handling concepts.

CO5: Intrepret the importance of multi-threading concepts to develop concurrent applications.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING - FUNDAMENTALS
 

Review of OOP - Objects and classes in Java – defining classes – methods - access specifiers – static members – constructors – finalize method – Arrays – Strings - Packages – JavaDoc comments. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING - INHERITANCE
 

Inheritance – class hierarchy – polymorphism – dynamic binding – final keyword – abstract classes – the Object class – Reflection – interfaces – object cloning – inner classes.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
EVENT-DRIVEN PROGRAMMING
 

Graphics programming – Frame – Components – working with 2D shapes – Using color, fonts, and images - Basics of event handling – event handlers – adapter classes – actions – mouse events – AWT event hierarchy – introduction to Swing – Model-View- Controller design pattern – buttons – layout management – Swing Components

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
GENERIC PROGRAMMING
 

Motivation for generic programming – generic classes – generic methods – generic code and virtual machine – inheritance and generics – reflection and generics – exceptions – exception hierarchy – throwing and catching exceptions.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
CONCURRENT PROGRAMMING
 

Multi-threaded programming – interrupting threads – thread states – thread properties – thread synchronization – thread-safe Collections – Executors – synchronizers – threads and event-driven programming, Parallel programming –fork, join framework.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.              Herbert Schildt, “Java The Complete Reference” , Ninth Edition, McGraw Hill Publishers 2014.

2.              Cay S. Horstmann and Gary Cornell, “Core Java: Volume I – undamentals”, Eighth Edition, Sun Microsystems Press, 2008.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.              Paul Deitel and Harvey Deitel , “Java How to program”, Tenth Edition, Deitel, 2016.

2.             Ivan BratikoPROLOG: Programming for Artificial Intelligence, Third Edition, Pearson Publisher, 2002.

3.            Bruce Eckel, “Thinking in Java”, 4th Edition, February 20, 2006.

4.          Doug Rosenberg, Matt Stephens, “Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML: Theory and Practice (Expert's Voice in UML Modeling)”, January 16, 2013.

Evaluation Pattern

 

  1. Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) for Theory + Practical papers: 70% (70 marks out of 100 marks)
  2. End Semester Examination (ESE): 30% (30 marks out of 100 marks)

CS434 - FORMAL LANGUAGE AND AUTOMATA THEORY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To have an understanding of finite state and pushdown automata.
  • To have a knowledge of regular languages and context free languages.
  • To know the relation between regular language, context free language and corresponding recognizers
  • To study the Turing machine and classes of problems.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Design finite automata with conversion between types of finite automata.

CO2: Develop regular expression and minimize the given finite automata for any regular language.

CO3: Develop context free grammar, parse trees and pushdown automata for a given context free language.

CO4: Explain decidable and undecidable problems, solvable and unsolvable problems with their complexity analysis.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
AUTOMATA
 

Automata - Introduction to formal proof – Additional forms of proof – Inductive proofs –Finite Automata (FA) – Central concepts of Automata Theory, Representation of Automata, Deterministic Finite Automata (DFA) – Non-deterministic Finite Automata (NFA) – Finite Automata with Epsilon transitions. Introduction to automata simulation tools

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
REGULAR EXPRESSIONS AND LANGUAGES
 

                

Regular Expression – FA and Regular Expressions – Proving languages not to be regular – Closure properties of regular languages – Equivalence and minimization of Automata.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Context-Free Grammar and Languages
 

Context-Free Grammar (CFG) – LMD, RMD, Parse Trees – Ambiguity in grammars and languages – Definition of the Pushdown automata – Languages of a Pushdown Automata, Designing of a PDA and string acceptance – Equivalence of Pushdown automata and CFG, Non-Deterministic Pushdown Automata.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Properties of Context-Free Languages
 

Simplifications of CFG, Normal forms for CFG – Pumping Lemma for CFL - Closure Properties of CFL – Turing Machines – Definition, Problems, Language accepted, String acceptance, Programming Techniques for TM.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Undecidability
 

A language that is not Recursively Enumerable (RE) – An undecidable problem that is RE – Undecidable problems about Turing Machine – Post’s Correspondence Problem - The classes P and NP, Linear Bounded Automata - Definition and examples

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. J.E.Hopcroft, R.Motwani and J.D Ullman, “Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages and Computations”, Pearson Education, 2008.

T2. Peter Linz  “An Introduction to formal languages and automata”, sixth edition, Jones and Bartlett Learning, 2016.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

 

R1. H.R.Lewis and C.H.Papadimitriou, “Elements of The theory of Computation”, Second Edition, Pearson Education/PHI, 2003

R2. J.Martin, “Introduction to Languages and the Theory of Computation”, 3rd Edition, TMH, 2003.

R3. MichealSipser, “Introduction of the Theory and Computation”, Thomson Brokecole, 3rd Edition, 1997

Evaluation Pattern

CIA = 50% out of 100

ESE = 50% out of 100

CS435P - COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND ARCHITECTURE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will help the students to learn about basic structure of computer system, design of arithmetic and logic unit with the implementation of fixed and floating point numbers. Further, it will give knowledge about design of control unit and pipelined processing concepts. It discusses about various parallel processing architectures, different memory systems and I/O Communication systems

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the functions of basic components of computer system and Instruction set Architecture

CO2: Select suitable arithmetic algorithm to solve given arithmetic and logical problems

CO3: Utilize appropriate instruction level parallelism concepts in multiprocessing environment

CO4: Identify suitable control unit design and pipelining principles in computer architecture design

CO5: Choose suitable memory and I/O system design

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEM
 

Functional Units – Basic Operational Concepts – Performance – Instructions: Language of the Computer – Operations, Operands – Instruction representation – Logical operations – decision making – MIPS Addressing.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
COMPUTER ARTHIMETIC
 

Addition and Subtraction – Multiplication – Division – Floating Point Representation – Floating Point Operations – Subword Parallelism

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
BASIC PROCESSING AND CONTROL UNIT
 

A Basic MIPS implementation – Building a Datapath – Control Implementation Scheme – Pipelining – Pipelined data path and control – Handling Data Hazards & Control Hazards – Exceptions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
PARALLELISM
 

Parallel processing challenges – Flynn‘s classification – SISD, MIMD, SIMD, SPMD, and Vector Architectures - Hardware multithreading – Multi-core processors and other Shared Memory Multiprocessors - Introduction to Graphics Processing Units, Clusters, Warehouse Scale Computers and other Message-Passing Multiprocessors.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
MEMORY AND I/O
 

Memory Hierarchy - memory technologies – cache memory – measuring and improving cache performance – virtual memory, TLB‘s – Accessing I/O Devices – Interrupts – Direct Memory Access – Bus structure – Bus operation – Arbitration – Interface circuits - USB.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. David A. Patterson and John L. Hennessy, “Computer Organization and Design: The Hardware/Software Interface”, Fifth Edition, Morgan Kaufmann / Elsevier, 2014.

T2. Carl Hamacher, ZvonkoVranesic, SafwatZaky and NaraigManjikian, “Computer Organization and Embedded Systems”, Sixth Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, 2012.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. William Stallings, “Computer Organization and Architecture – Designing for Performance”, Sixth Edition, Pearson Education, 2003.

R2.  John L. Hennessey and David A. Patterson, “Computer Architecture –A Quantitative Approach”, Fifth Edition, Morgan Kaufmann / Elsevier Publishers,2012.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA  - 70% out of 100

ESE - 30% out of 100

CSHO432AIP - ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND MACHINE LEARNING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

● Discuss the core concepts Statistical Analytics and Regression

● Apply the basic principles, models, and algorithms for Multiple and Non Linear Regression

● Analyze the structures and algorithms of Convolutional Neural Networks

● Explain notions and theories associated to Convolutional Neural Networks

 

● Solve problems in Deep Unsupervised Learning

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and explain concepts associated Statistical Analytics and Regression

CO2: Infer details of Multiple and Non Linear Regression mechanisms.

CO3: Solve problems connected to Convolutional Neural Networks.

CO4: Analyse concepts of Convolutional Neural Networks.

CO5: Appraise concepts of Deep Unsupervised Learning.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Regression
 

Relationship between attributes using Covariance and Correlation, Relationship between multiple variables: Regression (Linear,

Multivariate) in prediction. Residual Analysis, Identifying significant features, feature reduction using AIC, multi-collinearity,

Non-normality and Heteroscedasticity

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Multiple and Non Linear Regression
 

Polynomial Regression, Regularization methods, Lasso, Ridge and Elastic nets, Categorical Variables in Regression, Logit function and

interpretation, Types of error measures (ROCR), Logistic Regression in classification

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Convolutional Neural Networks I
 

Invariance, stability. Variability models (deformation model, stochastic model). Scattering networks, Group Formalism,

Supervised Learning: classification. Properties of CNN representations: invertibility, stability, invariance.

Covariance/invariance: capsules and related models.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Convolutional Neural Networks II
 

Connections with other models: dictionary learning, LISTA. Other tasks: localization, regression. Embeddings (DrLim), inverse problems, Extensions to non-euclidean domains Dynamical systems: RNNs.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Deep Unsupervised Learning
 

Autoencoders (standard, denoising, contractive, Variational Autoencoders Adversarial Generative Networks, Maximum Entropy Distributions

 

 

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.Ian Goodfellow and Yoshua Bengio and Aaron Courville,” Deep Learning ”, MIT Press, March 2018.

T2.Sebastian Raschka and Vahid MirjaliliPython Machine Learning: Machine Learning and Deep Learning with Python, scikit-learn, and TensorFlow 2, 3rd Edition, Packt, 2019

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Seber, Linear Regression Analysis 2ed,Wiley India Exclusive (Cbs), 2018

R2. Jeremy Arkes, Regression Analysis: A Practical Introduction, Routledge, 2019

R3. Aurelien Geron, Hands-On Machine Learning with Scikit-Learn, Keras and Tensor Flow: Concepts, Tools and Techniques to Build Intelligent Systems, Shroff/O'Reilly, 2019

R4. Andreas Muller, Introduction to Machine Learning with Python: A Guide for Data Scientists, Shroff/O'Reilly, 2016

R5. François Chollet, Deep Learning with Python, Manning Publications, 2017

Evaluation Pattern

CIA: 70

ESE:30

CSHO432CSP - MOBILE AND NETWORK BASED ETHICAL HACKING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

After learning the course for a semester, the student will be aware of the hacking concepts in cyber security for addressing cryptography, data protection, information-network security and detection of attacks. The student would also get a clear idea on some of the cases with their analytical studies in cyber-attacks and hacking in the related fields.

Course Outcome

CO1: To describe the vulnerability scanning for network.

CO2: To understand the information gathering modes for any attack on the network

CO3: To evaluate different hacking process and corresponding attacks for mobile platforms

CO4: To interpret means to evade fire-walls and other security parameter for ethical hacking

CO5: To analyze about best possible solutions for different vulnerabilities that are exploited for hacking

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION
 

Introduction to ethical hacking, IP addressing, Network routing protocols, network security, network scanning, and vulnerability assessment OpenVAS, Nessus, etc. of computation device (mobile, pc, etc.) and network of the system

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
UNIT-II
 

Computation system hacking, modes of gathering information, password cracking, penetration testing including backdoor issues, Malware threats and different cyber-related attacks

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
UNIT-III
 

Introduction to Mobile Hacking, encryption types and attacks, different mobile platforms and corresponding vulnerabilities

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
UNIT-IV
 

Evading firewalls, standard detection systems and frameworks, and other possible ways of detecting attacks

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
UNIT-V
 

Case studies: various hacking scenarios and their information gathering along with possible solutions.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Thompsons, Josh. Hacking: Hacking For Beginners Guide On How To Hack, Computer Hacking, And The Basics Of Ethical Hacking (Hacking Books). Create Space Independent Publishing Platform, 2017.

2.     Weidman, Georgia. Penetration testing: a hands-on introduction to hacking. No Starch Press, 2014.

3.     Dwivedi, Himanshu. Mobile application security. Tata McGraw-Hill Education, 2010

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Engebretson, Patrick. The basics of hacking and penetration testing: ethical      hacking and penetration testing made easy. Elsevier, 2013.

2.     McNab, Chris. Network security assessment: know your network. " O'Reilly Media, Inc.", 2007.

3.     Simpson, Michael T., Kent Backman, and James Corley. Hands-on ethical hacking and network defense. Cengage Learning, 2010

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-70

ESE-30

EVS421 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:0
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To understand the scope and importance of environmental science towards developing a conscious community for environmental issues, both at global and local scale.  

Course Outcome

CO1. Explain the components and concept of various ecosystems in the environment (L2, PO7)

CO2. Explain the necessity of natural resources management (L2, PO1, PO2 and PO7)

CO3.Relate the causes and impacts of environmental pollution (L4, PO1, PO2, and PO3, PO4)

CO4.Relate climate change/global atmospheric changes and adaptation (L4,PO7)

CO5. Appraise the role of technology and institutional mechanisms for environmental protection (L5, PO8)

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction
 

Environment and Eco systems – Definition, Scope and importance. Components of environment. Concept and Structure of eco systems. Material Cycles – Nitrogen, Carbon, Sulphur, Phosphorous, Oxygen. Energy Flow and classification of Eco systems.   

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Natural Resources
 

Classification and importance- Forest, Water, Mineral, Food, Energy. Management of natural resources – challenges and methods. Sustainable development – Goals, Agriculture, Industries

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Environmental Pollution
 

Causes and Impacts – Air pollution, Water pollution, Soil Pollution, Noise Pollution, Marine Pollution, Municipal Solid Wastes, Bio Medical and E-Waste. Solid Waste Management

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Climate change/Global Atmospheric Change
 

Global Temperature, Greenhouse effect, global energy balance, Global warming potential, International Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) Emission scenarios, Oceans and climate change. Adaptation methods. Green Climate fund. Climate change related planning- small islands and coastal region. Impact on women, children, youths and marginalized communities

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Environmental Protection
 

Technology, Modern Tools – GIS and  Remote Sensing,. Institutional Mechanisms - Environmental Acts and Regulations, Role of government, Legal aspects. Role of Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) , Environmental Education and Entrepreneurship

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1Kaushik A and Kaushik. C. P, “Perspectives in Environmental Studies”New Age International Publishers, New Delhi, 2018 [Unit: I, II, III and IV]

T2Asthana and Asthana, “A text Book of Environmental Studies”, S. Chand, New Delhi, Revised Edition, 2010 [Unit: I, II, III and V]

T3Nandini. N, Sunitha. N and Tandon. S, “environmental Studies” , Sapana, Bangalore,  June 2019 [Unit: I, II, III and IV]

T4R Rajagopalan, “Environmental Studies – From Crisis to Cure”, Oxford, Seventh University Press, 2017, [Unit: I, II, III and IV]

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1.Miller. G. T and Spoolman. S. E, “Environmental Science”, CENAGE  Learning, New Delhi, 2015

R2.Masters, G andEla, W.P (2015), Introduction to environmental Engineering and Science, 3rd Edition. Pearson., New Delhi, 2013.

R3.Raman Sivakumar, “Principals of Environmental Science and Engineering”, Second Edition, Cengage learning Singapore, 2005.

R4.P. Meenakshi, “Elements of Environmental Science and Engineering”, Prentice Hall of India Private Limited, New Delhi, 2006.

R5.S.M. Prakash, “Environmental Studies”, Elite Publishers Mangalore, 2007

R6.ErachBharucha, “Textbook of Environmental Studies”, for UGC, University press, 2005.

R7. Dr. Pratiba Sing, Dr. AnoopSingh and Dr. PiyushMalaviya, “Textbook of Environmental and Ecology”, Acme Learning Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi.

Evaluation Pattern

No Evaluation

HS422 - PROFESSIONAL ETHICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Understand the importance of Values and Ethics in their personal lives and professional careers

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the importance of Values and Ethics in their personal lives and professional careers

CO2: Learn the rights and responsibilities as an employee, team member and a global citizen

CO3: Estimate the impact of self and organization?s actions on the stakeholders and society

CO4: Develop an ethical behaviour under all situations

CO5: Appreciate the significance of Intellectual Property as a very important driver of growth and development in today?s world and be able to statutorily acquire and use different types of intellectual property in their professional life

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Ethics
 

Introduction to Professional Ethics : Definition, Nature, Scope- Moral Dilemmas- moral Autonomy-Kohlberg’s theory- Gilligan’s theory, Profession Persuasive, Definitions, Multiple motives, Models of professional goals. Moral Reasoning and Ethical theories – Professional Ideals and Virtues- Theories of Right Action, Self- interest, Customs and Regions- Use of ethical Theories

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Engineering as Social Experimentation and Responsibility
 

Engineering as Social Experimentation and Responsibility For Safety Engineering as experimentation- Engineers as responsible experimenters, the challenger case, Codes of Ethics, A balanced outlook on law. Concept of safety and risk, assessment of safety and risk- risk benefit analysis and reducing the risk- three- mile island, Chernobyl and safe exists.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Global Issues and Introduction To Intellectual Property
 

Global Issues and Introduction To Intellectual Property - Multinational corporations- Environmental ethics- Computer ethics and Weapons developments. Meaning and Types of Intellectual Property, Intellectual Property. Law Basics, Agencies responsible for intellectual property registration, International Organizations, Agencies and Treaties, Importance of Intellectual Property Rights.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Foundations of Trademarks
 

Foundations of Trademarks - Meaning of Trademarks, Purpose and Functions of Trademarks, types of Marks, Acquisition of Trademark rights, Common Law rights, Categories of Marks, Trade names and Business Name, Protectable Matter, Exclusions from Trademark Protection.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Foundations of Copyrights Law
 

Foundations of Copyrights Law - Meaning of Copyrights, Common Law rights and Rights under the 1976 copyright Act, Recent developments of the Copyright Act, The United States Copyright Office

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Mike Martin and Roland Schinzinger, “Ethics in Engineering”, McGraw-Hill, New York 1996.

T2. Govindarajan M, Natarajan S, Senthil Kumar V. S, “Engineering Ethics”, Prentice Hall of India,  New  Delhi, 2004.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Jayashree Suresh &B.S.Raghavan “Human values and Professional Ethics”, S. Chand, 2009.

                                   

R2.  Govindarajan, Natarajan and Senthilkumar “Engineering Ethics”, PHI:009.

                                               

R3.  Nagarajan “A Text Book on Professional ethics and Human values”, New Age International, 2009.

                                               

R4.  Charles &Fleddermann “Engineering Ethics”, Pearson, 2009.

                                               

R5.  Rachana Singh Puri and Arvind Viswanathan, I.K.”Practical Approach to Intellectual Property rights”, International Publishing House, New Delhi. 2010.

                                               

R6.  A.B.Rao “Business Ethics and Professional Values”, Excel, 2009

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I -Evaluated out of (20) --> CIA I cnverted to (10)

CIA II - Evaluated out of (50) ---> CIA II cnverted to ( 25) 

CIA III - Evaluated out of (20) ----> CIA III cnverted to (10)

Total CIA is scaled down to 20

Att. Marks5

ESE Evaluated out of (50) ---> ESE converted to (25) 

Total marks - 50

MA431 - PROBABILITY AND QUEUING THEORY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

1.      At the end of the course, the students would have a fundamental knowledge of the basic probability concepts.

2.      Have a well – founded knowledge of standard distributions which can describe real life phenomena.

3.      Acquire skills in handling situations involving more than one random variable and functions of random variables.

4.      Understand and characterize phenomena which evolve with respect to time in a probabilistic manner.

5.      Be exposed to basic characteristic features of a queuing system and acquire skills in analyzing queuing models.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the basic probability concepts {L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO2: Describe standard distributions which can describe real life phenomena {L2} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO3: Solve problems involving more than one random variable and functions of random variables. {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO4: Understand and characterize phenomena which evolve with respect to time in a probabilistic manner. {L4} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

CO5: Explain queuing system and queuing models. {L3} {PO1, PO2, PO3}

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
UNIT I: Probability and Random Variables
 

Axioms of probability - Conditional probability - Total probability – Baye’s theorem Random variable - Probability mass function - Probability density function - Properties – Moments - Moment generating functions and their properties.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
UNIT II: Standard Distributions
 

Poisson, Geometric, Negative Binomial, Uniform, Exponential, Gamma, Weibull and Normal distributions and their properties - Functions of a random variable.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
UNIT III: Two Dimensional Random Variables
 

Joint distributions - Marginal and conditional distributions Covariance– Correlation and regression - Transformation of random variables - Central limit theorem.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
UNIT IV: Random Processes and Markov Chains
 

Classification - Stationary process - Markov process - Poisson process - Birth and death process - Markov chains - Transition probabilities - Limiting distributions. Transition Diagram.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
UNIT V: Queuing Theory
 

Markovian models – M/M/1, M/M/C, finite and infinite capacity - M/M/∞ queues - Finite source model - M/G/1 queue (steady state solutions only) – Pollaczek – Khintchine formula – Special cases. Single and Multiple Server System.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Ross, S., “A first course in probability”, Ninth Edition, Pearson Education, Delhi,  2013  

T2. Medhi J., “Stochastic Processes”, 3rd Edition,New Age Publishers, New Delhi, 2009. 

T3. Veerarajan, “Probability, Statistics and Random process”, Third Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi,  2009.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Allen., A.O., “Probability, Statistics and Queuing Theory”, Academic press, New Delhi

R2. Taha, H. A., “Operations Research-An Introduction”, Eighth Edition, Pearson Education Edition Asia, Delhi, 2015.

R3. Gross, D. and Harris, C.M., “Fundamentals of Queuing theory”, John Wiley and Sons, Third Edition, New York, 2008.

Evaluation Pattern

·         Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

·         End Semester Examination(ESE)      : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

Components of the CIA

CIA I   :  Subject Assignments / Online Tests                      : 10 marks

CIA II  :   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                    : 25 marks                  

CIA III            : Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/

              Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications       : 10 marks

Attendance                                                                             : 05 marks

            Total                                                                                       : 50 marks

Mid Semester Examination (MSE) : Theory Papers:

  • The MSE is conducted for 50 marks of 2 hours duration.
  • Question paper pattern; Five out of Six questions have to be answered. Each  question carries 10 marks

End Semester Examination (ESE):

The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration.

The syllabus for the theory papers are divided into FIVE units and each unit carries equal weightage in terms of marks distribution.

Question paper pattern is as follows.

Two full questions with either or choice will be drawn from each unit. Each question carries 20 marks. There could be a maximum of three sub divisions in a question. The emphasis on the questions is to test the objectiveness, analytical skill and application skill of the concept, from a question bank which reviewed and updated every year

The criteria for drawing the questions from the Question Bank are as follows

50 % - Medium Level questions

25 % - Simple level questions

25 % - Complex level questions

CS531P - COMPUTER NETWORKS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To understand the concepts of data communications.

To study the functions of different layers. To introduce IEEE standards employed in computer networking.

To make the students to get familiarized with different protocols and network components.

To build foundation of Networks in Algorithms and its analysis, Software Engineering Models and Theory of Automata.

Course Outcome

CO1: Outline the basic concepts of reference models and the functionalities of physical layer in computer communications.

CO2: Experiment with the data link layer protocols for error detection and corrections mechanism.

CO3: Develop subnetting using IP addressing schemes and experiment with routing algorithms.

CO4: Analyze the functionalities and features used in UDP and TCP protocols.

CO5: Examine the Application layer protocols and cryptographic algorithms used in networking environment.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
DATA COMMUNICATIONS
 

Components – Direction of Data flow – networks – Components and Categories – types of Connections – Topologies –Protocols and Standards – ISO / OSI model – Transmission Media – Coaxial Cable – Fiber Optics – Line Coding – Modems – RS232 Interfacing sequences.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
DATA LINK LAYER
 

Error – detection and correction – Parity – LRC – CRC – Hamming code – low Control and Error control - stop and wait – go back-N ARQ – selective repeat ARQ- sliding window – HDLC. - LAN - Ethernet IEEE 802.3 - IEEE 802.4 - IEEE 802.5 - IEEE 802.11 – FDDI - SONET – Bridges.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
NETWORK LAYER
 

Internetworks – Packet Switching and Datagram approach – IP addressing methods – Subnetting – Routing – Distance Vector Routing – Link State Routing – Routers.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
TRANSPORT LAYER
 

Duties of transport layer – Multiplexing – Demultiplexing – Sockets – User Datagram Protocol (UDP) – Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) – Congestion Control – Quality of services (QOS) – Integrated Services.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
APPLICATION LAYER
 

Domain Name Space (DNS) – SMTP – FTP – HTTP - WWW – Security – Cryptography-Case study.

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1: Behrouz A. Forouzan, “Data communication and Networking with TCP/IP protocol suite”, Tata McGraw-Hill, Sixth Edition, 2021. ISBN 978-1-26-436335-3.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1: James F. Kurose, Keith Ross, “Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet”, Pearson Education, 2020. ISBN: 9780135928523.

R2: Larry L. Peterson, Bruce S. Davie, Computer Networks: A Systems Approach Edition: 6th Edition, MK-Morgan Kaufmann/Elsevier-2021. ISBN: 978-0-12-818200-0.

R3: Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Nick Feamster, David J. Wetherall, Computer Networks: 6th Edition, Pearson, 2021, ISBN 9780136764052.

Evaluation Pattern

Continous internal assesment 70%

End Semester Examination 30%

CS532 - INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICAL INTELLIGENCE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

This course provides a strong foundation of fundamental concepts in Artificial Intelligence. To provide a basic exposition to the goals and methods and to enable the student to apply these techniques in applications which involve perception, reasoning and learning.

Course Outcome

CO1: Illustrate the basics of Artificial Intelligence and problem solving

CO2: Explain the various Searching Techniques

CO3: Outline the Adversial Search and CSP

CO4: Make use of Knowledge Engineering in real world representation

CO5: Apply the different Forms of Learning

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION
 

History - Applications – Components of AI - Intelligent Agents - Characteristics of Intelligent Agents - Agents and Environments - Good behavior – The nature of environments – structure of agents - Problem Solving - problem solving agents – Example problems– Searching for solutions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
SEARCHING TECHNIQUES
 

Classical Search: Uniformed Search strategies - BFS - DFS- Bidirectional Search-Informed Heuristics Search Strategies -Heuristic function - Greedy - best -first search-A* Algorithm. local search algorithms and optimization problems –Hill-climbing Search, Simulated annealing, Local beam Search, Genetic algorithm -Searching with partial observations - Online Search Agents and Unknown Environment.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
GAME PLAYING AND CSP
 

Games – Optimal decisions in games –Min-Max algorithm- Alpha – Beta Pruning – imperfect real-time decision –Stochastic Games. 

Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP): Definition - Constraint propogation - Backtracking search - Local Search -The Structure of problems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
KNOWLEDGE REPRESENTATION
 

Logic - Propositional logic - First order logic – Syntax and semantics for first order logic – Using first order logic – Knowledge engineering in first order logic. 

Inference in First order logic – propositional versus first order logic – unification and lifting – forward chaining – backward chaining - Resolution - Knowledge representation - Ontological Engineering - Categories and objects.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
LEARNING
 

Learning from Examples : Forms of Learning - Supervised learning - Learning Decision Trees - Regression and classification with linear models, Artificial Neural Network. 

Knowledge in Learning : Logical formulation of learning – Explanation based learning – Learning using relevant information – Inductive logic programming. Statistical learning- Learning with complete data - Learning with hidden variable.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books

T1. Stuart Russell and Peter Norvig, “Artificial Intelligence – A Modern Approach”, 4th Edition, Pearson Education, 2020.

T2. Elaine Rich; Kevin Knight; Shivashankar B Nair, “Artificial Intelligence”, 3rd Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2019.

T3. Francois Chollet “Deep Learning with Python”, 1st Edition Manning Publication, 2018.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. Jeff Heaton, "Artificial Intelligence for Humans, Volume 1: Fundamental Algorithms",1st edition, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013

R2. George F. Luger, " Artificial Intelligence: Structures and Strategies for Complex Problem Solving", 6th Edition, Pearson Education,2021

R3.Kevin Warwick, " Artificial Intelligence: The Basics", Routledge, 2011.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment- 50%

End Sem Examination- 50%

CS533P - DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce basic concepts of algorithms; To introduce mathematical aspects and analysis of algorithms; To introduce sorting and searching algorithms; To introduce various algorithmic techniques; To introduce algorithm design methods.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the process of algorithmic problem solving with time and space complexity

CO2: Identify algorithm design techniques for searching and sorting

CO3: Inspect algorithms under divide and conquer technique

CO4: Solve problems by applying dynamic programming technique and determine the efficiency of algorithms.

CO5: Interpret the limitations of Algorithm power and demonstrate backtracking technique.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION AND FUNDAMENTALS OF THE ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHM EFFICIENCY
 

Introduction, Notion of Algorithm, Fundamentals of Algorithmic Solving, Important Problem Types, Fundamentals of the Analysis Framework, Mathematical Analysis  of Non-recursive Algorithm, Mathematical Analysis of Recursive Algorithm and examples, Empirical Analysis of Algorithms and Algorithm Visualization.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
ALGORITHM DESIGN TECHNIQUES
 

Brute Force and Exhaustive Search: Selection Sort, Bubble Sort, Sequential Search and Brute-force string matching, Travelling Salesman Problem, Knapsack Problem, Assignment Problem. 

Decrease and Conquer: Insertion Sort and Topological Sorting and Fake Coin Problem, Russian Peasant Multiplication, Josephus Problem

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
ALGORITHM DESIGN TECHNIQUES
 

Divide and conquer: Merge sort, Quick Sort, Binary Tree Traversals and Related Properties and Multiplication of Large Integers and Strassen’s Matrix Multiplication.

Transform and Conquer: Presorting, Notion of Heap and Heapsort, Horner’s Rule and Binary Exponentiation.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
ALGORITHM DESIGN TECHNIQUES
 

Space and Time Trade - Offs: Sorting by Counting, Horspool’s and Boyer - Moore Algorithm for String Matching, Hashing.

Dynamic Programming: Knapsack Problem, Warshall’s and Floyd’s Algorithm. 

Greedy Techniques: Prim’s Algorithm, Kruskal’s Algorithm, Dijkstra’s Algorithm.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
ALGORITHM DESIGN TECHNIQUES
 

Limitations of Algorithm Power: Decision Trees, P, NP and NP Complete Problems, Challenges in Numerical Algorithms.

Backtracking: n-Queen’s Problem, Hamiltonian Circuit problem and Subset-Sum problem.

Branch and Bound: Assignment problem, Knapsack problem and Traveling salesman problem.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. AnanyLevitin, “Introduction to the Design and Analysis of Algorithm”, 3/e, Pearson Education Asia, Reprint 2012.
  2. Michael T. Goodrich, Roberto Tamassia, Michael H. Goldwasser, “Data Structures and Algorithms in Java”, 6/e, Wiley, 2014.
  3. T. H Cormen, C E Leiserson, R L Rivest and C Stein: “Introduction to Algorithms”, 3rd Edition, The MIT Press, 2014.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Ellis Horowitz, Sartaj Sahni and Sanguthevar Rajasekaran, Computer Algorithms, Second Edition, Universities Press, 2007.
  2. Richard Neapolitan, “Foundations of Algorithms”, 5/e, Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2014.
  3. Richard Johnsonbaugh, Marcus Schaefer, “Algorithms”, Pearson Education, 2009.
  4. Clifford A Shaffer, “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in Java”, 3rd Edition, Courier Corporation, 2014.
Evaluation Pattern
  1. Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) for Theory + Practical papers: 70% (70 marks out of 100 marks)
  2. End Semester Examination (ESE): 30% (30 marks out of 100 marks)

CS541E01 - COMPUTER GRAPHICS WITH OPEN GL (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • The students will gain a strong foundation on concept of Computer Graphics.
  • The students will learn the various Input and Output graphics devices.
  • The students will understand the techniques of 2D and 3D transformations.
  • The students will study OpenGL in Java and JOGL and how to create graphics object with JOGL

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the fundamentals of applications and techniques involved in computer graphics.

CO2: Build 2D and 3D transformations using matrices representations in homogeneous coordinates.

CO3: Examine OpenGL functions and relate to Cross-platform API for writing applications.

CO4: Evaluate various properties of geometry.

CO5: Support transformation principles, various types of light and material properties.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION
 

A survey of Computer Graphics, Video Display Devices, Raster-Scan Systems, Graphics Workstation and Viewing Systems, Input Devices, Hard-Copy Devices, Graphics Networks, Graphics on the Internet.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Output primitives & 2-D, 3-D Geometrical transforms
 

Line Drawing Algorithms, DDA Algorithms, Bresenham's Line Algorithm, CircleGenerating Algorithms, Midpoint Circle Algorithms, Ellipse Algorithms, Basic TwoDimensional Transformations, Matrix Representation, Three-Dimensional Translation, Three-Dimensional Rotation, Three-Dimensional Scaling, Other Three-Dimensional Transformations - Reflection and Shears.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Graphics in 2D with OpenGL
 

Java Graphics in 2D, Two-Dimensional Graphics in Java, Transformations and Modeling, Basics of OpenGL and JOGL, Basic OpenGL 2D Programs, Into the Third Dimension, Drawing in 3D, Normal and Textures

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
3D viewing & Projections
 

Geometry, Vectors, Matrices and Homogeneous Coordinates, Primitives, Polygonal Meshes, Drawing Primitives, Viewing and Projections, Perspective Projection, Orthographic Projection, The Viewing Transform, A Simple Avatar, Viewer Nodes in Scene Graphics

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Light, Material & Textures with Open GL
 

Light and Material, Vision and Color, OpenGL Materials, OpenGL Lighting, Lights and Materials in Scenes, Case Study: Textures, Texture targets, Mipmaps and Filtering, Texture Transformations, Creating Texture with OpenGL, Loading Data into Texture, Texture Coordinate Generation, Texture Objects.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. David J. Eck, “Fundamentals of Computer Graphics with Java, OpenGL and JOGL”, Hobart and Williams Smith colleges, 2010.
  2. Donald Hearn, Pauline Baker and Warren Carithers, “Computer Graphics with OpenGL”, 4th Edition Pearson, 2010.
  3. Dave Shreiner, Graham Sellers, John Kessenich, Bill Licea-Kane, "OpenGLR Programming Guide", Pearson Education, 2013
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1.  Donald Hearn and M.Pauline Baker, “Computer Graphics C Version”, Pearson Education, 2003.
  2.  Foley, Vandam, Feiner and Huges, “Computer Graphics: Principles & Practice”, second edition, Pearson Education, 2003.
Evaluation Pattern

 

  •  Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)
  •  End Semester Examination (ESE): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

 

CS541E02 - INTERNET AND WEB PROGRAMMING (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Explain tools for developing applications in Web programming; Describe scripting languages –Java Script; Under case study: Exposure to a web platform.

Course Outcome

CO1: Build the basic web page using HTML and CSS concepts.

CO2: Experiment JavaScript?s for designing web applications.

CO3: Make Use of react JS for building the effective web pages.

CO4: Develop a back end connection using PHP.

CO5: Construct web applications using platforms like Node.js

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
HTML5 and CSS3
 

 HTML5:

 

Introduction to HTML5 basic tags, Forms, Multimedia (video, audio) markup and APIs, Canvas, Data Storage, Drag & Drop, Messaging & Workers CSS3:

Understanding basic CSS Syntax and Styles, Understanding Display, Position, and Document Flow, Changing and styling fonts, Adding transitions and animations, Introduction to usage of bootstrap and sass.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Java Script
 

Java Script: Introduction, Java script function’s, methods and objects, Decisions and loops, Document Object, Model (DOM), JavaScript Events, Ajax and JSON, API, error handling and debugging, Filtering and Form enhancement, Introduction to Dynamic Web Programming, Implementing jQuery and JavaScript in Web Pages, Building Richly Interactive Web Pages with jQuery, Introducing jQuery UI, Getting started and building Web applications with angular JS.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
React JS
 

React js: Introduction, JSX in Depth, Data Flow and Life Cycle Events, Composite and Dynamic Components and Forms, Mixins and the DOM, React on the Server, React Addons, Performance of React Apps, React Router and Data Models, Animation, React Tools, Flux, Redux and React.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
PHP
 

 Introduction to Server-Side Development with PHP, What is Server-Side Development, A Web Server’s Responsibilities, Quick Tour of PHP, Program Control, Functions, PHP Arrays and Super globals, Arrays, $_GET and $_POST Super global Arrays, $_SERVER Array, $_Files Array, Reading/Writing Files, PHP Classes and Objects, Object-Oriented Overview, Classes and Objects in PHP, Object Oriented Design, Error Handling and Validation, What are Errors and Exceptions?, PHP Error Reporting, PHP Error and Exception Handling, connectivity to database and processing the form.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
CASE STUDY - Node.js
 

The Node Module System, The Node Programming Model, Events and Timers, The Command Line Interface, The File System, Streams, Binary Data, Executing Code, Network Programming, HTTP.

Node JS Database Connectivity, MVC Framework and Architecture, Web Hosting and Content Management System, Usage of Amazon storage for web application.

Text Books And Reference Books:

TEXT BOOKS:

1.      Bruce Lawson, Remy Sharp, “Introducing HTML 5”, Pearson Education, 2011.

2.      Ian Lunn, “CSS3 Foundations”, Wiley Publishers, 2012.

3.      Jon Duckett, “JavaScript and JQuery: Interactive Front-End Web Development”, Wiley Publishers: 2014.

4.      Sams, “Teach Yourself AngularJS, JavaScript, and jQuery All in One”, Pearson Education ,2015.

5.      Vipul A M, Prathomesh Sonpatki, “React JS by Example-Building Modern Web Application with React”, Packt Publishing,2019.

6.      Colin J. Ihrig, “Pro Node.js for Developers”, APRESS, 2013.

7.   Randy Connolly, Ricardo Hoar, "Fundamentals of Web Development”, 1 stEdition, Pearson Education India. (ISBN:978-9332575271)

 


Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1.      Matt West, “HTML5 Foundations”, Wiley Publishers: 2012.

2.      Training Guide Programming in HTML5 with JavaScript and CSS3 (MCSD) (Microsoft Press Training Guide), 2013.

3.      Elizabeth Castro, Bruce Hyslop, “HTML and CSS: Visual QuickStart Guide” 8th edition, 2013.

4.      Robin Nixon, “Learning PHP, MySQL &JavaScript with jQuery, CSS and HTML5”, 4 thEdition, O’Reilly Publications, 2015. (ISBN:978-9352130153) 2) Luke Welling, Laura Thomson, “PHP and MySQL Web Development”, 5th Edition, Pearson Education, 2016. (ISBN:978-9332582736)

5.      Nicholas C Zakas, “Professional JavaScript for Web Developers”, 3rd Edition, Wrox/Wiley India, 2012. (ISBN:978-8126535088) 4) David Sawyer Mcfarland, “JavaScript & jQuery: The Missing Manual”, 1st Edition, O’Reilly/Shroff Publishers & Distributors Pvt Ltd, 2014 (ISBN:978- 9351108078)

6.       Zak Ruvalcaba Anne Boehm, “Murach's HTML5 and CSS3”, 3rdEdition, Murachs/Shroff Publishers & Distributors Pvt Ltd, 2016. (ISBN:978-9352133246)

Evaluation Pattern

 

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) for Theory papers: 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

End Semester Examination (ESE): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

 

CS541E04 - CRYPTOGRAPHY AND NETWORK SECURITY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course objectives:

To understand the principles of encryption algorithms; conventional and public key cryptography.

To have a detailed knowledge about authentication, hash functions and Network & application-level security

mechanisms.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain various features of Security mechanisms and services to study Standard Block Ciphers along with their design principles.

CO2: Utilize the basic concepts and algorithms of public key encryption mechanism for secure data transmission.

CO3: Compare various Cryptographic authentications protocols, Hash Functions, Algorithms and Standards.

CO4: Identify Various Protocols and Standards in Network Security.

CO5: Make use of various research directions at system level security.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

OSI Security Architecture, Classical Encryption techniques, Cipher Principles, DES, Crypto analysis of DES, AES, Block Cipher Design Principles and Modes of Operation, Triple DES, Placement of Encryption Function, Traffic Confidentiality.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Public Key Cryptography
 

Introduction to Number theory, Deffie Hellman Key Exchange, Key Management, Elliptic curve Cryptography, Confidentiality using Symmetric Encryption, Public Key Cryptography and RSA.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Authentication & Hash Functions
 

Authentication Requirements, Authentication Functions, Message Authentication Codes, Hash Functions, MD5, SHA, RIPEMD and HMAC Standards

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Network Security
 

Authentication Applications: Kerberos – X.509 Authentication Service – Electronic Mail Security – PGP – S/MIME - IP Security – Web Security.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Application Security
 

Intrusion detection – password management – Viruses and related Threats – Virus Counter measures – Firewall Design Principles – Trusted Systems, Secret sharing schemes, Probabilistic encryption, Quantum Encryption, Attribute and Identity Encryption CASE-Study

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.William Stallings, “Cryptography and Network Security – Principles and Practices”, 6th Edition, 2016.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. AtulKahate, “Cryptography and Network Security”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2013.

R2.Bruce Schneier, “Applied Cryptography”, John Wiley & Sons Inc, 2015.

R3.Charles B. Pfleeger, Shari Lawrence Pfleeger, “Security in Computing”, Fifth Edition, Pearson Education, 2015.

 

Evaluation Pattern

ASSESSMENT - ONLY FOR THEORY COURSE (without practical component)

● Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

● End Semester Examination(ESE) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

 

CS581 - INTERNSHIP - I (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Internships are short-term work experiences that will allow  a student to observe and participate in professional work environments and explore how his interests relate to possible careers. They are important learning opportunities through industry exposure and practices.   

 Course Objectives: 

•Identify how the internship relates to their academic courses and preferred career path

•Integrate existing and new technical knowledge for industrial application

•Understand lifelong learning processes through critical reflection of internship experiences.

•Articulate their experience and skills to potential employers

Course Outcome

CO1: Design solutions to real time complex engineering problems using the concepts of Computer Science and Information Technology through independent study.

CO2: Utilize acquired Skills and professional ethics for developing computational solutions.

CO3: Employ the knowledge aquired to prepare a technical summary and for an oral presentation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Regulations
 

1.The student shall undergo an Internship for30 days starting from the end of 4th semester examination and completing it during the initial period of 5th semester.

2.The department shall nominate a faculty as a mentor for a group of students to prepare and monitor the progress of  the students.

3. The students shall report the progress of the internship to the mentor/guide at regular intervals and may seek his/her advise.

4. The Internship evaluation will  be completed by the end of  5th semesters.

5. The students are permitted to carry out the internship outside India with the following conditions, the entire expenses are to be borne by the student and the University will not give any financial assistance.

6. Students can also undergo internships arranged by the department during vacation.

7. After completion of Internship, students shall submit a report to the department with the approval of both internal and external guides/mentors.

8. There will be an assessment for the internship for 1 credit, in the form of report assessment by the guide/mentor  and a presentation on the internship given to department constituted panel.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Nil

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Nil

Evaluation Pattern

Maximum Marks = 50(Only credit will be displayed in the score card)

Passing marks 40% min

Internship assessment will be carried out based on the following parameters, during the 5th semester as a single Presentation evaluation.

 

Total No. of Internship Hours
(5)

Learning Objectives
(10)

Performance
Contribution
(10)

Personal and
Professional
Development (10)

Quality of Study/work/paper (10)

Submission of Report (5)

Total
(50)

 

EC535OE01 - EMBEDDED BOARDS FOR IOT APPLICATIONS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The aim of this course is to introduce the architecture, programming and interfacing of peripheral devices with embedded boards for IOT applications and design IOT based smart applications. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the architecture, programming and interfacing principles of ATMEGA32 AVR microcontroller and Rasberry Pi

CO2: Understand the applications of ATMEGA32 AVR microcontroller, Microprocessor and Rasberry Pi in IoT

CO3: Analyze the design scheme for IoT using Microcontrollers

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
NETWORKING SENSORS
 

Network Architecture - Sensor Network Scenarios- Optimization Goals and Figures of Merit- Physical Layer and Transceiver Design Considerations-MAC Protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks- Introduction of sensors and transducers

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
ARDUINO BOARD AND its INTERFACING
 

ATMEGA328 microcontroller - Architecture- memory organisation – Operating modes – On chip peripherals- Embedded communication interfaces-  Example programs using Arduino IDE- Integration of peripherals (Buttons & switches, digital inputs, Matrix keypad, Basic RGB color-mixing, electromechanical devices- Displays- sensors(Temperature, Pressure, Humidity, Water level etc.), camera, real time clock, relays, actuators, Bluetooth, Wi-fi)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
IoT BASED SYSTEM DESIGN
 

Definition of IoT- Applications and Verticals- System Architecture-Typical Process Flows-Technological Enablers- Open Standard Reference Model- Design Constraints and Considerations- IoT Security-  Experiments using Arduino Platform

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
RASBERRY-PI
 

Introduction to Raspberry pi – configuration of Raspberry pi – programming raspberry pi - Implementation of IOT with Rasberry pi

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
IMPLEMENTATION
 

{This unit is entirely practical based}

Implementation of a IOT based real time system. The concept of the specific embedded design has to be discussed.

Eg: Smart Irrigation using IOT/IoT Based Biometrics Implementation on Raspberry Pi/ Automation etc.

Note: Unit – V will be based on a group project. Each group comprising of maximum 3 members. Any microcontroller can be used in Unit-V

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.Slama, Dirak “Enterprise IOT : Strategies and Best Practices for Connected Products and services”, Shroff Publisher, 1st edition,2015

T2. Ali Mazidi, Sarmad Naimi, Sepehr Naimi “AVR Microcontroller and Embedded Systems: Using Assembly and C”, Pearson 2013

T3. Wentk, “Richard Raspberry Pi”, John Wiley & Sons, 2014

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. .K. Ray & K.M.Bhurchandi, “Advanced Microprocessors and peripherals- Architectures, Programming and Interfacing”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2002 reprint

R2. Gibson, “Microprocessor and Interfacing” Tata McGraw Hill,II edition, 2009

R3. Muhammad Ali Mazidi, Rolin D. Mckinlay, Danny Causey “8051 Microcontroller and Embedded Systems using Assembly and C” Prentice Hall of India,2008

Evaluation Pattern
Evaluation Pattern
 

·         Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

·         End Semester Examination(ESE)      : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

Components of the CIA

CIA I   :  Subject Assignments / Online Tests                      : 10 marks

CIA II  :   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                    : 25 marks                  

CIA III            : Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/

              Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications       : 10 marks

Attendance                                                                             : 05 marks

            Total                                                                                       : 50 marks

EC535OE02 - FUNDAMENTALS OF IMAGE PROCESSING (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The aim of this course is to introduce image processing fundamentals making the students to understand the different methods available to process an image and also give them an insight about the toolbox in MATLAB which can be used to do simulations in image processing. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the basic principles of image processing

CO2: Understand the tools used for image processing applications

CO3: Analyze the methods used for image preprocessing

CO4: Apply the compression techniques and analyze the results

CO5: Develop an image processing system for a given application

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
DIGITAL IMAGE FUNDAMENTALS
 

Concept of Digital Image, conversion of analog image to digital, General Applications of image processing, Fundamental Steps in Digital Image Processing. Components of an Image Processing System. Elements of Visual Perception. Light and the Electromagnetic Spectrum. Image Sensing and Acquisition. Image Sampling and Quantization

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
MATLAB USING IP TOOL BOX
 

Introduction to MATLAB, Introduction to IP Tool box, Exercises on image enhancement, image restoration, and image segmentation, Fourier Transform, Discrete Fourier Transform and Discrete Cosine Transform

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
IMAGE PROCESSING TECHNIQUES PART 1
 

Image Enhancement in the Spatial Domain: Some Basic Gray Level Transformations. Histogram Processing. Enhancement Using Arithmetic/Logic Operations. Basics of Spatial Filtering. Smoothing Spatial Filters. Sharpening Spatial Filters. Importance of Image Restoration, Model of the Image Degradation/Restoration Process. Noise Models. Filters for Image Restoration: Minimum Mean Square Error (Wiener) Filtering. Constrained Least Squares Filtering. Geometric Mean Filter

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
IMAGE PROCESSING TECHNIQUES PART 2
 

Image Compression: Fundamentals. Image Compression Models. Elements of Information Theory. Error-Free Compression. Lossy Compression. Image Compression Standards. Image Segmentation: Detection of Discontinuities. Edge Linking and Boundary Detection. Thresholding. Region-Based Segmentation. Segmentation by Morphological Watersheds

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
APPLICATION OF IMAGE PROCESSING
 

Applications of image processing in the field of Biomedical, Remote sensing, Machine vision, Pattern recognition, and Microscopic Imaging

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1.Gonzalez and woods, Digital Image Processing using MATLAB, PHI, 2005

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

No reference books

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

·         Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

·         End Semester Examination(ESE)      : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

Components of the CIA

CIA I   :  Subject Assignments / Online Tests                      : 10 marks

CIA II  :   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                    : 25 marks                  

CIA III  : Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/

              Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications       : 10 marks

Attendance                                                                             : 05 marks

            Total                                                                                       : 50 marks

EC535OE03 - OBSERVING EARTH FROM SPACE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The aim of this course is to understand the basics and applications of Satellite Remote Sensing, become familiar with the usage of active and Passive remote Sensing from space and explore the applications of Satellite Remote Sensing from Ecology to National Security. The course will include some simple python based Jupyter Notebooks and open-source Remote Sensing resources. The course will introduce students to a career in Satellite remote sensing

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the basics and applications of Satellite Remote Sensing

CO2: Describe usage of Passive remote Sensing from space

CO3: Explain the applications of active remote sensing from space

CO4: Understand the applications of Satellite Remote Sensing in Agriculture, Forest Biomass Measurement, Security and Geodesy

CO5: Apply the fundamentals of satellite and remote sensing for hazardoues and disaster management uses.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
BASICS Of SATELLITES AND SATELLITE IMAGERY
 

History of Satellites, Types and Classification of Satellites, Launching of Satellites, orbits, attitude and orbit control, Satellite imagery and basics of Satellite datasets, Satellite Imagery for UN SDG, Satellite data analysis

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION TO PASSIVE SATELLITE IMAGERY
 

Concept of Imaging Spectroscopy, Difference between multispectral and hyperspectral, Spectral features, Types of Spectrometer Sensors and missions,resolution,AI and ML in satellite image analysis, Introduction to python and Jupyter notebooks for satellite image analysis

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION TO ACTIVE SATELLITE IMAGERY
 

Active imaging technology, radar range equation and its Implications, using amplitude phase and polarity of returned signals to measure target parameters,scattering matrix and its decomposition, Introduction to EarthEngine and Sentinel Hub

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
LAND APPLICATIONS
 

Use of Satellite Remote Sensing in Agriculture, Forest Biomass Measurement, Security and Geodesy

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
HAZARD AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT
 

Hazards and Disaster Management as per UN SDG, Use of Satellite Remote Sensing in predicting/monitoring floods, Earthquakes, volcanoes and Fires

Text Books And Reference Books:

T1. Rebekah B. Ismaili, “Earth Observation Using Python”, Wiley, 2021, Satellite Communication Anil Mainy Wiley 2010

T2. Ruiliang Pu, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Fundamentals and Practice ,CRC Press 2017

T3. The SAR Handbook. NASA & Servir Global

T4. Liguo Wong,Chunhui Zhao,Hyperspectral Image Processing,Springer 2015

T5. Matteo Pastorino and Andrea Randazzo, “ Microwave Imaging Methods and Applications”, Artech House, 2018

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

R1. Dimitri G. Manolakis  Hyperspectral Imaging Remote Sensing Physics, Sensors, and Algorithms,Cambridge University Press,2016

R2. Smith, B., Carpentier, M.H, “ The Microwave Engineering Handbook-Microwave systems and applications”, Springer

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

·         Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA): 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

·         End Semester Examination(ESE)      : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

Components of the CIA

CIA I   :  Subject Assignments / Online Tests                      : 10 marks

CIA II  :   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                    : 25 marks                  

CIA III  : Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/

              Innovative Assignments/presentations/publications       : 10 marks

Attendance                                                                             : 05 marks

            Total                                                                                       : 50 marks

EE536OE01 - HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the fundamental concepts, principles, analysis and design of hybrid and electric vehicles.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand concepts of hybrid and electric drive configuration, types of electric machines that can be used and the energy storage devices.

CO2: To recognize the application of various drive components and selection of proper component for particular applications.

CO3: To demonstrate the operation on Electrical Machines used in Automotive applications and to carry out the control operation

CO4: To perform mathematical modelling of the power train and to perform sizing of the components based on the design requirements.

CO5: To analyse the various Energy Management strategies used in Hybrid, Electric and Conventional Vehicle with analysis on the scope of regulation of the Energy Management Control.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
HYBRID VEHICLES
 

History and importance of hybrid and electric vehicles, impact of modern drive-trains on energy supplies. Basics of vehicle performance, vehicle power sources, transmission characteristics, and mathematical models to describe vehicle performance.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
HYBRID TRACTION
 

Basic concept of hybrid traction, introduction to various hybrid drive-train topologies, power flow control in hybrid drive-train topologies, fuel efficiency analysis. Basic concepts of electric traction, introduction to various electric drive-train topologies, power flow control in hybrid drive-train topologies, fuel efficiency analysis.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
MOTORS AND DRIVES
 

Introduction to electric components used in hybrid and electric vehicles, configuration and control of DC Motor drives, Configuration and control of Induction Motor drives, configuration and control of Permanent Magnet Motor drives, Configuration and control of Switch Reluctance Motor drives, drive system efficiency.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
INTEGRATION OF SUBSYSTEMS
 

Matching the electric machine and the internal combustion engine (ICE), Sizing the propulsion motor, sizing the power electronics, selecting the energy storage technology, Communications, supporting subsystems

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
ENERGY MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES
 

Introduction to energy management strategies used in hybrid and electric vehicle, classification of different energy management strategies, comparison of different energy management strategies, implementation issues of energy strategies.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      BimalK. Bose, ‘Power Electronics and Motor drives’ , Elsevier, 2011

2.      IqbalHussain, ‘Electric and Hybrid Vehicles: Design Fundamentals’, 2nd edition, CRC Pr I Llc, 2010

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Sira -Ramirez, R. Silva Ortigoza, ‘Control Design Techniques in Power Electronics Devices’, Springer, 2006

2.      Siew-Chong Tan, Yuk-Ming Lai, Chi Kong Tse, ‘Sliding mode control of switching Power Converters’, CRC Press, 2011

3.      Ion Boldea and S.A Nasar, ‘Electric drives’, CRC Press, 2005

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 20 marks

CIA II -midsem 50 marks

CIA III - 20 marks

ESE - 100 marks

EE536OE02 - ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

·         To understand concepts in kinematics and dynamics of robotic system.

·         To introduce control strategies of simple robotic system.

·         To study the applications of computer based control to integrated automation systems.

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the basic concepts in robotics.

CO2: To describe basic elements in a robotic system

CO3: To understand the kinematics, dynamics and programming with respect to a robotic system.

CO4: To understand the control system design for a robotic system

CO5: To discuss some of the robotic applications

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction
 

Robot definitions - Laws of robotics - Robot anatomy - History - Human systems and Robotics - Specifications of Robots - Flexible automation versus Robotic technology - Classification applications

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Robotic systems
 

Basic structure of a robot – Robot end effectors - Manipulators - Classification of robots – Accuracy - Resolution and repeatability of a robot - Drives and control systems – Mechanical components of robots – Sensors and vision systems - Transducers and sensors - Tactile sensors – Proximity sensors and range sensors - Vision systems - RTOS - PLCs - Power electronics

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Robot kinematics, dynamics and programming
 

Matrix representation - Forward and reverse kinematics of three degree of freedom – Robot Arm – Homogeneous transformations – Inverse kinematics of Robot – Robo Arm dynamics - D-H representation of forward kinematic equations of robots - Trajectory planning and avoidance of obstacles - Path planning - Skew motion - Joint integrated motion – Straight line motion - Robot languages- Computer control and Robot programming/software

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Control system design
 

Open loop and feedback control - General approach to control system design - Symbols and drawings - Schematic layout - Travel step diagram, circuit and control modes - Program control - Sequence control - Cascade method - Karnaugh-Veitch mapping - Microcontrollers - Neural network - Artificial Intelligence - Adaptive Control – Hybrid control

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Robot applications
 

Material handling - Machine loading, Assembly, inspection, processing operations and service robots - Mobile Robots - Robot cell layouts - Robot programming languages

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Nagrath and Mittal, “Robotics and Control”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2003.

2.      Spong and Vidhyasagar, “Robot Dynamics and Control”, John Wiley and sons, 2008.

3.      S. R. Deb and S. Deb, ‘Robotics Technology and Flexible Automation’, Tata McGraw Hill Education Pvt. Ltd, 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Saeed B. Niku, ‘Introduction to Robotics’,Prentice Hall of India, 2003.

2.      Mikell P. Grooveret. al., "Industrial Robots - Technology, Programming and Applications",     McGraw Hill, New York, 2008.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I -20 marks

CIA II - midsem 50 marks

CIA III - 20 marks

ESE - 100 marks

EE536OE03 - SMART GRIDS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introducing the concepts of various components of Smart Grid, and their impacts on the energy industry, including renewable integration, PHEV penetration, demand side management, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions. Energy policy modeling and analysis, such as policies on GHG emissions reductions and incentives to green energy investments, will be integrated into the course as well.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the concepts and principles of Smart Grid, technology enabling, and demand participation

CO2: Understand the impacts of renewable resources to the grid and the various issues associated with integrating such resources to the grid.

CO3: Understand the structure of an electricity market in either regulated or deregulated market conditions.

CO4: Understand how (wholesale) electricity is priced in a transmission network.

CO5: Evaluate the trade-off between economics and reliability of an electric power system.

CO6: Evaluate various investment options (e.g. generation capacities, transmission, renewable, demand-side resources, etc) in electricity markets.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION TO SMART GRID
 

Evolution of Electric Grid, Concept of Smart Grid, Definitions, Need of Smart Grid, Functions of Smart Grid, Opportunities & Barriers of Smart Grid, Difference between conventional & smart grid, Concept of Resilient &Self Healing Grid, Present development & International policies in Smart Grid. Case study of Smart Grid.CDM opportunities in Smart Grid.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES: PART 1
 

Introduction to Smart Meters, Real Time Prizing, Smart Appliances, Automatic Meter Reading(AMR), Outage Management System(OMS), Plug in Hybrid Electric Vehicles(PHEV), Vehicle to Grid, Smart Sensors, Home & Building Automation, Phase Shifting Transformers.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES: PART 2
 

Smart Substations, Substation Automation, FeederAutomation. Geographic Information System(GIS), Intelligent Electronic Devices(IED) & theirapplication for monitoring &protection, Smart storage like Battery, SMES, Pumped Hydro,Compressed Air Energy Storage, Wide Area Measurement System(WAMS), PhaseMeasurement Unit(PMU).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SMART GRID
 

Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), Home Area Network (HAN), Neighborhood Area Network (NAN), Wide Area Network (WAN). Bluetooth, ZigBee, GPS, Wi-Fi, Wi-Max based communication, Wireless Mesh Network, Basics of CLOUD Computing & Cyber Security for Smart Grid. Broadband over Power line (BPL). IP based protocols.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
POWER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN SMART GRID
 

Power Quality & EMC in Smart Grid, Power Quality issues of Grid connected Renewable Energy Sources, Power Quality Conditioners for Smart Grid, Web based Power Quality monitoring, Power Quality Audit.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Ali Keyhani, Mohammad N. Marwali, Min Dai “Integration of Green and Renewable Energy in Electric Power Systems”, Wiley

2. Clark W. Gellings, “The Smart Grid: Enabling Energy Efficiency and Demand Response”,CRC Press

3. JanakaEkanayake, Nick Jenkins, KithsiriLiyanage, Jianzhong Wu, Akihiko Yokoyama,“Smart Grid: Technology and Applications”, Wiley

4. Jean Claude Sabonnadière, NouredineHadjsaïd, “Smart Grids”, Wiley Blackwell

5. Peter S. Fox Penner, “Smart Power: Climate Changes, the Smart Grid, and the Future ofElectric Utilities”, Island Press; 1 edition 8 Jun 2010

6. S. Chowdhury, S. P. Chowdhury, P. Crossley, “Microgrids and Active DistributionNetworks.” Institution of Engineering and Technology, 30 Jun 2009

7. Stuart Borlase, “Smart Grids (Power Engineering)”, CRC Press

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Andres Carvallo, John Cooper, “The Advanced Smart Grid: Edge Power DrivingSustainability: 1”, Artech House Publishers July 2011

2. James Northcote, Green, Robert G. Wilson “Control and Automation of Electric PowerDistribution Systems (Power Engineering)”, CRC Press

3. MladenKezunovic, Mark G. Adamiak, Alexander P. Apostolov, Jeffrey George Gilbert“Substation Automation (Power Electronics and Power Systems)”, Springer

4. R. C. Dugan, Mark F. McGranghan, Surya Santoso, H. Wayne Beaty, “Electrical PowerSystem Quality”, 2nd Edition, McGraw Hill Publication

5. Yang Xiao, “Communication and Networking in Smart Grids”, CRC Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

End Semester Examination(ESE)          : 50% (50 marks out of 100 marks)

Components of the CIA

CIA I  :  Subject Assignments / Online Tests             : 10 marks

CIA II:   Mid Semester Examination (Theory)                      : 25 marks                   

CIAIII: Quiz/Seminar/Case Studies/Project/

Innovative assignments/ presentations/ publications              : 10 marks

Attendance                                                                             : 05 marks

            Total                                                                            : 50 marks

Mid Semester Examination (MSE): Theory Papers:

The MSE is conducted for 50 marks of 2 hours duration.

Question paper pattern; Five out of Six questions have to be answered. Each question carries 10 marks

End Semester Examination (ESE):

The ESE is conducted for 100 marks of 3 hours duration.

The syllabus for the theory papers are divided into FIVE units and each unit carries equal Weightage in terms of marks distribution.

Question paper pattern is as follows.

Two full questions with either or choice will be drawn from each unit. Each question carries 20 marks. There could be a maximum of three sub divisions in a question. The emphasis on the questions is to test the objectiveness, analytical skill and application skill of the concept, from a question bank which reviewed and updated every year

The criteria for drawing the questions from the Question Bank are as follows

50 % - Medium Level questions

25 % - Simple level questions

25 % - Complex level questions

HS521 - PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course develops the competencies and skills for planning and controlling projects and understanding interpersonal issues that drive successful project outcomes. Focusing on the introduction of new products and processes, it examines the project management life cycle, defining project parameters, matrix management challenges, effective project management tools and techniques, and the role of a Project Manager. This course guides students through the fundamental project management tools and behavioral skills necessary to successfully launch, lead, and realize benefits from projects in profit and non-profit organizations.

Course Outcome

CO1: Apply the concept of project management in engineering field through project management life cycle.

CO2: Analyze the quality management and project activity in engineering field through work breakdown structure.

CO3: Analyze the fundamentals of project and network diagram in engineering and management domain through PDM techniques.

CO4: Understand the basics of Business finance and its applications.

CO5: Understand the meaning and approached to Capital and Financial Structure

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT MANAGEMENT
 

Introduction to Organisations, Principles of Management - its functions, Skills, Organisation Structure, Financial Feasibility. Introduction to Project, Concept, Project Management, Project Life Cycle, Role of Project Manager - Functional Areas, Qualities and Responsibilities, Impact of Delays in Project Completions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
PROJECT PLAN
 

Project management functions - Controlling, directing, project authority, responsibility, accountability, Scope of Planning, Market Analysis, Demand Forecasting, Product line analysis, Product Mix Analysis, New Product development, Plant location, plant capacity, Capital Budgeting, Time Value of Money, Cash flow importance, decision tree analysis.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
PROJECT SCHEDULING
 

Introduction, Estimation of Time, Project Network Analysis - CPM and PERT model, Gantt Chart, Resource Loading,Resource Leveling, Resource Allocation.  Estimating activity time and total program time, total PERT/CPM planning crash times, software‘s used in project management.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
PROJECT MONITORING AND CONTROLLING
 

Introduction, Purpose, Types of control, Designing and Monitoring Systems, reporting and types. Financial Control, Quality Control, Human Resource Control, Management Control System, Project Quality Management, Managing Risks.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
PROJECT EVALUATION AND AUDITING
 

Types of Project Closures, Wrap-Up closure activities, Purpose of Project Evaluation - Advantages, factors considered for termination of project, Project Termination process, Project Final report. Budgeting, Cost estimation, cost escalation, life cycle cost. Project finance in the roads sector, Project finance (Build Own Operate (BOO) / Build Own Operate Transfer (BOOT) Projects / Build Operate and Transfer (BOT).

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

T1. “Effective Project Management”, Robert K. Wysocki, Robert Beck. Jr., and David B. Crane; - John Wiley & Sons 2003.

T2. . Richard A.Brealey, Stewart C.Myers, and Mohanthy, Principles of Corporate Finance, Tata McGraw Hill, 11th Edition, 2014.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

R1. “Project Planning and Control with CPM and PERT” Dr. B.C. Punmia & K.K.Khandelwal; - Laxmi Publications, New Delhi 2011.

R2. I.M.Pandey, Financial Management, Vikas Publishing House Pvt., Ltd., 11th Edition, 2008.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 50% out of 100

ESE - 50% out of 100

IC521 - INDIAN CONSTITUTION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed to create awareness on the rights and responsibilities as a citizen of India and to understand the administrative structure, legal system in India.

Course Outcome

At the end of the course, the students will be able to:

1. Explain the fundamental rights granted to citizens of India as per the Constitution 

2. Describe the Directive Principles of State Policy along with its key aspects 

3. Explain the legislative powers of Union Government and its elected legislature

4. Understand the Indian judiciary with respect to civil and criminal aspects

5. Explain the working of state government and its electoral powers

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Making of the Constitution and Fundamental Rights
 

Introduction to the constitution of India, the preamble of the constitution, Justice,  Liberty, equality, Fraternity, basic postulates of the preamble

Right to equality, Right to freedom, Right against exploitation, Right to freedom of religion, Cultural and educational rights, Right to constitutional remedies 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Directive Principles of State Policy and Fundamental Duties
 

Directive Principles of State Policy, key aspects envisaged through the directive principles, Article 51A and  main duties of a citizen in India

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Union Government and Union Legislature
 

the president of India, the vice president of India, election method, term, removal, executive and legislative powers, prime minister and council of ministers, election, powers, parliament, the Upper House and the Lower House, composition, function

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Indian Judiciary
 

Supreme court, high courts, hierarchy, jurisdiction, civil and criminal cases, judicial activism 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
State Government and Elections in India
 

State executive, governor, powers , legislative council and assembly, composition, powers, electoral process, election commission, emergency

Text Books And Reference Books:

R1. B R Ambedkar, ‘The Constitution of India’. Government of India

R2. Durga Das Basu, Introduction to the Constitution of India, LexisNexis, 24th edition

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

As per university norms

IT541E01 - UNIX AND SHELL PROGRAMMING (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • Identify and define key terms related to operating system.
  • Explain basic Unix concepts related to concurrency and control of programs.
  • Capability to name and state the function of Unix commands.

Course Outcome

CO1: Outline the basics of UNIX Operating System.

CO2: Understand the UNIX file system aspects.

CO3: Formulate and develop the process concept of UNIX OS.

CO4: Design SHELL programming, services and utilities of UNIX OS.

CO5: Describe the importance of Awk and Perl Programming.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION
 

General Overview of the System: System structure, user perspective, O/S services assumption about Hardware, The Kernel and buffer cache architecture of Unix O/S, System concepts, Kernel data Structure, System administration, Buffer headers, Structure of the buffer pool, Scenarios for retrieval of the buffer, Reading and writing disk block, Advantage and disadvantage of buffer cache.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
INTERNAL REPRESENTATION OF FILES
 

Internal Representation of Files: Inodes, Structure of regular, Directories conversions of a path name to an inode, Super block, Inode assignment to a new file, Allocation of disk blocks, Open read write file and record close, File creation, Operation of special files change directory and change root, change owner and change mode. STAT and FSTAT, PIPES mounting and unmounting files system, Link Unlink

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
STRUCTURES OF PROCESSES AND PROCESS CONTROL
 

Structures of Processes and process control: Process states and transitions layout of system memory, the context of a process, manipulation of process address space, Sleep process creation/termination. The user Id of a process, changing the size of a process. Killing process with signals, job control, scheduling commands: AT and BATCH, TIME, CORN.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION TO SHELL SCRIPTS
 

Introduction to shell scripts: shell Bourne shell, C shell, Unix commands, permissions, editors, grep family, shell variables, scripts, metacharacters and environment, if and case statements, for while and until loops. Shell programming.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION OF AWK AND PERL PROGRAMMING
 

Introduction of AWK and Perl Programming: AWK pattern scanning, BEGIN and END patterns, AWK arithmetic and variables, and operators, functions, perl; the chop() function, variable and operators. Networking tools: Resolving IP addressing, TELNET, FTP, Socket programming, introduction of Linux structure.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

1. Sumitabha Das “Unix concepts and Applications”, Tata McGraw Hill, Fourth Edition, 2017.

2. Y.Kanetkar “Unix shell programming”, BPB Pub.

3. M.J. Bach “Design of UNIX O.S.", PHI Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

1. B.W. Kernighan & R. Pike, “The UNIX Programming Environment”, PHI Learning.

2. S.Prata “Advanced UNIX: A Programming's Guide”, BPB Publications, New Delhi.

3. Beck “Linux Kernel, Pearson Education, Asia.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 50% out of 100

ESE - 50% out of 100

BTGE631 - CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will familiarize the students with the concept of corporate social responsibility. The evolution of CSR has far reaching consequences on the development sector in India. The collaboration of companies and NGOs with the community has initiated a new paradigm of change in the country. The students will have an overview of the theories and the frameworks developed in the area of CSR. The paper will discuss a few prominent case studies of CSR.

 Course Objectives 

 

  • To understand the concept of CSR and the theoretical underpinnings.

  • To understand the stakeholder approaches.

  • To provide an experiential, integrative, substantive, and high quality experience surrounding issues of Corporate Social Responsibility

  • To provide participating students with a truly unique curriculum experience with field experience.

Course Outcome

CO1: The student will understand the different dimensions of the concept of CSR.

CO2: They will understand the theoretical framework of CSR and the legal guidelines developed to undertake CSR.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Corporate social responsibility
 

Defining CSR. Aim and Objectives, Components of CSR, key  drivers,  History  and  Evolution  of  CSR  in  the  Indian 

and international  context,  CSR  policies  and  Governance,  Laws  and Regulations. Competencies of CSR Professionals. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Stakeholder Engagement
 

Stakeholder engagement, Interaction in a Multi-Stakeholder Context: CSR role on internal environment: Employees, Human Resource Management - labour security and human rights, Health and Safety.CSR role on External environment: 1) Customers: Consumer rights and movements affecting CSR; (2) Community: Community involvement, (3) Shareholders (4) Suppliers.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
CSR towards Environment and Biodiversity
 

Environment: Need for Environmental assessments. Governments’ response to CSR. Role of Biodiversity, Climate change and Environment in business. Environmental compliance. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Sustainability models
 

Benefits of CSR to Business. Factors hindering CSR activities in companies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Theories of CSR
 

Theories of CSR: A.B Carroll, Wood, and stakeholders Theories.  The triple bottom line approach.  Stakeholder engagement, Standards and Codes – SA 8000, the Global Compact, GRI, ISO 26000.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Agarwal, S. (2008). Corporate social responsibility in India. Los Angeles: Response.

  • Visser, W. (2007). The A to Z of corporate social responsibility a complete reference guide to concepts, codes and organisations. Chichester, England: John Wiley & Sons. 

  •  Crane, A. (2008). Corporate social responsibility: Readings and cases in a global context. London: Routledge.'

 Werther, W., & Chandler, D. (2006). Strategic corporate social responsibility: Stakeholders in a global environment. Thousand Oaks: SAGE Publications.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Baxi, C. (2005). Corporate social responsibility: Concepts and cases: The Indian experience. New Delhi, India: Excel Books.

Visser, W. (2011). The age of responsibility CSR 2.0 and the new DNA of business. Chichester, West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 20 Marks

CIA 2 - 50 Marks 

CIA 3 - 20 marks

 

ESE - 100 marks

BTGE632 - DIGITAL MEDIA (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides students the insight on search engine optimization, social media and digital marketing techniques that helps them understand how each of the social media platforms works and how to strategize for any type of objectives from clients. Students will discover the potential of digital media space and will have hands on experience with different digital platforms.

Course Outcome

 

  • Students would be able to optimize the website and social media platforms which will be search engine friendly and as well as user friendly.
  • Students would be able to develop a digital strategy for a business’s online objectives.

 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Concepts
 

Website Hosting/Design/Development/Content, Fundamentals of SEO, Voice Search Optimization, Local SEO, Advanced/Technical SEO, SEO Audit, Competition Analysis, Concepts of Digital Marketing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Marketing
 

Marketing on platforms – Facebook/Twitter/LinkedIn/Instagram/YouTube, Quora, Basics of Video Editing, Inbound Marketing, Email Marketing, Digital Marketing Planning and Strategy, Marketing Automations and Tools

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Growth Hacking
 

Ethical vs. Unethical, Funnels, KPI’s, Viral Coefficient, Cohorts, Segments, Multivariate Testing, Lifetime Value of a Customer, Customer Acquisition Cost, Analytics Types, Tools, Project

Text Books And Reference Books:

Phillip J. Windley, "Digital Identity" O'Reilly Media, 2005

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Dan Rayburn, Michael Hoch, "The Business of Streaming and Digital Media", Focal Press, 2005

Evaluation Pattern
  • CIA 1 - Evaluated out of 20, which will be converted to 10
  • CIA 2 - Mid Semester Exam evaluated out of 50, which will be converted to 25
  • CIA 3 - Evaluated out of 20, which will be converted to 10
  • Total CIA Marks after conversion - 45
  • Attendance Marks - 5
  • ESE Evaluated out of 100, which will be converted to 50
  • Total Marks = CIA (Total) + ESE + Attendance = 45 + 50 + 5 = 100

 

BTGE633 - FUNCTIONAL ENGLISH (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Students will be able to develop a clear understanding of the principles and characteristics of communication in professional settings. They would have developed skills for grammatical accuracy, precise vocabulary, clear style and appropriate tone for formal, professional communication

Course Outcome

•          Upon completing the syllabus students will be able to show a good grasp of the fundamentals of English language

•          Will be able to deliver the topic orally and in writing with greater independence and greater linguistic correctness

•          Will be able to distinguish and discuss differences in English language structure between speech and writing as well as distinguish and discuss stylistic differences (formal and informal English)

•          Will be able to actively and independently participate in group discussions, can make successful attempt to persuade in decision making, and can withstand the pressures in interview.

•          Will be equipped to network in academic and work settings. Would be able to confidently appear in front of a larger crowd and give presentations

 

•          Will acquire skills in CV writing, cover letter writing and content generation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Verbal
 

       Training on Nouns, Pronouns, Homophones, Homonyms

       Verbs and Gender

       Training on Tenses

       Active Voice, Passive Voice and Sentence Formation

       Direct and Indirect Speech

 

       Adjectives and Adverbs

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
FORMAL COMMUNICATION
 

       Barriers of communication and effective solutions

       Workplace English

       Pleasantries and networking

       Cross-cultural understanding

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
WRITTEN Workplace English
 

•    Professional Writing

•    Analytical

•    Instructional including writing MOMs

•    Project Planning

•    Creative writing

•    Blogging

•    Event management proposal meeting

•          Professional communication – Email Etiquette, Cover letters, Resume

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
WRITTEN Academic Writing
 

       Application in technical fields and written communication

       Project writing, essays and theories

       Paper presentation skills and creative writing

 

       Final project writing

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
PUBLIC SPEAKING
 

       Training on Presentation Skills

       Body Language and Accent Training

       Voice projection

       Group Discussion Do’s and Don’ts

       Getting individual feedback

Training on appropriate grooming code and body language in a professional workplace and delivery of apt elevator pitch

Text Books And Reference Books:

   TEXT BOOKS

       High School English Grammar and Composition Book, Wren and Martin

 

       Writing At Work: Professional Writing Skills for People, Edward L. Smith and Stephen A. Bernhardt

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

REFERENCE BOOKS

       English grammar in use book – Raymond Murphy

       WordPress to Go: How to Build a WordPress Website on Your Own Domain, from Scratch, Even If You Are a Complete Beginner Sarah McHarry.

       The Art of Public Speaking

       Textbook by Stephen E. Lucas

       True Professionalism, David Maister

Evaluation Pattern

Stress Interview/ Panel Discussion/Group

BTGE634 - GERMAN (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Description:  Can understand and use familiar, everyday expressions and very simple sentences, which relate to the satisfying of concrete needs. Can introduce him/herself and others as well as ask others about themselves

Objectives

      Impart the language and through that insight into the country and the culture.

     Sensitize the students to the environment of a foreign country. To enable the students adapt to a new environment and culture.

Course Outcome

CO1: Can understand and use familiar, everyday expressions and very simple sentences, which relate to the satisfying of concrete needs.

CO2: Can introduce oneself and others as well as ask others about themselves ? e.g. where they live, whom they know and what they own ? and can respond to questions of this nature.

C03: Can handle everyday situations like shopping, eating out, visiting places, travelling, holidaying, requesting for information, making an appointment, cancelling an appointment, filling up a form etc.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
INTRODUCTION, SELF AND OTHERS
 

Introduction: Greeting and saying goodbye, Introducing yourself and others, Talking about yourself and others.

Numbers, telephone numbers and mail-addresses, the alphabet (spelling), countries and languages.

Question words, sentences, verbs and personal pronouns.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
AROUND YOU? :FRIENDS, COLLEGEAUS
 

Hobbies, meeting friends, Weekdays, months and seasons, work and working times

Articles, verbs, Yes/ no questions, Plurals, The verbs “to have” and “to be”.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
PLACES TO VISIT
 

Places in the city, asking for directions, Means of transport. Orientation in a city.

Imperative sentences.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
FOOD
 

Shopping for food, conversation during food shopping, ordering food and drinks, general greetings during eating out.

Word position in sentence, accusative case.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
TIME WITH FRIENDS
 

Telling time and organizing meetings with family and friends.

Making plans, Birthday invitations, in Restaurants.

Finding information in a text, event tips in the radio, leisure activities, brochures.

Possessive articles, Modal verbs ,simplePast tense (to have and to be)

Text Books And Reference Books:

·       Netzwerk – Deutsch als Fremdsprache A1.

Publisher- Langenscheidt

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

·       Netzwerk – Deutsch als Fremdsprache A1.

Publisher- Langenscheidt

Evaluation Pattern

·       CIA I

 

Content

 

 

Marks

 

Nature of evaluation

 

Self introduction

Answering 2 Questions

 

 

4

6

 

Speaking

 

Filling an application form

 

 

10

 

Written

 

 

·       CIA II

Written examination 50 marks

 

·       CIA III

 

Content

 

 

Marks

 

Nature of evaluation

 

Hearing comprehension

Reading comprehension

 

 

5

5

 

Listening to a track

Written

 

Writing a letter

 

 

10

 

Written

·       SEMESTER EXAM

 

Written examination 100 marks

 

BTGE635 - INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Innovation is crucial to us and plays significant role in the growth of economy. Government policies and legal framework offer protection to new inventions and creative works. This course intends to equip students to understand the policies and procedures they may have to rely on for the purposed of protecting their inventions or creative works during the course of their study or employment.

The course consists of five units. Theories behind the protection of intellectual property and its role in promoting innovations for the progress of the society are the focus of first unit. Second unit deals with protection of inventions through patent regime in India touching upon the process of obtaining international patents. The central feature of getting patent is to establish new invention through evidence. This is done through maintaining experimental/lab records and other necessary documents. The process of creating and maintain documentary evidence is dealt in Unit 3. Computers have become an integral part of human life. Till 1980, computer related inventions were not given much importance and lying low but today they have assumed huge significance in our economy. Computer related inventions and their protection which requires special treatment under legal regimes are discussed in Unit 4. The last module deals with innovations in e- commerce environment.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the meaning and importance of intellectual property rights as well as different categories of intellectual property.

CO2: Understand the meaning of patentable invention, the procedure for filing patent applications, rights of the patentee and the different rights of patentee.

CO3: Maintain research records in the patent process, the process of patent document searching and how to interact with patent agent or attorney.

CO4: Understand the issues related to patenting of software, digital rights management and database management system.

CO5: Understand the intellectual property issues in e- commerce, evidentiary value of electronic signature certificates, protection of websites and the protection of semiconductor integrated circuits.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction
 

Detailed Syllabus: Philosophy of intellectual property - Intellectual Property & Intellectual Assists – Significance of IP for Engineers and Scientists – Types of IP – Legal framework for Protection of IP – Strategies for IP protection and role of Engineers and Scientists.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Patenting Inventions
 

Meaning of Invention – Product and Process Patents – True inventor – Applications for Patent – Procedures for obtaining Patent – Award of Patent – rights of patentee – grounds for invalidation – Legal remedies – International patents

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Inventive Activities
 

Research Records in the patent process – Inventorship - Internet patent document searching and interactions with an information specialist - Interactions with a patent agent or attorney - Ancillary patent activities - Technology transfer, patent licensing and related strategies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Computer Implemented Inventions
 

Patents and software – Business Method Patents – Data protection – Administrative methods – Digital Rights Management (DRM) – Database and Database Management systems - Billing and payment – Graphical User Interface (GUI) – Simulations – E-learning – Medical informatics – Mathematical models

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Innovations in E-Commerce
 

IP issues in e-commerce - Protection of websites – website hosting agreements – Copyright issues – Patentability of online business models – Jurisdiction – Digital signatures – Evidentiary value of Electronic signature certificates – Role of Certifying Authorities – Protection of  Semiconductor ICs

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. V.J. Taraporevala’s, Law of  Intellectual Property, Third Edition, 2019

2. Elizabeth Verkey, Intellectual Property, Eastern Book Company,  2015

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Martin Adelman, Cases and Materials on Patent Law, 2015

2. Avery N. Goldstein, Patent Law for Scientists and Engineers, Taylor & Francis (2005)

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1

Assignment description: Class test to identify the different aspects of IP.

 

Assignment details: MCQs

 

CIA II (MSE)

Assessment Description: Closed book exam

Assignment Details: Mid semester examination five questions need to be answered.

 

CIA III

Assessment Description: Students would be assessed on the understanding of the different forms of IP, relevant theoretical justifications of intellectual property protection and the relevant IP statute from practitioner’s approach taught in the class and their ability to apply it correctly to the given problem and proposing solutions.

 

Assignment details: Students will be given a hypothetical legal problem in IP and will be required to write short essay, containing maximum 500 words. In the short essay, they have to answer the following questions

1. Identify the appropriate form of intellectual property.

2. Describe whether a pertinent theoretical justification meets or does not meet the respective form of IP.

3. Apply the correct principle of IP protection to the given case.

4. Evaluate the lacunae in the existing IP mechanism in comparison to international framework.

5. Devise a correct way of handling the lacunas.

ESE DETAILS -

Assessment Description : Closed book exam

Assignment Details: Five problem based questions need to be answered out of seven questions.

BTGE636 - INTRODUCTION TO AVIATION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

A student successfully completing this course will be able to:

Explain basic terms and concepts in air transportation, including commercial, military, and general aviation; air traffic control. Identify on the parts of an aircraft, classify the aircraft types and Construct models of an Aircraft. Understand the types of Aero engines and analyse the impact of meteorology in Aviation.

Course Outcome

CO1: Interpret the fundamental principles of flight based on theorems and parts of the Aircraft

CO2: Summarize the types of aircrafts and illustrate modelling of an Aircraft

CO3: Identify the types of Aero engines and Make use of Meteorology

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Principles of Flight
 

Development of Aviation- Introduction- Laws of Motion -Bernoulli’s Theorem and Venturi Effect – Aero foil- Forces on an Aircraft- Flaps and Slats- Stalling- Thrust, Basic Flight Instruments- Introduction of Radar- Requirement of Navigation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Aircrafts and Aeromodelling
 

Airfield Layout- Rules of the Air- Circuit Procedure ATC / RT Procedure Aircraft Controls- Fuselage – Main Tail Plane Ailerons- Elevators- Rudder –Landing Gear.

 Fighters- Transports- Helicopters- Foreign Aircraft History of Aero modelling- Materials used in Aero modelling - Types of Aero models

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Aero Engines and Meteorology
 

Introduction of Aero engines - Types of Engines-Piston Engines -Jet Engines – Turboprop Engines, Importance of Meteorology in Aviation- Atmosphere - Clouds and Precipitation - Visibility – Humidity and Condensation

Text Books And Reference Books:

Text Books:

• Airwing Cadet Handbook, Specialized Subject SD/SW, Maxwell Press, 2016.

• Introduction to Aerospace Engineering: Basic Principles of Flight, Ethirajan Rathakrishnan, Wiley Press, 2021.

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Reference Books:

• An Observer’s Guide to Clouds and Weather, Toby Carlson, Paul Knight, and Celia Wyckoff,2015, American Meteorological Society.

• Aero Engines, LNVM Society, 2007, L.N.V.M. Society Group of Institutes. 

Evaluation Pattern

This Course do not have CIA 1/2/3. It has Overall CIA(out of 100 and will be Converted to 50) and ESE ( out of 100 and will be converted to 50). Total Marks=100.

BTGE637 - PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The main aim of the course is to enhance personal and professional development of the student. It will also prepare students to assume appropriate professional roles at work and develop personal awareness.

Objectives of the course are

  • To provide students with frameworks from psychology of human development
  • To enhance their personal and professional development.
  • To examine their behavioural and relational styles, develop skills of managing work life interface issues and become more sensitive cultural differences and diversity in groups.

 

 

Course Outcome

  1. successful completion of the course and through participation in the class room lectures and activities
  2. Students will have greater awareness of their thinking styles, relational styles and behavioural styles of functioning.
  3. Students will develop interpersonal awareness and skills especially in the context of diversity and difference.
  4. Students will develop preparatory skills towards effective work – life balance.
  5. Students will develop overall understanding of the psychosocial skills required in professional world.

 

 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Human Development and Growth- Introduction
 

Psychosocial development (Erickson).

Development of Cognition (Piaget), 

Moral Development (Kohlberg), 

Faith Development (Fowler)

Emotional Devlopment ( Kagan)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Self-Awareness
 

Thinking Styles (Cognitive distortions), 

Interpersonal relationship styles (adult attachment theories), 

Personality styles (Jung type indicator or Myers Briggs Type Indicator), 

Coping styles (Emotion focused and Problem focused)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Social Networks and self,
 

Family Genogram (Bowen), 

Community, Genogram (Ivey),

Family Dynamics (Epstein),

Identifying triangles (Bowen), 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Work Life Balance
 

Meaning of Work life balance and (Jim Bird) Emotion – decision link in Work life balance, 

Connecting life goals with work goals, improvin relationship at work, five steps to better work life balance (Jim Bird)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Professional development and Diversity
 

Coaching skills, Mentoring skills, Effective feedback, Developing a competency framework, 

Self Determination Theory (Ryan and Deci), 

Burke –Litwin change model.

 

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Diversity and challenge Cross cultural communication
 

Diversity and challenge Cross cultural communication, respecting diversity, Intercultural awareness, Multicultural awareness.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Nelson Goud and Abe Arkoff, Psychology and Personal Growth, Edition, Allyn and Bacon, 2005. 
  2. Richard Nelson Jones, Human Relationship skills: Coaching and self coaching, 4th edition, Routledge, 2006
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Nelson Goud and Abe Arkoff, Psychology and Personal Growth, Edition, Allyn and Bacon, 2005. 

Richard Nelson Jones, Human Relationship skills: Coaching and self coaching, 4th edition, Routledge, 2006

Evaluation Pattern

CIA – 1 for 20 marks reduced to 10

CIA – 2 for 50 marks reduced to 25

CIA – 3 for 20 marks reduced to 10

Attendance is for 5 marks

End Semester Exam for 100 marks reduced to 50

 

Total marks = 100

BTGE651 - DATA ANALYTICS THROUGH SPSS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

1)      COURSE OBJECTIVES

 

a)      To make students understand the concepts used to analyse business data

 

b)      To enable students to analyse data using softwares like SPSS

 

c)      To enable students to understand how Analytics helps decision makers

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will understand the concepts involved for analyzing Business data

CO2: Students will be able to understand how to use software like SPSS to analyse data

CO3: Students will be able to appreciate the use of Data Analytics for business decision making

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction to data Analysis
 

Introduction to data Analysis

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:2
Types of data
 

Different steps involved in data Analysis, Types of Data, SPSS Interface, Modules, Importing Data From excel, Creating a SPSS File

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Types of data
 

 

Entering Differing types of Data, Defining Variables

 

Data Manipulation in SPSS: Recoding Variables, Splitting File, Merging Files, Weight Cases

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Introdcution to SPSS
 

Saving file and exporting results, working with output file .spv, Running Descriptive Statistics: Explore, Frequencies, Descriptive, Crosstabs, Building different types of charts

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Univariate Analysis
 

 

Univariate Analysis: Hypothesis Testing-T Test, correlation and Regression, One way and Two way ANOVA, Chi Square Test

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:14
Multivariate analysis
 

Multivariate analysis: Linear Regression, Logistic Regression, Factor Analysis, Cluster Analysis, Discriminant Analysis, Decision Tree
MDS, and Conjoint Analysis

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

1.      Andy field, “Discovering Statistics Using SPSS”, SAGE Publications, Second Edition, 2006.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

1.      Darren George|Paul Mallery, “SPSS for Windows Step by Step”, Pearson, Tenth Edition, 2012.

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA-1

Unit 1,2,3,4

Mid Term

Unit1,2,3,4,5

CIA-3

Unit 6

 

BTGE652 - DIGITAL MARKETING (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

 

Course Description:

 

Developing a successful digital marketing strategy and implementation is both an art and science. It involves in-depth knowledge of dynamics of new media (Social Media, Mobile) and utilizing the right resources and marketing skills to design and launch successful customer engagement campaigns. Digital Marketing course has been designed to help students to understand both functional and management roles required to plan and execute effective Digital Marketing campaigns. The course also helps students gain an insight how to plan and implement Digital Marketing initiatives

 

Course Objectives:

 

·         To apply the basics of digital marketing in the contemporary business scenario

 

·         To utilize google ads for promotional activities

 

·         To contrast various social media marketing platforms and activities