Department of SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Syllabus for
Post Graduate Diploma (International Education)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
IEDU131 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION - 5 4 100
IEDU132 CURRICULUM PROCESSES - 5 4 100
IEDU133 ASSESSMENT AND LEARNING - 4 4 100
IEDU134 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY - 5 4 100
IEDU135 FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH - 5 4 100
IEDU136 TEACHING AND LEARNING OF SCHOOL SUBJECT - 5 4 100
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
IEDU231 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING - 5 3 100
IEDU232 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN EDUCATION - 5 4 100
IEDU233 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT - 5 4 100
IEDU234 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION - 5 4 100
IEDU281 INTERNSHIP - 60 8 100
IEDU282 RESEARCH PROJECT - 4 4 50
        

Department Overview:

School of Education, CHRIST (Deemed to be University), Bangalore offers a range of undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral programmes in education. It is the only academic institution in India to provide learners with the opportunity to pursue an International Baccalaureate integrated programme in the Bachelor of Education and Post Graduate Diploma in International Education programme.

Mission Statement:

Vision: To lead and educate wholly-developed educators and citizens for a sustainable future

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Introduction to Program:

The Post Graduate Diploma in International Education (PGDIE) and the International Baccalaureate Educator Certificate (IBEC) is an academic programme designed as a dual qualification for students in schools in India and abroad. The International Baccalaureate Organisation (IBO) recognises the PGDIE offered by CHRIST (Deemed to be University) for the issue of an IB Educator Certificate in Teaching and Learning for the Diploma Programme (IBDP)

The PGDIE is a one year programme, structured to be delivered in a blended mode. It is suitable for students and teachers who wish to enhance their professional qualifications and career prospects. The curriculum is designed to prepare competent and professional educationists who will be able to perform various roles in the field of education. Experienced university professors will deliver the academic programme, along with IBEN members, IB School coordinators, teachers and educational leaders.

Program Objective:

Programme Outcomes

At the end of the programme, the graduating students must be able to:

  • Research Competence: 
  • Apply the knowledge of research in solving social and educational problems
  • ICT Competence: 
  • Demonstrate digital literacy and digital citizenship
  •   
Assesment Pattern

The courses which do not follow the above pattern are discussed below:

Method of Evaluation for

HOL111 and 211 (Holistic Education): Activity-based learning and grading

IEDU 281 Internship in IB schools[ Internship Handbook]

IEDU 282 Research Project- [Research Project Handbook]

End semester Examination- Department conducted

Examination And Assesments

Course modules, assignments and assessments, aligned with the philosophy, mission, standards and practices of IB, will prepare students for international education settings. The blended part comprises hybrid teaching, video conferencing, workshops, online presentations and webinars. Workshops led by international and IB facilitators, university professors are a rich resource of professional learning and network. The internship in IB schools provides opportunities for the students to observe, interact, learn and teach in IB Schools

Students are evaluated for each course on the basis of Written Examination and Continuous Internal Assessment. Each course carries a maximum of 100 marks and the pattern of evaluation is as follows:

End Semester Exam (ESE) Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA I, II, III) CIA-30%:70%

End Semester Exam: 50 marks (2 Hours) Departmental

End Semester exam will be reduced to 30 for deciding the promotion criteria.

 

Continuous Internal Assessment

CIA-I, CIA-II and CIA-III: Continuous Internal Assessment

Continuous Internal Assessment I-20 marks

Written assignments- Group or Individual and Viva or Presentation, workshop-based assignments

Continuous Internal Assessment II- 25 marks

Project, Competency, Skill-based assignments/activities, workshop-based assignments

Continuous Internal Assessment III- 20 marks

Multiple choice-based tests, practical activity, Presentation/Viva, Group Discussion, workshop-based assignments

Attendance

The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows

95%-100% : 05 marks

90%-94% : 04 marks

85%-89% : 03 marks

80%-84% : 02 marks

76%-79% : 01 mark

IEDU131 - INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is offered in the first semester. It creates awarenessabout theeducational systems at the national and international levels. This course will help the students in acquiring the knowledge of educational schools of thought. The student teachers will understand the need for developing a sound understanding of philosophical bases of International Baccalaureate education. Students also acquire the knowledge of principles and processes of teaching, learning and current pedagogical practices in the International Baccalaureate education. Educational thoughts of great thinkers and their influence in the society are also discussed to motivate the teacher trainees to reflect about their roles as teachers.

  • To describe school education boards at the national and international levels.
  • To explain the nature, scope, and functions of education at the national and international levels.
  • To critically reflect on the philosophy of the International Baccalaureate education.
  • To explain philosophical theories underpinning the International Baccalaureate education.
  • To explain approaches to teaching and learning at the International Baccalaureate education.
  • To recognize and appreciate the contributions of Indian and western educational thinkers.
  • To recognize and explain educational schools of thought
  • To demonstrate the essential knowledge to perform competently as an IB teacher
  • To articulate in writing a teaching philosophy that draws on international-mindedness and identifies elements of the IB mission and philosophy aligned with this teaching philosophy.
  • To read and understand the IB DP policies

 

 

 

Learning Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

              Describe school education boards at the national and international levels.

              Explain the nature, scope, and functions of education at the national and international levels.

              Critically reflect on the philosophy of the International Baccalaureate education.

              Explain philosophical theories underpinning the International Baccalaureate education.

              Explain approaches to teaching and learning at the International Baccalaureate education.

              Recognize and appreciate the contributions of Indian and western educational thinkers.

              Recognize and explain educational schools of thought

              Demonstrate the essential knowledge to perform competently as an IB teacher

              Articulate in writing a teaching philosophy that draws on international-mindedness and identifies elements of the IB mission and philosophy aligned with this teaching philosophy.

              Read and understand the IB DP policies

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Education
 

Meaning, nature, and scope of education. Vedic, Buddhist, Jain, and Islamic Education System. Individual and social aim of education. Functions of Education – at individual level, national level, and global level.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Philosophy and Education
 

Meaning and Functions of Philosophy; Branches of Philosophy: Metaphysics, Epistemology and Axiology; Relationship between Philosophy and Education with respect to teacher, student, curriculum, and teaching.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Philosophical Schools of Thought
 

Idealism, Naturalism, Marxism, Realism and Pragmatism; Indian educational Thinkers: Mahatma Gandhi, Swami Vivekananda, Aurobindo and Rabindranath Tagore. Western educational thinkers: Jean Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, Montessori.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Introduction to IB Education
 

History of International Baccalaureate; IB key influential educationalists - John Dewey, A.SNeil, Jean Piaget, Jerome Bruner and their key insights contributing to IB. Theories underpinning IB, IB education, IB mission, IB organization. Educational aim of IB.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Approaches to Teaching and Learning in IB Education
 

Ten attributes of IB learner profile, Approaches to learning; Thinking skills, Communications skills, Social skills, Self-management skills, and Research skills. Approaches to teaching; basedon inquiry, focused on conceptual understanding, developed in local and global contexts, focused on effective teamwork and collaboration, differentiated to meet the needs of all learners, informed by formative and summative assessment. Academic honesty practices in IB. Conceptual understanding of International mindedness in IB DP. IB DP Policies for learner, IB DP Policies for teacher, IB learner resources, IB teacher resources, IB teacher job Description.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anand, C.L. (1993). Teacher and education in the emerging Indian society. NCERT.

Badami, B.S., (2007). Philosophical and sociological foundations of education. Vidhyanidhi Publications

Chartock, R. K. (2004). Educational foundations: An anthology (2nd ed.). Pearson.

Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2003). Philosophical foundations of education (7th ed.). Merrill Prentice Hall.

Siegel, H. (2012). The Oxford handbook book of philosophy of education. (1st ed.). Oxford University Press.

Anand, C.L. (1993). Teacher and education in the emerging Indian society. NCERT.

Badami, B.S., (2007). Philosophical and sociological foundations of education. Vidhyanidhi Publications

Chartock, R. K. (2004). Educational foundations: An anthology (2nd ed.). Pearson.

Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2003). Philosophical foundations of education (7th ed.). Merrill Prentice Hall.

Siegel, H. (2012). The Oxford handbook book of philosophy of education. (1st ed.). Oxford University Press.

Anand, C.L. (1993). Teacher and education in the emerging Indian society. NCERT.

Badami, B.S., (2007). Philosophical and sociological foundations of education. Vidhyanidhi Publications

Chartock, R. K. (2004). Educational foundations: An anthology (2nd ed.). Pearson.

Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2003). Philosophical foundations of education (7th ed.).

Merrill Prentice Hall.

Siegel, H. (2012). The Oxford handbook book of philosophy of education. (1st ed.). Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Goldman, A. I. (2008). A causal theory of knowing. The Journal of Philosophy, 64(12).  http://www.jstor.org

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

IB. (2013). IB Learner Profile. http://www.ibo.org

IB. (n.d). Middle Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

IB. (n.d). Primary Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

IB. (2017). The History of the IB.  http://www.ibo.org

IB. (2017). What is an IB education?  http://www.ibo.org

Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2003). Philosophical foundations of education (7th ed.).

Merrill Prentice Hall.

Wiphi Open Access Philosophy. (2016, Feb 26). The Gettier Problem [Video].  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lB-XJjmvoE

Wiphi Open Access Philosophy. (2016, Feb 26). Introduction to theory of knowledge [Video].  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_Y3utIeTPg&t=76s

Hrera, S. R. (2012). Approaches to international mindedness in IB world schools. http://www.ibo.org

IB. (2019). Approaches to teaching and learning in the Diploma Programme.  http://resources.ibo.org

IB. (2020). Diploma Programme Assessment Procedures. http://resources.ibo.org

IB. (2013). IB Learner Profile.  http://www.ibo.org

Tomlinson, C., & Imbeau, M. B. (2011). Managing a differentiated classroom: A practical guide. https://www.researchgate.net

Tomlinson, C. (2014). The differentiated classroom: Responding to the needs of all learners. (2nd ed.). ASCD.

Evaluation Pattern

 

 


CIA 1 -Evaluated out of

CIA II - Evaluated out of

Mention Whether CIA II is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

CIA III - Evaluated out of

Total CIA

 

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of

ESE converted to

Mention Whether ESE is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

Total Marks

If the ESE is centralized mention the Duration of the Exam

Is the question paper generated from Question Bank? (Yes/No)

20

25

Department

20

65

05

50

30

Departmental

100

2

NO

The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows

95%-100%         : 05 marks

90%-94%           : 04 marks

85%-89%           : 03 marks

80%-84%           : 02 marks

76%-79%           : 01 mark

IEDU132 - CURRICULUM PROCESSES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is offered as a core course in the first semester of the programme. It introduces the students to a variety of theoretical perspectives, principles and philosophies in education. It helps the students acquire knowledge on curriculum designs, development and evaluation. It engages the students in practices of international mindedness and inquiry-based learning.

Learning Objectives

 

      To acquaint the students with the theoretical background of curriculum

      To design authentic application of appropriate learning activities

      To develop a futuristic vision about devising new curriculum designs

      To reflect and review curricula to improve implementation and evaluation

      To create opportunities to synthesize, apply and demonstrate mastery of use online resources

Learning Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

                  Analyse the importance of philosophical, psychological and sociological bases of curriculum construction at the local, national and international contexts;

                  Apply and demonstrate the principles, stages and criteria of curriculum construction

                  Illustrate the curriculum processes in the International Baccalaureate PYP, MYP and DP programmes

                  Recognize and practice IB curriculum framework

                  Develop and practice professional competencies in educational settings

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Curriculum
 

Meaning and concept of curriculum, aims, objectives, goals and types of curriculum design. Philosophical foundations of the curriculum. Sociological foundations of the curriculum. Psychological foundations of the curriculum. A glance at the schoolcurriculum of State Board, CBSE, ICSE IGCSE and IB.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to International Curriculum
 

Curriculum framework in International Baccalaureate (IB) programmes: Primary year programme (PYP), Middle year programme (MYP), and Diploma Programme (DP). IB curriculum as a continuum from PYP to DP. IB DP programme standards and practices. Principles of learning underpinning the IB curriculum. Structure of IB curriculum; DP curriculum framework logo, DP subject logo, IB Diploma Programme model and its constituent parts, Core elements of IB curriculum: Extended essay, Theory of Knowledge, Creativity, Activity and Service, Role of subject groups, learner profile attributes, and DP core elements in developing international mindedness. Working with MYIB for DP curriculum related resources. Impact of IB curriculum on student learning. Critiquing the IB curriculum. IB Language policy

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Curriculum Development
 

Principles of Curriculum Construction, Stages, Criteria of curriculum design. Interdisciplinary, trans-disciplinary and multidisciplinary curriculum. Curriculum Development Models- analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation.  Tyler model of Curriculum Development: Taba model of curriculum development. Differentiated Learning Strategies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Curriculum Evaluation
 

Evaluation an integral part of the Curriculum - Criteria for evaluating curriculum – Models of curriculum evaluation. Tyler’s Model, Stufflebeam’s CIPP model, Stake’s Responsive model, Eisner’s model.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:13
Instructional Design
 

Instructional design, Principles of instructional design, Types of instructional design: Backward design, ADDIE, Merril’s Model, Kirkpatrick, Gagne’s Nine Events of Instruction, ASSURE model. Curricular mapping.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Batra, P. (2015). Curriculum in India. In W. Pinar (Ed.). Curriculum studies in India: Intellectual   histories, present circumstances, (pp. 35-63). Springer. doi: 10.1057/9781137477156_5

IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

IB. (2013). IB Learner Profile. http://www.ibo.org

IB. (n.d). Middle Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

IB. (n.d). Primary Years Programme.  https://resources.ibo.org

Jain, M. (2015). Curriculum studies in India: Colonial roots and postcolonial             trajectories. In W. Pinar (Ed.). Curriculum studies in India: Intellectual             histories, present circumstances, (pp. 111–139). Springer. doi:              10.1057/9781137477156_5

Ornstein, A. C., & Hunkins, F. P. (1998). Curriculum: Foundations, principles, and issues.             Allyn and Bacon.

Mathews, J. (2018). Curriculum exposed. Routledge.

Stobie, T. (n.d.). Coherence and consistency in international curricula: A study of      the International Baccalaureate Diploma and Middle Years Programmes.             The SAGE Handbook of Research in International Education, 140–151.    doi: 10.4135/9781848607866.n13

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Avinash, C. (2006). Curriculum development and evaluation in education. New Delhi: Sterling          Publishers

Jurowski, C. (2002). BEST think tanks and the development of curriculum modules for teaching        sustainability principles. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 10(6), 536–545. doi:             10.1080/09669580208667186

NCERT. (2014). Curriculum in transaction.  https://www.ncert.nic.in/departments/nie/dtee/activities/pdf/syllabus_bed.pdf

Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005) Understanding by design (2nd ed.). ASCD.

Harlacher, J. E., Sakelaris, T. L., & Kattelman, N. M. (2013). What is curriculum-based       evaluation? In J. E. Harlacher, T. L. Sakelaris, & N. M. Kattelman (Eds.),    Practitioner’s Guide to Curriculum-Based Evaluation in Reading (pp. 47–61).      Springer Science & Business Media. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4614-9360-0_4

Lam, T. S. J. (2012). Curriculum evaluation. In S. S. Yeung, J. T. Lam, A. W. Leung, & Y. C., Lo (Eds.), Curriculum change and innovation.Curriculum change and innovation (pp. 189-214). Hong Kong University Press. doi:             10.5790/hongkong/9789888139026.003.0008

Rothwell, W. J., Benscoter, G.M., King, M. & King, S. B. (2015). Planning and managing instructional design projects. In W. J. Rothwell, G.M. Benscoter,             M. King, & S. B. King. (pp. 334–340). Mastering the Instructional Design   Process. doi: 10.1002/9781119176589.ch19

Rothwell, W. J., Benscoter, G.M., King, M. & King, S. B. (2015). An overview of instructional design. In W. J. Rothwell, G.M. Benscoter, M. King, & S. B. King. (pp. 1-16). Mastering the Instructional Design Process. doi: 10.1002/9781119176589.ch19

Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005) Understanding by design (2nd ed.).ASCD.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 -Evaluated out of

CIA II - Evaluated out of

Mention Whether CIA II is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

CIA III - Evaluated out of

Total CIA

 

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of

ESE converted to

20

25

Department

20

65

05

50

30

Total Marks

100

 

IEDU133 - ASSESSMENT AND LEARNING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the first semester. It brings out the relationship between teaching, learning and assessment. It creates an understanding on the assessment of learners' understanding. It trains the trainee teacher in numerous ways of formative and summative assessments with respect to the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme. Furthermore, the student teacher would gain knowledge and computations skills of basic descriptive statistics needed for analysis of assessments

Course Objectives

The course develops in the students an understanding of the assessment practices in national and international schooling. It familiarizes them with domain-based assessment practices. The students would be trained in developing effective assessment tasks and instruments. Furthermore, students would be equipped with computational skills of descriptives statistics.

Learning Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

      Describe the fundamental concepts of assessment

      Explain assessment practices in national and international schools.

      Evaluate the assessment of TOK, EE, CAS as per IB DP.

      critically analyse subject wise assessment practices in IB DP

     Develop assessment tools.

     Develop skills and competencies in constructing and using rubrics, diagnostic tests

            Compute various descriptive statistics

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Fundamental Concepts of Assessments
 

Level of Knowledge– Conceptual and Working Knowledge

 

Measurement and Evaluation, Principles of assessment, Assessment for learning, Assessment as learning, and assessment of learning, Formative assessment, Summative assessment, Norm referenced testing, Criterion referenced testing, Internal assessment, External assessment. Assessment based on Bloom’s taxonomy, Peer Assessment, Performance Assessment- GRASPS model.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Tests and Assessment tools
 

Level of Knowledge– Conceptual and Working Knowledge

 

Concept, Construction, and uses of Teacher made Test (Unit test), Standardized Test, Diagnostic Test. Characteristics of a Good assessment Tool; Validity, Reliability, Objectivity, and Utility. Construction of Test Items – Essay type, Short Answer type, Objective type- Multiple choice, Fill in the blanks, True or False, Matching type. Qualitative tools-Anecdotal record, interview. Quantitative Tools- Rating scale, CheckList.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Designing Assessment Tasks and Feedback
 

Level of Knowledge– Conceptual and Working Knowledge

 

Class quiz: Construction of e-quiz and quiz, Worksheet: Construction, Home assignment. Rubrics: meaning, types, and construction. Unit test procedures in IB DP. Using LMS/Moodle for formative assessment. Assessment Portfolios, Using technological tools for assessment: Kahoot, scorative, gform. Nature of Performance-Based Concept of Feedback, Types of Feedback: Teacher feedback, Peer feedback, Performance feedback. Parents’ feedback. Practices at IB. Student feedback practices at IB. Assessment. Designing Meaningful performance based assessment. Development of Affective Assessment Tools. Statistics and Computer: Tools for Analyzing Assessment Data.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Assessment in International Baccalaureate Education
 

Level of Knowledge– Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Assessment of TOK exhibition, Extended essay assessment rubric, EE viva voce. Academic honesty in assessment. Maximum and minimum points for IB Course certificate, non-regular IB diploma, and IB Diploma certificate. CAS experience authenticating procedure. Subject wise internal and external assessment ratios and points. Subject wise Mark boundaries. Assessment of students for whom language of instruction is not their mother tongue, Assessment of special educational needs students, Support system required of inclusive education. Subject wise Summative assessment for standard and Higher levels. IB examination regulations.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Statistics in Assessment- Descriptive Statistics
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual and Working Knowledge

Need and Importance of Statistics in Education; Tabulation of Data -Frequency Distribution Table; Descriptive Statistics- Measures of Central Tendencies-Mean, Median, Mode-Meaning, Computation for grouped and ungrouped data, uses; Measures of Variability-Range, Standard Deviation, Quartile deviation-Meaning, Computation for grouped and ungrouped data, uses; Interpretation based on Measures of central tendencies, Measures of Variability; Percentiles.

Text Books And Reference Books:

References

Spendlove, D. (2015). 100 Ideas for Secondary Teachers: Assessment for Learning. Bloomsbury        Education

Binkley, M., Erstad, O., & Herman, J. (2010). Defining 21st century Skills. Retrieved from http://                  atc21s.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/1-Defining-21st-Century-Skills.pdf.

 

Bolhuis, S. and Voeten, M, (2001). Toward Self-Directed Learning in Secondary Schools: What do teachers do? Teaching and Teacher Education. 17 (7).

Erickson, L. (2012). Concept-based teaching and learning. IB Position Paper.

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 meta-Analyses Relating to                                                     Achievement. New York, USA: Routledge.

King, LG. (2009). The importance of failing well. Unpublished thesis. Retrieved from http://                                             taolearn.com/articles/article28.pdf.

Kohn, A. (2000). Punished by Rewards. New York, USA: Houghton Mifflin.

McKinney, P. (2014). Information Literacy and Inquiry Based Learning: Evaluation of a Five-year Programme of Curriculum Development. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. 46.148-166 .

Prince, M. (2004). Does active learning work? A review of the research. Journal of Engineering Education. 93 (3), 223–231.

Schulz, C. (2011). Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error. London, UK: Portobello                                              Books.

Wagner, T. (2010). The Global Achievement Gap. New York, USA: Basic Books.

Wiliam, D. (2011). Embedded Formative Assessment. Bloomington, Indiana, USA: Solution Tree Press.

Aggarwal, J.C. (2003). Essentials of Examination System Evaluation Tests and Measurement.

New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.

Coolidge, Frederick L. (2013). Statistics- A Gentle Introduction. New Delhi: SAGE Publications. Pathak (2012). Measurement and Evaluation in Education. New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Reid, Howard M. (2013). Introduction to Statistics-Fundamental Concepts and Procedures of                                              Data Analysis. New Delhi: SAGE Publications Pvt Ltd.

Care, Esther, McGaw, Barry & Griffin, Patrick. (2012). Assessment and Teaching of 21st Century Skills. New York: Springer

Gardner, John. (2012). Assessment and Learning -2nd edition. New Delhi: SAGE Publications.

Patel, N. R. (2001). Educational Evaluation- Theory and Practice. Mumbai: Himalya Publishing House.

Rao, V. K. (2006). Perspectives in Educational Evaluation. New Delhi: Common Wealth                Publishers.

Sharma, R.A. (2004). Essentials of Measurement in Education and Psychology (4th ed.):                                  SuryaPublication.

Singh, B. (2004). Modern Educational Measurement and Evaluation System. New Delhi: Anmol   Publication.

Vashisht, S.R. (2004). Theory of Educational Measurement. New Delhi: Anmol Publications.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

References

Spendlove, D. (2015). 100 Ideas for Secondary Teachers: Assessment for Learning. Bloomsbury        Education

Binkley, M., Erstad, O., & Herman, J. (2010). Defining 21st century Skills. Retrieved from http://                  atc21s.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/1-Defining-21st-Century-Skills.pdf.

 

Bolhuis, S. and Voeten, M, (2001). Toward Self-Directed Learning in Secondary Schools: What do teachers do? Teaching and Teacher Education. 17 (7).

Erickson, L. (2012). Concept-based teaching and learning. IB Position Paper.

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 meta-Analyses Relating to                                                     Achievement. New York, USA: Routledge.

King, LG. (2009). The importance of failing well. Unpublished thesis. Retrieved from http://                                             taolearn.com/articles/article28.pdf.

Kohn, A. (2000). Punished by Rewards. New York, USA: Houghton Mifflin.

McKinney, P. (2014). Information Literacy and Inquiry Based Learning: Evaluation of a Five-year Programme of Curriculum Development. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. 46.148-166 .

Prince, M. (2004). Does active learning work? A review of the research. Journal of Engineering Education. 93 (3), 223–231.

Schulz, C. (2011). Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error. London, UK: Portobello                                              Books.

Wagner, T. (2010). The Global Achievement Gap. New York, USA: Basic Books.

Wiliam, D. (2011). Embedded Formative Assessment. Bloomington, Indiana, USA: Solution Tree Press.

Aggarwal, J.C. (2003). Essentials of Examination System Evaluation Tests and Measurement.

New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.

Coolidge, Frederick L. (2013). Statistics- A Gentle Introduction. New Delhi: SAGE Publications. Pathak (2012). Measurement and Evaluation in Education. New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Reid, Howard M. (2013). Introduction to Statistics-Fundamental Concepts and Procedures of                                              Data Analysis. New Delhi: SAGE Publications Pvt Ltd.

Care, Esther, McGaw, Barry & Griffin, Patrick. (2012). Assessment and Teaching of 21st Century Skills. New York: Springer

Gardner, John. (2012). Assessment and Learning -2nd edition. New Delhi: SAGE Publications.

Patel, N. R. (2001). Educational Evaluation- Theory and Practice. Mumbai: Himalya Publishing House.

Rao, V. K. (2006). Perspectives in Educational Evaluation. New Delhi: Common Wealth                Publishers.

Sharma, R.A. (2004). Essentials of Measurement in Education and Psychology (4th ed.):                                  SuryaPublication.

Singh, B. (2004). Modern Educational Measurement and Evaluation System. New Delhi: Anmol   Publication.

Vashisht, S.R. (2004). Theory of Educational Measurement. New Delhi: Anmol Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 -Evaluated out of

CIA II - Evaluated out of

CIA III - Evaluated out of

Total CIA

 

Att. Marks

ESE converted to

Total Marks

20

25

20

65

05

30

100

Attendance 

The Marks distribution for attendance is as follows

95%-100%         : 05 marks

90%-94%           : 04 marks

85%-89%           : 03 marks

80%-84%           : 02 marks

76%-79%           : 01 mark

IEDU134 - EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is offered in the first semester. It develops the knowledge of psychological methods and its application in the educational context. It enhances the views of a teacher towards the pupils in a positive way viz., Intelligence, Individual differences, Interest, Attention, Attitude, Memory etc. It helps to develop teachers’ attitude and retain a healthy atmosphere in the classroom

Learning Outcome

            Explain various methods of Educational Psychology.

            Describe the various developmental characteristics of adolescents

            Explain the various types of Intelligence

            Analyse the various types of Personality

            Compare the various Learning Theories

            Describe the various factors affecting learning

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Unit- 1 Meaning and Scope of Educational Psychology
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual and Basic

Meaning and Scope of Educational Psychology; Methods of Educational Psychology- Observation, Case Study, Experimentation, Meaning, Steps, Uses and Limitations;

Need of Educational Psychology to the teacher

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit- 2 Learners as a Developing Individual
 

Level of Knowledge – Application

Different stages of growth in human beings: Concept of Growth and Development; Adolescents Psychology: Meaning, Characteristics, Various developments viz., Physical, Mental, Social and Emotional; developmental tasks of adolescents; Piaget 's stages of cognitive development; Mental Health- Meaning, causes for mental ill-health, Role of a teacher in fostering mental health.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit- 3 Understanding the Difference between the Learners
 

Level of Knowledge – Comprehension

Individual differences: Meaning and factors-heredity and environment, Differences between individual learners, learning style, self-concept, self-esteem, attitude, aptitude, and interest; Intelligence: Meaning, different types of test with examples, IQ and its distribution; Multiple Intelligence by Howard Gardner; Emotional IntelligenceL Concept, dimensions and its importance; Gifted children: Meaning, Nature, Identification, Educational programmes for gifted children; Educationally Backward Children: Meaning, characteristics, causes and remedial instruction; Creativity: Meaning, characteristics of creative children, role of teachers and parents in fostering creativity. Socio-emotional learning. Sternberg’s Triarchic Intelligence Theory

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Unit- 4 Personality
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual

Personality: Meaning and Classification; Structure of Personality: Sigmund Freud's theory; Assessment of Personality - Subjective, Objective and Projective techniques; Role of a teacher in moulding personality.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Unit- 5 Theoretical Perspectives of Learning
 

Learning: Meaning and Nature; Learning Theories of learning -Trial and Error learning theory and laws of learning; Classical conditioning theory and its educational implications; Operant conditioning theory and its educational implications; Gestalt theory and its educational implications; Gagne's hierarchy of learning and its educational implications; Constructivism: Meaning and types: Cognitive constructivism: Piaget’s theory of cognitive development and social constructivism: Vygotsky theory of cognitive development and its educational implications; Concept formation; Concept learning: Meaning, types, approaches to teach concepts; Learning in constructivist’s perspective. Growth Mindset: Carol Dweck

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Unit- 6 Factors Affecting Learning
 

Level of Knowledge – Comprehension

Maturation: Meaning and Educational Implications; Motivation: Meaning and Techniques to motivate the students, Abraham Maslow’s theory of motivation; Memory- meaning, process - registration, retention, recall and recognition and types -STM and LTM; Transfer of learning – meaning, types and its educational implications; Biological and hereditary factors influencing learning- Attention, interest, and readiness as factors influencing scholastic learning.

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Psychological Association. (2021). APA style blog. https://apastyle.apa.org/blog

Best, J. W., & Kahn, J. V. (2014). Research in education. Pearson.

Cohen, L. Manion. L & Morrison, K. (2007). Research Methods in Education. Routledge. 

Creswell, J. W., & Creswell, J. D. (2017). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Dweck, C. (2017). Mindset-updated edition: Changing the way you think to fulfil your potential. Hachette UK.

Mangal S.K. (2013). Advanced Educational Psychology. Prentice Hall.

Somashekar, T. V. (2006). Educational Psychology. Nirmala Prakashana.

Mangal S.K. (2013). Advanced Educational Psychology. Prentice Hall.

                                      

Somashekar, T. V. (2006). Educational Psychology. Nirmala Prakashana

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 -Evaluated out of

CIA II - Evaluated out of

Mention Whether CIA II is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

CIA III - Evaluated out of

Total CIA

 

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of

ESE converted to

Mention Whether ESE is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

Total Marks

If the ESE is centralized mention the Duration of the Exam

Is the question paper generated from Question Bank? (Yes/No)

20

25

Department

20

65

05

50

30

Departmental

100

2

NO

IEDU135 - FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the first semester. This course introduces students to research, types of research, and the essential elements of educational research.

The objective of the course is to enable students to put educational research into practice, to make presentations, and to publish.

Learning Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

  • Describe the nature and scope of educational research.

  • Critically review the research literature.

  • Recognise theoretical framework required for conducting research

  • Employ quantitative and qualitative methods to do research.

  • Formulate statement of the problem, research questions, objectives, and hypothesis

  • Describe the sampling technique, research design, and procedure

  • Construct and use different kinds of tools and techniques of collecting Data.

  • Articulate the process of research

  • Articulate the format of a manuscript for publication

  • Create a manuscript for publication

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Research
 

 

Meaning and nature, need and importance and scope of educational research; Action Research; Nature and scope of action research. Identification of research problem, Sampling techniques, Variables, Research tools, Formulating research question, hypothesis construction.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Review of Literature and References
 

 

Review of literature, Types of review of literature, In-text citation, Reference style APA, Introduction to Mendeley.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Quantitative Methods
 

 

Correlation design, Survey design, Experimental design, Analysing Quantitative Data and interpretation: Correlation, Descriptive analysis, Inferential analysis.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Qualitative Methods
 

 

Ethnographic research, content analysis, case study, Meta-analysis. Data collection in qualitative research: In-depth Interview, Focus group interview, Analysing Qualitative Data and interpretation

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Manuscript Template
 

 

Abstract & Keywords, Introduction, Literature review and theoretical framework, Research question, Method (Sampling, design procedure, analysis procedure), Results and discussion, Timeline and planning

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 American Psychological Association. (2021). APA style blog. https://apastyle.apa.org/blog

 Best, J. W., & Kahn, J. V. (2014). Research in education. Pearson.

 Cohen, L. Manion. L & Morrison, K. (2007). Research Methods in Education. Routledge. 

 Creswell, J. W., & Creswell, J. D. (2017). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Kumar R. (2005). Research Methodology: A step by step guide for beginners. Pearson.

 Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (2017). The Sage handbook of qualitative research. Sage.

 Patton, M. Q. (2015). Qualitative research & evaluation methods: Integrating theory and practice (4th ed.). Sage.

Evaluation Pattern

 


CIA 1 -Evaluated out of

CIA II - Evaluated out of

Mention Whether CIA II is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

CIA III - Evaluated out of

Total CIA

 

Attendance Marks

ESE Evaluated out of

ESE converted to

Mention Whether ESE is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

Total Marks

20

25

Department

20

65

05

50

30

Departmental

100

 

IEDU136 - TEACHING AND LEARNING OF SCHOOL SUBJECT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the aims and objectives of teaching School subjects at national and international schools. It introduces the essential elements of School subject teaching and practice needed to teach School subjects in an effective and inspirational manner. It develops the skills and competencies required for a School subject teacher to teach School subjects in the global context.

  • To acquire School subject content knowledge suitable for the age group of 11 to 18 years old. 
  • To understand IB knowledge framework logo and subject logo.
  • To understand the theory of knowledge (TOK) with respect to School subjects.
  • To recognise and practice IB learner profile attributes.
  • To understand and practice approaches to teaching (ATT) as per IB.
  • To understand and practice approaches to learning (ATL) as per IB.
  • To recognise the role of School subjects in the local and global contexts.
  • To understand and develop international-mindedness.
  • To acquire the knowledge and use of command terms in developing teaching and learning plans.
  • To develop the skill of preparing a Course outline, Unit plan, and Lesson plan as per IB
  • To be able to understand and practice inquiry-based teaching and learning
  • To be able to understand and use collaborative teaching techniques

Learning Outcome

 

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

 

Research and design appropriate learning activities
Create and experiment with course plans, unit plans and lesson plans and provide meaningful learning opportunities
Demonstrate independent implementation of approaches to teaching and learning Construct meaningful opportunities for content analysis and transaction
Present effectively use of resources in the English classroom
Discuss and demonstrate professional competencies

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Setting goals and purpose of Teaching and Learning in School subject
 

Relationship of Inquiry, action, and reflection. Setting up of the purpose of a School subject unit: transferable goals, content, skills, application:  Bloom’s and Anderson’s Taxonomy 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Effective Planning for Teaching and Learning in School subject
 

Lesson Plan: Meaning and importance; Evaluation Approach to Lesson plan, IB course outline; Templates and construction, IB Unit Plan: Templates and construction.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Teaching School subject in a global classroom
 

IB knowledge framework logo, IB subject logo, School subject as an area of study, the scope of School subject, Significance of School subject in daily life, Theory of Knowledge in School subject teaching; Constructing Theory of knowledge questions in School subject. International mindedness with respect to School subject. Linking the learner profile in School subject class. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches to Teaching School subject
 

Approaches to teaching (ATT) as per IB, Inquiry based teaching and learning: Structured inquiry, Guided inquiry, Open inquiry, Differentiated teaching strategies, Technology for teaching and learning, Collaborative Teaching techniques: Socratic Seminar, Flipped classroom, fishbowl discussion method, Think-pair-share, Jigsaw technique, graphic organisers,  Spider web discussion method

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches to Learning School subject
 

Approaches to learning (ATL) as per IB: Thinking skills, Communication skills, Social skills, Self-management skills, Research skills, Oral and written communication skills, Critical thinking skills, Problem solving skills, Teamwork and collaborative skills, Metacognitive skills, Self-regulated learner

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anderson, LW and Krathwohl, DR (eds). 2001. A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Longman. New York, USA.

Audet, RH., & Jordan, LJ (eds). (2005). Integrating inquiry across the curriculum. Thousand Oaks, California, USA. Corwin Press.

Bergmann., J. & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education.

Tilke, A. 2011. The International Baccalaureate Diploma Program and the School Library: Inquiry-Based Education. Santa Barbara, California, USA. ABC-CLIO, LLC.

Kamala, N. (2005). Content Cum Method of Teaching Chemistry. Bangalore: SumukhaPrakashana.

Skoumal, M. T., Seiler, P. M., Heinrichs, L., & Harcet, J. (2016). Ib mathematics higher level. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Stead, I. (2016). Your IB Mathematics Standard Level. Retrieved October 22, 2019, from https://global.oup.com/education/secondary/curricula/ib-diploma/mathematics/ib- maths-support/mathsl/?region=international. Pdfdrive.com/ib-maths-sl-book- oxford- e55706753.html

Wright, C. (n.d.). IB Approaches to Teaching and Learning. Retrieved October 24, 2019, from https://www.thinkib.net/leadership/page/21808/ib-approaches-to-teaching-and- learning.

Woodward, T. (2004). Planning Lessons and Courses. Cambridge University Press.

Bergmann., J. & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. International Society for Technology in Education

B. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme. Retrieved from https://resources.ibo.org

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kochhar, S.K. (1998). The Teaching of Social Studies. Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd. New

Delhi:
Kohli, A.S. (2004). Teaching of Social Studies. Anmol Publications. New Delhi Sharma, S. K. Teaching of History, Lotus Press. New Delhi,
IB. (n.d). Diploma Years Programme. Retrieved from https://resources.ibo.org

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (2011) Understanding by Design® Guide to Creating High

Quality Units. Alexandria, VA. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ACSD)

Trilling, B & Fadel, C. (2009). 21st Century Skills: Learning for Life in our Times. San

Francisco, California, USA. John Wiley & Sons,
Wiggins, A. (2011). Spider web. Retrieved from http://alexiswiggins.pbworks.com

Theory of Knowledge – Mathematics. (n.d.). Retrieved October 23, 2019, from https://www.theoryofknowledge.net/areas-of-knowledge/mathematics/.

British International School. (n.d.). Lesson Plans. Retrieved October 23, 2019, from https://ibmathsresources.com/category/lesson-plans/.

Micek T. (2014). Visual, Auditory and Kinesthetic Styles. Retrieved from http://www.tesol.org/connect/tesol-resource-center

McWilliam, E. (2008). Unlearning how to teach. Innovations in Education and Teaching

International, 45(3), 263–269. doi: 10.1080/14703290802176147

Anderson, L. W., & Bloom, B. S. (2014). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: a revision of Blooms. Essex: Pearson. Retrieved from https://www.ccri.edu/ctc/pdf/ Blooms_Revised_Taxonomy.pdf.

Coffman, T. (2017). Inquiry-based learning: designing instruction to promote higher level thinking. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield

IB. (2013). IB Learner Profile. Retrieved from http://www.ibo.org
Steve, R Hrera. (2012). Approaches to International mindedness in IB world Schools [PDF 
file]. Retrieved from http://www.ibo.org 

 

Carol, Ann Tomlinson., & Marcia, B. Imbeau. (2011). Managing a differentiated class room A Practical Guide [PDF file]. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net

IB. (2019). Approaches to teaching and learning in the diploma programme. Retrieved from http://resources.ibo.org 

 
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 -Evaluated out of

CIA II - Evaluated out of 

Mention Whether CIA II is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

CIA III - Evaluated out of

Total CIA

  

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of 

ESE converted to 

Mention Whether ESE is Centralized exam or department level Assessment 

Total Marks

If the ESE is centralized mention the Duration of the Exam

 

20

25

Department

20

65

05

50

30

Departmental

100

2

 

IEDU231 - PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course purports to prepare a professional teacher. Teacher agency is vital to being a professional teacher. Students will know how to analyze their professional needs, the avenues available for developing professionally, how to communicate, grow and thrive in professional learning communities, research, evaluate and reflect on furthering one’s continuous professional development.

The Objectives of the course are the development of:

  •     a professional teacher
  •     a teacher who is aware of agency and self-direction
  •     a teacher who identifies areas for development and seeks continuous professional development.

Learning Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

  • describe the need for continuous teacher professional development

  • demonstrate teacher-agency

  • review the current national and international policies and documents on teacher continuous professional development critically

  • identify and analyze areas for improvement in teacher competencies

  • demonstrate communication skills and reflective skills

  • create a plan for self-professional development based on the self-analyses and from the variety of available professional development programmes

  • create an e-portfolio to demonstrate professional development

  • evaluate one’s professional development and of a peer with the evidence of the e-portfolio.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Continuous Professional Development
 

1. Professional Development:

Profession. Professionalism. Professional development. Compulsory and Self-directed professional development. Funding & time factors for professional development programmes

2. Teacher Professional Development:

Teaching as a profession. Teacher-Professionalism & Teacher Agency. Need for teacher professional development. Critical review of the current national and international policies and documents on teacher continuous professional development. Criteria for effective teacher professional development programmes. Impact of teacher professional development programmes

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Teacher Professional Development Programmes: Needs Analyses
 

Education in a VUCA world and its implications for teacher professional development programmes; Types of teacher professional development programmes; Teacher competencies/professional standards: Knowledge, Dispositions, Skills; Self-assessment of teacher professional standards; Needs analyses and choosing a suitable professional development programme.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Teacher Professional Development: Skills-Development
 

1. Teacher-Communication:

Listening: Types; barriers; improving Listening skills. Speaking: With students, colleagues, administrators, and parents; speech; talk;  presentations; engaging in informal dialogue with peers on how to improve teaching. Reading: Different genres, reading professional literature, especially practitioner journals/magazines; reading habit for teachers and students. Writing: Giving student-feedback; blackboard; slides; other genres; adherence to grammar and spelling; writing for practitioner journals/magazines

2. Teacher-Reflection:

Need for reflection. Process of reflection. Barriers to reflection. Reflective writing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Teacher Professional Development Programmes: First-Hand-Experience
 

Observation visits to other schools: Choice; Reasons for choice; Visit; Location of school; Vision, Mission, & Values of School; Curriculum; Demographic information of region, school, teachers, and students; Physical facilities; seating arrangement; approaches to teaching-assessing of subjects; arts; sports; approaches to learning; inclusion; student-support centres/staff.

Interview a teacher and/or administrator: Preparation of interview questions; interview; report. Interview a Student/s (With parental permission): Preparation of interview questions; interview; report

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Teacher Professional Development Programmes: Competence-Enhancement
 

Workshops: Sources for information; kinds of workshops; enroll; attend/facilitate

Education conferences or seminars: Sources for information; kinds of conferences or seminars; enroll; attend/facilitate

Courses: Subject matter or methods and/or other education-related topics; MOOCs: Types of MOOCs; types of courses; choice; reasons for choice; sources for information

Qualification programme: Furthering educational degrees: Sources for information; types of degrees; Participation in a network of teachers: Exploration of professional organizations for teachers or professional learning communities (PLCs)

Mentoring and/or peer observation and coaching: Exploration

Individual or collaborative action research:  Exploration

Websites: Exploration of Department of School Education and Literacy, SE Shagun Online Junction, Digital Repository SE Shagun, Diksha, Performance Grading Index, DIET, ASER; Exploration of Educational: Books other than textbooks, videos, films, blogs, speeches, talks, podcasts: Exploration

2. Evaluation of Professional Development

Writing a teaching philosophy statement; Creating an e-teaching portfolio with teaching-assessing artifacts; Self- and peer-evaluation and feedback

Text Books And Reference Books:

Creswell, J. W., & Creswell, J. D. (2017). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage.

Ministry of Education. (2020). National Education Policy.https://www.mhrd.gov.in/sites/upload_files/mhrd/files/NEP_Final_English_0.pdf

Priestley, M., Biesta, G.J.J. & Robinson, S. (2015). Teacher agency: what is it and why does it matter? In R. Kneyber & J. Evers (Eds.), Flip the system: Changing education from the bottom up, (pp. 134-148). Routledge. 

Schön, D. A. (1987). Educating the reflective practitioner: Toward a new design for teaching and learning in the professions. Jossey-Bass.

 

Silver, F. (2018). Why is it important for teachers to have good communication skills? https://work.chron.com/important-teachers-good-communication-skills-10512.html

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

ACS Distance Education. (2021). Listening. https://www.acs.edu.au/info/education/trends-opinions/listening-skills.aspx

 

Aguilar, E. (2013). 10 ways to cultivate a love of reading in students. https://www.edutopia.org/blog/cultivating-love-reading-students-elena-aguilar

 

 Andrade, D. (n.d.). The importance of communication in education.http://www.techlearning.com/blogentry/8716

 

 Australian Council of Professions. (n.d.). What is a profession? https://www.professions.org.au/what-is-a-professional/

 

 Beaton, G. (2010). Why professionalism is still relevant. https://www.professions.org.au/wp-content/uploads/Why_Professionalism_is_still_Relevant_Beaton.pdf

 

Brookfield, S. (1998). Critically reflective practice. Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 18(4), 197-205.

 

Calvert, L. (2016). The power of teacher agency. The Learning Professional, 37(2), 51-56.

 

Cambridge Assessment International Education. (n.d.). Getting started with reflective practice. https://www.cambridge-community.org.uk/professional-development/gswrp/index.html

 

 Centre for Teacher Accreditation. (2018). CENTA standards.https://mycentacertificationsubmissions.nyc3.digitaloceanspaces.com/CENTA_Standards_v3.0.pdf

 

 Cox. J. (2019).  6 traits of writing: Characteristics, definitions, and activities for each component.https://www.thoughtco.com/six-traits-of-writing-2081681

 

 Cox, J. C. (2020).  4 teaching philosophy statement examples: Develop your own teaching philosophy.https://www.thoughtco.com/teaching-philosophy-examples-2081517

 

Creswell, J. W., & Creswell, J. D. (2017). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage.

 

 Darling-Hammond, L., Hyler, M. E., Gardner, M. (2017).Effective teacher professional development.https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/product/effective-teacher-professional-development-report

 

Dewey, J. (1997). How we think. Courier. https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/37423

 

Grant, C., & Zeichner, K. (1984). On becoming a reflective teacher. In C. Grant (Ed.), Preparing for reflective teaching: A book of readings, (pp. 1-9). Allyn & Bacon.

 

 Havighurst, R. J. (2020). Teaching. Encyclopedia Britannica.https://www.britannica.com/topic/teaching

 

 Impedova, M. A. (2021). Identity and teacher professional development: A reflective, collaborative and agentive learning journey. Springer Briefs in Education.

 

 Kolb, D. A. (1984). The process of experiential learning. Experiential learning: experience as the source of learning and development. In D. Kolb (Ed.), The experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. (pp. 20-38). Prentice-Hall.https://learningfromexperience.com/research-library/the-process-of-experiential-learning

 

Ministry of Education. (2020). National Education Policy.https://www.mhrd.gov.in/sites/upload_files/mhrd/files/NEP_Final_English_0.pdf

 

Moon, J. (2001). PDP working paper 4: Reflection in higher education learning. Higher Education Academy, 1-25.

 

Muste, D. (2016). The role of communication skills in teaching process. In Selection and peer-review under responsibility of the Organizing Committee of the conference. The European Proceedings of Behavioral and Social Sciences.

 

 National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. (2021). Early adolescence general standards. https://www.nbpts.org/wp-content/uploads/EA_Gen_2Ed.pdf

 

Patton, M. Q. (2002). Qualitative research and evaluation methods. Sage.

 

 Patton, M. Q. (2015). Qualitative research & evaluation methods: Integrating theory and practice (4th ed.). Sage.

 

Priestley, M., Biesta, G.J.J. & Robinson, S. (2015). Teacher agency: what is it and why does it matter? In R. Kneyber & J. Evers (Eds.), Flip the system: Changing education from the bottom up, (pp. 134-148). Routledge.

 

Professional Standards Council. (n.d.). What is a profession? https://www.psc.gov.au/what-is-a-profession

 

Raghavan, N. (2015). The reflective teacher: Case studies of action research. Orient BlackSwan.

 

Reading Horizons. (2013). 7 ways teachers' reading habits influence students' reading habits.https://www.readinghorizons.com/blog/post/2013/02/04/Love-of-Reading-Makes-You-a-Better-Teacher-of-Reading

 

Schön, D. A. (1987). Educating the reflective practitioner: Toward a new design for teaching and learning in the professions. Jossey-Bass.

 

Silver, F. (2018). Why is it important for teachers to have good communication skills?https://work.chron.com/important-teachers-good-communication-skills-10512.html

 

Victoria State Government. (2021). Annual teacher audit. https://www.vit.vic.edu.au/professional-responsibilities/for-teacher/annual-teacher-audit

 

Evaluation Pattern

 


CIA 1 -Evaluated out of

CIA II - Evaluated out of

Mention Whether CIA II is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

CIA III - Evaluated out of

Total CIA

 

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of

ESE converted to

Mention Whether ESE is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

Total Marks

If the ESE is centralized mention the Duration of the Exam

Is the question paper generated from Question Bank? (Yes/No)

20

25

Department

20

65

05

50

30

Departmental

100

2

NO

 

IEDU232 - CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN EDUCATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This core course is offered in the second semester. It helps to acquire knowledge on emerging national and international issues in education and concerns such as Human rights, Peace, health and safety, sustainable development and service learning. It gives an opportunity for students to debate, negotiate, and resolute contemporary issues in education in global context.

 

Learning Objectives

 

      To provide experiential learning and promote global citizenship.

 

      To recognize the existing contemporary issues in education.

 

      To sensitize about emerging concerns such as Human rights, Peace, health and safety, environment, sustainable development and service learning.

 

      To locate and address local educational challenges.

 

      To inculcate rational thinking, critical awareness, decision making.

 

Learning Outcome

After the completion of the course, the students will be able to:

      Analyse the contemporary issues in education and its educational implications

      Implement experiential learning and promote global citizenship.

      Describe the social realities of Indian society and its impact on education

      Recognize the existing contemporary issues in education.

      Analyse emerging concerns such as Human rights, Peace, health and safety, environment, sustainable development and service learning.

      Outline and address local educational challenges.

      Integrate rational-thinking, critical-awareness, decision-making.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Global Issues in Education
 

Recognizing contemporary educational issues, Case studies on cutting edge educational change in teaching and learning. Prime educational issues in China and Finland, Issues and Concerns in International Baccalaureate programme, Barriers to education in the world, Addressing local issues of education through CAS, Education and world economy, Online educational resources and its authenticity to a learner, Educational aid during natural calamities. Social diversity – at the level of the individual, of regions, languages, religions, castes, tribes-how it enriches our life and at the same time poses challenges for universal education,Liberalization / Privatisation / Globalization/ -Factors behind-LPG and Education

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Human Rights Education
 

Human rights education- Concept, Need, Significance, Pedagogy for Human rights education- International and National contexts. Child Rights Education - Concept, Need, Significance, and Child rights in the Indian Constitution, India and United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Policy Framework for Public Education in India
 

Aims of Education in Contemporary Indian society, Universalization of Elementary Education — Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan, RTE ACT 2009, RMSA, MHRD and Elementary education, Significant recommendations of commission and committees – National policy on education 2019.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Education for Peace and Service Learning in Education
 

Education for Peace: Awareness, Challenges and Approaches. Meaning and definition ofthepeace Education. Gandhian Concept of Peace. UNESCO Peace Education, Handbook for teachers; NCERT and peace education

Service Learning - Definition, Characteristics, Competencies, Partnership, Impact, Reflection: linking service and learning.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Education for Sustainable Development
 

Sustainable Development: Meaning, nature, scope, approaches and strategies, Integration in the school curriculum, Role of teacher in promoting sustainable development

Text Books And Reference Books:

Allaire, J. (n.d.). Five Issues Facing Higher Education in 2018.  https://www.cornerstone.edu/blogs/lifelong-learning-matters/post/five-issues-facing- higher-education-in-2018.

What are the pros and cons of Finland’s education system ... (n.d.)  https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-pros-and-cons-of-Finlands-education-system.

 

 

Sugata Mitra. (n.d.).  https://theschoolinthecloud.org/people/sugata-mitra/. Taj, H. (2005). Current challenges in education. Hyderabad: Neelkamal Publications.

Balkrishna K (2009) Human Rights Education in India: Needs and Future Actions

www.hurights.or.jp/archives/human_rights_education_in_asian_schools/section2/1999/03/human-rights-education-in-india-needs-and-future-actions.html

Mehta, D. D. (2009). Education in Emerging Indian Education, Indian Education.Ludhiyana: Tondan Publications, Books Market.

Pathak, K. R. (2007). Education in the Emerging India. New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers. Chandra, U. (2007). Human Rights. Allahabad: Law Agency Publications.

“The Human Rights Education Resource book”, second edition, Human Rights Education Associates (HREA), 2000. Available on-line at <http://www.hrea.org>.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bharathidasan University. (n.d.).

http://www.bdu.ac.in/cde/docs/ebooks/B-Ed/II/PEACE DUCATION.pdf.

Read, H. (2011). Education for peace. London: Routledge.

Peace and Human Security

(n.d.).http://www.unesco.org/new/en/education/themes/leading the-international-agenda/education-for-sustainable-development/peace-and-human-security/

Centre for Environment Education. (2005). Education for a sustainable future: 18-20 January, 2005, Ahmedabad, India: final report of the International Conference on Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

Bartlett N. (2013) What Makes Service-Learning Unique: Reflection and Reciprocity http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/curriculum-development/what-makes-service-learning-unique-reflection-and-reciprocity/#sthash.I0SsR0mr.dpuf

Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) (n.d.).  http://www.unesco.org/new/en/education/themes/leading-the- international- agenda/education-for-sustainable-development/

Bartlett N. (2013) What Makes Service-Learning Unique: Reflection and Reciprocity http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/curriculum-development/what-makes-service- learning-unique-reflection-and-reciprocity/#sthash.I0SsR0mr.dpuf

Cortese, A. (2001). Education for a Sustainable Future: The Next Industrial Revolution.

Boston, MA: Second Nature, Inc.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 -Evaluated out of

CIA II - Evaluated out of

Mention Whether CIA II is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

CIA III - Evaluated out of

Total CIA

 

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of

ESE converted to

20

25

Department

20

65

05

50

30

Total Marks

100

 

IEDU233 - EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper will help the students acquire knowledge of Educational Management. Students will understand the principles of preparation of School Time Table and Management of Material and Human resources. Students will understand the concept of Total Quality Management. Students will also understand the various dimensions of Organizational Culture and the various styles of Leadership followed in Educational Institutions.

Learning Outcome

After the completion of the course, the student will be able to:

            Describe the principles and process of Management.

            Summarize the concept and importance of Time Management.

            Articulate an understanding of Theories of leadership and Management.

         Describe the concept of TQM and its application

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
- 1 Introduction to Management
 

Level of Knowledge Conceptual

Management: Concept, functions of Management-Theories of Management- Principles of Management-Process of Management. Educational Management-purpose and importance

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Management of Human Resources
 

Level of Knowledge-Basic

Duties of Head master as a Teacher, Supervisor and Manager -Qualities and Functions of Teachers, Motivation of Teachers - Factors affecting Motivation of Teachers: Role of the Headmaster-Managing human relations with students, parents and the community-Organizing staff meetings. Classroom Management- Principles of classroom management-Techniques of classroom management.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Unit- 3 Management of Time
 

Concept of Time Management – Annual Programming - Factors to be considered in Annual Programming - Time Table – Principles of framing Time Table and types of Time Table; Developing learning related competencies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Unit- 4 Management of Material Resources
 

Level of Knowledge- Theoretical and Practical

School Plant, Infrastructural facilities, Preparation of School Budget, sources of Income and Expenditure of school, School Complex- Meaning, Purpose and Function -Maintenance of School records - Purpose and Types of School Records

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Unit- 5 Total Quality Management
 

Level of Knowledge – Conceptual

TQM – Definition - Fundamental principles - Process of TQM - Quality tools of TQM

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Unit- 6 Organization Culture
 

Level of Knowledge-Conceptual

Organization-Principles of Organization- Types of Organization and Structure.Organizational Development-Objectives of Organizational Development-Process of organizational Development-Organizational Culture-Concept-Creating an Organizational Culture and managing an Organizational Culture-Dimensions of Organizational Culture, Organizational climate-Concept

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chaube, S. P., & Chaube, A. (2004). School Organisation (2nd ed.). Pune: Vikas Publishers.

Davis, B., & West-Burnham, J. (2003). The Handbook of Educational Leadership & Management.                   London: Pearson Education.

Jain, V. (2012). Management Theory and Practice (3rd ed.). New Delhi: International Book House.

Kochhar, S. K. (2005). Secondary School Administration. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers.

Mohanty, J. (1990). Educational Administration and Supervision. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers.

Murthy, S. K. (1995). Essentials of School Organisation and Administration. New Delhi: Tandon                  Publishers.

Myageri, C. V. (1993). Textbook of Educational Management. Gadag: Vidyanidhi Prakashan.

Pandya, S. R. (2007). Administration and Management of Education. New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing          House.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Robbins, S. P., & Matthew, M. P. (2011). Organization Theory: Structure, Design, and                                              Applications (3rd ed.). New Delhi: Pearson.

Sachdeva, M. S. (1997). School Organization and Administration. New Delhi: Prakash Brothers.

Suganthi, L., & Samuel, A. A. (2009). Total Quality Management. New Delhi: PHI Learning Private Limited.

Terry, G. R., & Franklin, S. G. (1997). Principles of Management (8th ed.). New Delhi: AITBS Publishers.

Veer, U. (2004). Modern School Organisation. New Delhi: Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd.

Weber, C. A., & Weber, M. E. (2007). Fundamentals of Educational Leadership. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 -Evaluated out of

CIA II - Evaluated out of

Mention Whether CIA II is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

CIA III - Evaluated out of

Total CIA

 

Att. Marks

ESE Evaluated out of

ESE converted to

Mention Whether ESE is Centralized exam or department level Assessment

Total Marks

If the ESE is centralized mention the Duration of the Exam

Is the question paper generated from Question Bank? (Yes/No)

20

25

Department

20

65

05

50

30

Departmental

100

2

NO

IEDU234 - INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is a general paper offered in the fourth semester. The students learn the fundamentals of Educational Technology, WEB 2 Technologies, Programmed learning, Instructional design, ICT in school education and its application in the teaching-learning process. They prepare a technology based lesson on the texts prescribed at the secondary level and present them effectively in the classroom. They also have hands-on experience on use of computers at school for academic and administrative purposes.

 

            To interpret the concept of Educational Technology, WEB 2 Technologies, ICT in school education and its application to teaching and learning.

            To Illustrate educational possibilities of technology.

            To demonstrate the knowledge and skill of Programmed Learning and Instructional Design and prepare and present modules in the classroom.

            To demonstrate the knowledge and skill of current and future trends in Educational technology

            To appraise models of instructional design and enhance creativity and imagination of the learners.

              To critically demonstrate the use of ICT.

            To review researches in ICT.

            To describe use of ICT in school education.

Learning Outcome

After the completion of the course, the student will be able to:

            Interpret the concept of Educational Technology, WEB 2 Technologies, ICT in school education and its application to teaching and learning.

            Illustrate educational possibilities of technology.

            Demonstrate the knowledge and skill of Programmed Learning and Instructional Design and prepare and present modules in the classroom.

            Demonstrate the knowledge and skill of current and future trends in Educational technology

            Appraise models of instructional design and enhance creativity and imagination of the learners.

              Critically demonstrate the use of ICT.

            Review researches in ICT.

            Describe use of ICT in school education.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit- 1 Educational Technology
 
  1. Meaning - Definition - Scope and Significance of Educational Technology. Objectives-Forms of Educational Technology-Approaches of Educational Technology; Hardware and software approach. Role of technology in modern educational practices and in the classroom.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit- 2 Programmed Learning
 

Meaning, Characteristics and Principles of Programmed Instruction, Types of Programmed Learning - Linear- Branching –Mathetics. Advantages- Disadvantages-Application of Programmed Learning in school instruction. Computer Assisted Instruction – Meaning, Characteristics, Mode.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit- 3 Current and Future Trends in Educational Technology
 

WEB 2 Technologies for classroom-

WEB 3.0- Technologies for classroom

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Unit- 4 Instructional Design
 

Meaning- ICT- Uses and Advantages. National Policy on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in School Education- Infrastructure - Digital Resources - Capacity Building- ICT for children with special  needs; skill development;  SWAYAM- Study Webs of Active Learning for Young Aspiring Minds, MOOC    

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Unit- 5 ICT in School Education
 

Integrating ICT in teaching and learning, Global context of a teacher, Using ICT to collaborate and consult educators. Cultures of communication and information storage: oral, script, print, digital; Digital Culture; Digital Literacy,  Open Educational Resources, Open-Data, Wikipedia, Wiki source, Wiktionary, Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons. Using social media for education: blogs, Facebook, twitter, YouTube

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Unit- 6 Review of Research in ICT in Education
 

ICT in Education: A Critical Literature Review and Its Implications; Quality Issues in ICT-Based Higher Education; A Monitoring and Evaluation Scheme for an ICT-Supported Education Program in Schools; Developing Thinking and Learning with ICT: Raising Achievement in Primary Classrooms; Meeting the Standards in Using ICT for Secondary Teaching; Learning to Teach ICT in the Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience; Quality Issues in ICT-Based Higher Education       

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. 7 Innovative Apps for Parent-Teacher Communication. (2015, January 28).  https://                 teach.com/blog/parent-teacher-apps/

    Aggarwal, C. J. (2009). Essentials of Educational Technology (3rd ed.). New Delhi: Vikas Publishing                House.

    Aggarwal, D. D. (2004). Educational Technology. New Delhi: Sarup and Sons.

    An Overview of Instructional Design. (2015). Mastering the Instructional Design Process, 1–16. doi:                10.1002/9781119176589.ch1

    Barseghian, T. (2011, April 5). How Learning Environments Are Changing.  https://                www.kqed.org/mindshift/8016/how-learning-environments-are-changing

    Clark, C. (2014). Google’s Latest Education Innovation: Google Classroom.  http://                  teach.com/education-technology/google-for-education

    Edwards, A. (2012). New Technology and Education (1st ed.). New Delhi: Bloomsbury.

    Fallows, S., & Bhanot, R. (2005). Quality in ICT-based higher education. Quality Issues in ICT-Based                      Higher Education, 1–6. doi: 10.4324/9780203416198_chapter_1

    Fu, Hayes, M., Whitebread, D., Way, J., Beardon, T., Wong, Sivakumaren. (n.d.). ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) in Education.  https://www.questia.com/library/                    education/curriculum-and-instruction/educational-technology/ict-in-education

    Fu, J. S. (2013). ICT in Education: A Critical Literature Review and Its Implications. International                  Journal of Education and Development Using Information and Communication                                     Technology99(1).  https://www.questia.com/library/education/curriculum-and-                            instruction/educational-technology/ict-in-education

    Heinecke, W., & Adamy, P. (2010). Evaluating Technology in Teacher Education: Lessons from the Preparing Tomorrow's Teachers for Technology (PT3) Program (Research, Innovation and Methods in                  Educational Technology). Charlotte, North Carolina: Information Age Publishing.

    Kaushik, V. K., & Prasad, J. (2002). Advanced Educational Technology. New Delhi: Kanishka                               Publishers.

    Kemp, C. (2014). The current and future trends in Educational Technology.  http://                 mrkempnz.com/2014/09/the-current-and-future-trends-in-educational-technology.html

    Kennewell, S., Parkinson, J., & Tanner, H. (2003, August 27). Learning to Teach ICT in the Secondary                      School: A Companion to School Experience.  https://www.taylorfrancis.com/                         books/e/9780203218532

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Kumar, K. L. (2008). Educational Technology-A Practical Textbook for Students, Teachers,                             Professionals and Trainers. New Delhi: New Age Publishers.

    Loveless, A., & Ellis, V. (2001). Ict, pedagogy, and the curriculum: subject to change. London: