CHRIST (Deemed to University), Bangalore

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

School of Commerce, Finance and Accountancy

Syllabus for
BCom (Applied Finance and Analytics/Honours/Honours with Research)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
1 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA141A DIGITAL FINANCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141D TALENT MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141E UNDERSTANDING OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
BBA141F SUSTAINABILITY?AND GREEN MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
COAF101-1 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
COAF161-1 SPREADSHEET FOR BUSINESS Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
COM001-1 INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTANCY Bridge Courses 4 0 0
COM101-1 LEGAL ASPECTS OF BUSINESS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
COM102-1 BUSINESS ECONOMICS Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
CSC141 PROGRAMMING IN C Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC143 WEB DESIGNING USING HTML, PHP AND MYSQL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC149 INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DMT141 DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY Multidisciplinary Courses 2 3 100
DMT142 INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DSC141 PRINCIPLES OF DATA SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DSC142 PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR DATA SCIENCE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO143 DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO144 GLOBALISATION AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ECO145 ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
ENG181-1 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 2 2 50
EST142 READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
EST144 DESIGN THINKING AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
EST146 FOOD AND LITERATURE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST147 HISTORY OF INDIAN BUSINESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
HIS141 HISTORY AND CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW143 LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MAT141 FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MAT142 QUANTITAIVE TECHNIQUES FOR MANAGERS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED141 MEDIA AND POLITICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MED144 HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MED145 SOCIAL MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
PHY141 FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY143 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY155 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY156 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY159 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEADERSHIP Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SOC141 WOMEN'S ISSUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC142 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
SOC143 SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
STA142 DATA ANALYSIS USING EXCEL Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
THE141 THEATRE APPRECIATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2023 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA142A ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142B EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND MANAGERIAL EFFECTIVENESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142C FUNDAMENTALS OF DIGITAL MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142D WEALTH MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 03 100
BBA142F FINANCIAL EDUCATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BBA142G GROUP AND TEAM EFFECTIVENESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
BLS143 PRINCIPLES OF HORTICULTURAL TECHNIQUES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
BLS144 PRINCIPLES OF AYURVEDA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CHE141 CHEMISTRY IN ACTION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
COAF101-2 CORPORATE FINANCE Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
COAF201-2 CORPORATE ACCOUNTING Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
COAF261-2 BUSINESS DATA VISUALISATION Skill Enhancement Courses 3 3 100
COM101-2 PRACTICES OF BANKING AND INSURANCE Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
COM102-2 CORPORATE LAW AND ADMINISTRATION Major Core Courses-I 4 4 100
CSC152 INTRODUCTION TO BLOCKCHAIN Multidisciplinary Courses 3 4 100
CSC153 INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (DBMS) Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC154 INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON PROGRAMMING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
CSC155 USER DESIGN EXPERIENCE (UX) Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
DSC143 DATA VISUALIZATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
ECO146 GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
ENG181-2 ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses 3 2 100
EST152 SKILLS FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 50
EST153 PARTITION NARRATIVES Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
EST154 LITERATURE FROM THE NORTHEAST Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
LAW142 RIGHT TO INFORMATION Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
LAW146 LAW AND PRACTICE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
LAW148 LEGAL DIMENSIONS OF MARKETING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
LAW149 LEGAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Multidisciplinary Courses 3 2 100
LAW150C CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MAT141 MATHEMATICS FOR MANAGERIAL DECISIONS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
MAT143 MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
MED148 LANGUAGE OF CINEMA: A VISUAL APPROACH Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
MED149 INTRODUCTION TO SEMIOTICS Multidisciplinary Courses 45 3 100
MED150 ARTS APPROACHES TO PEACEBUILDING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
POL141 DEMOCRACY AND ETHICAL VALUES Multidisciplinary Courses 2 2 100
PSY144 BASICS OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
PSY157 SCIENCE OF WELLBEING Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
STA141 ELEMENTS OF STATISTICS Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
SW141 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 50
THE144 ACTING FOR MEDIA Multidisciplinary Courses 3 3 100
  

    

Introduction to Program:

BCom (Applied Finance and Analytics)

The BCom (Applied Finance and Analytics) programme formerly known as BCom (Honours) is designed with a dual focus of applying knowledge of Finance and the knowledge of analytics in real world situations. It’s unique Applied course design helps a learner to learn by doing.  It is best suited for students who wish to master the knowledge of finance and at the same time acquire skills to embrace an artificial intelligence enabled future.

The course on the Finance front, is carefully designed to give students the knowledge and skills to be employed in various finance related roles by combining the knowledge of finance, economics, accounting and quantitative techniques. Students will learn to analyse financial data with the backdrop of economic trends and develop financial models to cater to the needs of business. From the first year of the programme, students are exposed to real time industry environments  through industry integrated capstone projects. Students learn advanced courses across finance catering to careers in Corporate Finance , Mergers and Acquisition , Business  Valuation and Modelling,  Investment Management, Risk Management , Financial planning , Private equity, Wealth management and Management Consulting.  These courses are benchmarked with professional qualifications such as CFA, FRM, LOMA and help them to clear to Level 1 of these qualifications effortlessly.

On the Analytics front, students will learn to code, programme and handle complex data sets with algorithms.  They’ll learn to use tools such as Python, R, VBA, Power BI,SQL and will develop skills to interpret and convert data into valuable insights and use them to create business strategies and drive business decisions. They will also learn a few courses pertaining to data science techniques such as predictive modelling, optimization techniques , advanced statistics and machine learning.  At the end, students learn about visualisation and presentation of insights. These courses are benchmarked against industry standard certifications in analytics such as Microsoft Certified Data Analyst and IBM Data Science Professional Certificate.

During the course of study, students are exposed to foundational subjects such as Economics, Accountancy, Taxation, Business Regulations, Marketing , Human resource management and  Risk management . The domain insights gained through these foundation level subjects help a learner to combine this domain knowledge with analytics for e.g., using Marketing domain insights for Social media /Web analytics or for taking better strategic financial decisions.

The course is systematically designed with capstone projects specifically to cater to analytics based courses in various domains such as -Retail, Web and social media, Supply chain and logistics , Health care, Banking, Insurance, Finance and Accounting  and start-ups where industry partners mentor and evaluate the projects along with faculty mentors.

 

  

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

P01: Apply knowledge of core disciplines of commerce to support strategic decision-making and fulfillment of business goals.

PO2: Create, design, and develop business ideas into value-generating enterprises.

PO3: Demonstrate holistic values, skills pertaining to physical and emotional well-being, moral principles, and community engagement skills in both personal and professional life.

PO4: Apply a multi-disciplinary approach to gain a deeper understanding of concepts, drive new business initiatives and solve complex problems creatively.

PO5: Evaluate investing and financing strategies to meet specific financial goals

PO6: Use analytical tools and techniques to evaluate financial data, conduct financial analysis, and make informed business decisions.

PO7: Apply data analysis methods, including statistical analysis, data visualisation, and predictive modelling to facilitate corporate decision making.

Programme Specific Outcome:

-: -

Programme Educational Objective:

-: -
Assesment Pattern

Assessment Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment (CIA). Each paper carries a maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

Assessment Component

Description

Weightage

CIA I

Quizzes, role plays, objective type tests, written assignments, discussion forums, article reviews, case analysis etc.

10%

CIA II

Mid semester written examination conducted for 2 hours duration

25%

CIA III

Group work consisting of presentations, viva voce, and report submission.

10%

ESE

Written examination conducted for 3 hours duration

50%

Attendance

 

05%

 

TOTAL

100%

 

Examination And Assesments

Question Paper Pattern - MSE

The question paper pattern will be as specified below: 

 

Sections

Type

Marks

A

Short Answer Questions – Answer any 5 out of 7

5 X 2 = 10

B

Conceptual / Descriptive Type questions – Answer any 2 out of 3

2 x 8 =   16

C

Analytical / Essay Type Questions -  – Answer any 2 out of 3

2 x 12 = 24

 

Question Paper Pattern - ESE

The question paper pattern will be as specified below: 

 

Sections

Type

Marks

A

Short Answer Questions– Answer any 12 out of 14

12 X 2 = 24

B

Conceptual / Descriptive Type questions – Answer any 5 out of 7

5 x 8 =   40

C

Analytical / Essay Type Questions- Answer any 3 out of 5

3 x 12 = 36

BBA141A - DIGITAL FINANCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This course provides the participants with a bird’s-eye view of the FinTech landscape and an appreciation of the history of financial innovation. The course examines the technology fundamentals driving the FinTech revolution to develop an appreciation of their application in a comprehensive array of financial sectors.  This course builds on the foundation of elementary financial theory and complements financial intermediation and capital market courses with a unique yet essential technology and innovation perspective. 

Course Objective:

CO1: To give an overview of digital finance, Fintech, and its trend.

CO2: To understand the role of Fintech in the financial system.

CO3: To give awareness about the application of Fintech in various fields of Finance.

CO4:To give an understanding of contemporary issues related to FinTech 

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop an overview of Digital Finance and its trend

CO2: Develop an appreciation of the global FinTech landscape

CO3: Understands the application of fintech in various fields

CO4: Develops insight into contemporary issues related to digital finance

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Digital Finance ?An Introduction
 

Digital Finance meaning, Landscape of digital finance, Ecosystem of digital finance, Digital Financial Services, Benefits of DFS, Importance of digital financial transformation. Types of Digital Finance Services, Evolution and Trend of digital finance in India. Case -Study

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Overview of FinTech
 

Definition of Fintech, Traditional financial services vs. today, History of FinTech,. Fintech trends. Factors driving Evolution of FinTech, Overview of Fintech Ecosystem. Fintech applications, Machine Learning and AI: AI/ML Introduction, Application, Changing Business Landscape, Cloud Computing:

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Digitalisation of Payment System
 

Evolution from credit card to CBDC, B2B, B2C, C2C payment mechanisms, EMV, NFC, Tokenization, Mobile wallet, UPI, QR code, Cross-border digital payments, Payment platforms & Ecosystem, Open/Neo banking,  ..Digital Payment system of India – Case Study

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Bitcoin and Blockchains.
 

Introduction:4the economic function of currency in the economy.  Problems with issuer¿s credibility. Analysis of bitcoin as a currency. The blockchain as a registration mechanism. The integration of bitcoin and blockchain and issuer’s incentive problems. Possible alternative uses of blockchain technology in the economy and difficulties in its implementation. Use of bitcoin in money laundering. The regulatory debate, CBDC. Current status of blockchain & CBDC in India

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Regtech, Insurtech and BancTec
 

Insurtech: How does InsurTech work, Business model disruption, Aggregators, AI/ML in InsurTech, IoT, and InsurTech, Risk Modelling, Fraud Detection, Processing claims, and Underwriting, Innovations in Insurance Services.

 

Banktech: Regulatory Framework for Product Pricing, loan origination, and servicing, Social media-based profiling, comparison tools and aggregators, Dynamic credit rating, Risk management & underwriting, Using Credit Counsellor Robo/Bot for faster approvals & funding, Utilizing data science tools and machine learning for data mining/ cross sale, Hybrid Lending Products

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
The Future of Data-Driven Finance
 

Introduction. Contemporary issues in digital finance and fintech,  Fintech Big trends- looking forward. Case study

Text Books And Reference Books:

Lynn, T., Mooney, J.G., & Rosati, P., & Cummins, M. (2019). Disrupting Finance: FinTech and Strategy in the 21st Century. (DF)  

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Cheun, D.L.K. (2015). Handbook of Digital Currency, Bitcoin, Innovation, Financial Instruments, and Big Data. Elsevier.

 2. Chishti, S., & Barberis, J. (2016). The FinTech book: the financial technology handbook for investors, entrepreneurs and visionaries. John Wiley & Sons.

3. Chishti, S., & Puschmann, T. (2018). The Wealthtech Book: The FinTech Handbook for Investors, Entrepreneurs and Finance Visionaries. John Wiley & Sons.

 4. Loesch, S. (2018). A Guide to Financial Regulation for Fintech Entrepreneurs. John Wiley & Sons.

5. Metawa, N., Elhoseney, M., Hassanein, A.E., & Hassan, M.K.H. (2019). Expert Systems in Finance: Smart Financial Applications in Big Data Environments. Routledge. 

6. Sironi, P. (2016). FinTech Innovation, From Robo-Advisors to Goal Based Investing and Gamification.

7. VanderLinden, S. L., Millie, S. M., Anderson, N., & Chishti, S. (2018). The INSURTECH Book: The Insurance Technology Handbook for Investors, Entrepreneurs and FinTech Visionaries. John Wiley & Sons.

Evaluation Pattern
Evaluation Pattern
 

CIA 1: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 2: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 3: 50 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 25 MARKS)

Attendance 5 marks 

Total 50 marks 

BBA141D - TALENT MANAGEMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Human Resource is considered as a valuable resource in every organization. The world class companies compete among themselves to attract the best talent across the globe.  They view talent as competitive differentiator and one where the acquisition, engagement, development and retention of talent is considered as a strategic priority of business.  This course exposes the students to methods and practices to acquire, engage and develop talent, focus on development of strategic leaders within an organization and also deals with how talent and knowledge can be managed effectively for the development of the organization

Course Outcome

CO 1: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts, principles and models related to talent and knowledge management

CO 2: 2. Evaluate the importance of talent management in developing organizations

CO 3: 3. Learn to apply the theories and concepts studied in the classroom to practical situations

CO 4: 4. Analyse the various talent and knowledge management practices and their value to organizations

CO 5: 5. Solve the issues pertaining to talent and knowledge management

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Introduction to Talent Management
 

Meaning and concept of talent management, need and scope for talent management, Talent vs Knowledge, Talent management models: Process and Integrated model, Talent management initiatives, Techniques for potential appraisal, Talent management grid, Benefits of talent management.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Creating Talent Management Systems
 

Building blocks for talent management strategy, Developing and implementing Effective Talent Management System, Measuring the effectiveness of talent management, creating talent management system for organizational excellence.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Competency mapping and approaches to talent management
 

Competency Mapping- Meaning, Importance and Steps in competency mapping, Competency model, Role of leaders and HR in talent management, Talent Management Approaches, Mapping Business Strategies and Talent Management Strategies, Achieving competitive advantage, Best practices in talent management- Case studies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management
 

Introduction to knowledge management, types of knowledge, Benefits of Knowledge Management, Integrating talent management and knowledge management, Role of Information technology in talent and knowledge management.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Recent Trends and Best Practices in Talent Management
 

Introduction, Use of Technology in Talent Management, Use of AI in Talent Management, Talent Management using Design Thinking

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Project Work: Field study & Report Submission
 

Experiential Learning Activity: Identifying any one organization in the manufacturing or service sector- Interacting, observing and conducting interviews with their senior HR leaders to understand how they manage and retain talent in their organizations.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

       Lance A. Berger, Dorothy Berger (2017): Talent management handbook, McGraw Hill New York.

 

       Mohapatra.M & Dhir.S (2022); Talent Management-A contemporary perspective (2022), Sage Publications

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

       Mark Wilcox (2016), Effective Talent Management: Aligning strategy, people and performance, (1st ed.), Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.

       Marshal Gold Smith and Louis Carter (2018): Best practices in talent management, A Publication of the practice institute, Pfeiffer, A Wiley Imprint.

       Atheer Abdullah Mohammed (2019), Integrating Talent and Knowledge Management: Theory and practice, Lamber Publishing co.,

       Cappeli Peter: Talent on Demand –Managing Talent in an age of uncertainty, Harvard Business press.

Sphr Doris Sims, Sphr Matthew Gay(2007),Building Tomorrow’s Talent : A Practitioner’s Guide to Talent Management and Succession Planning, Author House

Evaluation Pattern

Component

 

Maximum marks

Weightage

Total Marks in Final Grade

CIA1

20

50%

10

CIA2

20

50%

10

CIA3

50

50%

25

Attendance

5

100 %

05

Total = 50

 

BBA141E - UNDERSTANDING OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 Course Description: This course aims at understanding the financial statements published by Indian companies and make a meaningful understanding of the same. The course gives the initiation towards terminology in accounting and takes the readers through Income statement and Balance sheet. The interpretation of the cash flow, Income statement and Balance sheet gives the reader an understanding of fundamentals of the company and gives a sense of financial soundness or not of any company. The growing need of adherence to rules and practice of ethics in accounting in its various aspects from public practice to reporting with case studies will explain the profoundness of Ethics in Accounting and corporate reporting.

Course Outcome

1: Relate to accounting terminologies

2: Explain the components of Financial statements

3: Interpret financial statements

4: Realise the importance of ethics in accounting practices

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Terminologies in Financial Statement
 

Assets- Current assts and fixed assets, Non-current Liabilities, current liabilities, Owners Equity, shareholders fund, External equity, Return on investment, operating expenses, Normal profit, Earnings per share private -Public Investors-Income Statement-Revenue-Expenses-Profit/loss-Balance sheet- Dual aspects of the balance sheet, Significant accounting policies and principles- Full Disclosure-Standalone statements-consolidated statements.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding Income Statement and Balance sheet
 

Meaning and Purpose of Income statement- Cost of goods Sold-Gross profit, Operating Income-EBITDA-EBIT-EBT-Depreciation-Tax provisions made-Deferred Taxation- EPS: Basic and Diluted- Purpose of Balance sheet- Share capital- Net Worth-Shareholders fund- Book value of assets-Face value of shares-Current and non-current liabilities and assets- Amortisation and Depreciation-Notes to accounts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Cash Flow statements and Notes to accounts
 

Meaning and Purpose of cash flow statements- Meaning of cash flow,  sources of cash flow, Operating, Investing and Finance activities- Inflow and outflow of cash- Indirect method-Interpreting company growth rate from cash flow stage-Positive and Negative cash flow-Effect of changes in cash flow on performance – Interpretation of high cash balances-Exhibit of cash flow statements of Indian companies- Schedules or notes to accounts- preparation and  relevance- interpretation of schedules.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Interpretation of Financial Statements
 

Year On Year (YoY) comparison of Income statement and Balance sheet-Common size comparison-Interpreting EPS, DPS, MPS, PE Ratio, Intrinsic value, Liquidity ratio, Current ratio, Debt Equity Ratio- Dividend payout- Ascertaining performance of a company through exhibit of annual report of Indian companies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
: Ethics in Accounting
 

Compliance of accounting standard in letter vs true spirit- window dressing- effects of unethical practices and non-disclosures-case study ethics in public practice of accounting, ethics in compliance, ethics in corporate reporting, ethics in non-profit organisations.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Gupta, A. (2020). Financial Accounting for Management: An Analytical Perspective, Noida, Pearson Education.
  2. Raman, B. S. (2014). Financial Accounting (1stedi).I & II, New Dehli:United Publishers.
  3. Porter, G.A., & Norton, C.L. (2013). Financial Accounting (IFRS update)( 6thedi), Cengage Learning.
  4. Jawahar Lal & Seema Srivastava (2013). Financial Accounting New Delhi:Himalaya Publishing House.
  5.  Sharma & Sashi Gupta (2020) Management Accounting, Kalyani Publishers 
  6. I M Pandey (2020) Management Accounting, Vikas Publishers 
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Financial Accounting By SP JAIN & NArang , Kalyani Publishers, Noida

Evaluation Pattern

Total 50 marks . 

CIA-1 20 marks (weightage 50% ie 10 marks ) 

CIA-2 20 marks(weightage 50% ie 10 marks ) 

CIA-3 - 50 marks (weightage 50% ie 25 marks ) 

For attendance 5marks 

This is a Submission paper .There is no MSE or ESE 

BBA141F - SUSTAINABILITY?AND GREEN MARKETING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is designed to understand the importance of Sustainability and Green Marketing on consumer satisfaction and environmental safety. Green revolution, going green, environment protection, and sustainable development have become the buzz words today. Consumers are gradually becoming conscious buying eco-friendly products. This course aims at understanding the concept of Green Products and Marketing. This course also revisits the factors that affect consumers’ purchase decision in general. This course will lead the exploration of the leading edge of this paradigm shift that is now underway. This course introduces students to the concepts and processes of Green marketing and takes them deeper into the world of Green marketing.

Course Objectives: This course intends

 

  • To examine green marketing and its importance from the perspective of consumers and businesses.

  • To evaluate evidence of emerging green consumer segments and how marketers address those needs.

  • To explain the current state of the environment resulting from past and present human consumption practices.

  • To elaborate on opportunities, challenges, and issues in designing and implementing sustainable green marketing strategies.

 

 

Course Outcome

CLO1: Analyze green marketing and its importance from the perspective of consumers and businesses.

CLO2: Assess evidence of emerging green consumer segments and how marketers address those needs.

CLO3 : Interpret the current state of the environment resulting from past and present human consumption practices.

CLO4: Discuss the opportunities, challenges, and issues in designing and implementing sustainable green marketing strategies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Sustainability and Fundamentals of Green Marketing
 

Meaning, Concept and Evolution of Sustainability, Green Marketing, Types of Green Marketing, Difference  between Marketing and Green Marketing, Green Product, Green Marketing, Importance of Green Marketing, Benefits of Green Marketing, Adoption of Green Marketing, Green Marketing Mix, Strategies for Green Marketing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Segmentation of Green Marketing
 

Green Spinning, Green Selling, Green Harvesting, Enviropreneur Marketing, Compliance Marketing, Green Washing, Climate Performance Leadership Index, Promotional Channels of Green Marketing.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Green Marketing Initiatives
 

Green Firms, HCL’s Green Management Policy, IBM’s Green Solutions, IndusInd Bank’s Solar Powered ATMs, ITCs Paperkraft, Maruti’s Green Supply Chain, ONCGs Mokshada Green Crematorium, Reva’s Electric Car, Samsung’s Eco-friendly handsets, Wipro Infotech’s Eco-friendly computer peripherals

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Environmental consciousness
 

 

Introduction to Environment, Importance of environmentalism, Environmental movement, Benefits of green environment to society, E-waste exchange, Extended Producer Responsibility Plan, Guidelines for Collection and Storage of E-Waste, Guidelines for Transportation of E-Waste, Guidelines for Environmentally Sound Recycling of E-Waste

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Socially Responsible Marketing
 

Sustainable Marketing, Social Criticisms of Marketing, Marketing’s Impact on Individuals, Marketing’s Impact on Society as a Whole, Marketing’s Impact on Other Businesses, Actions to Promote Sustainable Marketing, Business Actions Toward Sustainable Marketing, Principles and Marketing Ethics.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Ottman, J. A. (2011). The new rules of Green Marketing: Strategies, tools, and inspiration for Sustainable Branding. Barrett-Koehler Publisher. 

  2. Ottman, J. A. (2001). Green Marketing: Opportunity for Innovation. NTC Business Books.

  3. Dahlstrom, R. (2011). Green Marketing Management. South-Western Cengage Learning.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Esty, D. C., & Simmons, P. J. (2011). The green to gold business playbook: How to implement sustainability practices for bottom-line results in every business function. Wiley. 

  2. Grant, J. (2009). The Green Marketing Manifesto. Wiley.  
Evaluation Pattern
CIA 1: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 2: 20 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 10 MARKS)

CIA 3: 50 MARKS ( LATER CONVERTED TO 25 MARKS)

Attendance 5 marks 

Total 50 marks 

 

COAF101-1 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course presents the underlying framework and concepts of Financial Accounting in the context of how accounting fits into the overall business environment of contemporary society. Students will learn how accounting is an information development and communication system that supports economic decision-making and provides value to entities and society. As a prerequisite, the students should have basic knowledge of Accountancy.

Course Outcome

CO1: Examine the process of valuation of loss of stock and amount to be claimed from insurance companies in the event of fire accident

CO2: Solve problems relating to calculation of rate of interest, cash price and instalment amount under hire purchase system.

CO3: Examine the account for business with different branches and incorporate it in the books of the Head office.

CO4: Explain the process of converting partnership firms into companies.

CO5: Identify and explain different accounting software and their importance

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Insurance Claim
 

Introduction – Need – loss of stock policy – preparation of statement to ascertain value of stock on the date of fire – Treatment of salvage – valuation of stocks prior to date of fire – calculation of GP Ratio when GP Ratio is not given – Treatment of Average Clause, Treatment of Abnormal items.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Accounting for Hire Purchase and Installment Systems
 

Hire Purchase - Meaning - Legal provisions, [including repossession, only theory] - Calculation of interest - when rate of interest and cash price is given - when cash price and total amount payable is given when rate of interest and installments amount are given but cash price is not given - Calculation of cash price under annuity method - Journal entries and Ledger accounts in the books of hire-purchaser and hire-vendor. Installment system- Meaning - Difference between hire purchase and installment system (Theory only). Interest calculation using MS Excel.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Accounting for Inland Branches
 

Concept of dependent branches, Accounting aspects, Debtors system. Independent branches: Concept- Accounting treatment: important adjustment entries.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Conversion of Partnership firm into company
 

Meaning – Need for conversion - Purchase Consideration – Mode of Discharge of Purchase Consideration – Methods of calculation of Purchase Consideration – Net Payment Method – Net Assets Method - Journal Entries and Ledger Accounts in the books of vendor firm – Treatment of items: Dissolution Expenses, Unrecorded Assets and Liabilities, Assets and Liabilities not taken over by the Purchasing Company, Contingent liabilities, Incorporation entries and preparation of balance sheet in the books of purchasing company.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Automation in Accounting
 

Meaning of Automation, Automation in Accounting, Impact on Accountants and Industry, Tally, quickbooks, XBRL, Blockchain, Cloud Computing in Accounting, Big Data in Accounting, Robotic Process Automation in Accounting, Recent innovations in Accounting: Connected Banking.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Jain &Narang, (2019). Financial Accounting. Mumbai: Kalyani Publisher

2. Gupta, R.L., & Radhaswamy, M., (2019) Financial Accounting (18ed.). New Delhi: Sultan Chand & Sons.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Maheswari S. N. & Maheswari S. K. (2019). Advanced accountancy. New Delhi: Vikas

2. Shukla M. C. & Grewall T. S. (2019). Advanced accountancy (15 Ed.). New Delhi: S. Chand

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment (CIA). Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

Assessment Component

Description

Weightage

CIA I

Quizzes, role plays, objective type tests, written assignments, discussion forums, article reviews, case analysis etc.

10%

CIA II

Mid semester written examination conducted for 2 hours duration

25%

CIA III

Group work consisting of presentations, viva voce, and report submission.

10%

ESE

Written examination conducted for 3 hours duration

50%

Attendance

 

05%

 

TOTAL

100%

 

COAF161-1 - SPREADSHEET FOR BUSINESS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the role of spreadsheet software in finance. Students will learn how to use Microsoft Excel to analyse financial data, perform financial calculations and presentation data using graphs. As a prerequisite, the students should have basic knowledge about computers and MS Office.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain basic terminologies and functionalities of excel

CO2: Use Excel's data analysis tools, including sorting, filtering, and pivot tables, to analyse financial data.

CO3: Perform the conditional formatting with finance data.

CO4: Evaluate long-term investment proposals and select the best alternative for the organisation

CO5: Create charts and graphs in Excel to visually represent financial data.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Excel
 

Basic Excel functions: Understanding the Excel interface - Entering and formatting data - Basic formulas and functions - Structure of an excel function, functions such as SUM (), MIN (), MAX (), AVERAGE (), COUNT (), AUTOSUM, AUTOFILL. Sort - Filter - Conditional Formatting to Find Duplicates, Removing Duplicates.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Validation
 

Excel Data Validation: Understanding the Need for Data Validation, Creating a Validation List, Adding a Custom Validation Error, Dynamic Formulas by Using Validation Techniques - Understanding Excel PivotTables, Creating an Excel PivotTable, Modifying Excel Pivot Table Calculations, Grouping Pivot. Table Data, Formatting PivotTable Data, Drilling Down into PivotTable Data, Creating Pivot Charts, Filtering PivotTable Data, Filtering with the Slicer Tool.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Conditional Functions and Working with Large Excel Data Sets
 

Conditional Functions: Working with Excel Name Ranges, Using Excel's IF () Function, Nesting Functions, Using Excel's COUNTIF () Function, Using Excel's SUMIF () Function, Using Excel's IFERROR () Function. Working with Large Sets of Excel Data: Using the Freeze Panes Tool, Grouping Data (Columns and/or Rows), Consolidating Data from Multiple Worksheets.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Lookup, Text Based Function and financial function
 

Excel's Lookup Functions: Using Excel's VLOOKUP() Function, Using Excel's HLOOKUP() Function, Using Excel's INDEX() and MATCH() Functions. Excel's Text Based Functions: Using Excel's functions such as LEFT(), RIGHT() and MID(), LEN(), SEARCH(), CONCATENATE(). Time value of money - present value of money - capital budgeting, Net present value, Internal rate of return. Introduction to macros. Creation of simple macro functions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Data Analysis and visualisation
 

Pivot tables and charts - Data analysis tools - Charting and graphing techniques - Dashboard creation

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.Microsoft Excel 2016 Step by Step Curtis Frye, Microsoft Press, A division of Microsoft Corporation, 2016 edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Microsoft Excel Essential Hints and Tips Fundamental hints and tips to kick start your Excel skills By Diane Griffiths Published, 2015 edition.

2. Excel 2010 Formulas, by Wiley Publishing, 2010 Edition

Evaluation Pattern

 

Students are evaluated through continuous internal assessment (CIA). It is evaluated as follows:

 

 

Assessment Component

Description

Marks

CIA I

Quizzes, objective type tests, written assignments, discussion forums, article reviews, case analyses, etc.

30%

CIA II

Demonstration & Presentation, Quizzes, Assignments, Discussion, etc.

30%

CIA III

Comprehensive Practical Test, Viva-Voce, Report Book Submission

35%

Attendance

 

5%

 

Total

100%

 

COM001-1 - INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTANCY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:0
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to impart basic knowledge of accounting to non-commerce student who have taken up Bachelor of Commerce in their graduation. Detail about the Basic fundamentals and concept of accounting will be covered along with passing of journal entries for different type of transactions and posting them in the ledger accounts. Preparation of subsidiary books and trial balance will also be taught to students so that they will be able to prepare different types of books. The course ends with the preparation of financial statements by calculating gross profit, net profit and finally preparing balance sheet involving different types of adjustments.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Recall the basic fundamental concepts of accounting and understand some of the basic terminologies used in accounting.

CO2: Pass journal entries for different type of transactions and post them in ledger account.

CO3: Differentiate between trial balance and ledger accounts and prepare a trial balance.

CO4: Ascertain gross profit and net profit by allocating different income and expenses.

CO5: Prepare financial statements of an organization.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Accounting
 

Accounting – Meaning, Objectives, Internal and External users of accounting information and their needs, Basic Accounting Terms – Asset, Liability, Capital, Expense, Income, Expenditure, Revenue, Debtors, Creditors, Goods, Cost, Gain, Stock, Purchase, Sales, Loss, Profit, Voucher, Discount, Transaction, Drawings.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Subsidiary Books
 

Introduction, Objectives, advantages & limitations of subsidiary books, preparation of cash book, purchase book, sales book, purchase return books, sales return books, Bills receivables book, bills payable book. 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Journal entries
 

Meaning, features and importance of journal entries, passing of journal entries for different type of transactions.

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Preparation of Ledger Accounts
 

Meaning, definition, features, objectives, advantages and preparation of different types of ledger accounts, difference between subsidiary books and ledger accounts.

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Financial statements
 

Meaning, features, objectives, advantages and limitation of financial statements, preparation of trading account, objectives of trading account, profit & loss account, objectives of profit & loss account, Balance sheet, objectives of balance sheet, preparation of balance sheet, classification of assets, classification of liabilities, adjustment relating to outstanding expenses, Prepaid expenses, Accrued income, Income received in advance, Depreciation, Bad debts, Provision for doubtful debts etc. 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Jain S.P. &Narang K.L (2019). Corporate Accounting. New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers, REP/Edition
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Jain S.P. &Narang K.L (2019). Corporate Accounting. New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers, REP/Edition

 

Evaluation Pattern

The students are assessed at the end of the bridge course to compare with entry level assessment scores.

COM101-1 - LEGAL ASPECTS OF BUSINESS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In the ever changing dynamic business environment, it is important that students are aware of the laws of the land, legislative systems and relevant applications of the provisions of the law. This course enables students to recognize, appreciate and apply the relevant provisions of the legislations in business. 

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognize the relevant legislation in business and the applicability of its relevant provisions.

CO2: Comprehend provisions and applicability of the Sale of Goods Act and The Insolvency Introduction, need and objective of Information Technology Act, Definitions, Cyber Law in India, Cyber Crimes and its meaning and types, offences and penalties, Cyberspace, digital and Bankruptcy Code.

CO3: Familiarize the aspects of IT Act and its relevance and applicability in the present environment.

CO4: Comprehend the Companies Act for its application in the current business environment.

CO5: Acquire the knowledge and understand the applicability of competition and consumer laws.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
The Indian Contract Act, 1872
 

Introduction and Salient Features Nature of contract and essential elements of valid contract, Offer - General offer- Specific offer, Acceptance- essentials of acceptance, Consideration, Misrepresentation, Free consent,  Fraud, Mistake -Types. Minor agreements Special Contracts – Indemnity and guarantee, Contracts of Bailment, Pledge and Agency - Breach of Contracts – Remedies for Breach of Contracts. (Relevant case laws)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The Sale of Goods Act Law and Insolvency
 

The Sale of Goods Act, 1930: Formation of the contract of sale, Conditions and Warranties, Transfer of property, Finder of goods, Performance of contract of sale, Rights of an unpaid seller.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
The Information Technology Act 2000
 

Introduction, need and objective of Information Technology Act, Definitions, Cyber Law in India, Cyber Crimes – meaning and types, offences and penalties, Cyber space, digital signature, private key, public key, encryption, digital signature certificate, Cyber regulations appellate tribunal – Role and authority (Relevant case laws)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Competition and Consumer Laws
 

Competition Act 2002 – Objectives, Features, Competition Appellate Tribunal, Offences and Penalties under this Act, Competition Commission of India - Powers and Duties. 

Consumer Protection Act 1986 – Introduction, objectives and need of the act, Definitions of Consumer, Consumer Dispute, Defect, Deficiency, Unfair Trade Practices and Services. Rights of Consumer, Consumer Redressal Agencies- District Forum, State Commission and National Commission.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Prevention of Money Laundering Act, 2002
 

Concept and Definitions, Offence of money laundering, Attachment, adjudication and confiscation - Obligations of Banking companies, Financial Institutions and Intermediaries – Summons, Search and Seizure – Appellate Tribunal  (Relevant case laws)

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Maheshwari SN and Maheshwari SK. (2018). Business Law, National Publishing House, New Delhi.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.Kapoor N.D. (2019). Mercantile Law, Sultan Chand & Sons

2.Tulsian P C and Tulsian Bharat. (2018). Business Law, McGraw Hill Education 

3.Sharma, J.P. and Kanojia Sunaina. (2018) Business Laws, Ane Books Pvt. Ltd., New, Delhi

4.Mulla. (2017). The Law of Insolvency in India, 6th ed., Lexis-Nexis. 

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment (CIA). Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

 

Assessment Component

Description

Weightage

CIA I

Quizzes, role plays, objective type tests, written assignments, discussion forums, article reviews, case analysis etc.

10%

CIA II

Mid semester written examination conducted for 2 hours duration

25%

CIA III

Group work consisting of presentations, viva voce, and report submission.

10%

ESE

Written examination conducted for 3 hours duration

50%

Attendance

 

05%

 

TOTAL

100%

COM102-1 - BUSINESS ECONOMICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The modules incorporated in this paper deal with the nature and scope of economics, the theory of consumer behaviour, analysis of production function and equilibrium of a producer, the price formation in different market structures and the equilibrium of a firm and industry. In addition to this, students get acquainted with the trade policy, the fiscal policy, and monetary policy within the context of a country.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop the conceptual foundations and analytical methods used in micro economics.

CO2: Develop the ability to understand and appreciate the economic theories and their application in real economic life.

CO3: Understand the role of prices in allocating scarce resources in market economies and explain the consequences of government policies in the form of price controls.

CO4: Appraise the monetary policy and fiscal policy prevalent within a country.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Demand and supply Analysis and Applications
 

Economic models- Production Possibility Frontier; Demand Analysis: Law of demand, Exceptions to the law; Changes in demand, Elasticity of Demand: Definition, degrees and measurement - Supply Analysis: Laws of supply, Changes in supply, and elasticity of supply - Market equilibrium, Applications in real life: Price Ceiling and Price Floor and Extrality - Consumer’s surplus (Marshall) and Producer surplus.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Theory of Consumer Choice
 

The Budget Constraint: What the Consumer Can Afford, Preferences: What the Consumer Wants, Indifference curves- Properties, Optimization: What the Consumer Chooses, Decomposition of Price Effect into Income and Substitution Effects

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Theory of Production and Cost
 

Producer’s Equilibrium with the help of iso-quants and iso-cost lines, Cost FunctionImportant cost concepts. Short run and long run cost analysis (traditional theory) Modern theory of cost- Revenue analysis. TR, AR and MR.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Market Structure
 

Market structure- Perfect competition, Price and output determination- Monopoly- Price output determination, Price discrimination Monopolistic Competition. Price and Output determination. Selling costs. Product differentiation- oligopoly; Price determination – Non Collusive: Kinked Demand Curve and Collusive Oligopoly: Cartel and price leadership.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Measuring Nation's Income and Cost of Living
 

Measuring GDP - Real and Nominal GDP and GDP Deflator – Inflation: Consumer Price Index, Comparison of CPI an GDP Deflator and Adjusting economic variables to inflation – Money Supply Measures

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Economic Fluctuations and Keynesian Economics
 

Economic Fluctuations and its features – Modelling Short Run Fluctuations: Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply – Influence of Monetary and Fiscal Policies on AD and As - Multiplier and Crowding Out Effects – Balance of Payments Accounts and Exchange Rate.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Gregory Mankiw, N. (2022). Principles of Economics, 8th Edition, Cengage Learning India.

2. Pindyk and Rubinfeld (2017). - Microeconomics (Pearson Education), Eighth Edition

3. Maheshwari, Yogesh (2012). Managerial Economics, New Delhi: PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. CORE’s The Economy (https://www.core-econ.org/)

2. CORE’s The Economy: A South Asian Perspective

3. Lipsey, R.G. and K.A. Chrystal (2011). Principles of Economics (IX ed.). Oxford University Press: Oxford

4. Ramsfield, E. (2012). Micro Economics (IX ed.). New York: W.W Norton and company.

5. Ray, N.C. (2014). An introduction to Microeconomics, Macmillan Company of India Ltd: Delhi. 

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

Students are evaluated for each paper on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment (CIA). Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

 

Assessment Component

Description

Weightage

CIA I

Quizzes, role plays, objective type tests, written assignments, discussion forums, article reviews, case analysis etc.

10%

CIA II

Mid semester written examination conducted for 2 hours duration

25%

CIA III

Group work consisting of presentations, viva voce, and report submission.

10%

ESE

Written examination conducted for 3 hours duration

50%

Attendance

 

05%

 

TOTAL

100%

CSC141 - PROGRAMMING IN C (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the C programming language, covering its history, features, data types, and program structure. Students will learn to apply decision control and loop structures, along with various operators, to create basic programs. Additionally, the course covers functions, recursion, arrays, and pointers to provide a solid foundation for C programming and problem-solving.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the fundamentals of C programming, including its history, features, variables, and data types.

CO2: Apply decision control statements, loop control structures, and various operators to write basic C programs.

CO3: Analyze and design functions, including recursion and passing values/arrays, and understand storage classes in C.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to C
 

 

Types of Programming Language- History of C, Features of C , C Tokens, variables and keywords and identifiers ,Types of C constants and variables, Rules for constructing variable names, Structure of C program, Input /output statements in C

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Data types and Control Structures
 

Data Types, Type declaration, Different Operators in C - Arithmetic, Logical, Relational, Bitwise, Conditional, Expressions, Hierarchy of operations.

Control structures

 

Decision control statements-if, switch, go to statement, conditional operator statement. Loop control structures- while, do-while, for loop, Break statement, Continue statement.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Function
 

Introduction, function definition and prototyping, Types of functions, passing values to function, recursion, passing arrays to functions. I/O functions- formatted & unformatted console I/O functions Storage classes in C- Automatic, Register, Extern and Static Variables.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Arrays
 

 

One dimensional and multidimensional arrays, Declaration, initialization, Reading values into an array, Displaying array contents and Array Manipulations. String-Basic Concepts, Library Functions

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Pointers
 

Definition, notation, pointer and arrays, pointers and functions-call by value and call by reference.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Balagurusamy, E. Programming in ANSI C 4th Edition. Tata McGraw-Hill, 2010.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Kanetkar, Yashavant. Let Us C. 4th Edition. BPB Publications, 2012.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

CSC143 - WEB DESIGNING USING HTML, PHP AND MYSQL (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the fundamentals of HTML and PHP for web development. Students will learn HTML tags for content structuring and essential PHP scripting concepts, including variables, conditional statements, and error handling. Additionally, they will explore form handling, loops, and MySQL database interactions using PHP. By the end, students will be equipped to create dynamic web applications and understand the essentials of web programming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply HTML basics, including tags for structure, lists, images, hyperlinks, and tables.

CO2: Develop PHP scripts with variables, data types, conditional statements, and error handling techniques.

CO3: Utilize PHP for form handling, switch-case statements, loop structures, and working with arrays in MySQL database.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-1
 

 

Basic HTML tags- HTML, HEAD, BODY, TITLE, Paragraphs, Headings, Line Breaks, Dividers- P, H1, …H6, BR, HR, Character Entity References- Quotes, ampersands, angle brackets, and non-breaking spaces Lists- OL, UL, DL, Formatting-URL and Paths, Images- IMG, Hyperlinks, Table-TABLE, TR, TD, TH, Form-FORM, INPUT, TEXTAREA, SELECT, OPTION, Frames-FRAMESET, FRAME

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
PHP Basic
 

Writing PHP scripts - Writing PHP scripts, learn about PHP code structure, how to write and execute a simple PHP script and to add comments within your code.

Variables and Data Types- Learn about Variables, values and Data Types in PHP: boolean, integer, float, string, array, object, Resource, null.

Numbers and mathematical Operators- Introducing Numbers and mathematical 0perators, some PHP functions for more complex operations with numbers.

PHP Strings- Working with strings, using simple and double quotes, escaping quotes and other characters, concatenating strings, some functions for strings.

 Constants- Introducing Constants, syntax for defining constants, differences between variables and defined constants.

PHP Error Handling and Debugging-Error Handling, debugging and trigger errors and how to adjust the level of error reporting, handling exceptions.

 

If ... Else conditionals, Comparative and Logical operators - Make PHP script takes decisions with If, Else, Elseif conditional statements. Compare two values with Comparative and Logical operators. The ternary operator.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-3
 

Using HTML Forms - Using HTML Forms, PHP form handling, get data sent from form fields through GET and POST method, form validation.

$_GET, $_POST Variables - How to send data with get and post methods to a PHP script and access it with superglobal $_GET, $_POST variables.

Switch ... Case ... - PHP MySQL course - Switch ... Case ... conditional statement, switch with break and default instructions.

While Loops - Using While and Do Wile Loops. End the While loops with the break instruction. Syntax and examples.

For and For each Loops - Using for () and for each () Loops. End the "For" loops with the break instruction. Syntax and examples.

 

PHP Arrays - Creating Numeric (indexed) Arrays and Associative arrays. Accessing, modifying and traversing array elements.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-4
 

PHP MySQL Introduction, Data Types - PHP MySQL Introduction, database structure, tables. MySQL naming rules, and column's data types.

PHP MySQL - INSERT INTO - Insert data in MySQL table, INSERT INTO query. Insert data from a form into a database.

 

PHP MySQL - SELECT, ORDER BY - Retrieve and display data from a MySQL table, SELECT SQL command. Determine the number of records. Sort query results with ORDER BY clause (ASC and DESC).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Unit-5
 

PHP MySQL - WHERE and LIKE - Selecting specific data from a database with the WHERE clause and Conditionals. Check for string matching with LIKE and NOT LIKE terms.

PHP MySQL – UPDATE - UPDATE query to edit / change existing records in MySQL table.

 

PHP MySQL – DELETE - The DELETE statement, used to entirely remove records from a database table.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Powell, HTML & XHTM: The Complete Reference, 4th Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill Edition
[2] Steven Holzner, PHP: The Complete Reference, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2008


Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

[1] Robin Nixon, Learning PHP, My SQL and Java Script, Kindle Edition, O'Reilly Media 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

CSC149 - INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introductory-level training will be given software and tools for solving data science problems.

This course is designed to provide the theoretical foundations of data science.

Standard problems in data science, such as pre-processing, classification, clustering, and visualization, will be addressed.

Practical sessions will provide demonstrations, training, and discussions on results and interpretation methods.

Course Outcome

CO1: Collect the data from various sources.

CO2: Understand the problem scenario.

CO3: Solve data science problems with appropriate tools.

CO4: Interpret the results through visualizations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 1
 

Introduction – Concept data – types of data – sources of data – data sets – terminologies – pre-processing – classification – clustering – association rule mining – visualization – approaches – statistics – machine learning and soft computing.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Preprocessing & Data Transformation:
 

Data cleaning – handling missing values – errors and outliers

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Classification
 

Decision trees – naïve based methods – neural networks – SVM.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Data Transformation
 

Application of normalization methods – min-max method – 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Clustering
 

K-Means – Distance-based methods – Association Rules – finding frequent itemsets – apriori method.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Post-processing
 

Performance metrics of tasks – drawing various charts from the results – interpretation of results.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Tools for data science
 

Exploring the open source tools: Weka, Orange, Rapid Miner.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques, Han, Kamber and Pei, 2013

2. Data Mining and Predictive Analytics, Daniel T. Larose & ChantalD Lorose, Wiley Publisher, 2017

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Data Mining and Analysis Fundamental Concepts and Algorithms, Zaki and  Meira, MK Publisher,  2014.

2. Data Mining: The Text  Book, Aggarwal, Springer, 2015.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 50%

ESE 50%

DMT141 - DANCE MOVEMENT THERAPY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description:

This course has been conceptualized in order to Understanding and exploring theory and practice as two sides of the same coin for academic 

excellence in Performing Arts. Benchmarking quality, understanding and exploring adaptability to situations and taking leadership tasks.

Maintaining emotional and aesthetics sensitivity in verbal and non-verbal communication

Course Outcome

CO1: To work on the body schema, body image and physical self-concept To examine the concept of creativity and imagination.

CO2: To understand and gain practical understanding about the human body expression through the Gross Motor Skills Development, the Global Motor Coordination Schemes according Bartenieff, the Effort/Shape system of movement analysis according Laban.

CO3: To gain the ability to express emotions To improved confidence and self-esteem

CO4: To analyse and to gain practical understanding about the concept of Dance: from ancient social function to performance, from performance to therapy. To learn how Dance Movement Therapy dances with life: instances of different social areas in which Dmt is practised.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Introduction on Dance Movement
 

  Definition of Dance and its history 

 Definition of creativity 

 History of Dance Movement Therapy theory 

 

To understand and to gain practical understanding about the human body expression 

the Gross Motor Skills Development,

the Global Motor Coordination Schemes according Bartenieff,  

the Effort/Shape system of movement analysis according Laban.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:25
Practice
 

Explore the body: The warm –up in Dance Movement Therapy 

The social function of the dance 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential references: (in APA format)

- Bellia , V. (2020). A body among other bodies. Relational Expressive Dance Movement Therapy. Catania A&G

- Hackney, P. (1998). Making connections. Total body integration through Barrtenieff Fundamentals. Routledge, New York.

- Laban R. (1950). The mastery of movement on the stage. McDonald & Evans, London

- Laban R., Lawrence F.C. (1947). Effort. McDonald & Evans, London

- Schilder P., (1935) The image and appearance of the human body. Taylor & Francis

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Essential references: (in APA format)

- Bellia , V. (2020). A body among other bodies. Relational Expressive Dance Movement Therapy. Catania A&G

- Hackney, P. (1998). Making connections. Total body integration through Barrtenieff Fundamentals. Routledge, New 

- Schilder P., (1935) The image and appearance of the human body. Taylor & Francis

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation patterns  - final assessment 100 marks

DMT142 - INTRODUCTION TO CARNATIC MUSIC (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introduction to Carnatic music focus on the basic fundamentals of Carnatic music. This course helps to improve the vocal quality as the lessons works as voice culture to the begginner.

Course Outcome

CO1: Ability to render the Swara-s in three speeds

CO2: Ability to identify and render the 7 Swara-s

CO3: Ability to render Sarala, Janta, Dhatu, Tarasthayi, and Alankara-s in three speeds.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Svaravali varisas and Janti varisas
 

Lessons in three speeds

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Tarasthayi and Dhattu varisas
 

All the lessons in to three speeds

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Alankaras and Geethams
 

Sapta tala alankaras and any for geethams

Text Books And Reference Books:

Carnatic music reader by Panchapakesha Iyer

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ganamrutha Bodhini

Evaluation Pattern

Final assessment for 100 Marks

DSC141 - PRINCIPLES OF DATA SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To provide a strong foundation for data science and the application area related to it, train toexplore the process of data pre-processing and machine learning, and to inculcate the importanceof ethics while handling data and problems in data science. To provide students with a fundamental understanding of the digital computing concepts from a hardware and software perspective.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the fundamental concepts of data science.

CO2: Explore the concepts of data pre-processing and visualization.

CO3: Learn the basic concepts of machine learning.

CO4: Practice the ethics while handling data

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:14
Introduction
 

INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE

What is data science? – Why data science? – Data science venn diagram – Terminologies – Application case studies. Types of data – Structured vs unstructured data – Quantitative vs qualitative data – Four levels of data.

Data Science Ethics – Doing good data science – Owners of the data - Valuing different aspects of privacy - Getting informed consent - The Five Cs – Diversity – Inclusion – Future Trends.

 

  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Data Science process and Machine Learning
 

 DATA SCIENCE PROCESS

Five steps of data science – Ask an interesting question? – Obtain the data - Explore the data – Model the data – Communicate and visualize results – Basic question for data explorations – case studies for EDA

 Machine Learning

Machine learning – Modeling Process – Training model – Validating model – Predicting new observations –Supervised learning algorithms-– Unsupervised learning algorithms. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Data Visualization
 

DATA VISUALISATION

Communicating data – Identifying visualization – Importance of graphs and statistics – Verbal communication – The why, how and what strategy of presenting.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1]Sinan Ozdemir, Principles of Data Science learn the techniques and math you need to start making sense of your data. Birmingham Packt December, 2016.

[2]Davy Cielen and Arno Meysman, Introducing Data Science. Simon and Schuster, 2016.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]M. Loukides, H. Mason, and D. Patil, Ethics and Data Science. O’Reilly Media, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 100%

DSC142 - PYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR DATA SCIENCE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the programming paradigms associated with Python. It provides a comprehensive understanding of Python data types, functions and modules with a focus on modular programming.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and apply core programming concepts.

CO2: Demonstrate significant experience with python program development environment.

CO3: Design and implement fully-functional programs using commonly used modules and custom functions.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
INTRODUCTION
 

INTRODUCING PYTHON

Introduction, Python Fundamentals, Features of Python, Components of a Python Program, Understanding the interpreter.

Python basics:

Identifiers, Basic Types, Operators, Precedence and Associativity, Decision Control Structures, Looping Structures, Console input, output.

Practical Exercises:

1.Implement Basic data types, Control structures and operators.

2.Exercise on console input and output.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Programming Fundamentals
 

PYTHON DATA TYPES

Strings,Lists:Accessingelements,Basic List operations, Built-in methods

Tuples: working with elements, Basic Tuple operation, Tuple methods and Type of Tuples 

Sets: Definition, Set Elements, Built-in methods, basic set operations, Mathematical Set operation, Variety of Sets.

Dictionaries: Defining a dictionary, accessing elements, basic operations, methods.

COMPREHENSIONS and FUNCTIONS

 Comprehensions:ListComprehensions, Set Comprehension, Dictionary Comprehension.

Functions: Defining a function, Types of arguments, unpacking arguments.

Recursive functions.Main module, built-in, custommodules, importing a module.

 

Practical Exercises:

    1. Implement Tuples

    2. Implement Dictionary

    3. Implement Set

    4.ImplementList, Set and Dictionary Comprehensions

    5.Implement Recursive function

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to NUMPY AND PANDAS
 

NUMPY 

Introduction to NumPy, Aggregations Computation on Arrays, Comparisons, Sorting Arrays.

PANDAS

Introduction to Pandas: Data indexing and Selection, Operating on Data, Handling Missing Data.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

[1]Martin Brown, Python:The Complete Reference,     McGraw Hill Publications,4th Edition March 2018.

[2]Yashavant Kanetkar,Aditya Kanetkar, Let Us Python, BPB Publications ,4th Edition 2022.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1]Reema Thareja ,Python Programming using problem solving Approach , Oxford University, Higher Education Oxford University Press, 2017

[2]Zhang.Y      ,An      Introduction     to         Pythonand      Computer            Programming,Springer Publications,2015

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 100%

ECO143 - DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMY (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates on democracy and emerging issues in economies.  The course discusses how various socioeconomic factors act as constraints on economic growth and development. This basic framework allows a student to delve into the causes and consequences of various strategies/methods taken/applied by policymakers and practitioners and how it affects the overall objective of the state/economy through a trifocal analysis of the economy, society, and market keeping the central theme of ‘Democracy.’This course will introduce students to:

  • Growing crisis of wealth distribution and income inequality.
  •  Sectoral significance and state intervention in policy making.
  • Informal sector and labor market participation and rights.
  • Analyze corruption in emerging economies through various case studies.
  • Discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory, and measurement.

Course Outcome

CO1: Recognise the growing crisis of wealth and income inequality among the members of the economy.

CO2: Understand the economic crisis in different sectors and government interventions in practices.

CO3: Get familiar informal sector and labour market participation and rights.

CO4: Understand debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption.

CO5: Investigate issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing challenges in economies through the lens of democracy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratization and Society
 

Theories of Democratization; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratization; The Global Wave of Democratization; Causes and Dimensions of Democratization: The Political Economy of Democracy; Political Culture, Mass Beliefs and Value Change; Gender and Democratization; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratization Processes: Role, impact on policy reforms and cultural change.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy, Democratisation and Society
 

Theories of Democratisation; Democratic and Undemocratic States; Measuring Democracy and Democratisation; The Global Wave of Democratisation; Causes and Dimensions of Democratisation: The Political Economy of Democracy: Political Culture, Mass Beliefs, and Value Change; Gender and Democratisation; Social Capital and Civil Society; Social Movements and Contention in Democratisation Processes: Role, Impact on Policy Reforms and Cultural Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation;   Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratization; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Actors and Institutions
 

Conventional Citizen Participation; Institutional Design in New Democracies; Gender and Democratisation; A Decade of Democratic Decline and Stagnation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of political transitions: Choice of the economic and political regime; Theoretical extensions: growth, trade, political institutions; Democracy and the public sector; the state, the treat of expropriation and the possibility of development: Social and economic wellbeing and policy reforms.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Democracy and Redistribution
 

A Theory of Political Transitions: Choice of Economic and Political Regime; Theoretical Extensions: Growth, Trade, Political Institutions; Democracy and the Public Sector; the State, the Threat of Expropriation and the Possibility of Development: Social and Economic Wellbeing and Policy Reforms

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development
 

A Marxian theory of democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development
 

A Marxian Theory of Democracy; The Importance of Social Class in Historical Comparative Perspective; The Case Study of India; Dependency and Development; Democracy in Developing Countries; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Growth and Development Indian Experience
 

India’s Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality, and Public Reasoning; A case study on Gujarat experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome; Kerala experience of development: Approaches, impact, and outcome.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Democracy and Economic Development: Indian Experience
 

India's Tryst with Destiny; Democracy, Inequality and Public Reasoning, A Case Study on Gujarat's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome; Kerala's Experience of Development: Approaches, Impact and Outcome

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhagwati, J. N., & Panagariya, A. (2012). India's Tryst with Destiny: Debunking Myths that Undermine Progress and Addressing New Challenges. HarperCollins Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Boix, C. (2003). Democracy and Redistribution. Cambridge University Press.

Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2015). An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions. Economics Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: 20 Marks

CIA 3: 45 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

ECO144 - GLOBALISATION AND DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Liberalisation policies being pursued by most national economies in the world today, including India creates the need to acquire knowledge and comprehension of Globalisation as ideology along with its practical dynamics. The course intends to provide a sound understanding about the various components, and issues of this ideology at an introductory level. The methodology will be learning centered and so will be one of intensive facilitation by faculty of the reading to be done by students.

Course Outcome

CO1: Describe the various facets of globalisation.

CO2: Explain the various challenges of globalisation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Globalisation: Brief History – The Marrakesh Meet – Globalisation as a contested concept – Debate of Globalisation as a new phenomenon

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Political Economy of Globalisation
 

Political Economy Debate of Comparative Advantage versus Imperialism – Introduction to Globalisation and the Political Economy of the External Sector.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Dimensions of Globalisation
 

The Economics Dimension – The Political Dimension – The Cultural Dimension

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Ideology
 

The Ideological Dimension of Globalisation – Challenges to Globalism – Assessing the Future of Globalisation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Manfred Steger ‘Globalisation the new Market Ideology’.

2. Joseph Stiglitz ‘Discontents of Gloablisaton’

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Justin Ervin, Zachary A Smith "Globalisation: A Reference Hand Book."

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 25 Marks

CIA II - 25 Marks

ESE - 50 Marks

ECO145 - ECOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to provide a holistic and a deeper understanding of the trade-off between ecology and development. Through an inter-disciplinary lens an organic approach is adopted to understand the trade-off. This course, therefore, seeks to cultivate not only the moral and ethical thinking of the ecology but also it tries to put forth an action plan from a policy front. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To evoke a sense of deep ecology and social justice.

CO2: To familiarize the students with the development paradigms and how it affects the ecology.

CO3: To examine the problems behind value designations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Value
 

The Value Problem in Ecological Economics- Values in Ecological Value Analysis: What Should We Be Learning from Contingent Valuation Studies? - Natural Capital in Ecological Economics-Entropy in Ecological Economics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Ecology and Development
 

The environmental impact of land development-Development of water resources-Development and changing air quality- Urban development and environmental change-Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?- Power Inequality and the Environment.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ecofeminism and Ecocriticism
 

Gender and environment; Ecofeminism; androcentrism; Deep ecology – ecofeminism debate; Ecocriticism; Nature writings; Thinking like a mountain; The forgetting and remembering of the air - The Varna Trophic System An Ecological Theory of Caste Formation. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Action Plans
 

Reading Ecology, Reinventing Democracy-Scientists or Spies?- Revisiting the Debates on Man-Nature Relation- Lecture of Medha Patkar- Ecological Fiscal Transfers and State-level Budgetary Spending in India- -Bourgeois Environmentalism, the State, the Judiciary, Urban Poor, Significance of Silent Valley- Silent Valley: A controversy that focused global attention on a rainforest 40 years ago- Equity and Justice

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      1.Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

2.Daly & Farley. (2011). Ecological Economics (Principles and Applications). Island Press

3.Pepper, D. (2002). Eco-socialism: from deep ecology to social justice. Routledge

1.      4.Gupta, Avijit. (1998).Ecology and Development in Third World. Routledge

4. Patel, S. (1997). Ecology and Development. Economic and Political Weekly, 2388-2391.

5. Sankar, U. (ed.) (2000). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press

6. Burkett, Paul. (2006). Marxism and Ecological Economics. Brill

7.Venkatachalam, L. (2007). Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?. Ecological economics, 61(2-3), 550-558.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.    1. Plumwood, V. (1993).  Feminism and the Mastery of Nature. London: Routledge

2. Warren, K.J. (ed), (1994).  Ecological Feminism. London: Routledge.

3.Shiva, V. (2016). Staying alive: Women, ecology, and development. North Atlantic Books.

4.Kavoori, P. S. (2002). The Varna Trophic system: an ecological theory of caste formation. Economic and Political Weekly, 1156-1164. 

5.Gill, K. (2009). Bourgeois environmentalism’, the State, the Judiciary, and the ‘urban poor’: The political mobilization of a scheduled caste market. Of Poverty and Plastic (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2010), 209.

6. Kaur, A., Mohanty, R. K., Chakraborty, L., & Rangan, D. (2021). Ecological fiscal transfers and state-level budgetary spending in India: Analyzing the flypaper effects. Levy Economics Institute, Working Papers Series July.

7.Parameswaran, M. P. (1979). Significance of Silent Valley. Economic and Political Weekly, 1117-1119.

8. Lewis, M. (2002). Scientists or spies? Ecology in a climate of Cold War suspicion. Economic and Political Weekly, 2323-2332.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 - 25 Marks

CIA 2- 25 Marks

CIA 3- 50 Marks 

ENG181-1 - ENGLISH (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities, and politics and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO2: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO3: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare
 
  • 1. The Happy Prince- Oscar Wilde
  • 2. Sonnet 18- William Shakespeare

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors  Just a minute talk, cubing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
1. Why We Travel-Pico Iyer
 

 Why We Travel-Pico Iyer 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism,

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
1. Thinking Like a Mountain By Aldo Leopold
 

Thinking Like a Mountain  By Aldo Leopold

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article
 

 

Aarushi-Hemraj Murder Article 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
1. My Story- Nicole DeFreece
 

 

 My Story- Nicole DeFreece

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Casey at the Bat- Ernest Lawrence Thayer
 
  • Casey at the Bat-  Ernest Lawrence Thayer
Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Additional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20 

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks

EST142 - READING SPORTS AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:3
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Reading Sports and Literature

Course Description: The Sports and Literature course aims to explore the relationship between sports and literature through the analysis of various literary works. By examining texts that center around sports themes, this course will delve into the cultural, social, and personal aspects of sports as portrayed in literature. Students will develop critical thinking, analytical, and communication skills as they engage with a diverse range of texts, including novels, short stories, poems, and essays. Through class discussions, readings, and written assignments, students will gain a deeper understanding of the literary representation of sports and its significance in society.

Course Objectives:

To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

 

To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Course Outcome

CO1: To analyze and interpret literary works that feature sports themes.

CO2: To examine the portrayal of sports in literature and its reflection of cultural and social values.

CO3: To explore the personal and psychological dimensions of sports as depicted in literature.

CO4: To develop critical thinking and analytical skills through textual analysis.

CO5: To enhance written and oral communication skills through class discussions and written assignments.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Sports and Literature
 

Defining the relationship between sports and literature

Historical perspectives on sports in literature

 

The role of sports in society and culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
The Heroic Athlete
 

 

Exploring the archetype of the hero in sports literature

Analysis of sports heroes and their portrayal in literary works

 

Themes of triumph, perseverance, and sacrifice

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Gender and Sports
 

 

Gender representation in sports literature

Examination of gender roles and expectations in athletic contexts

 

Sports as a means of empowerment and resistance

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Identity
 

 

Sports as a vehicle for personal and collective identity

Intersectionality and the portrayal of race, ethnicity, and class in sports literature

 

The relationship between sports and national identity

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Sports and Coming-of-Age
 

 

Analysis of sports as a backdrop for personal growth and maturation

The challenges and conflicts faced by young athletes in literature

 

Themes of ambition, dreams, and disillusionment

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Sports and Society
 

Unit 6: Sports and Society

Critical examination of the social issues depicted in sports literature

Sports as a reflection of broader societal dynamics

 

Ethics, values, and controversies in the world of sports

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. "The Natural" by Bernard Malamud
  2. "Friday Night Lights" by H.G. Bissinger
  3. "The Art of Fielding" by Chad Harbach
  4. "Seabiscuit: An American Legend" by Laura Hillenbrand
  5. "The Contender" by Robert Lipsyte
  6. "The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner" by Alan Sillitoe
  7. "A Fan's Notes" by Frederick Exley
  8. "The Boys of Summer" by Roger Kahn
  9. "The Sportswriter" by Richard Ford
  10. "Open" by Andre Agassi
  11. "Fever Pitch" by Nick Hornby
  12. "The Crossover" by Kwame Alexander (young adult literature)
  13. "The Runner" by Cynthia Voigt (young adult literature)
  14. "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" by Sherman Alexie (young adult literature)
  15. "The Fighter" by Michael Farris Smith
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. "The Boxer" by Joyce Carol Oates
  2. "The Runner" by Don DeLillo
  3. "Blindside" by Michael Lewis
  4. "The Tennis Partner" by Abraham Verghese
  5. "Basketball" by John Updike
  6. "The Chariot" by Ray Bradbury
  7. "The Trophy" by Alberto Alvaro Ríos
  8. "The Catch" by W.P. Kinsella
  9. "In the Ring" by Andre Dubus
  10. "Roller Derby Queen" by Margot Livesey
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-20

CIA 2- MSE 50

CIA 3- 30

ESE- 50

EST144 - DESIGN THINKING AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:45
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

Rural India comprises 66.46% of India’s population and contributes to a large portion of India’s GDP by way of agriculture, services, skilled and non-skilled labour.  Rural India suffers from socio-economic distress due to several factors, small land holding, rain dependent agriculture, and lack of alternative sources of income, migration to urban centers and due to several sociological factors. 

Rural India in its diverse geographies has a huge potential to provide solutions to some of the gravest global challenges pertaining to environment and sustainable development and which remains largely untapped.  This calls for a focused approach in exploring the potential opportunities through a scientific approach of critical thinking and creativity, pro-active engagement of rural communities, creating effective structures to implement and create global visibility for the proprietary products and services created. Such an approach will substantially mitigate socio-economic distress in rural communities by providing them income generating opportunities by engaging social enterprises and also contribute to the sustainability goals of the UN.

The course of Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship for students of English Language and Literature  seeks to sensitise students with an on field immersion with rural India and explore possibilities for enterprise through case studies on innovative rural enterprises.  The course seeks to apply their finer eye for aesthetics and culture and

Course Objectives

 

•           To familiarize students with the Sustainability goals envisioned by UN and motivate them to proactively contribute towards its attainment.

•           To create a firsthand awareness of rural India and challenges which can be translated into entrepreneurial opportunities.

•           To study and analyze different Social Enterprise models and their relative outcomes

•           To gain an understanding of the challenges of running a social enterprise.

•           To give students a firsthand experience of understanding the challenges of capacity building and leadership creation in rural communities for an enterprise and engage them proactively in building a sustainable business.

•           To stimulate curiosity in students to identify the areas of gaps in products and services and come up with creative solutions which can be translated into profitable enterprises.

•           To help students develop ethical business models founded on the principles of equity and fair play vis-à-vis the engagement of rural and grass root communities

•           To enable students to curate branding and market strategies for products and services emerging from a social enterprise to make them profitable and sustainable

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will have a comprehensive understanding of the U N Sustainability goals and get engaged in it proactively.

CO2: Students will have gained a firsthand awareness of rural India and challenges which can be translated into entrepreneurial opportunities.

CO3: Students will be exposed to different Social Enterprise models and their relative outcomes

CO4: Students will have envisaged the challenges of running a social enterprise.

CO5: Students will have gained on-field experience of engaging with rural communities for capacity building and leadership

CO6: Students will have envisaged the challenges of running a social enterprise.

CO7: Students will have identified at least one problem/gap area in a product or service and will have come up with creative solutions as part of their project.

CO8: Students will develop business models founded on the principles of equity and fair play vis-à-vis the engagement of rural and grass root communities

CO9: Students will develop branding and market strategies for products and services which they will have developed as part of their project work.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Understanding UN Sustainability Development Goals
 

Session on 17 UN Sustainability Development Goals.   After the disucssion, students are asked to identify any two sustainability goals and asked to suggest any action steps that can be taken at the community level to reach the goals.  Students present their ideas.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Understanding Rural India
 

Field visit and online interaction with members of rural communities to understand how political, societal, and domestic realities vary among different geographies and how they impact life and living of rural communities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Understanding Rural India
 

Field Visit and online interactive session

Students visit a village near Bangalore and interact with the communities.  Students also have online interactive sessions with women groups in three villages one each in Karnataka, Kerala, and Tamil Nadu.  

Students study how political, societal, and domestic spheres vary in different geographies of India and how they impact their life and living.  

Student groups present their finidings.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Rural Enterprise: Case Study
 

Student groups identify one Social Entrepreneur in India and analyze their social enterprise vis-a-vis problem identified and addressed, understanding how they converted the problem into a viable business,  the business model, challenges and opportunities.

Student groups make their presentation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Grassroots Innovation: Problem Identification and Building the Value Proposition Canvas
 

Student groups are given the task of identifying one problem/gap in service which can be converted into an opportunity.

Students are taught how to build the value proposition around a problem or gap in service by identifying the pain points and possible gain creators which can result in a business opportunity

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Buildling Proof of Concept, Prototyping/Piloting
 

Students are taught how to iterate and build a proof of concept of their solution.  Students are facilitated to prototype their products/pilot their innovative solutions i

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:9
Business Model Canvas/Pitch Deck/Presentation
 

Students are taught to build a Business Model Canvas of their solution, and prepare a pitch deck and make their final business presentation

Text Books And Reference Books:

Frugal Innovation: How to Do More With Less: Navi Radjou Jaideep Prabhu

           Jugaad Innovation: Navi Radjou, Jaideep Prabhu, Simone Ahuja

           Poor Economics: Abhijit Bannerjee, Esther Duflo

           The Open Book of Social Innovation: Geoff Mulgan, Robin Murray

           The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding: Al Ries

           Marketing Strategy- A Decision-Focused Approach: Walker, Mullins

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

A Handbook of Rural India (Readings on Economy, Polity and Society) Surinder S Jodka

           Women in Rural India: Vani Prabhakar

           Rural Development in India Strategies and Processes: G Sreedhar and D Rajasekar

           Communication for Rural Innovation: Cees Leeuwis, A. W. van den ban

Evaluation Pattern

Two Case Studies-40 Marks

Live Project-40 Marks

Presentation-20 Marks

EST146 - FOOD AND LITERATURE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

 

This course offers an interdisciplinary exploration of the connections between food and literature, focusing on how food has been represented in literary works from different cultures and time periods. In addition, the course will provide an overview of the history and evolution of food culture, as well as the politics and economics of food production and consumption. By examining culinary themes in literary works, students will gain a deeper understanding of how food functions as a powerful symbol and narrative device in literature, reflecting social, cultural, and historical contexts. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the rich connections between food and literature, fostering critical thinking, cultural awareness, and personal reflection.

 

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

 

 

 

1.     To enhance the ability to identify and interpret the symbolic, metaphorical, and cultural significance of food within literary works.

 

2.     To help explore how food reflects and shapes social, historical, and cultural aspects of different societies and communities, shaping individual and collective identities and reflect social hierarchies and inequalities.

 

3.     To develop the ability to craft vivid and evocative descriptions by learning techniques for using sensory details, imagery, and figurative language to bring culinary experiences to life in their own writing.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will develop a deeper understanding of the cultural context of food and its representation in literature and its portrayal journalistic genres.

CO2: Students will be able to appreciate the influence of food on individual and collective identities.

CO3: They will understand how food can reinforce or challenge social hierarchies and inequalities.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:3
Unit I- Introduction to Food and Literature
 

Definition and scope; cultural, historical, and social significance of food; overview of how literature incorporates culinary themes

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

Anton Chekhov: "Gooseberries"

 

Margaret Atwood: "Bread"

 

Borden Deal: “The Taste of Watermelon"

 

Mona Gardner: "The Dinner Party"

 

Shobha Narayan: “First Foods”Excerpt from Monsoon Diary: A Memoir with Recipes

 

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Poetry
 

Li-Young Lee: "Eating Together"

 

Gwendolyn Brooks: "Kitchenette Building"

 

Seamus Heaney: "At a Potato Digging "

 

Risa Potters: "In My Mother’s Things"

 

Choman Hardi: “My Mother’s Kitchen”

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Essays
 

Ligaya Mishan: What We Write About When We Write About Food (NY Times, 2022)

 

Roland Barthes: Wine and Milk

 

Jackie Varriano: “How Female Food writers penned their way out of the home kitchen” 

 

Nimisha Sinha: “Delicious Fictions: Reading Food in Literature”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

§  Chekhov, Anton. Gooseberries. United Kingdom, Penguin Books Limited, 2015.

 

§  Atwood, Margaret. “Bread.Women on War: An International Anthology of Women's Writings from Antiquity to the Present. United States, Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 2003.

 

§  Deal, Bordan “The Taste of Watermelon”. 1979

 

§  Gardner, Mona. “The Dinner Party.” The Saturday Review of Literature. 1941.

 

§  Narayan, Shoba. Monsoon Diar:  A Memoir with Recipes. India, Penguin Group, 2004.

 

§  Lee, Young- Li. “Eating Together” Poetry Foundation.< https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43015/eating-together-56d221af2bf26> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Brooks, Gwendolyn. “kitchenette building” Poetry Foundation. < https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43308/kitchenette-building> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Heaney, Seamus. “At a Potato Digging” < https://genius.com/Seamus-heaney-at-a-potato-digging-annotated> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Potters, Risa. “In My Mother’s Things”Rattle. https://www.rattle.com/in-my-mothers-things-by-risa-potters/ Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Hardi, Choman. “My Mother’s Kitchen” Poetry Archive. < https://poetryarchive.org/poem/my-mothers-kitchen/> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Mishan, Ligaya. “What We Write About When We Write About Food” The new York Time Style Magazine. 18 February 2022. < https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/18/t-magazine/food-writing-journalism-criticism.html> Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Varriano, Jackie. “How Female Food writers penned their way out of the home kitchen”  02 March 2022. < https://www.seattletimes.com/life/food-drink/how-women-food-writers-penned-their-way-out-of-the-home-kitchen/ > Accessed on 22 July 2023.

 

§  Barthes, Roland. “Wine and Milk.”Mythologies: The Complete Edition, in a New Translation. United States, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013.

 

§  Sinha, Nimisha.Delicious Fictions: Reading Food in Literature.” Caffe Dissensus. 28 January 2020. < https://cafedissensus.com/2020/01/28/delicious-fictions-reading-food-in-literature/> Accessed on 22 July 2023

 

§  Shahani, Gitanjali G. Food and Literature. United States, Cambridge University Press, 2018.

 

§  Fitzpatrick, Joan. 2012a. "Food and Literature: An Overview." The Routlege International Handbook of Food Studies. Edited by Ken Albala. Routledge International Handbooks. London. Routledge. pp. 122-34

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

§  Gilbert, Sandra M.. The Culinary Imagination: From Myth to Modernity. United States, W. W. Norton, 2014.

 

§  Hosking, Richard. Food and Language: Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium of Food and Cookery 2009. United Kingdom, Prospect Books, 2010.

 

§  Waxman, Barbara Frey. “Food Memoirs: What They Are, Why They Are Popular, and Why They Belong in the Literature Classroom.” College English, Vol. 70, No. 4, Special Focus: Food (Mar., 2008): 363-383

 

§  Ferrier, Peyton. “Food in Popular Literature.” Choices, Vol. 29, No. 1 (1st Quarter 2014): 1-6

 

§  Jones, Michael Owen . “Food Choice, Symbolism, and Identity: Bread-and-Butter Issues for Folkloristics and Nutrition Studies (American Folklore Society Presidential Address, October 2005)” The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 120, No. 476 (Spring, 2007), pp. 129-177

 

§  Daly. Suzanne, and Ross G. Forman. “Introduction: Cooking Culture: Situating Food and Drink in the Nineteenth Century.” Victorian Literature and Culture, Vol. 36, No. 2 (2008), pp. 363-373

 

§  Holtzman, Jon D. “Food and Memory.” Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 35 (2006), pp. 361-378

 

§  Tigner, Amy L., and Carruth, Allison. Literature and Food Studies. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2017.

 

§  Fisher, Mary Frances Kennedy. The Gastronomical Me. United States, World Publishing Company, 1948.

 

§  "Feast and Famine: Food Imagery and Class Identity in Victorian Literature" by Debra L. Gimlin (Victorian Literature and Culture)

 

§  Albala, Ken. Routledge International Handbook of Food Studies. United States, Taylor & Francis, 2013.The Routledge Companion to Literature and Food. United States, Taylor & Francis, 2018.

 

§  Counihan, Carole, and Penny Van Esterik. Food and Culture: A Reader. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print.

 

§  Humble, Nicola. The Literature of Food: An Introduction from 1830 to Present. India, Bloomsbury Publishing.

 

§  J. Michelle Coghlan. The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food. India, Cambridge University Press, 2020.

 

§  Fitzpatrick, Joan, and Boyce, Charlotte. A History of Food in Literature: From the Fourteenth Century to the Present. United Kingdom, Taylor & Francis, 2017.

 

§  Kara K. Keeling, Scott T. Pollard. Critical Approaches to Food in Children's Literature. N.p., Taylor & Francis, 2012. Print.

 

§  < https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/18/t-magazine/food-writing-journalism-criticism.html>

 

§  Julia Rappaport: “Take a bite out of food writing”

 

§  < https://www.writermag.com/improve-your-writing/nonfiction/take-bite-food-writing/>

 

§  < https://www.seattletimes.com/life/food-drink/how-women-food-writers-penned-their-way-out-of-the-home-kitchen/>

 

§  Ceillie Clark- Keane: “Women Writing Food” < https://blog.pshares.org/women-writing-food/>

 

§  Barthes, Rolan. “Wine and Mild.” Mythologies. New York: Hill and Wang, 195: 58-61. Print.

 

§  Kapla, David M. “Introduction: The Philosophy of Food.” The Philosophy of Food. University of California Press, 2012:1-23. <https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt7zw2cx.3 >

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: Presentation (20 Marks)

 

Create a character diary or character letter in the voice of a character from any chosen literary work.

 

 

 

Mid Semester: Research paper (50 Marks)

 

Analyze literary works (novel/ poem/short story/ play) for food-related social issue addressed in their narrative and write a research paper in 1000- 1500 words considering the broader social, political or cultural significance of these issues/ representations.

 

 

 

CIA 3: Photo Essay (20 Marks)

 

Create a photo essay on a particular cuisine, street food, or food markets in Bangalore focusing on any kind of its presentation.

 

 

 

End Semester: Food Narrative Project (50 Marks)

 

Create a food narrative project based on a specific food culture (local/regional) or a family/ community recipe. The foodscape should focus on these four aspects- recipe, anecdote, history and relevance, the transformative culinary experience and the rationale for the choice of recipe. Recall specific sensory details associated with your chosen theme or focus. Consider the taste, smell, texture, and appearance of the food. Reflect on the ambiance, sounds, and emotions evoked by the culinary experience. Conduct research to explore the cultural, historical, or social context to your food narrative. It should include photographs, videos, or any other visual or auditory elements.

 

EST147 - HISTORY OF INDIAN BUSINESS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course seeks to historically explore the features, activities, phenomenon that shaped the Indian Business. Focus of the course is on history that has influenced and informed the contours of modern Indian business not to emphasize the capitalistic foundation of any business. The course traces the interaction between Europe and pre-colonial Indian approaches, caste system influencing the business, impact of Globalisation leading to the fourth industrial revolution shaping the businesses in India.

Objectives:

·       To trace the historical phenomenon influencing the Indian business  

·       To understand that business responds to different political, social, cultural aspects of a society, not a-historical money-making venture

Course Outcome

CO1: Students will be familiar with the different business practices such as business communities/groups and multinational firms

CO2: Students will have ?historical? approach and understand the importance of historical sensibility in Management Studies

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Business History: Meaning and Scope
 

·       What is Business History?

·       Contours of Indian Business History

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Beginning of Indian Business
 

·       Precolonial trade in India - a. Agency Houses b. Opium Trade c. Banking Houses d. Anglo-Bania Alliance

·       European trading interests in India The East India Company and the manufactures upto 1757 British private trade in eighteenth century East India Company’s trade, 1757-1833

·       European Agency Houses Currency credit and indigenous bankers, 1800-1850 Origins and growth of Managing Agencies- new industries and technology

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Transition to Industrial Capitalism
 

·       The East India Company

·       The Industrial Revolution & Railroads 

·       Entrepreneurship and Rise of the Industrial Elite

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Second Industrial Revolution
 

·       The growth of big business in India and abroad

·       Mergers in the 19th and early 20th century

·       Family oriented firms and practices

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Business in Post-independent and Globalising India
 

·       Government industrial policy Growth of Business: 1947-1990

·       Technical innovations

·       Multinationals

·       Shifts in the policy and their critique

Text Books And Reference Books:

·       Tripathi, Dwijendra & Jumani, Jyoti. 2013. The Oxford History of Contemporary Indian Business. New Delhi: Oxford University Press

·       Roy, Tirthankar. 2011. The Economic History of India, 1857-1947. New Delhi: OUP.

·       Lectures delivered at Godrej Archives, Mumbai 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Roy, Tirthankar. Company of Kinsmen: Enterprise and Community in South Asian History 1700-1940

A Pictorial History of Indian Bussiness

Evaluation Pattern

2 Class tests to assess the concepts discussed in class for 20 marks each

Compiling the history of a Bangalore based family business; write a narrative based on the changes that the business has adopted to survive and responded to the changing business environment - 30 marks

Select a woman entreprenuer who is running a bussiness for the past 10years in Bangalore. Interview her to understand the business from its inception, her business philosophy and her journey as a business woman. Video record the interview. The interview should be atleast for 20min. The video should be accompanied by a reflective essay. - 30marks  

HIS141 - HISTORY AND CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course attempts to map out the connection between history and cinema. It aims to look at how cinema can be treated as a visual text and a source for understanding history. 

Course Outcome

CO1: To enhance and deepen the understanding of history through cinema.

CO2: To enable the students to develop their understanding and awareness of the rich possibilities of cinema and its connection with history.

CO3: To enhance the analytical skills of students and develop an understanding of how cinema engages with socio-cultural and political concerns, by placing the cinema in their historical context and engage with the current debates and future challenges with cinema as a medium.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 1
 

a)   History as a narrative – History and Truth Contested Notions –Ideology, Sources and Historian

b)   Multiple Identities and Histories – History as a point of reference – Issues of Legitimacy & Justification.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 2
 

a)     Cinema as a narrative – Words and Images – Genre- Representation Vs. Reality – Propaganda – selling History. 

b)    Language of Cinema- Color – Angles – Movement

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit 3
 

a)     Between History and Cinema:  The problem of linear narratives and flash back – questions of authenticity – definition of authenticity.

b)    Cinema as a political, social and historical text.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chapman, J. (2003). Cinemas of the World: Film and Society from 1895 to the Present. Reaktion Books.

Chapman, J., Glancy, M., & Harper, S. (Eds.). (2007). The new film history: sources, methods, approaches. Springer.

Ferro, M. (1988). Cinema and history. Wayne State University Press.

Chapman, J. (2005). Past and present: national identity and the British historical. London: IB Tauris.

Miskell, P. (2004). Historians and film. In Making History (pp. 253-264). Routledge.

Nowell-Smith, G. (Ed.). (1996). The Oxford history of world cinema. OUP Oxford.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). Seduced by the Familiar: Narration and Meaning in Indian Popular Cinema. Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Chapman, J. (2013). Cinema, propaganda and national identity: British film and the Second World War. In British Cinema, Past and Present (pp. 213-226). Routledge.

Miskell, P. (2005). Seduced by the silver screen: Film addicts, critics and cinema regulation in Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. Business History47(3), 433-448.

Sedgwick, J., Miskell, P., & Nicoli, M. (2019). The market for films in postwar Italy: Evidence for both national and regional patterns of taste. Enterprise & Society20(1), 199-228.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2011). Bipolar identity: Region, nation, and the Kannada language film. Oxford University Press.

Raghavendra, M. K. (2014). The Politics of Hindi Cinema in the New Millennium: Bollywood and the Anglophone Indian Nation.

Sanyal, D. (2021). MK Raghavendra, “Locating World Cinema: Interpretations of Film as Culture” (Bloomsbury Academic India, 2020).

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  10 Marks            

CIA 2:  Mid Semester Examinations 25 Marks

CIA 3:  10 Marks

End semester examination: 50 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks

LAW143 - LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

It is a solitary principle of industrial relations that a happy and content labourer is an indispensable asset for any employer. However, labourers have not received their due on account of historical wrongs, and in this era of a market economy, labourers do not seem to get the minimum standards of social security. As a result, industrial peace and harmony have remained a distant dream. Hence, constant efforts are being made by the governments to ameliorate the working conditions of labour in order to ensure minimum welfare for the workers.

Course Outcome

CO 1 : Explain the general concept of labour social welfare and also the constitutional foundation of the same

CO 2 : Analyse the role of the International Labour Organisation in the protection of Labour Welfare

CO 3 : Describe existing provisions relating to the working conditions of Labourers

CO 4 : Describe the legal provisions relating to the health, safety, and welfare conditions of the employees.

CO 5 : Analyze the legal provisions relating to Maternity benefits in workplaces

CO 6: Describe the legal provisions relating to and regulation of Contractual employment in India

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
INTRODUCTION
 

Meaning and nature of social security; Public assistance v. Public insurance; Constitutional foundations and the role of ILO

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
HEALTH, SAFETY AND WELFARE OF WORKERS
 

Introduction; Manufacturing and hazardous processes; Health, safety and welfare in factories; Working hours and employment of young persons 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
EMPLOYEES' INSURANCE
 

Introduction; Important definitions; ESI Corporation; Various benefits

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
MATERNITY BENEFIT
 

Introduction; Employment of or work by women; Right to payment of maternity benefit; Dismissal and deduction of wages

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
CONTRACT LABOUR
 

Introduction: nature and meaning; Licensing of contractors; Regulation and abolition of Contract Labour

Text Books And Reference Books:

Industrial Jurisprudence: A Critical Commentary by Dr EM Rao., Lexis Nexis., Second Edition 2015 p. 14-21

Labour and Industrial Law by H.L.Kumar., Universal Law Publishing Co., 2 volumes 15th edition 2010.,p.2082-2125

P.L.Malik‟s Industrial Law 2 Volumes., Eastern Book Company., 23rd Edition 2011.,p.2398-2405 

Pai, G. B. Labour Law in India. New Delhi: Butterworth, 2001. Rao, E. M. Industrial Jurisprudence, New Delhi: LexisNexis (India), 2004.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Industrial Jurisprudence: A Critical Commentary by Dr EM Rao., Lexis Nexis., Second Edition 2015 p. 14-21

Labour and Industrial Law by H.L.Kumar., Universal Law Publishing Co., 2 volumes 15th edition 2010.,p.2082-2125

P.L.Malik‟s Industrial Law 2 Volumes., Eastern Book Company., 23rd Edition 2011.,p.2398-2405 

Pai, G. B. Labour Law in India. New Delhi: Butterworth, 2001. Rao, E. M. Industrial Jurisprudence, New Delhi: LexisNexis (India), 2004.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline: There are in all 3 components in the scheme of evaluation. Weightage for the components is indicated in percentage.

CIA I- Class Test carrying 25 marks

CIA II – Class Test carrying 25 marks

CIA III – Class Test carrying 50 marks

MAT142 - QUANTITAIVE TECHNIQUES FOR MANAGERS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This skill-based course aims at imparting theoretical knowledge of optimization techniques.  These techniques are widely used in the industry to optimize available resources.  This will help the student to apply the mathematical techniques to real life situations.

Course Objectives: This course will help the learner to

COBJ1.   Acquire problem solving skills in Linear Programing and its related problems

COBJ2.   Gain proficiency in implementing the algorithms for solving Transportation and Assignment Problems.

COBJ3.  Demonstrate the methods of solving Two-Person Zero-Sum Games

 

Course Outcome

CO1: Formulate and solve Linear Programming Problems using graphical and simplex method.

CO2: Solve Transportation problems by using Modified distribution method.

CO3: Solve assignment problems by using Hungarian technique.

CO4: Solve simple two person zero sum games.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:17
Linear Programming
 

Definitions of O.R.- Definition of Linear Programming Problem (L.P.P) - Formulation of L.P.P. – Linear Programming in Matrix Notation – Graphical Solution of L.P.P –  Simplex Method – Big M Technique – Two Phase Method.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Transportation and Assignment Problems
 

Introduction to Transportation Problem – Initial Basic Feasible solution – Moving towards Optimality – Degeneracy in Transportation Problems – Unbalanced Transportation Problem – Assignment Problems.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Game Theory
 

Games and Strategies – Introduction – Two person zero sum games – Maximin and Minimax Principles – Games without saddle point – mixed strategies – Solution of 2 x 2 rectangular games – Graphical method – Dominance Property –  Algebraic Method for m x n   games.

Text Books And Reference Books:

K. Swarup, P. K. Gupta, and Man Mohan, Operations Research-Principles and Practice, 10th edition, New Delhi, India: Sultan Chand & Sons, 2004.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. G. Hadley, Linear Programming, Reprint, New Delhi: Narosa Publishing House, 2002.
  2. K. V. Mittal and C. Mohan, Optimization Methods in Operation Research and System Analysis, 3rd ed., New Delhi: New Age International Pvt. Ltd., 2008.
  3. H. A Taha, Operations Research- an introduction, 8th ed., New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India, 2009.
Evaluation Pattern

This course is completely depending upon the CIAs, which will be evaluated through assignments and tests/examinations.

The component-wise evaluation pattern is given below:

Component

Mode of Assessment

Parameters

Points

CIA I

Test and written assignment

Basic, conceptual, and analytical knowledge of the subject. 

25

CIA II

Test and written assignment

Application of core concepts and problem solving skills.

30

CIA III

Comprehensive Examination

Comprehensive knowledge of the subject and Problem solving skills.

40

Attendance

Attendance

Regularity and Punctuality.

05

 

 

MED141 - MEDIA AND POLITICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course considers the degree to which media influences political opinion and actions and also its impact on public policy in the Indian context. In other words, the course examines the role of news media in the Indian political process from both behavioural and institutional perspectives.

 

Course Outcome

CO1: To understand the concepts and theories that inform us about the role of news media in society.

CO2: To be able to critically analyse the role of Indian media in shaping public opinion.

CO3: To attempt a deconstruction of the role social media plays in shaping the fortunes of politicians.

CO4: To apply this understanding to further greater political participation among students.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Media & Politics: A Theoretical Perspective
 

Theories of news media

Media as fourth estate of democracy

Media and civic engagement

Politics and social media: Issues and debates

 

Media regulation and politics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Media & Politics: Dynamics
 

Media and the political communication process

Media and its impact on public opinion

Sociology of news construction

Media’s role in the empowerment of social movements

Role of media in elections- campaigns, strategies and advertisement

Media role in exposing political scandals

 

Media as spaces for dissent, marginal voices and alternative platforms

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:3
Media & Politics: A Critical Appraisal
 

The corporate world, media conglomerates and politics interface

Media’s role in manufactured consent giving

Visual media and political communication

Role of social media in image building

 

Case study- Rebranding of PM Modi

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Politics of Media, 1st Edition by Ranjith Thankappan, 2016.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Making Sense of Media and Politics: Five Principles in Political Communication, 2nd Edition by Gadi Wolfsfeld, 2022.

 

Political Communication and Mobilisation: The Hindi Media in India, by Taberez Neyazi, 2018.

Evaluation Pattern

Blog (weekly posts)- reflections on issues in the news media

CIA 1- MCQ

CIA 2- Class test

CIA 3- Group presentation

 

ESE- Written exam

MED144 - HARRY POTTER AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will provide students the opportunity to apply a variety of interdisciplinary approaches on popular young adult narratives. Students will be exposed to the real -world culture and physical environment that produced, shaped, and continues to inform the Harry Potter series, giving students greater insight into the importance of textual awareness and analysis.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explore the socio-cultural, historical, and technological perspectives behind Harry Potter phenomenon.

CO2: Develop critical thinking skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History of wizards in cinema
 

History of wizards in cinema – P L Travers, Disney era, rise of Nanny McPhee, Arrival of Harry potter in bookstores, narrative development of book 1 – Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Deconstruction of characters, significance of four houses, potions, beasts and spells.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Hogwarts a world class school
 

Hogwarts a world class school – dynamics of homework, relationship, bullying, teachers, team spirits and opponents, wizards and other, Debates on Morality, Technology and Media in Potter world, Privacy concerns with magical objects, Cultural Hegemony, Case Study on Snape and Dumbledore

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Sociological perspective
 

Sociological perspective – idea of home, community, clan and society, class struggle and dynamics, Aurora and Azkaban, Representation of Gender, Idea of family and institution, construction of power structures

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Film Screening
 

Screening of First and Last Harry Potter films

Text Books And Reference Books:

Harry Potter and Sorcerer’s Stone, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0590353427)

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439064873)

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439136365)

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439139601)

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439358071)

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0439785969)

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, J. K. Rowling (ISBN 978-0545139700)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Whited, L A & Grimes, K. (2015). Critical Insights: The Harry Potter Series. Salem Books.

Bell, C E (2018). Inside the World of Harry Potter: Critical Essays on the Books and Films.McFarland Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

Assignments will be done through Google Classroom

CIA -1 – Class Test– 20 marks

CIA 2 –  – 50 marks

CIA 3 – Group Assignment – 20 marks

End Semester - Project – 50 marks

MED145 - SOCIAL MEDIA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

The Social Media course is designed as an engaging and comprehensive undergraduate elective that explores the dynamic and influential world of social media. In this course, students will gain a critical understanding of the social media , their impact on society, and their role in shaping communication and democracy.

Course Outcome

CO1: Develop a comprehensive critical understanding of social media.

CO2: Identify the strengths and weaknesses of social media platforms.

CO3: Critically create social media content.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Social Media
 

Definition and characteristics of social media

Evolution and historical context of social media for democracy

 

Key technological features and functionalities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Social media for democracy
 

Cultural implications of social media use

Social media's impact on political mobilization and activism

 

Utilizing social media for positive social change and advocacy

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Social media and individual
 

Agency and social media

Personal data and issues

 Identity and Social media

Text Books And Reference Books:

Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism Is Turning the Internet Against Democracy  by Robert W. McChesney

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The Social Media Reader by Michael Mandiber

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1 – Submission of social media platform introduction video (5 marks)

CIA 2 –Submission of 3 Instagram posts and reels based on the class discussions (15Marks)

CIA 3 – Submission of 3 Snaps based on a critical view of social media. (15 Marks)

CIA4- Submission of 3 Tweets, A Facebook post, and Instagram Live on social media & democracy (15 Marks)

All CIAs   – Department level only; All submissions.

PHY141 - FUNDAMENTAL OF FORENSIC PHYSICS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of forensic science. Student will be introduced to the different analytical tool to analyse the results. They will also learn the physics behind investigative method used to gather evident. Finally, students will study emerging use of nanotechnology in forensic science.  

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the different technique to analyse the results.

CO2: Understand the basic science underlying the motion of bullets, collisions, explosion and blood dynamics.

CO3: Learn about the advantage of nanotechnology in forensic science.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Analytical instruments and techniques of forensic physics
 

Introduction, electromagnetic spectrum, sources of radiation, their utility and limitations, refractive index, interaction of light with matter, idea on instrumentation and results analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Forensic physics
 

Scope and significance of forensic physics, basic physics in solving crime, motion of bullet and other projectile, vehicular collisions, blood stain analysis using fluid mechanics, physics of explosions, development and identification of latent fingerprints using optics.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Nanotechnology in forensic science
 

Nanotechnology, utilization of nanotechnology in analysis of physical evidence, applications of nanotechnology in forensic evidence analysis, introduction to nanomaterials, types of nanomaterials. 

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. B.B. Nanda and R.K Tiwari, Forensic Science in India: A vision for the Twenty First Centrury, select publishers, New Delhi (2001)
  2. CM Hussain, D Rawtani, G Pandey, M Tharmavaram, Handbook of Analytical Techniques for Forensic Samples: Current and Emerging Developments, ISBN: 978-0-12-822300-0, Elsevier, 2020
  3. M.K Bhasin and S.Nath, Role of Forensic Science in the New Millenium, University of Delhi, Delhi(2002).
  4.  S.H James and J.J Nordby, Forensic Science :An introduction to scientific and Investigative Techniques, 2nd Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton(2005)
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. W.G. Eckert and R.K. Wright in Introduction to Forensic Sciiences, 2nd Edition, W.G. Eckert (ED), CRC Press, Boca Raton(1997).
  2. R. Saferstein, M.L. Hastrup and C.Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013)
  3. W.J. Tilstone, M.L. Hastrup and C.Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013)
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation will be based on presentations by each student and class work.

PSY143 - ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Artificial intelligence (AI) is the basis for all human-machine interfaces and learning, and it is the future of all complex decision-making across diverse sectors. Students will explore the concepts of HMI and AI and become aware of advances in Artificial Intelligence. Case studies and workshops will allow students to consider how human factors and design thinking are applied in designing an interface and the ethical issues and implications of preserving human values. Through discussion, analysis, and workshops, students move towards designing or modifying a user-centric interface considering any sustainable development goal.

Course objectives: 

  • To explain Human-Machine Interactions and Artificial Intelligence and their applications in daily life.
  • To identify the importance and application of human factors and design thinking in interface design. 
  • To evaluate a user-centric interface considering any sustainable development goal.

Course Outcome

CO1: Explain Human-Machine Interactions and Artificial Intelligence and their applications in daily life.

CO2: Identify the importance and application of human factors and design thinking in interface design.

CO3: Evaluate a user-centric interface considering sustainable development goals.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to AI and HMI
 

Introduction to AI and HMI, Types of AI and HMI, Machine and Deep Learnings and their applications, Current trends and development.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Human factors & AI
 

Human factors - Sensation, Perception, Apperception, Working Memory, Decision-making, and Design Thinking.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Principles of interface Design and Application of AI
 

Schneiderman’s eight golden rules, Norman’s model of interaction, Neilson’s Heuristics, Designing for people across the lifespan, and the Application of AI in health, aviation, and the workplace.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dix, A., Dix, A. J., Finlay, J., Abowd, G. D., & Beale, R. (2003). Human-computer interaction. Pearson Education.

Tenner, E. (2015). The Design of Everyday Things by Donald Norman. Technology and Culture, 56(3), 785-787. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Burnett, B., & Evans, D. (2016). Designing your life: How to build a well-lived, joyful life. Knopf.

Gassmann, O., & Reepmeyer, G. (2008). Universal design–innovations for all ages. In The silver market phenomenon (pp. 125-140). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. 

Davenport, T., & Kalakota, R. (2019). The potential for artificial intelligence in healthcare. Future healthcare journal, 6(2), 94. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1 will be an individual assignment.

CIA2 will be a group assignment with individual components for evaluation. 

CIA3 will be a written exam for 2 hours and 50 Marks. CIA3 will have Section- A and Section - B.

Section A (Essay questions). 10 Marks X 3 Questions=30 Marks 

Section B (Case study). 20 Marks x 1Q= 20 Marks

PSY155 - PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized to help learners in delving into the conversation between gender and psychology. Through the lens of socio-historico location of an individual an attempt will be made to locate gender, cognize the spaces of performing, reproducing and perpetuating gender. Looking through psychological and feminist theoretical lenses, the course will analyze the connection of the psychology of gender to the discourse of power and socio-political economical structures. Learners are encouraged to evaluate and envision possible new grounds for a better world, considering the changing cultural diversity in the present Indian society, therefore, reinforcing them to approach gendered issues through cultural, social constructionist and post-structuralist lens to analyze its implications.

Course Outcome

1: Examine the accounts of the production, reproduction and perpetuation of gendered and sexual identities, spaces and subjectivities and related psychological concepts.

2: Discuss gender roles and intersectional nature of identity in everyday life and experience, using psychological, feminist and post-feminist lenses.

3: Demonstrate psychological literacy and problem-solving abilities by suggesting possible counters to the critical gendered issues in personal, interpersonal, social, emotional, cultural, political and professional domains in a multicultural context

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Describing the spectrum and gender-diverse identities. 

Classical 

psychoanalytic theories on masculinity and 

feminity, analyses 

through feminist, queer and trans readings of psychoanalytic 

theories. 

Feminist theories 

Male gender role stress Gender and space - 

secondarity, 

performativity, 

multiplicity, trans 

community and mental health. 

Body, identity and 

subjectivity - 

psychological and 

philosophical readIngs

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 1
 

Describing the spectrum and gender-diverse identities. Classical psychoanalytic theories on masculinity and feminity, are Analyses through feminist, queer and trans readings of psychoanalytic theories. Feminist theories Male gender role stress Gender and space - secondarity, performativity, multiplicity, trans-community and mental health. Body, identity and subjectivity - psychological and philosophical readings

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Theories
 

Queer and trans theories, Political Economy of Sex Gender and life-space- psychology, feminism, architecture, history & philosophy.

Gender and Bodies; Gender and Violence; Gender and Media

Gender and Work; Gender and Parenthood; Gender and Mental Health

Gender and Indian Law: LGBTQIA+ RightS

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 2
 

Queer and trans theories, Political Economy of Sex; Gender and life-space psychology, feminism, architecture, history & philosophy. Gender and Bodies; Gender and Violence; Gender and Media; Gender and Work; Gender and Parenthood; Gender and Mental Health; Gender and Indian Law: LGBTQIA+ Rights

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Project Work
 

Project-work: 

Examine various sites of the performance and perpetuation of gender and Gendered 

discrimination– 

Through field work, that shows its 

Production in everyday spaces and at the 

Intersections of social, cultural, politcal  Location marked 

Discourses of gender.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit 3
 

Project-work: Examine various sites of the performance and perpetuation of gender and Gendered discrimination– Through fieldwork,

that shows its Production in everyday spaces and at the Intersections of social, cultural, political. Location marked. Discourses of gender

Text Books And Reference Books:

RUDMAN, L. A. (2021). Social Psychology of gender: How Power and Intimacy Shape Gender Relations (2nd ed.). GUILFORD.

Matlin, M. (2011). Potential Problems and Biases in Current Research in The Psychology of Women (pp. 20-27). Nelson Education.

Fine, C. (2010). Delusions of gender: How our minds, society, and neurosexism create difference. WW Norton & Company.

Matlin, M. (2011).The Psychology of Women. Nelson Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Webb, D. (2023). LGBTQ rights in India. AEA Randomized Controlled Trials. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.10953-1.0

Irigaray(1995)-The Question of the Other Foucault(1976)-The Will to Knowledge: History of Sexuality (Vol 1)

Kristeva (1980) - Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection; Tans. (1992) by L. S. Roudiez.

Gayle (1975). “The Traffic in Women: Notes on a Political Economy of Sex.” In Rayna R. Reiter (ed.), Toward an Anthropology of Women. Monthly Review Press. pp. 157--210

(1975)

Stryker (2004) - Transgender Studies: Queer Theories Evil Twin.

Nagoshi et al. (2010)- Transgender Theories: Embodying Research & Practice Fieldwork and Project-based learning

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline: 

 

CIA 1 and CIA 2 is a 20 mark assignment 

CIA 3 is a 50 mark complex assignment

PSY156 - PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Understanding close relationships is among the central goals of social psychology. Close relationships range from family ties to friendships to romantic and sexual relationships. Our main purpose will be on learning about the life cycle of adult intimate (i.e., romantic) relationships, ranging from stages of initial attraction and relationship initiation to growth and maintenance of the relationship, and in some cases, dissolution. Although other close relationships such as close friendships, family, and work relationships will also be addressed and integrated into the course, they will be of secondary importance. Class meetings will consist mainly of facilitated discussions and student-led presentations on topics such as the biological bases of attraction and love, commitment and interdependence, relationship cognition, attachment, communication, sexuality, relational interaction patterns, relationship satisfaction, and the social context of relationships (e.g., the influence of others) conflict, relationship dissolution, and relationship maintenance.

CO1: Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.

CO2: Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.

CO3: Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.

CO2: Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.

C03: Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understand the major concepts and models of interpersonal relationships.
 

Introduction to key theories and concepts in relationship psychology (attachment theory, social exchange theory, equity theory, interdependence theory, etc.), theories of attraction (evolutionary, social, and cognitive perspectives), historical perspectives on the study of relationships, Ethical considerations in relationships.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Evaluate the different types of relationships and their impact on one's life.
 

Different types of relationship: childhood relationship (parent, teacher, caregiver), adult relationship, friendship and workplace relationships, emerging trends in relationships such as virtual relationship, long distance relationship, cohabitation, post- divorce relationship, friendships and social networks – benefits, types and maintenance. Social media and its influence on relationship formation and maintenance

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Use strategies to enhance everyday life challenges and sustain effective relationships
 

Effective communication strategies,

Active listening skills and empathetic communication,

Conflict resolution techniques and managing relationship disagreements, developing self-awareness, empathy, emotional intelligence, and applying psychological principles to real-life relationship scenarios.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baron, R.A., Byrne, D. & Bhardwaj, G. (2010). Social Psychology (12th Ed.). New Delhi: Pearson.

Miller, Chapter 1: The Building Blocks of Relationships Reis, H. T. (2012).

A history of relationship research in social psychology. In A.W. Kruglanski & W Stroebe (Eds.), Handbook of the history of social psychology (pp. 213- 232). New York: Psychology Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Graziano, W. G., & Bruce, J. W. (2008). Attraction and the initiation of relationships: A review of the empirical literature. In S. Sprecher, A. Wenzel, & J. Harvey (Eds), Handbook of relationship initiation, pp. 269-295. New York: Psychology Press.

Cameron, J. J., Stinson, D. A., & Wood, J. V. (2013). The bold and the bashful: Selfesteem, gender, and relationship initiation. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4, 685-692. https://doi.org/10.10 02/9780470939338

Finkel, E.J., Eastwick, P.W., Karney, B.R., Reis, H. T., & Sprecher, S. (2012). Online dating: A critical analysis from the perspective of psychological science. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 13, 3– 66.

Emery, L. F., Muise, A., Dix, E. L., & Le, B. (2014). Can you tell that I’m in a relationship? Attachment and relationship visibility on Facebook. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 40, 1466–1479.

Vanden Abeele, M., Schouten, A. P., & Antheunis, M. L. (2017). Personal, editable, and always accessible: An affordance approach to the relationship between adolescents’ mobile messaging behavior and their friendship quality. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships.

Sbarra, D. A., & Beck, C. J. A. (2013). Divorce and close relationships: Findings, themes, and future directions. In J. A. Simpson & L. Campbell (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 795-822). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Lewandowski, G. W., Aron, A., Bassis, S. & Kunak, J. (2006). Losing a selfexpanding relationship: Implications for the selfconcept. Personal Relationships, 13, 317-331

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:Individual assignment – Video presentations

The students are required to make individual video presentations on the basis of the topics that will be given to them. Submission will be based on one of the different topics through a Video PPT (The feature is available in PPT software) Topics: Example: theories of relationship psychology; theories of attraction Number of Slides: Maximum 9 slides (excluding the Title slide) Duration: 3 minutes

Test details: ● Total Marks: 20 marks ● Date of Submission: 31st August

Evaluation Criteria:  Organization of the content  Quality of the information  Research citations   Creativity   Personal Learnings 

CIA 2: Group Presentation (with viva)

This is a group assignment and the groups will be divided into groups of five. The faculty in charge will be giving each group a movie (based on relationships). Each group will be given one movie/short film to watch and a week long time shall be given for the same. In the following Thursday, 2 hours shall be given to the group to prepare a presentation (5 Slides in 5 Minutes) on the basis of guiding questions and will have to present the same in 5 mins in the next class. Individually group members shall answer facilitator’s questions. Post the presentation each member of the group will write a reflective note on their experience working on the topics and submit the same on moodle. Students can be creative in making their ppts and adding audio-visuals etc but should be able to cover within the specified time limit. PPT submission pre presentation mandatory and individual reflective notes submission post presentation is mandatory. The presentation might primarily include :  Different types of relationships portrayed in the film  Their own perception as to whether the relationships has been portrayed accurately in the film or not.  Conflict resolution strategies in relationships that were used in the film vs what they would have used.

Details: Total marks: 20 ● Date of Allotment of their Movie/Documentary: 12th September ● Date of Group Discussion/Planning: 21st September ● Date of Presentation – 28th September 

Evaluation Criteria:

Pre- Presentation: ● 1. Timely Submission 

Individual contribution: ● a. Organization and Flow of the content ● b. Relevance of the content  ● c. Reference 

Presentation: ● 3. Delivery and presentation of information  ● 4. Organization of the slides  5. Group effort and team spirit  6. Time Management  7. Q & A (one question to per person) 

Post Presentation 8. Depth of Individual Reflections / Learnings

CIA 3: In class written exam

This will be an in class written exam. It will consist of two parts – Part A and Part B. Part-A is for a total of 30 marks. Part A will consist of five 10-mark questions. Out of five, students will answer three questions (each question carries ten marks). Part - B is for 20 marks. It is a compulsory case study that the students need to answer. There is no choice. Total marks: 50 marks Date of examination: 26th October An Assessment scheme will be created for the paper

PSY159 - PSYCHOLOGY OF LEADERSHIP (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This multidisciplinary course examines the concept of leadership and the psychological and social processes that characterize leadership. We will explore the qualities of effective leadership and the role of situational factors that make some forms of leadership more effective than others. We will explore paradox and complexity in discussions of leadership and will explore the dynamics of identity and power in the unfolding of leadership. In this course, students will not only learn about leadership in traditional ways, such as readings and discussion, but will explore their personal leadership style and plan their goals for personal leadership growth.

Course Objectives:

- To understand and differentiate leadership models, styles, and functions.

- To enhance learners’ knowledge about leading and sustaining diverse teams under diverse circumstances.

- To develop a personal leadership plan using leadership models.

Course Outcome

CO1: Understand and differentiate leadership models, styles, and functions.

CO2: Enhance learners? knowledge about leading and sustaining diverse teams under diverse circumstances.

CO3: Develop a personal leadership plan using leadership models.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding Leadership
 

Introduction, Functions of a leader, Models, and theories of leadership, Styles in leadership, and Qualities of effective leadership.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Factors Influencing Leadership
 

Leadership and Power, Leadership and Gender, Leadership and Personality, Leadership and EQ, Leadership and Morals. Leadership and Decision making.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Personal Leadership Development
 

Personal leadership development models, self analysis and strength mapping, goal setting models.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Haslam, S. A., Reicher, S. D. & Platow, M. J. (2020): The New Psychology of Leadership: Identity, Influence and Power. Routledge

Barling, J. (2014). Science of leadership. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Rowe, W. G., & Guerrero, L. (2016). Cases in leadership (4th ed.). Sage.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kotter, J.P. (2012). Leading Change. Harvard Business Review

Northouse, P.G. (2022). Leadership Theory and Practice. ISE Sage.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1 will be an individual assignment. 

CIA2 will be a group assignment with individual components for evaluation.  

CIA3 will be a written exam for 2 hours and 50 Marks. CIA3 will have Section- A and Section - B.

Section A (Essay questions). 10 Marks X 3 Questions=30 Marks 

Section B (Case study). 20 Marks x 1Q= 20 Marks

SOC141 - WOMEN'S ISSUES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course aims at enabling the student to study and understand the problems and issues relating to women in Indian society in the context of wider social forces. This course will sensitize students on the issues of subjugation of and oppression prevalent against women in Indian society and enhance their understanding of the various social problems that women face in the society.

Course objectives :

●        To introduce the students to social issues relating to women

●        To explore gender relations from an interdisciplinary perspective 

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Sociological Understanding of Social Problem with a Gender Perspective
 
  1. Conceptualization of a social problem                                         
  2. Structural and functional perspective, cultural roots, and critical analysis of social issues under power, ideology, and hegemony.
  3.  Understanding Gender and subjugation of gender.
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Sociological Understanding of Social Problem with a Gender Perspective
 
  1. Conceptualization of a social problem                                         
  2. Structural and functional perspective, cultural roots, and critical analysis of social issues under power, ideology, and hegemony.
  3.  Understanding Gender and subjugation of gender.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit II: Problems of Inequality
 
  1. Poverty - Concept of poverty, its multidimensional manifestations, Feminization of Poverty.
  2. Caste Inequality - Concept of caste, nature of inequality and position of women within it.
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Unit II: Problems of Inequality
 
  1. Poverty - Concept of poverty, its multidimensional manifestations, Feminization of Poverty.
  2. Caste Inequality - Concept of caste, nature of inequality and position of women within it.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Problems of Violence and Discrimination
 
  1. Violence against Women: Cultural setting, Dowry, acid attacks, physical and sexual abuse, Global Sex Market.
  2. Missing Millions- Skewed sex ratio, son preference
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: Problems of Violence and Discrimination
 
  1. Violence against Women: Cultural setting, Dowry, acid attacks, physical and sexual abuse, Global Sex Market.
  2. Missing Millions- Skewed sex ratio, son preference
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV: Problem of Personal Well-being
 
  1. Women and Health : Reproductive health
  2. Aging and women
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Unit IV: Problem of Personal Well-being
 
  1. Women and Health : Reproductive health
  2. Aging and women
Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhasin, K. (1994). What is Patriarchy? New Delhi: Kali for Women.

Beteille, A. (1990). Race, Caste and Gender. Man, 25(3), 489–504. https://doi.org/10.2307/2803715

John, Mary E. (2008). Women’s Studies in India: A Reader. New Delhi:Penguin Books.

Krishnaraj, M. (2007). Understanding Violence against Women. Economic and Political Weekly, 42(44), 90–91. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40276750

Kotiswaran, P. (2008). Born Unto Brothels: Toward a Legal Ethnography of Sex Work in an Indian Red-Light Area. Law & Social Inquiry, 33(3), 579–629. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20108776

KUMAR, A. K. S. (2013). The Neglect of Health, Women and Justice. Economic and Political Weekly, 48(23), 25–27. http://www.jstor.org/stable/23527205

 

Karkal, M. (1999). Ageing and Women in India. Economic and Political Weekly, 34(44), WS54–WS56. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4408566

 

Merton, R and Nisbet. (1966). Contemporary Social Problems, New York: Harcourt, Brace and World.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bhasin, K. (1994). What is Patriarchy? New Delhi: Kali for Women.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment:

CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )- Class Presentations

CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )- Article Review

CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) - Prferably an exam

Attendance 5 marks 

 

SOC142 - CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course discusses various social issues which are of relevance for contemporary world. These issues surround the broad themes of population, health, development. In relation to population and health this course would cover issues like aging, reproductive health, HIV AIDS, euthanasia, drug abuse, etc. In relation to development this course would look into issues like urban land use, farmer’s suicide, displacement, etc.

 Course Objective:

Students shall be able to identify and analyze contemporary social problems. They will be able to apply interdisciplinary approach to relevant policies at local, national, and international levels.

 

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Sociological Analysis of Social Problems
 
  1. Study of ‘Social Problems’
  2. Characteristics, Stages and Reactions 
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Sociological Analysis of Social Problems
 
  1. Study of ‘Social Problems’
  2. Characteristics, Stages and Reactions 
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Population and Health and Social Problems
 
  1. Demographic Transition
  2. HIV AIDS and societal alienation
  3. Drug Abuse

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Population and Health and Social Problems
 
  1. Demographic Transition
  2. HIV AIDS and societal alienation
  3. Drug Abuse

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Development and social problems
 
  1. Poverty
  2. Corruption
  3. Development induced displacement

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Development and social problems
 
  1. Poverty
  2. Corruption
  3. Development induced displacement

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Human Rights Issues
 
  1. Covenants
  2. Human Rights Organizations
  3. Domestic Violence and child abuse

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Human Rights Issues
 
  1. Covenants
  2. Human Rights Organizations
  3. Domestic Violence and child abuse

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Alavi, H.D and Shanin, T. (Ed.) (1982). Introduction to the Sociology of Developing Societies, London: MacMillan.

Ahuja R.  (2014). Social problems in India. New Delhi: Rawat Publication.  

Merton, R. and Nisbet. (1966). Contemporary Social Problems, New York: Harcourt, Brace and World.

Shah, G. (2001). Cultural Subordination & Dalit Challenge. Vol. II

Weeks, J. (2011). Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues. Wadsworth Publishing Company, California.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Alavi, H.D and Shanin, T. (Ed.) (1982). Introduction to the Sociology of Developing Societies, London: MacMillan.

Ahuja R.  (2014). Social problems in India. New Delhi: Rawat Publication.  

Merton, R. and Nisbet. (1966). Contemporary Social Problems, New York: Harcourt, Brace and World.

Shah, G. (2001). Cultural Subordination & Dalit Challenge. Vol. II

Weeks, J. (2011). Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues. Wadsworth Publishing Company, California.

Evaluation Pattern
CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) 
 
Attendance 5 marks 

SOC143 - SOCIOLOGY THROUGH CINEMA (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will begin with a session on the Sociology of Cinema and the tools and techniques necessary to analyze the films that will be used in this course as a vehicle to examine society sociologically. This course introduces the student to the discipline of Sociology through cinema from India and elsewhere. It aims to allow students to critically examine society through cinema and its representation.

Course objectives:

  • To enable students to view cinema as a text for sociological analysis
  •  To gain an introduction to the discipline of sociology through cinema

Course Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Sociology
 
  1. Sociology as a discipline
  2. Sociological Imagination
  3. Theoretical perspectives
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Sociology
 
  1. Sociology as a discipline
  2. Sociological Imagination
  3. Theoretical perspectives
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Social Structure
 
  1. Community, Association and Institution  
  2. Status and role
  3. Power and authority

Films: Dor (2006), Prem Rog (1982), Roja (1992)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Social Structure
 
  1. Community, Association and Institution  
  2. Status and role
  3. Power and authority

Films: Dor (2006), Prem Rog (1982), Roja (1992)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Culture and Socialization
 
  1. Culture
  2. Socialization
  3. Conformity and Deviance

Films: Taare Zameen Par (2007)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Culture and Socialization
 
  1. Culture
  2. Socialization
  3. Conformity and Deviance

Films: Taare Zameen Par (2007)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Stratification
 
  1. Sex and gender
  2. Race and Ethnicity
  3. Caste and Class 

 Films: Lajja (2001), India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart (2007)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Stratification
 
  1. Sex and gender
  2. Race and Ethnicity
  3. Caste and Class 

 Films: Lajja (2001), India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart (2007)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Burton, E. (1988 ). Sociology and the feature film. Teaching Sociology 16: 263-271.

Dudrah, R K. (2006).  Bollywood: Sociology goes to the Movies. New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Prendergast, C. (1986 ). Cinema Sociology: Cultivating the Sociological Imagination through Popular Film. Teaching Sociology 14: 243-248.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Mills, C. W. (2023). The sociological imagination. In Social Work (pp. 105-108). Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern
CIA 1  10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 2 10 marks (conducted out of 20 )
 
CIA 3 25 marks (conducted out of 50 ) 
 
Attendance 5 marks 

STA142 - DATA ANALYSIS USING EXCEL (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to build the logical thinking ability and to provide hands-on experience in solving statistical models using MS Excel with Problem based learning. To explore and visualize data using excel formulas and data analysis tool pack.

Course Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the logics of using excel features.

CO2: Demonstrate the building blocks of excel, excel shortcuts, sample data creation and analyzing data.

CO3: Analyze the data sets using Data Analysis Pack.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Basics
 

Introduction: File types - Spreadsheet structure - Menu bar - Quick access toolbar - Mini toolbar - Excel options - Formatting: Format painter - Font - Alignment - Number - Styles - Cells, Clear - Page layout - Symbols - Equation - Editing - Link - Filter - Charts - Formula Auditing - Overview of Excel tables and properties - Collecting sample data and arranging in definite format in Excel tables.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
File exchange and Data cleaning
 

Importing data from different sources - text file - web page and XML file - Exporting data in different formats - text - csv - image -pdf etc - Creating database with the imported data - Data tools: text to column - identifying and removing duplicates - using format cell options - Application of functions - Concatenate - Upper - Lower - Trim - Repeat - Proper - Clean - Substitute - Convert - Left - Right - Mid - Len - Find - Exact - Replace - Text join - Value - Fixed etc.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Data Analysis
 

Data analysis tool pack: measures of central tendency - dispersion - skewness - kurtosis - partition values - graphical and diagrammatic representation of data: histogram - bar diagram - charts - line graphs - Ogive - covariance - correlation - linear regression.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Alexander R, Kuselika R and Walkenbach J, Microsoft Excel 2019 Bible, Wiley India Pvt Ltd, New Delhi, 2018. 

 2. Greg Harvey, Excel 2019 All-in-One For Dummies,for Dummies,US, 2018. 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1 . Paul M, Microsoft Excel 2019 formulas and functions, Pearson Eduction, 2019

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 100%

THE141 - THEATRE APPRECIATION (2023 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is a participatory practice course, which makes Theatre appreciation applicable to all. It includes different Theoretical, Interactive and Participatory sessions from experts in the cultural industry. It also envisages witnessing live performances and digital performances to enhance the knowledge of the domain, which supports learning with clarity.

This course deals with five strands; Plays, Players, Places, Playgoers, and Performance practice.

Course Outcome

CO1: Able to appreciate the Theatre Art form as a whole.

CO2: Able to analyse and understand the aesthetics of the Theatre Performances.

CO3: Able to appreciate the performer's practices and the audience's reception.

CO4: Able to critically review live and digital Theatre performances.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Plays
 

Focus on Author and Texts.

Theatre Plays, Theatre text, What is Plays, Play style, Author, Dramatic text, Play text.

So, here is Talk, Play Reading 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Players
 

Focus on Acting practices and training.

How the plays can be played by players-who are the Players-Players are nothing but Actors/Performers, all Players are Directors cum Practitioners.

How these players Enact, Perform, Prepare, and how these Players are subjected to Acting training.

Players' concept -Acting, Directing, Design.

Players are playing a play.

So here is a workshop model planning.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Places
 

Focus Design concept.

What are the places where the Act happens -different stages, different Theatre, practice, live, video.

How places interact, Act happens, Events take place, What are the different Stage places, and how places connect with the significant aspects of the design; in this liveness, the video presentation will be there to make them understand different kinds of places and events.